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Obituaries - Surname B

 

In order to comply with copyright laws, please submit only obituaries published before 1935.

 

Those names in bold, red lettering were well-known, a soldier, or of importance in Madison County.

 

A     B     C     D     E     F     G     H     I -J     K     L     M     N     O     P     Q-R     S     T     U-V     W     X-Z

 

SURNAME B

BABBITT, E. DARWIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 1, 1904

The funeral of E. Darwin Babbitt was held this morning from the family home on Alby street. There was a very large attendance of the friends of Mr. Babbitt. During his lifetime affliction had laid its hand heavily on Mr. Babbitt, but through it all he bore himself up cheerfully, manfully trying to do what he thought was necessary and in the misfortunes that came to him in later days of his life, he won the admiration of all who knew him by his fortitude and industry. Mr. Babbitt was a man of fine parts. He was highly educated, had held high positions in educational institutions in young days. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing of the First Baptist church, assisted by Dr. Robert Gibson, Mr. Babbitt's family physician who knew deceased well for many years. Dr. Gibson uttered a tender and touching eulogy upon his deceased friend, which was spoken of by those who heard as a true and merited verdict on a most worthy man. A quartet consisting of Miss Grace Watson, Mrs. Charles Beall, Allan Keiser and W. C. Gates sang several selections. A long cortege of friends followed the body to the City Cemetery.

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BABCOCK, LUTHER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 16, 1907

Luther Babcock, aged 67, died Saturday afternoon at his home, 1703 Curdie avenue in Alton, after an illness from cirrhosis of the liver. Babcock was many years ago a prominent manufacturer in St. Louis and was known widely as a kindly man with unbounded benevolence. He was a member of the Masonic order and the body will be taken to St. Louis and burial will be in his lot in Bellefontaine cemetery under the auspices of Washington lodge, F. & A. M., of which he was a member. Walter G. Wilderman, master, and William L. Reynolds, secretary, of Washington lodge, came to Alton yesterday to make arrangements for the funeral and they supplied information which no one else knew of the dead man. In the days when he was prosperous his hand was always extended to help the poor and the unfortunate. He never stinted anyone, always following the Scriptural injunction that if a man asks for your coat, give him your cloak also, and if he asks you to go with him a mile, go with him twain. He never took any security for the loans he made and trusted to those he had befriended to make such recompense as they could to him, or pass it on to someone else in trouble. A niece arrived from New York a few days before his death, and a cousin from the south on Saturday. Babcock leaves some real estate in St. Louis and considerable money in an Alton bank. He came here from Bunker Hill where he had lived on a farm for a few years, but sold that to take up his residence in Alton. He was always attended by a negro valet who, with his wife, kept house for Babcock. The deceased was not married.

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BADE, JOHN HENRY/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, June 8, 1916                      Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

Henry Bade, veteran of the Civil War and a prominent Nameoki township farmer died there Wednesday at the age of 76. The funeral will be held Saturday at 2 p.m., from St. John's church there, with Rev. G. Plassmann in charge. He was born in Luedersfel (sic), Schamburg (sic), Lippe, Germany, April 10, 1849 (sic) and came to this country in 1856. Mr. Bade was very well liked in Nameoki township and his death is sincerely mourned by all.

Source:  Granite City Press-Record, 9 Jun 1916                            Submitted by Marsha Ensminger
John Henry Bade, an old time resident of Madison county, passed away at his home near Nameoki, Wednesday morning, at seven forty-five o'clock, a victim of bowel trouble. The deceased was born in Germany, April 10th, 1839 (sic) and came to this country in 1856, settling first in the district of this county what (sic) is known as "The Bluffs", and moving to the present Bade home place, two miles East of Nameoki, eighteen years ago. He leaves a wife and four grown children to mourn his death: Henry and John are married and William and Lula are at home. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family residence, with services at St. John's church, Rev, G. Plassman officiating. Interment will be in St. John's cemetery.

[Johann Heinrich Gottlieb Bade was born 10 Apr 1838 in Luedersfeld, Buckeburg, Niedersachsen, Germany; son of Herman Heinrich Bade and Anna Sophia Dorothea Hasemann. His wife was Anne Marie Louisa Sophia Westerhold.]
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BADE, RAYMOND/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, September 4, 1928                    Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

Son of H. C. Bade Died Suddenly in Alton State Hospital Saturday.  Funeral services were conducted from the Straube-Schneider Funeral Home on North Main street at 1 o'clock this afternoon for Raymond Bade, 20 year-old son of Henry C. and Mrs. Anna Bade [nee Lange], of Kuhn Station, who died last Saturday night at the Alton State Hospital where he had been a patient for the past three years and seven months. Services at the home were in charge of Rev. Hugo J. Bredehoeft, pastor of the Eden Evangelical Church. Burial was made in Bartlett Cemetery. Those who served as pallbearers were: George Holtman, Benjamin Brave, Alfred Mick, Oscar Buscher, Arnold Kuhn and Amiel Mick. Raymond was born in Nameoki and was baptized in the Christian faith at St. John's Church in Granite City. Seven years ago the family moved to Kuhn Station where they continued to reside. He is survived by his parents, one brother Wilbur, who resides at home, and one grandmother, Mrs. Louise Bade, of Edwardsville.

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BADE, WILBUR/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 13, 1931                              Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

Wilbur Bade, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Bade of Pin Oak died in an Alton hospital at 6 o'clock yesterday morning. He had been ill for a number of months and death was due to pulmonary tuberculosis. Mr. Bade was born September 28, 1909 in Nameoki. He was 21 years, (illegible) months and 11 days old. He farmed with his father. Mr. Bade was a member of the Eden Evangelical Church. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Bade. A brother and a (illegible) have preceded him in death. Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Straube Funeral Home. The Rev. H. J Bredehoeft will have charge. Interment will be made in the Bartlett Cemetery.  [Note: His brother Raymond and step-sister Roberta Thomas died in 1928 and 1924 respectively.]

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BAEHR, LIZZIE/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, September 27, 1882

Miss Lizzie Baehr, the young lady spoken of in our last communication as being ill, died at her mother's residence on last Friday. The funeral services were held at the C. P. church, Sunday, at three o'clock, p.m.. Rev. D. H. Starkey conducted the funeral service in a very solemn and impressive manner. Miss Lizzie was seventeen years of age, cut down just in the bloom of womanhood, and her untimely death will be greatly mourned by her many young friends with whom she associated. She was a great favorite as was evidenced by the large number of young folks that attended the funeral. There were several carriages from your city [Alton] and Edwardsville. Her remains were interred at the Bethalto cemetery. The pallbearers were Messrs. John Klein, Fred Huth, George Klein, Chris Langhorst, Charles Bangert and John Youngwirth. The sympathy of many friends are with the bereaved family.

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BAERENREUTHER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 28, 1912

The funeral of John Baerenreuther was held this afternoon from the family home on Fourth street. Services were conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller, assisted by Rev. J. M. Rohde. There was a large attendance of relatives and friends at the funeral services. Burial was in City cemetery, where members of Western Star lodge, I. O. O. F., conducted the burial ritual of their order.

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BAILEY, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1921

Mrs. Annie Bailey, aged 43 years, died on Monday at the family home at 134 Atkinson avenue, after an illness of six days, suffering from acute muscular rheumatism. She is survived by three children, Samuel, and Misses Lucy and Blanche Bailey. Her husband, Alfred Bailey, died sixteen years ago. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock from the Campbell Chappel, with Rev. Jones officiating.

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BAILEY, ELMER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 26, 1919       Eight Year Old Son of Asst. Supervisor F. C. Bailey Drowns

Elmer Bailey, eight year old son of Assistant Supervisor and Mrs. F. C. Bailey of 609 East Fifth street drowned shortly before noon today off the foot of Ridge street. The lad went down in fifty feet of water in sight of twenty-five companions, everyone of whom were good swimmers. His brother, Earl, was one of the spectators at the death of his brother. He, with the rest of the party, was unable to do anything for the drowning boy. The lad went to the swimming hole this morning without the consent of his mother. He had been in swimming for some time when he met his death. He swam out into the river quite a distance, according to the lads who witnessed the drowning, and suddenly he disappeared. He never came up. Before the party realized what had happened, the boy was gone in the swift current. But the death of the boy did not stop the swimming party. While some of the lads carried the news to the parents and the authorities, the boys continued to swim. By the time Deputy Coroner William Bauer arrived, there were twenty-five lads in the water swimming about in the spot where young Bailey went down. The hole in which the lads were swimming is about fifty feet deep. This was the hole made by the dredging for the Illinois Terminal River Terminal. On account of the depth of the hole, it was feared this afternoon that it might be impossible to secure the body until it floated. Several lads were attempting to dive for the body and two parties were dragging for the body. At the time of the accident the father was in charge of the substation of the Alton, Granite and St. Louis Traction Co. at Hartford. A substitute was sent down to relieve him and to tell him of the accident. This afternoon Mr. Bailey offered a reward of $25 for the recovery of the body.

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BAILEY, ELZIRA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 15, 1907

Mrs. Elzira Bailey, wife of Rev. George W. Bailey, died at the family home, 630 Pine street, Sunday evening at 7:20 o'clock, after an illness from heart trouble, aged 56 years. Mrs. Bailey raised probably the largest family of any person in the city of Alton. She leaves beside her husband, eleven sons, all living in Alton, and one daughter, Mrs. Lucy Bemmis, living on the Pacific coast. All of the children but two are over age. Mrs. Bailey was a member of the First Baptist church of Alton for twenty five years. The funeral services will be held Tuesday morning at 7:30 o'clock so the body can be taken across the river on the 9 o'clock boat. The body will be taken to West Alton for burial in the Perkinson cemetery, Rev. Dr. Gibson officiating.

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BAILEY, GEORGE T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 19, 1916           Death of Old Time Baptist Preacher - Leaves 12 Children

Rev. George T. Bailey, aged 74 years, died at his residence, 630 Summit street, after a long illness with dropsy. The aged retired Baptist clergyman had been very sick for nearly three months, but he had been in failing health for several years. He suffered intensely in the last illness, and the aged gentleman looked forward to the close of his pain. He was a remarkable man. For many years this rugged, old character had been the chief bearer of the lamp of religion on Missouri Point. He was a farmer there for forty years and during that time Rev. Bailey was the old standby to conduct funeral services, perform marriages, minister to the spiritual needs of the sick and the well, and his services were always ready at any call. He was born in England and came to America when he was nine years old. In 1859 he moved to St. Charles, Mo., near West Alton, and for forty years he resided there farming. He gave up farm work after a very successful career in 1888, and moved to Washington, but returned to Alton the year following and settled down here. He selected as a site for his home a bluff he had seen from his old home on Missouri Point, and from which he could view his farm. Just below Riverview Park, the aged man would sit on the bluff and view the river day after day, looking over the fertile fields of Missouri Point, and he passed his declining years in happiness and peace. He was the father of fourteen children, twelve of whom survive him, eleven sons and one daughter. They are: George, James, John, Thomas, Jacob, Stephen, Robert, Joseph, Harry, John, Byron Bailey and Mrs. Lucy C. Bemis of Castle Rock, Washington. Only one of his sons, Stephen, a resident of St. Louis, does not live in Alton. Rev. Bailey's wife died in April 1907. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock and services will be conducted at the home on Summit street.

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BAILEY, GEORGE T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1918

George T. Bailey, aged 67, a well known former Alton business man, died Saturday night in Chicago, and the body will be brought to Alton tomorrow morning for burial. The funeral will be direct from the C. & A. train to City Cemetery. Mr. Bailey leaves two sons, Harry and George T. Bailey, both of Chicago. He resided for a number of years on Langdon street between Seventh and Eighth streets. He was in the tobacco business in Alton for a long time. The funeral will be private.

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BAILEY, LAURA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 19, 1903             The Assault and Murder of Laura Bailey

Mrs. Gus Bailey, her 15 year old daughter, Eilza [later the newspaper states she was 18], and her 5 year old little son, Richard, were assaulted Thursday night by an unknown person and left dying beside the road. They were found shortly before midnight by Gus Doerr, who was returning from Bethalto to East Alton, and along the road met a horse and buggy going along without a driver. Doerr investigated when he met the horse and buggy, and finding no driver in the vehicle, took possession of it and turned toward East Alton. A short distance farther on, the horse shied violently, and Doerr, on getting out of the buggy to investigate the cause, found three bodies - that of Mrs. Bailey and her two children, aged 15 and 5, lying beside the main road leading from East Alton to Bethalto. Mrs. Bailey was suffering from a big hole in the back of her head, gashes and bruises on her face and temples. Her head was bruised to a jelly and her hands mashed. The daughter had similar injuries and both were unconscious. The little boy was not so badly hurt, but was dazed and unable to give an account of what had happened. Doerr hurriedly procured assistance, and the unconscious persons were taken to East Alton, where Dr. Pence attended them. He ordered that they be removed at once to St. Joseph's hospital in Alton. The cause of the crime is a mystery. The Baileys are a poor family who were driven from their home near East Alton by the flood. The father is a fisherman. After the family was driven from its home by the high water, they found refuge in a house at Job's ranch, near the old abandoned coal mines. The father was in Alton, having come to spend the night at the home of his sister-in-law, who lives in Yager Park. The mother and her two children were spending the evening in East Alton, and were driving home when the assault occurred. A telephone message was sent up to the Alton police to notify Bailey of what had happened, and he was found at his sister-in-law's home, about 2:30 this morning. The little boy was able to tell little of what had happened, and Dr. Pence believes the child was asleep when the assault occurred. The boy says they fell out of a big red wagon. In case of the death of the mother and sister, the boy would be able to give no important information of the affair. The motive of the assault is not known. A purse containing a small amount of money was left in the buggy by the assailant of the family, and could hardly have been overlooked had the motive been robbery. It was reported in East Alton that a negro tramp seen in the vicinity was responsible for the crime. A posse of East Alton men under Deputy Sheriff Laughlin started off at once to follow the suspect toward Bethalto. The girl, Eliza Bailey, partially regained consciousness Friday morning in the hospital. To Dr. Porter, the attending physician, she said that as they were driving home from East Alton, a man leaped into the vehicle with them and declared that he would kill them all. The man then threw the mother and two children out of the buggy and beat them to insensibility. The girl is in a semi-conscious condition and her story is very incoherent. She appeared to know who committed the assault, but could not bring herself to the point of telling. It was believed that she could be induced later to tell a good story of the events of Thursday night, when she recovered further from her injuries. Officer Edward Burjes and Deputy Sheriff Sam Laughlin went in pursuit of the assailant of Mrs. Bailey and her two children, about 4 o'clock in the morning. They followed a negro who had been hanging about East Alton and was seen walking along the road. The officers drove their horse hard, but failed to overtake the negro until they passed Moro. There they ordered the negro to stop, and he protested against being arrested. He was put in the buggy and taken back to East Alton, where he is being held in jail. Officer Burjes said that the Bailey family had received notice to move from their home and were intending to go to Moro. The father came up to Yager Park Thursday night to see his brother's widow, Mrs. James Bailey, and informed his family he would not return that night. Bailey had been hiring out a skiff in East Alton to young people who were enjoying the novelty of a boat ride in the village. He told his daughter she could go to East Alton where he kept the boat, and try to make some money by hiring the boat out during the evening. She did so, accompanied by her mother. It was while they were returning from East Alton the assault was committed.

 

Mrs. Bailey Dies From Wounds

Mrs. Bailey died shortly after one o'clock Friday afternoon from the wounds she sustained the evening before. She did not regain consciousness. Her daughter improved in condition steadily, and an effort was made to induce her to tell Friday afternoon who was responsible for the assault. She had repeatedly said in her half-delirium that she "did not know he was going with us," and further than that would say nothing, indicating that some person whom she was trying to shield had committed the assault. Deputy Sheriff Laughlin went to the hospital this afternoon to get her story, if possible. He said that the negro held at East Alton is undoubtedly innocent, and that the only reason for his arrest was the fact that his clothes were stained with red, believed to be blood. The stains proved to be red paint. All day today telephone calls have been received at the hospital from some unknown person who manifested the greatest solicitude over the condition of the Bailey family. The person refused to give a name, but called up five or six times. Dr. Porter said this afternoon that he had refused to allow any person to see Eliza Bailey, and that her condition is so serious she may not be capable of making any kind of a statement until tomorrow. Until then, it is said, the girl's knowledge regarding her assailant will not be made public. The mystery surrounding the case has grown much deeper, and there is much feeling over the tragedy in East Alton.

 

Eliza Bailey Still Unable to Talk

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 20, 1903

Efforts to get from Eliza Bailey, at St. Joseph's hospital, any information that would assist in unraveling the mystery surrounding the assault upon Mrs. Gus Bailey, her daughter, and little son, have failed. The girl is in a very dangerous condition and it is believed she too will die from the effects of the murderous assault. Sheriff G. F. Crowe and Deputy Coroner C. N. Streeper went to the hospital Saturday morning for an interview with the girl. Her father, Gus Bailey, went with the officers. He seemed deeply affected and wept as he saw the mangled condition of his daughter and little son. He kissed the girl and the little boy lying beside her on the bed. The girl cannot talk coherently now, and although able to answer a few questions, she replies to pointed questions with the answer "I don't know." She would not talk to the two officers at first, but her father was taken in to see her and he endeavored to induce the girl to tell what she could to assist in causing the arrest of her assailant. To her father the girl said that she was holding her little brother on her lap when someone came up from behind and struck each of them on the back of the head with a club, calling her mother a vile name as he struck her. When asked whether the man was white or black, she replied she did not know. When asked who committed the assault she gave the same reply, and taken altogether, the interview was very unsatisfactory. She is kept under the influence of opiates by instructions of the attending physicians. This morning she seemed brighter than yesterday, but complications are threatening to set in which may prove fatal, and the solution of the mystery will be impossible. The vehicle in which the Bailey family was driving was an open road buggy, and the horse was able to go no faster than a walk, being decrepit and old. It was an easy matter for the assailant to step up behind the vehicle and strike the helpless woman with her two children. There is no suspicion in the minds of well informed people, contrary to reports set afloat, that the father was implicated in the assault. A very convincing alibi could be established by him, if one was necessary, and his conduct on entering the room where his daughter and son were lying would convince anyone of his innocence. He pleaded with his daughter to tell who struck her, in the presence of the two officers who entered the room with him. Eliza Bailey has wounds similar to those of her mother, and those who have been with her since she was taken to the hospital do not believe she has much chance of recovery. Some people believe that the assault was intended for someone else, and that the Bailey family were beaten by mistake. Mr. Bailey says that his family has no enemies he knows, and that the assault could not have been committed for purpose of revenge. Sheriff Crowe says he will hold the colored man, arrested on suspicion, until after the inquest on Mrs. Bailey, which will probably not take place before next Thursday.

 

Daughter Still Refuses to Talk

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1903

Eliza Bailey has passed the crisis, the nurses and attending physician say, and is able to talk but she maintains a stolid silence, declining to say who it was that assaulted the family. The nurses do not know whether her silence is attributable to the shock of blows she sustained, or interest in the person who committed the crime. She rallied this morning and asked for food. She was able to rise from bed alone. It is said that there is no immediate danger of a collapse with fatal results, because of the improvement in her condition that was apparent this morning. She is not under influence of opiates. The girl does not know her mother is dead; and tomorrow she will be informed, also that a man supposed to be innocent is being held in jail and it is believed that she can then be persuaded to break her silence. Today no one saw the girl. The father took his son away from the hospital this morning. The child woke from a stupor Sunday night, and cried all night for his mother, so it became necessary for the father to take him. The child is now out of danger.

 

Noted Man Held in Alton Jail

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1903

James W. Raby, the man arrested last Friday morning on suspicion that he assaulted the Bailey family near East Alton, Thursday night, is a noted walker. His name appears in the New York World Almanac as the champion walker of the world, having made the best time for all distances, from two miles to and including fifteen miles. He is not of African descent, but is a Bermudan, and says his parents were Spanish and English. Since his arrest he has neither eaten, slept nor taken a drink of anything. Raby told a Telegraph reporter this morning his story and to substantiate it referred to the World Almanac, where his story was varified. He broke the world's record by walking 15 miles in 1 hour and 55 minutes, when he was 15 years of age, in 1881. Raby said that since his confinement in jail he had neither slept, eaten nor drunk, and that so long as the charge of suspicion of murder was hanging over him he could not partake of any nourishment. He has traveled over the whole world and collected many interesting curios. He makes a living as a sign painter and when he has no money to travel on trains, he walks. Raby says that since his incarceration, people have stood at the jail door and abused him and that he has so worried over the abuse he is almost crazy. Until this morning he refused to partake of any nourishment, but finally he consented to partake of some gumdrops and raisins, which he said was the kind of nourishment he was used to taking. He used raisins in water as a beverage. The officers holding Raby have been trying to calm him and assure him that he will not be held any longer than is necessary. It is not believed he is guilty, but he will be held until the coroner's inquest is held. Raby claims that he is a British subject, his father being an Englishman, and he was born under the British flag in the Bermudas. He says he will appeal to the British government for redress for imprisonment without cause, as soon as he is released here.

 

Liza Bailey's Statement

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 23, 1903

Frank Greathouse, an employee of the Equitable Powder Company, was arrested by Sheriff Crowe and Chief of Police Maxwell Tuesday morning on the charge of murdering Mrs. Gus Bailey, and committing a murderous assault upon Liza Bailey and Everett Bailey. The arrest was brought about by the girl, Liza Bailey, who seemed to recover her senses all at once during Monday night and began talking freely to her nurses and to attending physicians. The fact was reported to Sheriff Crowe and Chief of Police Maxwell, and early this morning they went to the hospital, accompanied by several newspapermen. Greathouse seemed to have been infatuated with the girl and endeavored to improve his acquaintance with her. The girl did not even know his name. She said that whenever he had an opportunity, he made himself offensive by his attempts to form an intimate acquaintance with her, and that she repulsed all his advances. It is supposed that because of his failure to ingratiate himself with the girl, Greathouse conceived the plan of murdering the whole family, including the girl. Eliza Bailey is a bright, pretty young girl, aged 18, and very attractive. When asked this morning by Sheriff Crowe if she could identify her assailant, the Bailey girl said she could, and repeatedly assured the officer that she would identify the man if he was brought to her bedside....[Greathouse] was taken to St. Joseph's hospital and into the room where his young victim lay, swathed in bandages and with her pretty eyes swelled to great black patches in her head. With halting speech the girl said, "That's the man," as soon as she saw Greathouse. She was most positive in her statement. Greathouse protested, "You know I wouldn't do anything like that to you," but the girl insisted that he was the guilty man who killed her mother and nearly killed her. Greathouse is about 30 years old and has been living in East Alton about two years. He came from Calhoun county and had lived about five miles south of Brussels. He is not married. He is about 5 feet 7 inches in height, stockily built. On his knuckles are bruises still apparent, which must have been caused by him striking his victims on the night of the assault.....[Eliza Bailey] said with painful halting and apparent difficulty in speech, frequently repeating herself during the course of conversation, "I saw the man and had a good look at him when he stepped up to the buggy. He had been trying to quarrel with me for a long time. He worked at the powder mills and when I would go there he would always step up to me to see what I wanted. Thursday night he came to where we had the skiff and were hiring it out to boys and girls. When I was ready to go home, he wanted me to stay and offered me a half dollar to let him have the skiff twenty minutes. I told him no, and said I was going home. He began quarreling about it, and Mr. Brown ordered him to stop. I put the skiff away and started to go with my mother. Mamma put our money in the pocketbook under the seat of the buggy and we started away. When we came near the hill at Job's place, I saw someone coming and told mamma we were being followed. She said she hoped not, and I said I did, too. Then the man came up to us and it was the same one I had the trouble with at the boat, and before at the powder mills. He was always quarreling about me. The man stepped up to the buggy and dragged mamma out, and then Everett and I. He said he would 'be the end of us all,' and I begged him not to hurt us. He struck us with his fists, but I do not know whether he had anything in his hand.." .....When Greathouse was taken into the hospital he was much agitated and almost fell in the entrance. He asked permission to sit down and when a chair was given him he almost collapsed. When he faced his accuser in the hospital ward, he nerved himself and restrained any expressions of emotion. Sheriff Crowe, in answer to a telephone call from the Telegraph, said that Greathouse was "as quiet as a lamb" on the way over to Edwardsville. That he was placed in jail before anyone knew of it. A report was current on the streets this afternoon that Greathouse had attempted to escape while on the way to Edwardsville.

 

Eliza Bailey In Grave Condition

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 24, 1903

The Sisters at the hospital say that Eliza Bailey is suffering intensely and that her condition is more serious than at any time since she was injured. She still sticks to her statement made yesterday that Frank Greathouse is the man who injured her and killed her mother. The Sisters impressed upon her the seriousness of her condition, and the dreadful consequences her statement entailed upon Greathouse. Miss Bailey asserted that her story of yesterday was true, and that Greathouse is the author of her injuries and the murderer of her mother.

 

Blood Stains on Greathouse's Shirt

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 25, 1903

Coroner Streeper impaneled a jury today to inquire into the cause of the death of Mrs. Gus Bailey, who was assaulted on the night of June 18, together with her daughter, Eliza, and her son, Everett, and left for dead on the roadway, and who died the next day from her injuries. The jury, after viewing the body of Mrs. Bailey, went to St. Joseph's hospital and there heard the evidence of Eliza Bailey. The witness was questioned by State's Attorney Robert J. Brown. The testimony sustained her previous statements fully. She was most positive in the identification of Greathouse as the perpetrator of the assault. She said she distinctly recognized Greathouse. She saw him knock the false teeth out of her mother's mouth. She thought he was trying to rob them of their money, and she pleased with him not to abuse her mother and herself and she would give him back the 20 cents he had paid her for boat rides. He replied, "No, I give it to you." She was sure. There was no doubt about Greathouse being the assaulter. He always treated her badly every time he met her. She had known him for about two months. She had worked in the powder mills with him. The jury, after hearing the evidence of Miss Bailey, went to East Alton and took the evidence of witnesses there. The first witness to testify was Mr. Doerr, who found the three bodies on the roadway. Ben Robinson, the roommate of Greathouse, was called. Greathouse had said that he could prove that he was in bed when the assault was committed. Robinson said he could not say that Greathouse was in bed at 10:30 o'clock; he was very reluctant to testify; he did not remember what hour Greathouse went to bed, all he knew about, and he was sure of it, was that Greathouse was not in bed when he (Robinson) woke up the next morning. He was asked as to Greathouse's talk concerning the blood on his clothes. He said Greathouse said it was some of the Bailey blood, whose bodies he claimed to have assisted in removing. Coroner Streeper, Deputy Sheriff Laughlin, Attorney Brown, and a representative of the Telegraph, went to Haller's boarding house and secured Greathouse's clothing. On the cuffs on a shirt were several blood spots, as if the blood had been splashed on the cuffs. Also on the shoulder was another blood stain. At this hour, 4 p.m., the inquest is still progressing.

 

Funeral of Mrs. Bailey

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 26, 1903

The remains of poor, mutilated Mrs. August Bailey were laid to rest in the East Alton (Milton) cemetery this afternoon, the funeral taking place from Streeper's undertaking establishment. Services were conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenny of the Cherry Street Baptist church. It is rare that so pitiable an affair takes place. Without a child to drop a tear o'er her bier, only her husband left to mourn the loss of a wife and mother. Her little boy is too young to know a mother's loss, and her daughter too ill to attend the services (with faint hope that she too will not soon pass over the river).  And all this sacrifice to gratify the brutal lusts of a so-called man. God pity such manhood.

 

Coroner Holds Frank Greathouse - Jury Finds Verdict Fixing Responsibility for Bailey Murder on Him

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 26, 1903

Frank Greathouse's failure to destroy the shirt he wore the night he committed the assault upon Mrs. Laura Bailey, Eliza Bailey and Everett Bailey may be his undoing. The coroner's jury took as evidence the shirt and the girl's statement made under oath, and the statement of a friend of Greathouse and his bedfellow, that Greathouse said the bloodstains in his shirt cuffs were from the Bailey family, and they found a verdict placing the responsibility of the murder upon him. Coroner Streeper at once bound over Greathouse without bail to the grand jury. According to the testimony of Gus Doerr, it required only ten minutes for him to go from the place where the bodies were found to the home of Marshal Schreiner, then to the depot and a short distance down the railroad track. In that event, even though Greathouse was in his room shortly after 10 o'clock, he would have had plenty of time to have made the trip from the scene of the crime to his boarding place at Haller's house by 10 o'clock. Some other strong testimony has been obtained by State's Attorney Brown, and he will submit it to the grand jury. It is probable that the present grand jury may be asked to indict Greathouse and to send representatives to the hospital in this city to take the statement of Eliza Bailey again. The girl is improving slightly in her memory, but her head still causes her intense pain and she is not out of danger. She tells her story without variation as she told it the first time she talked after regaining consciousness. Her statements concerning the assault are very convincing that she recognized her assailant in the darkness. She told of the terror of herself when Greathouse attacked the party in the vehicle and how she begged him to stop beating the family, offering him all the money they had if money was what he was after. Then she thought of jumping out of the buggy herself, but stayed in the hope she might be able to protect her little brother. Then Greathouse turned on her and she knew little afterwards. The last she remembered was when she was lying in the road and saw Greathouse leap from the buggy and start for her. She protected her little brother with her own body, she said, and turned her head. Greathouse struck her again and she knew nothing more. He must have used steel knuckles in beating his victims. The Bailey girl's story could not fail to be convincing to any jury of the guilt of the accused man. It has thoroughly convinced all who have heard her tell it as she does, painfully and slowly as her halting speech will allow her. The wound the girl sustained on the head seems to have injured her power of speech.

 

Family Secures Attorney for Greathouse

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 30, 1903

A brother and a half-brother of Frank Greathouse, the alleged murderer of Mrs. August Bailey, are here today endeavoring to secure attorneys to defend the accused. They live at Brussels, Calhoun county, and their mother sent them here to do what they can for their brother, whom the mother believes innocent.

 

[Editor's notes: A bloody shirt belonging to (Frank) Greathouse was later found at his home, and it was stated it was well known he carried with him brass knuckles. He was held without bail to the grand jury for murder. A trial was held in 1904, and he was found guilty and sentenced to 30 years in the penitentiary at Chester, Illinois. Eliza Bailey recovered from her wounds, and on July 5, 1904 was married to George Wheatley, a young man employed at the powder mills.]

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1903

Frank Greathouse, the murderer of Mrs. Laura Bailey at East Alton, was interviewed by Mrs. S. Demuth yesterday in the county jail at Edwardsville. Greathouse told Mrs. Demuth that he did not kill Mrs. Bailey, but that he knows who did do it. Mrs. Demuth asked him how he knew, and he replied that he heard two men talking about the assault on the Bailey family afterward and that he could tell who they are, but will not. Mrs. Demuth reminded him that for his unwillingness to tell on a friend he might suffer the penalty himself. He is trying to build up an alibi for defense, but it is deemed highly improbable that he can set up one sufficiently strong to shake the story of Eliza Bailey, who still maintains that he is the guilty man. Miss Bailey has recovered completely from the effects of the beating she suffered.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 1, 1903

Sheriff Crowe has started a rogue's gallery at the county jail, and has secured several pictures to start with. Frank Greathouse, who is under indictment for the murder of Mrs. Elizabeth Bailey, was the first. He curled his mustache and smiled pleasantly at the glassy eye of the camera. .....

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1904

The trial of Frank Greathouse for the murder of Mrs. Gus Bailey of East Alton is set for January 27 in the Circuit Court. A large number of witnesses will be subpoenaed in this case, and it is expected that this time Greathouse will certainly be put on trial for his life. Some of the most important witnesses, who are expected to disprove the story of Eliza Bailey, who identified Greathouse as the assailant of herself and murderer of her mother, are said to have disappeared. The witness, because of whose absence the last continuance was granted, is absent, but it is believed that Judge Moore will insist upon the case being disposed of at this term of court.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1904

Thirty years is what Greathouse gets for killing only one of the Bailey family. If he had killed the entire family, he would have been acquitted or never accused. Eliza could not then have told on him.

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BAILEY, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 24, 1921

Robert Bailey of 519 William street was taken to the hospital Sunday morning suffering from a fatal injury to his head which was sustained either in a fall or by a blow on the head. The fact that Bailey had not regained consciousness after being picked up precluded possibility of his story of the facts attending his injury being obtained. Mr. Bailey died about 11 o'clock this morning without regaining consciousness. He was in his 40th year. According to the best information obtainable, Bailey had been in a soft drinks place on East Broadway and coming out with another man had fallen on the sidewalk striking his head. There was a mark at the base of the skull which indicated a blow had been sustained there. The injured man was taken to St. Joseph's hospital by Dr. J. P. Hale, who afterward turned the case over to Dr. Shaff. All of Sunday, members of his family watched beside the bedside of the unconscious man and his death was expected at any time. There was considerable surprise that he lived through Sunday night. His condition was reported at the hospital Monday morning as being very bad, and it was said that there was little chance of his recovery. Mr. Bailey was employed at the Stanard Tilton mill. He was married, and beside his wife had two children. He belonged to a well known and large family, that of Rev. George Bailey. Two of his brothers have died within the past few years, one being killed by a train across the river from Alton, and the other, a returned soldier from overseas, died recently in St. Louis. The father died a few years ago. Dr. J. N. Shaff said after the death of Bailey that he was unable to say conclusively what was the cause of his death, and he indicated that a post mortem might be held to determine the exact cause. Mr. Bailey was a glassblower prior to the time of the changing of the glass works here to an automatic machine blowing plant. Besides his wife and two children, Mr. Bailey leaves eight brothers, George, James, Thomas, Charles, Jacob, Harry, Stephen and Joseph Bailey; and one sister, Mrs. Lucy Beemis.

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BAILHACHE, JOHN (JUDGE)/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, September 10, 1857

Thursday, September 3 - - We were greatly pained to be compelled to announce yesterday morning the serious accident which occurred to Judge Bailhache. This morning we are indeed sad. The good and venerable man has gone home to enjoy, we trust and believe, that blessed state for which he so long and ardently sighed and prayed. Yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock, John Bailhache died, full of years, ricvh in experience, abounding in charity, and zealous in every good work. An honest man left us yesterday. The cultivated mind which conceived, and the ready hand which, for so many years, placed such conceptions before the world, are now silent and motionless. The Master summoned him and he was ready to obey the call. Around the deathbed of such a man there is cause for regret - much more for rejoicing. We regret the departure of the well known form, the kindly voice, the benign smile, the Christian example, and the parental encouragement in good works which he gave to all. We rejoice that, being full of years, he was ready to go home - that, though dead, his bright example will still be before us - that his ardent longings to go home are at length gratified, and that our loss is his everlasting gain. As a journalist, we feel that an old and tried friend has been taken from us. We have known Judge Bailhache for upward of twenty years. While a printer in his office, full twenty years ago, he it was who never failed in a word of encouragement, or, if need be, of reproof. We often wrote for him, and from him received much instruction in the art of composition. For many years we were opposed to him in politics, and a part of that time we conducted an opposition journal. In these various relations we found him the same. Honest in his convictions, scrupulously careful in the means he employed, wielding a pen second to but few in the Union, and often engaged in heated party contests, we yet always found him charitable to his opponents, and at all times exercising those graces which distinguish the Christian gentleman. Judge Bailhache was the oldest editor in Illinois, probably in the United States. He had spent over half a century as the editor of a public journal. His connection with the public press ceased between two or three years ago, when we purchased the Telegraph, since which time he has been associated with L. A. Parks, Esq., one of the original founders of the Telegraph, in a Job office. After the death of R. M. Treadway in January 1837, Judge Bailhache became associated with Mr. Parks, the surviving partner, and continued to be its chief editor until 1855. For upwards of thirty years previous to his coming to Illinois, he had conducted various public journals in Ohio, and was considered the ablest in the profession. We have no disposition now to speak of his early history more at length. A future time will be more fruitful of facts. The present is too sad for reminiscences. We have lost a friend - one who was endeared to us by many pleasant recollections. Society has lost a valuable and highly esteemed member; the Church a consistent and shining light; his family an affectionate and devoted father. All - all have lost but him.

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BAKER, CHARLES A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1909

Charles A. Baker, a negro, aged 77, died at Melville this morning and will be buried tomorrow.

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BAKER, JENNIE B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 24, 1914

Miss Jennie B. Baker died at St. Joseph's hospital Friday noon after a long illness. She was 61 years of age. Her illness began ten years ago with an attack of typhoid fever, which after a period of six months, left her in frail health. Recently she suffered a complete nervous collapse and several weeks ago she was brought from Springfield, where she was in a hospital, to Alton, as it was seen her condition had become very grave. For a week her death has been expected to take place at any time. Miss Baker was a life long resident of Alton, and she resided almost all of her life in the one place on Fifteenth street. Miss Baker is survived by five brothers and two sisters, Mrs. H. H. Ferguson; Mrs. Clark McAdams; Messrs, Harry S.; S. B.; M. M.; L. F.; and H. B. Baker. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon, from the residence of H. S. Baker on Fifteenth street. Burial will be in the City Cemetery.

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BAKER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 2, 1918

John Baker, the six months old infant of Mr. and Mrs. J. Baker of 915 East Fourth street, died this morning from pneumonia. The funeral of the little one will be held Sunday afternoon, and interment will be in the city cemetery.

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BAKER, NORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 27, 1907

The body of Mrs. Nora Baker, colored, arrived from Omaha, Nebraska this morning and was taken direct from the depot to Rocky Fork cemetery, where interment was made. Deceased was a niece of Mrs. Erasmus Green, and a relative of the Townsends. She was thirty-six years of age, and the cause of death is given in the shipping certificate as "a shock."

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BAKER, SARAH ELIZABETH (nee PATRICK)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 17, 1914

Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Baker, widow of Charles Baker, in her 73rd year, died Thursday afternoon at 5:30 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Thomas Yarby, after an illness of six months with paralysis. Mrs. Baker's maiden name was Patrick. She was born in Madison County near Staunton, Ill., February 20, 1842. She came here at 5 years of age with her mother and sister, and after three years moved to Woodburn where she resided until her marriage to Charles W. Baker, Sept. 19, 1865. They came then to live in Alton. Seven children were born to them, of which three sons and two daughters survive. Isaac S. of Alton; Gus and Fred Baker of St. Louis; Mrs. Thomas Yarby and Mrs. Fred Nitsche. One stepson, Ed Baker, lives at Staunton, as does also a sister. She was a member of the Methodist Church of Woodburn. She leaves beside her relatives in Alton a large number of friends here and elsewhere. Rev. G. L. Clark of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian Church will conduct the funeral services tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, which she had occupied for nearly a half century. Burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery.

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BAKER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1903         Death of a Pioneer

William Baker, one of the oldest residents of Foster township, died last night at his home on a farm near Fosterburg, after suffering many months with heart disease and dropsy. Mr. Baker was 79 years old, and his illness has been watched with much interest by his many friends, which he had made during the many years he has resided in Foster township. William Baker was born in Lincolnshire, England, April 16, 1824. He was married there to Miss Susan Schoffield in 1848, and resided there until 1850, when he and his wife crossed the waters and settled in America, coming directly to North Alton. He engaged in coal hauling at North Alton ten years, after which he bought his farm in Foster township and lived on it until the time of his death. Mr. Baker was one of the best known and liked farmers in this vicinity, and his death is sad news to a large number of friends with whom he has done business so long. Besides his wife he leaves a family of nine children to mourn his demise. They are: Mrs. Elizabeth Lewis, Sharrod Baker, Mrs. Mary Meisenheimer, Mrs. Helen Taylor, Mrs. Bertha Baker, John Baker, Sarah Baker, Susan Baker and William Baker. Funeral arrangements have not been made, but it will probably be held Sunday.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1903

William Baker, an aged resident of Foster township, was buried Sunday afternoon in Ingersoll cemetery near Fosterburg. The services were conducted by Rev. Simeon Hussey, who had been requested by Mr. Baker many years ago to officiate at his funeral. Three sons, a grandson and two sons in law served as pallbearers. They were John, William and Shared Baker, B. Taylor, William McCauley and William Lewis. The attendance at the funeral was large. Mr. Baker was the head of a well known Madison County family, and throughout his life had been a highly respected resident.

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BALDWIN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 8, 1922          Attendant at Merry-Go-Round Electrocuted in Rock Spring Park ... Priests Look on as Man is Killed

John Baldwin, 18 years old, was electrocuted this morning at 11:15 o'clock in Rock Spring Park, where he was helping to operate a small merry-go-round. The accident has put a damper on the picnic for a time, that was being given for the children of the Alton Catholic Orphanage. Baldwin has come to Alton with George Alderman of Collinsville, who owned the merry-go-round. The little machine had been operating all last week at East Alton in connection with a carnival that was showing in that village and Alderman consented to set up the machine just for one day in Rock Spring park for the free amusement of the children of the orphanage. The machine had been set-up and had been running a couple of hours amusing the children before Baldwin picked up a live wire which killed him instantly. The merry-go-round has been running and carrying the children, but there was no music, the organ not being connected up with the electric wires to furnish power to run it. Alderman, who is an electrician himself, decided to rig up another wire to operate the organ. He did so and taking one end of the wire he climbed a pole in the park and made a connection with an electric fed wire that carried 110 volts. He had scarcely made the connection when Baldwin not knowing of the danger, picked up the other end of the wire which was lying on the ground in the center of the merry-go-round. He was instantly electrocuted. There were only a half dozen people standing nearby at the time the accident happened, including Father ????kel, Father Spaulding and several younger priests. It was several minutes before anyone knew that something wrong had occurred, so quick was the accident, and not a sound was heard from the young man through whose body the 110 volts of electricity had passed while he was standing on the wet ground. As soon as it was realized that the man had been electrocuted, the priests rushed in to telephone in the Valley Park pavilion and called for help. Drs. Taphorn, Davis, Walton and Brunk arrived in a few minutes. Two pulmotors were rushed to the park and everything possible was done to try to save the young man's life, but all efforts in an hour's time failed to revive him. Alderman, the owner of the merry-go-round, when he learned that the boy had been killed, became distracted and his sorrow was great. He said that he had been a life long friend to the boy's father and mother, and he felt that the relatives of the dead boy would feel that he was responsible for the lad's death. He refused to be comforted in spite of the efforts of many people in the park to persuade him that the accident was purely unavoidable, and that the boy's family would not blame him for it. When the physicians gave the boy up for dead, the body was turned over to Deputy Coroner Streeper, who took him to the undertaking rooms in Upper Alton. Alderman brought the merry-go-round to the Park yesterday afternoon. Work of setting it up was started at once, and it was running early this morning when the automobiles of Alton people commenced to arrive at the park with the orphans for their annual outing. The kiddies were enjoying the fun of riding on the machine, although it was a very small one. It had been set up on the picnic ground in the valley of the park, opposite the Valley Park pavilion. The picnic was almost broken up after the fatal accident. Alderman, because of the happening, would not run the machine any longer. At noon the White Hussar band members arrived at the park where they had been sent by the Egyptian Hustlers to give a concert for the orphans at their picnic. At 1 o'clock the band started to play and the children resumed playing. Another young man who had been with Alderman in the operation of the merry-go-round, consented to run it, and he again put the machine in operation. Alderman insisted that he be taken to his home at Collinsville after telegraphing to his wife of the accident, and instructing her to tell the boy's relatives. Alderman said Baldwin's father and mother are living at Millersburg, a little town southeast of Pocohontas in Bond County.

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BALDWIN, M. S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 13, 1903              Traveling Man Killed by Team of Runaway Horses

M. S. Baldwin, the Galesburg traveling man who was struck by a team of runaway horses belonging to F. Heintz of Fosterburg, Monday noon, died Monday evening at the Pieper hotel. Members of the Masonic and the Odd Fellows fraternities took care of the man until death, and the body was afterward removed to the undertaking parlors of A. I. Keiser where they were held to await orders from the relatives of the dead man. Baldwin never regained consciousness after the first few minutes after he was hurt, and he continued to become worse from 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Dr. Wilkinson was called in to consult as to the case, and it was then found that nothing could be done for him. Baldwin's skull was fractured near the base of the brain and he had a very serious form of concussion of the brain. Mr. Heintz, the man who was driving the runaway team, was assisted in stopping the horses on East Second street. The horses ran away a second time and were stopped by the driver with difficulty. Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest over the body of the dead man, which was completed this afternoon. It was found that Mr. Baldwin's skull was fractured near the base of the brain, and his death was inevitable. Mr. Joseph Heintz, of Fosterburg, was driving the runaway team, says that his horses ran away a second time from Second and Ridge streets, and ran ten blocks before he could stop them. He was helpless from exertion when the horses were finally stopped. He said that Mr. Baldwin attempted to get out of the way, but that he could not move quick enough on the slippery street pavement, and that one of the horses struck him before he could move. J. P. Foley of Galesburg, an undertaker, came to Alton for the body and will leave this evening for Galesburg. Mr. Baldwin leaves only his wife.

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BALDWIN, THOMAS H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 28, 1917            Soldier Drowned in Wood River While Seining for Minnows

Thomas H. Baldwin, one of the soldiers at East Alton, a member of Truck Co. No. 1 of St. Louis, was drowned in Wood River at 5 o'clock Friday afternoon by going into deep water while seining for minnows. Baldwin was 21 years of age. Two of the three men with him had narrow escapes and saved their own lives only by a desperate struggle in the water. Four men, including Baldwin, had to a deep hole in Wood River to seine for minnows. Baldwin had hold of the outer end of the seine and was walking around with it when he stepped off into deep water and began to go down. According to testimony given at the inquest by J. H. Mills of the party, Mills saw the danger of Baldwin and went to his rescue. He got too close in on the drowning man and became caught by a death grip of Baldwin, who lost his head completely. Mills and Baldwin had a desperate struggle in the water, and then Mills broke the hold of the drowning man and was himself near exhaustion. Chauncey Peterson, another one of the party, tried to save both the men and in so doing he got into trouble himself and was about to be drowned, when William McCool, the fourth member of the party, rescued both Mills and Peterson, but was too late to do anything for Baldwin. He had gone down for the last time. The body of the drowned man was recovered and Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer held an inquest. A verdict of accidental drowning was rendered by the jury on the testimony given by J. H. Mills. The body was shipped to the old home, Ridge Farm, Ill., for burial.

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BALLARD, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 2, 1920

Mrs. Anna Ballard, 40, died yesterday at her home, 1720 Belle street, following a week's illness with pneumonia. She is survived by a son, Peter F. Brooks, two sisters, Esther C_____ford, and Mrs. Sarah Myndman, and two brothers, James and Frank________. She will be buried Wednesday afternoon from the home. Interment will be in Upper Alton cemetery.

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BALLARD, ARCHIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1904

Archie, the 10 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. R. Ballard of East Alton, accidentally ran a splinter into his foot ten days ago. The foot became sore but there was no other indication of serious consequences. Saturday night the child was attacked by lockjaw and died Monday about midnight, after suffering terrible agony. The funeral will be held tomorrow from the family home, and Rev. C. L. Peterson will conduct the services. Mr. Ballard is section foreman for the C. B. & O.

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BALLARD, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 16, 1918

Charles Ballard, colored, died yesterday afternoon at his home at 1720 Belle street, at the age of 44 years, after a long illness. He is survived by his widow, Anna Ballard. The funeral will be held tomorrow at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

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BALLARD, EARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 7, 1909

The funeral of Earl Ballard was held this afternoon from the family home in Upper Alton and burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

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BALSTER, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 27, 1922          Young Man Drowns in Lake While Swimming

Clarence E. Balster, adopted son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Balster, this city, was drowned yesterday afternoon while swimming in LeClaire Lake at Edwardsville. The drowning was the result of the young man over-taxing himself in trying to swim too far. With a party of four other men, he had been traveling about the country distributing a baking powder. Yesterday afternoon they decided to take a swim in the Leclaire lake and Balster went clear across the lake. He was somewhat tired and after a short rest he went back in the water to return to his starting place, while on the way his strength gave out and he sank. His companions attempted to rescue him, and after they did get his dead body out of the water, a pulmotor was used in an effort to restore respiration, but in vain. After a short time the parents at Alton were notified that their son had been drowned. The body was taken in charge by an Edwardsville undertaker and was brought to Alton. The burial services will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Balster home on Humbert street. The drowning of their only son was a sad shock to Mr. and Mrs. Balster. He had entered the employ of the Baking Powder Co., less than a month before. Members of the family said that he was a good swimmer and that he should have been able to make the trip successfully across the lake and back. The parents moved to Alton two years ago from the Bethalto neighborhood where Mr. Balster was for a long time a mail carrier. An Edwardsville account of the drowning said: J. C. Hart, an expert swimmer of Springfield, Mo., and several other friends of Balster made a futile attempt to reach the drowning man before he sank in water 12 feet deep. Balster was an inexperienced swimmer and is believed to have gone into the deep water by mistake. Balster had been in the water for about an hour when he waved his hands and called for help. He sank twice before Hart reached the place where Balster was struggling in the water. Balster threw his arms around Hart and pulled the latter under the water with him as he sank the third time. Hart succeeded in freeing himself and swam to shore. Balster's body remained in the water about twelve minutes, when it was recovered by Abner Stolte of Edwardsville, a schoolboy who was at _______ [unreadable] the outing. O. G. Ball of Springfield, Mo., and R. Crane of Alton, were swimming near Balster when he drowned and were unable to get to him in time to save him.

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BALSTER, DIETRICH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 14, 1903

A large number of people went from Alton and East Alton to Bethalto, Sunday, to attend the funeral of Dietrich Balster, whose sudden death Thursday came as a shock to his wide acquaintanceship. Services were conducted by Rev. Ritchey of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and interment was in Bethalto Cemetery.

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BALSTER, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 9, 1904

Mr. Edward Balster of Bethalto died Wednesday morning after suffering for several months with dropsy. Edward was in his 20th year and had to discontinue teaching the Oak Grove school the beginning of the year, having a severe cold which settled on his chest and complications developed. He taught school at Fosterburg one year, and then took charge of the Oak Grove school. He had almost completed a course of law with the International School of Law, which profession was his aim. His father, John Balster, was on the operating table when death claimed Edward. Mr. Balster is in a critical condition.

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BALSTER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 10, 1904

On Wednesday the Telegraph announced the death of Edward Balster, a young man 20 years of age, and stated that his father, John Balster, was in a critical condition following an operation for stricture of the bowels. Last night, at 8 o'clock, Mr. Balster died. He was in his 51st year. A few months ago Mr. Balster's brother, Dedrich, died of typhoid fever. He was one of a large family, and leaves a wife and several children. It is one of those severe afflictions which sometimes come to families. Mr. Balster has been a farmer all his life and lives near Bethalto. The funeral of Edward, son, and John Balster, father, will take place on Saturday at 1 o'clock from the German Evangelical church in Bethalto.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1904

The funeral of John Balster, father, and Edward Balster, son, was held today at Bethalto at 1 o'clock. The funeral was one of the largest ever held in Bethalto. The Balster family is one of the most prominent in Madison County, and owing to the unusual sadness of the case, father and son dying on one day, there was a large outpouring of sympathetic friends to show their respect. Services were held in the German Lutheran church at Bethalto. Two hearses were used to carry the bodies of father and son to the cemetery, where a large number of relatives and friends saw them laid away.

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BALSTER, REBEKAH J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1902

Rebekah J. Balster, widow of the late E. C. Balster, died Thursday morning at the family home near Bethalto, aged 80 years, 3 months, and 6 days. Her husband died two years ago. Mrs. Balster has lived most of her life in the vicinity of Bethalto. She came to St. Louis in 1846, and was married to Mr. Balster in 18?8. For nine years they lived in St. Clair county and then moved to Madison county. Six children survive her, viz: Messrs. Deidrich, John, Edward and Henry Balster, all living near Bethalto; and Mrs. Ann Westhoff of Bethalto, and Mrs. Frederika Timmermann of Harvel, Christian county. The funeral will take place Saturday at 2 p.m. from the family home.

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BAUDENDISTEL, VALENTINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1904

Valentine Baudendistel, aged 71, died Sunday morning at his home, 618 East Fifth Street, after a long illness. He was born in Gamshurst, Baden, Germany, and came to this country 50 years ago. Shortly after arriving in Alton he was married to Miss Carrie Horn, also of Germany. During all the subsequent years Mr. Baudendistel lived in Alton where he raised a family of children. His widow and six children survive him, Mrs. Sherman Slemmons and Mrs. Philip Busack of St. Louis, Henry Baudendistel of Litchfield; Mrs. William Holland, Valentine Baudendistel and Katie Baudendistel of Alton. He leaves also fourteen grandchildren. The funeral will take place Tuesday afternoon at 1:15 o'clock from the family home to City Cemetery, Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann officiating.

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BANDY, JAMES M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph                Former Prosecuting Attorney and Brilliant Lawyer

James M. Bandy, former prosecuting attorney of Madison county, one of the best known lawyers in the county, died Sunday at his home in Granite City from pneumonia. He was 57 years of age. The death of Bandy was a great surprise as it was not generally known that he was seriously ill. He had been sick only a short time at his home, 2200 D street, Granite City. Bandy was formerly a railroad man but he studied law, was admitted to the bar and manifested such ability that he was not long in making rapid rise to eminence among Madison county lawyers. He was elected states attorney of Madison county for four years, and after retirement from that office he devoted himself to the practice of law. His specialty was criminal law and his services were in great demand for the defense of persons accused in court, and who had but little ground-work on which to base a defense. Dry law violators found in Bandy a reliable defender when they came into court to answer for their offenses. Mr. Bandy was a keen sharp lawyer, a good speaker and very successful in his profession. He is survived by his wife, two sons, Harold and James Bandy, and two daughters, Gertrude Ratliff and Zella Bandy. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the family home in Granite City.

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BANFIELD, L. H. (MRS.)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 13, 1914

Mrs. L. H. Banfield died at her home on Thirteenth and Alby streets at 8:45 this morning after an illness of five years duration. She is survived by her husband. Mrs. Banfield has been a resident of Alton for a number of years and had a large number of friends. The body will be shipped to Grafton for burial.

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BANGE, EMMA MARY/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, September 1914

Miss Emma Mary Bange, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bange, residing at 243 Hillsboro avenue, died at the home of her parents Saturday afternoon at 3:45 o'clock.  The end came peacefully and quietly with her parents, her nurse and the attending physician at her bedside. She had been very ill for the past year, but was not confined to her bed until just three weeks ago.  Then, for the past three weeks she showed marked improvement and she even believed she would recover.  Saturday morning she partook of a hearty breakfast and dinner. About 3 o'clock in the afternoon, she seemed worse and rapidly declined.  She was conscious up to the last and showed a little improvement just before she died. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning from the residence of her parents at 8:30 o'clock, thence to the St. Boniface's Catholic Church.  The pall bearers will be Frank, Edward, and Gustave Epping, Gus Smith, Henry Trares, and John Feldworth.  Interment will be in the Catholic Cemetery. Miss Bange was born May 13, 1872 and died September 13, 1914.  She was 42 years and 4 months old at the time of her death.  Her birth place was a farm in Hamel township.  She was the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bange.  She was of a kind and loving nature and made friends wherever she went. She attended the Edwardsville schools.  Fourteen years ago her parents retired from the farm and moved to Edwardsville.  Her brother Frank remained on the farm and she kept house for him for three years until he was married and then she came to town and remained with her parents up to her death. She is survived by her parents, three sisters and two brothers.  The sisters are Mrs. Fred Sido and Mrs. Frank McCormick of St. Louis and Mrs. Henry Epping of Nameoki.  The brothers are Frank Bange of Hamel and Joseph Bange of Salisbury, Mo.

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BANGE, HELEN ANGELA/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, November 1917/Submitted by Sharon Inman

OLD RESIDENT DEAD - MRS. HENRY BANGE PASSED THE FOUR SCORE MARK - Had resided in this locality nearly sixty years.

The funeral of Mrs. Helen Angela Bange, wife of Henry Bange, two of the very old residents of Edwardsville, will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Boniface Catholic Church.  Services will be conducted by Rev. J. D. Metzler and burial will be made at St. Boniface Catholic Cemetery. Mrs. Bange died Monday night at 11:35 o'clock after an illness of only five days.  She became ill with pneumonia and with her advanced age her heart failed, being the primary cause of death. Mrs. Bange was born in Hanover, Germany, on February 10, 1837, and was 80 years, 9 months, and 16 days old at the time of her death.  She had lived in the vicinity of Edwardsville for nearly sixty years. She was a member of a family of eight children which came to this country in 1858.  The family stopped in St. Louis a short time and then went to Florissant, MO, to live.  She was married on March 1, 1859, and the young couple located on a farm in Hamel township a short time afterwards. They continued their residence there, where he followed farming, until seventeen years ago, when they retired and have since lived at 243 Hillsboro road. Her husband observed his 90th birthday anniversary on September 8, and although on his way in the century mark is bearing up under the strain.  The couple observed their golden wedding anniversary in 1909 with a big celebration. Mrs. Bange was a member of the St. Boniface Church and the Altar Society, and in her younger days was active in work of the church and society. She was the mother of eight children, three of whom have died.  The children are Mrs. Fred C. Sido, of St. Louis; Joseph Bange, of Salisbury, MO; Mrs. Lena Epping, of Granite City; Mrs. Frank McCormick, who recently came to Edwardsville from St. Louis, and Frank Bange of Hamel.  There are twenty-three grandchildren and five great grandchildren. A sister and brother also survive.  They are;  Mrs. Katherine Abeln, 75 years old and Bernhard Brueggen, 70 years old, both of Salisbury. The children and sister and brother are here for the funeral.

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BANGE, HENRY/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, April 1919/Submitted by Sharon Inman

MANY HOMES ARE SAD - HENRY BANGE, AMONG OLDEST RESIDENT IS BURIED - Grim Reaper Cuts Swath as Springtime is Returning.

Edwardsville today buried one of its oldest and highly respected citizens, Henry Bange, whose death as he neared the century mark, was told in the Intelligencer Saturday.  He passed away at his residence, 243 Hillsboro Avenue at the advanced age of 91 years, 6 months, and 26 days. The funeral services were held at St. Boniface's Catholic Church at 9 o'clock, Rev. C. T. Stalze having charge.  He was assisted by Rev. Lorenz, a Redemptorist father of De Soto, MO, who has been here the past several days. Burial was made at St. Mary's Cemetery.  The pallbearers were six grandsons.  They were Frank, Edward, and Gus Epping.  Henry and George Schmidt and George Sido. Mr. Bange was born in Germany in 1827 and spent the first twenty-three years of his life in his native land.  In 1850 he came to America locating in Edwardsville with a brother, Bernard Bange.  His first acquaintance in Edwardsville was the late Vincent Ferguson. He went to work on the farm of the late John A. Prickett and later became manager of the Valley View farm, northeast of Edwardsville.  In 1856 he returned to Germany to visit his parents. Three years later in 1859 he was married to Miss Angela Brüggen by Rev. Dubin of the Holy Trinity Church in St. Louis.  The couple located on a farm in Hamel township.  He continued farming there until 1900 when he retired. The union was blessed with eight children, three of whom have preceded the father in death.  His wife died about 18 months ago.  Those who survive are Mrs. Fred Sido of St. Louis; Joseph Bange, Salisbury, Mo., Mrs. Lena Epping of Granite City; Mrs. Frank McCormick, Edwardsville and Frank Bange, Hamel.  There are twenty-three grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Many years ago Mr. Bange established a place among the respected residents of this section of the county and had a great many friends and acquaintances. Two of the daughters were unable to attend the funeral.  Those attending from elsewhere were Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bange and Ben Brüggen of Salisbury, Mo., Mr. and Mrs. Hy. Schmidt, Boone, Ia., Fred Sido and children of St. Louis; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Epping, Nameoki; Edward, Gus, and Angeline Epping of Granite City.

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BANGER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 2, 1904      Man Run Down by Fast Wabash Train

William Banger, a wealthy farmer living near Nameoki, was run down and killed Thursday afternoon by a fast train on the Wabash while he was driving across the railroad track at Nameoki with a wagon heavily loaded with potatoes and drawn by a horse and mule. Banger was thrown sixty feet in air, his body sailing over the top of the telegraph poles and dropping to the ground. His head was frightfully mutilated and he was dead when picked up immediately afterward. The coroner's jury found a verdict holding the engineer of the train responsible for Banger's death, alleging the the engine whistle was not sounded for the crossing. The wagon was demolished, the mule was killed and the horse badly cut. It was necessary to get a shovel to dig the potatoes out of the pilot of the engine, so firmly were they imbedded in the interstices of the front part of the engine. Banger was one of the most prominent farmers living near Nameoki.

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BANGERT, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 21, 1912

Mrs. Catherine Bangert, wh would have been seventy-nine on her next birthday, died this morning in the Nazareth Home for the aged on Central avenue after an illness of a year and a half, during which time she has been an inmate of the home. The immediate cause of her death was heart trouble. At the same time her son, George, who lives in St. Louis, is dying from Bright's disease and is too ill to be informed of his mother's death. Mrs. Bangert's husband was a shoe dealer in Bethalto for many years, about eighteen years ago. Since then she has resided with her children until her removal to the Nazareth Home. She was born in Germany, and came to Kentucky in '65, afterwards coming to Bethalto. She leaves seven children, four sons and three daughters, George of St. Louis, Charles of Bethalto, William of St. Louis, and Fred of Pomona, Cal.; and Mrs. Katie Ewan of Alton, Mrs. Lizzie Gemming of Bethalto, and Mrs. Emma Mohr of Alberta, Canada. Charles Bangert was working in East Alton when he received word of his mother's death, and went to Alton to arrange for the funeral. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning. The body will leave the Nazareth Home at 7 o'clock and will be taken to the Bethalto church. Burial will be in the Bethalto Cemetery.

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BANTZ, JOHN/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, April 2, 1934/Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

Farmer Expires in Alton Hospital of Complications Following Operation
John Bantz, farmer of near Bethalto, died in the St. Joseph's Hospital in Alton yesterday morning of complications which followed an operation. Mr. Bantz was born July 1, 1871 in Alton, a son of the late William Bantz of Ft. Russell Township. His marriage to Miss Hilka Klopmeier of Wood River Township occurred Aug 28, 1898. Mr. Bantz was a member of the Evangelical Church at Wood River and a former school director of Wood River Township. In addition to his widow he leaves two daughters, Mrs. William [Margaret] Henrick, Mrs. John [Marie] Ursprung of near Bethalto, and the following sisters and brothers: Mrs. Herman Heinze, Mrs. James Morrison, Mrs. Charles Weise of Liberty Prairie, Mrs. George Schwalb, Edwardsville, Mrs. Sophie Cornelison, Lebanon, Mo., George Bantz, Bethalto, Henry Bantz, Collinsville and Emil Bantz of Hartford. Plans are being made to hold the funeral services Thursday afternoon but definite arrangements have not been completed.

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BANTZ, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 3, 1922

William Bantz of Moro, 74, died yesterday at a sanitarium in Jacksonville. Mr. Bantz for a time was a resident of Wood River. He is survived by three sons, John and George of Bethalto, and Henry, who is in the Navy, and four daughters, Mrs. James Morrison, Mrs. George Schaik, and Mrs. Charles Wise of Moro, and Mrs. Herman Heinze of Liberty Prairie. Funeral services will be held at the Moro Evangelical church at 1:30 Sunday and will be conducted by the Rev. R. Muehelnhaus.

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BARBER, SARAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 18, 1907    Death Re-Unites Brother and Sister Who Refused to be Separated While Alive - Die Within Few Days of Each Other

Mrs. Sarah Barber, aged 83 years, died Monday night at St. Joseph's hospital from old age and weakness brought about by nursing a sick brother, William Bettis, through a long siege of illness at the home in Garden street. Both had been ill for some time and repeated attempts on the part of Mrs. Demuth and others to induce Mrs. Barber to go to the hospital where she could be cared for resulted in failure, as she refused to separate from her brother. He was equally positive in refusing to leave her. Last Wednesday Mrs. Demuth visited the home and found Mr. Bettis unconscious and Mrs. Barber very sick, and arrangements were at once made for the removal of both to the hospital. The police officers and Mrs. Demuth had a hard time moving the old couple. The sister wanted to go in the ambulance with her brother, and as there was not room enough for them to lie side by side it was necessary to make a two story effect in the ambulance. There was a swinging cot in the ambulance, and in this the old lady was placed after the man had been put in another stretcher on the floor. Mr. Bettis, who was 81 years old, was buried Sunday afternoon in the City Cemetery after services were conducted at the home in Garden street by the Rev. L. B. Lott, and Mrs. Barber was buried this afternoon, services being conducted at the same place. Many neighbors attended the funeral and floral offerings were numerous. Relatives of the aged couple living in Granite City have been in Alton several days and had charge of the funeral arrangements.

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BARBOUR, FLORENCE A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 8, 1918            Well Known Alton School Principal Dies After Surgery

Miss Florence A. Barbour, principal at Lovejoy school since that school was opened, died in a hospital in East St. Louis Saturday, while undergoing a surgical operation to remove a goiter in her neck which had rendered her incapable of attending to her school duties. Miss Barbour was one of the best known colored women in Alton. She was a highly successful instructor in the public schools. When the school board opened the two colored schools, Lovejoy and Douglas, Miss Florence Barbour was selected as principal of one and her sister as teacher of the other. Her move was at first a very unpopular one with people of her own race, but later they became reconciled to it and they afterward approved heartily the plan that had been adopted. So valuable were the services of Miss Barbour considered, the school board made special provision for her during the time of her long illness, though it was known that she would probably not be able to teach school again. She leaves three sisters, a niece and a large number of friends. The members of the school board will probably have much difficulty in finding anyone who can discharge the duties of the position she held as efficiently and as satisfactorily as she did. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from the family home, 1819 Maple street.

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BARCELLON, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 19, 1919

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Barcellon was buried this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock from St. Mary's church, Rev. M. A. Tarrant of the Cathedral officiating, being in charge of all church services this week. Interment was in St. Joseph's cemetery. Mary Barcellon died yesterday at 3:30 o'clock at the home of her parents at 1132 East Broadway. Death followed an accident which occurred when the little one was playing with matches and ignited her clothing.

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BARCO, UNKNOWN SON/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, November 30, 1892

The six year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Barco died Thursday afternoon. The remains were interred in Woodlawn Saturday morning.

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BARKER, DOLPH or DALPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 24, 1918                Killed in France with 129th Infantry

Dolph Barker, 23, has been killed fighting for his country in France, according to word received this morning by Mrs. John Schonbeckler, from her brother, Thomas Mooney. Mooney was the corporal in the squad in which Barker was fighting. Details of his death are lacking. Mooney evidently believed that the news of Barker's death would reach the United States long before the letter. At the same time that Barker's wife was receiving word through Mooney that her husband had been killed, a letter was received by her from her husband saying he was well and in good health. The letter sent by her husband was dated July 26. The letter from Mooney was dated July 30. This indicates that Barker met his death some time between July 26 and July 30. The letter from Mooney announcing the death of Barker reads as follows: "No doubt you have heard before this of the death of the first Alton boy in our company. He was Dolph Barker. He left for camp with me, was in my squad and came across with me. I was not with him when he was killed, as I had to stay back the day he went into the trenches. He was buried in a little cemetery near here with military honors. The services were conducted by the company chaplain." In the letter from Barker to his wife he said: "You make me homesick reminding me of the good times we had together the winter before I came away. I will be glad when it is all over and we come marching home. I am sleeping in foundries or any place I get a chance now. It will surely be good to get a chance for a good rest in bed." Barker was born in Brighton, Ill. May 19, 1895. He has been making his home in Alton for the past four or five years. He was a barber, and worked for the Kitzmiller barber shop before he went to war. Barker was married to Miss Verna Williamson of 318 East Third street in August 1917. In October he was called away from his bride and went to Camp Taylor. From there he was sent to Camp Houston, and later to Camp Upton. He sailed for France May 15. In none of his letters has he mentioned the fact that he was fighting in the trenches. Barker leaves three sisters, Mrs. Albert Vessel of 217 Spring street, Alton, and Mrs. Lottie Edwards and Miss Annie Barker, both of Brighton. His little wife was not convinced that he was dead, and said she would not believe it until official word was received from Washington. "Oh, how I wish I could go over there and do my part against the Germans," she wept. Relatives of Barker said this afternoon that a message would be sent at once to the War Department asking them to verify the death.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 27, 1918          Dolph Barkers' Death Confirmed

The War Department has sent out an official letter to the family of Dolph Barker, confirming the news of last Saturday that the young soldier has been killed in France. The official notice stated that the young soldier was killed in service on the fields of France on the 27th of July. Death came on the day following the one on which Barker wrote to his young bride that he was well and happy. The bride received the letter five minutes after word was told her of her husband's death. The news of the death was received through a private letter written by Corporal Thomas Mooney to his sister, Mrs. John Schoenbeckler on last Saturday.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 23, 1921             Body of Soldier To Return From France ... First Alton Soldier to Lose His Life in France

A telegram was received last night by Mrs. Verna Barker that the body of her husband, Dalph Barker, would be shipped from Jersey City, N. J. this morning, and would arrive in Alton via the Chicago and Alton. It is expected the body will be here ____ day night o Friday morning. Dalph Barker was killed _______ 27, 1918, in France, while in _____ Expeditionary Forces. He was a barber when called into the service, and was one of the first Alton boys to be killed. Members of the family were desirous of having the remains of the soldiers sent back home so they could have the privilege of burying it in the family lot.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1921

The body of Dalph Barker, killed in action overseas while in the service of his country, arrived back in Alton this morning at 5:40 o'clock, and was taken to the undertaking parlors of C. N. Streeper. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock and will be in the First Baptist church. Rev. M. W. Twing having charge of the services. Burial will be under the auspices of the American Legion. The body was accompanied to Alton by Private Peter Eagle. Mayor Sauvage gave orders Thursday afternoon that the flag on the City Hall be placed at half mast as an emblem of civic mourning for the dead soldier, and it will so float until after the funeral. The Mayor said that he had made a practice of lowering the flag to half mast every time one of the Alton soldier boys died, and that he felt Alton should pay special honor to this young soldier who had laid down his life on the field of battle. The funeral Sunday afternoon will doubtless be attended by an enormous crowd. Among those who will attend will be some of the boys who were with Barker when he fell. Among these was Thomas Mooney of Alton, who when the body of Barker was to be buried, gave his blanket to wrap the body in. Others from Alton were John Hoehn, Coburn Poole and Robert Lewis. The body of Dalph Barker is the first one that has come so far of the boys who were slain on the field of battle. The others which have so far been sent home are those of boys who died from causes other than wounds. Barker was buried near where he fell in the great offensive against the Germans, which finally resulted in victory for the Allied cause.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1921

Alton post, American Legion, conducted an impressive funeral ceremony Sunday afternoon over the body of Dalph Barker, who was the first Alton soldier to lose his life in France. The body arrived in New York a short time ago and was immediately conveyed to this city arriving here Friday morning. A large number of Legionnaires gathered Sunday afternoon to escort the body from the home to the Baptist church where Rev. Twing conducted a short prayer service, briefly reviewing the life of Dalph Barker, following his removal to this city in 1914, and prior to his entering the service. Barker left Alton in October 1917, sailed for France in April, and was killed on the English front in July, after which his body was interred, remaining in France until a recent date when it was returned to this country for final interment. Following the services at the Baptist church, the Legionnaires and many friends of the deceased followed the funeral procession to the City cemetery where Alton post of the American Legion had charge of the interment. At the cemetery Dr. Mather Pfeiffenberger, post commander of the Legion in a brief talk eulogized the dead soldier, who sacrificed his life in order that liberty might not perish from the earth, after the remains were interred. Military escort, firing squad and pallbearers were chosen from Legionnaires Tom Mooney, Frank Graham, Joe Mohr, Tom Stanton, Elmer Trout, and Earl Linkogle, former servicemen, attended the casket.

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BARNARD, JOHANNA M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 31, 1904

Mrs. Johanna M., wife of Ellis Barnard, died this afternoon at 4 o'clock, at the family home at 20 East Third street after an illness from pneumonia.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1904

The death of Mrs. Johanna M. Barnard, wife of Ellis Barnard, Thursday afternoon, was the sad ending of an illness which, until the day of death, did not appear to be of a fatal nature. She was taken ill with the grip about two weeks ago, and complications set in which developed into pneumonia, and Thursday was the first day that her condition was regarded as dangerous. Mrs. Barnard was a member of the well known Joesting family of Alton. She assisted in conducting a confectionery and restaurant on Belle street for many years, and did so until the time of her marriage to Mr. Barnard. She was one of the best known women in Alton and was regarded as a most estimable lady by all who knew her. She was devoted to her home and her death is a sad shock to the husband. Mrs. Barnard was born in Germany and was 48 years of age. She came to America and Alton when twelve years of age and had lived in this city since then. She leaves two brothers, G. A. Joesting, cashier of the Citizens National bank, Adolph Joesting, and three sisters, Mrs. John Koch, Mrs. Minnie Ernst and Miss Mary Joesting. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, 20 East Third street, Rev. Theo Oberhallmann officiating. [Burial was in City Cemetery]

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BARNARD, WILLIAM E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 28, 1920

William E. Barnard died this morning at one o'clock at the family home in South Wood River. He is survived by his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Wright of South Wood River, and one brother, Gus Barnard of Evansville, Ind. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the Streeper Undertaking Parlors. Interment will be in the Oakwood Cemetery.

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BARNES, ROSA (nee PHILLIPS)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 30, 1917           

Mrs. Rosa Barnes, wife of Harry Barnes of 25 East Elm street, died under sad circumstances today at her home, after an illness of one week. Mrs. Barnes was not believed to be seriously ill. She had been in bed a week, and it was believed she was improving steadily. Her husband, Harry Barnes, was sitting at her bedside. He believed that she had fallen asleep and he was sitting there quietly diverting himself by reading, while his wife was resting, as he believed. He sat there some time and finally, alarmed by his wife's failure to move or show any signs of life, he made a closer examination and found that she was lifeless. A doctor who was called said that she must have been dead for fully an hour when the husband made the discovery that she was dead. The death of Mrs. Barnes was wholly unexpected by anyone. She was 27 years of age, and besides her husband she leaves a little child of eleven months old. Mrs. Barnes was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Phillips. She had been married about four years. She was a member of the ladies of the Maccabees. She leaves four brothers and five sisters.

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BARNETT, ELIZA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1906

Mrs. Eliza Barnett, widow of Charles Barnett and one of the oldest and most esteemed residents of Alton, passed away Sunday afternoon at the residence of Joseph Wilkinson, where she has made her home for the past few years. She was born in Cardiff, Wales, in 1826, and came to this country with her husband soon after marriage. Her husband died sixteen years ago. Mrs. Barnett has been a great sufferer for years. The immediate cause of her death was paralysis. She leaves no relatives except a cousin in Massachusetts. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the First Baptist church.

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BARNSBACK, HENRY C./Source: Troy Call, January 18, 1918

Henry C. Barnsback, a brother-in-law of Mrs. John F. Jarvis of this city and one of the old residents of Madison county who was well known to many in Troy, expired at his home in Edwardsville yesterday morning at 10:30 o'clock. Death was due to an attack of heart trouble and nephritis. Mr. Barnsback was born in Madison county and was in his 80th year. He was a son of Julius and Mary (Gonterman) Barnsback, pioneer residents of the county. In her earlier life he formed a partnership with his brother, Julius, and they conducted a general store at Edwardsville for some years. He then purchased a half interest in the Edwardsville Intelligencer with James Brown and after this venture farmed in Coles county, near Charlestown, for several years. His wife, who was Mary Matilda Montgomery, survives him, as does his only brother, Julius Barnsback of Edwardsville. Mr. Barnsback had been in failing health for some time and had several severe sick spells from which he partially recovered. During the past several weeks he had failed rapidly. He talked freely of his condition and confidently believed that the end was near. Arrangements for the burial have not been made known here, but it is expected that the funeral will be held Sunday.

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BARNSBACK, MARY M. "GRANDMA"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 8, 1903

From the Edwardsville Intelligencer:  As the first light of day broke Wednesday morning, the sable angel sounded the summons for the oldest resident of Madison County, and as peacefully as she had lived, "Grandma" Mary M. Barnsback died. Not many knew that "Grandma" Barnsback was at death's door. On Sunday she dressed and went downstairs as usual, and was about most of the day. The trouble seemed to grow upon her, and after being placed in bed she observed to those around that she believed herself to be "sick unto death." She had no ailment, but the bodily tissues merely relapsed until the spirit forsook the frame, and one of this city's honored residents, whose years were nearly those of a century, was no more. Just before her death she seemed to collect her energies, and while a howling gale shook the house, she roused herself and sat up in bed for a moment, then lay back and was dead. The hour was 6:15 a.m. "Grandma" Mary M. Barnsback was 95 years, 10 months and 22 days old. She was the widow of Julius L. Barnsback, who died fifty years ago this year, and there survive her three children - Mrs. Elizabeth Prickett, Julius G. Barnsback, and Henry C. Barnsback. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence in the East End, and the interment will be at Woodlawn.

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BARR, AMY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1905

The funeral of Mrs. Amy Barr was held this afternoon at 2 o' clock from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Rollie Watson, on Alby street. Services were conducted by Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann, assisted by Rev. Dr. D. E. Bushnell. Burial was in City Cemetery.

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BARR, JOHN/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, December 11, 1856

Mr. John Barr, of this city, aged twenty-five years, received some injury to his spine on Monday last while loading wheat at the Terre Haute Railroad depot. On Wednesday he seemed to be improving, but yesterday he unexpectedly died at 10 o'clock. Young Barr was one of our most industrious and respected young men. He emigrated from Tyronne county, Ireland, about three years ago, and was employed by the Messrs. Sidway about two years. He leaves a widowed mother and several brothers and sisters to mourn his untimely and sudden death. His funeral will take place this morning from the residence, corner of Seventh and Belle streets, at 10 o'clock.

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BARRETT, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1903

Mrs. Catherine Barrett died this morning at 6:30 o'clock. The funeral will take place at 9 a.m. tomorrow from the Cathedral. Mrs. Barrett had been a resident of Alton many years. She was the mother of James Barrett, a well known business man of the city. She was 68 years of age, most of which time she passed in Alton, and was one of the most highly respected citizens of Alton. She leaves many friends to mourn her death.  [Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery]

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BARRUS, DON A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1921                 Two Friends Killed Instantly by Train

Don A. Barrus, aged 45, of Alton, and Alexander W. Crawford, aged 60, of Hillsboro, were instantly killed this morning at 9:30 o'clock by a Chicago and Alton train, No. 32, on the crossing at Wood River. The Chandler Dispatch car in which they were riding was demolished. The body of Don Barrus was underneath the wrecked engine of the car, and that of A. W. Crawford was carried up the track about 150 feet and dropped. Evidently he was caught in the smashed top of the car, which was dropped by the engine a short distance from where the body of Mr. Crawford lay. A car driven by John J. Brenholt Jr. just missed being struck by the engine. Mr. Brenholt got over just in time, the engine missing him by a few inches, while the car in which Barrus and Crawford were riding was a few feet behind and ran on directly in front of the train, which was traveling at a high speed. According to the engineer on the train that struck the Crawford automobile, his train stopped in 150 feet beyond the crossing, but this statement is disputed by men who witnessed the accident and who say that the train ran more than 1,000 feet. The trainmen said that the Illinois Terminal railroad crossing was blocked by a freight train and before the crossing was cleared, a string of six or seven automobiles had lined up. When the Illinois Terminal crossing was cleared, the automobiles, led by the car driven by J. J. Brenholt Jr., moved forward. Only a few feet space separated the two tracks at that place and there was very little room for any observations to be made down the C. & A. track. Evidently no one heard the approaching C. & A. train. The engineer said that the car driven by Mr. Brenholt barely got over the track when the train reached the crossing and that the Crawford car following close behind was struck squarely by the train. The impact buried the automobile into the air and the engine dragged the shattered care about 150 feet. The only part left intact was the tires of the automobile. Mr. Barrus was pinned down by the smashed engine which had been stripped from the rest of the car. Mr. Crawford was carried up the track in the winter top that had enclosed the car. According to men at the Don A. Barrus garage, Mr. Barrus had sold three Packard cars and was going to St. Louis to get two of them for delivery. He found opportunity to make the trip with Mr. Crawford, an old friend, and the two started off from the Mineral Springs Hotel about 9 o'clock. The accident, destroying the lives of two men so well known as Mr. Crawford and Mr. Barrus, produced a great shock to the community. Mr. Crawford was born in Godfrey and had lived there much of his life, and he was widely known. He had served as a member of the Illinois State Board of Equalization and four years ago he was a candidate of the Democratic ticket for the office of Clerk of the Supreme Court, but was defeated. Last November he was an unsuccessful candidate for State Senator in the Macoupin County district, going down in the Republican landslide. For a number of years he had been interested in the purchase of coal rights in Macoupin County and had done much to get together large tracts of land which were sold to mining concerns. He had a prominent part in developing the coal business of Macoupin and Montgomery counties. He was twice married, his second wife surviving him. He leaves six children, Mrs. L. H. Maxfield, Miss Alice of Carlinville, and William of Delhi,, La., Jack, Sue and Elizabeth of Hillsboro. He leaves also one sister, Miss Jennie Crawford, and three brothers, William and Thomas Crawford and John Tolman. Mr. Crawford had spent the night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. L. H. Maxfield. Don A. Barrus had been a resident of Alton since he came here a number of years ago with the late B. L. Dorsey. He served as Mr. Dorsey's business manager for a long period. In recent years he had taken an interest in real estate and it was he who put over a big deal for the sale of a tract of land to the Empire Oil and Gas Co., and he had a prominent part in some other realty transactions here. When the Illinois Terminal remodeled the building at Front and Alby streets, Mr. Barrus took the first floor as a garage and salesroom, and there he was conducting a very prosperous business. His death came at a time when he had been making some good sales of cars. He had disposed of nine others in the past month. Following news of the accident, _____ of parties started out to Wood River to view the scene and look at the wrecked car. The trainmen had the bodies of the two men lifted to one side of the track and Deputy Coroner Streeper was notified to get them. They were later conveyed to the Streeper morgue in Upper Alton. The two victims of the accident were two of the best known men in this vicinity. Both of them were very popular socially and were prominent in business. While Mr. Crawford had not lived here for a long time, he was in and out of Alton frequently visiting his relatives at Godfrey and seeing some of his business associates. It is related that when he was on the State Board of Equalization, he gave quite as much attention to serving people from his old home district as he gave to those from the district he was representing. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him. Mr. Barrus shared in public esteem with Mr. Crawford. He always had a smile for everyone, and it was said by his friends that he was a man whose friendship was to be valued highly. In the car with John J. Brenholt was his sister, Mrs. Edith Jones and Mrs. Anton Reck. After they passed the crossing safely, they looked back and just as they did they saw the Crawford automobile hurled into the air. They immediately telephoned to Alton to give notice of their safety. Reports that they did not know of the accident were denied by Col. J. J. Brenholt, who said that he had a telephone message from members of his family immediately afterward. The railroad men declared that the crossing watchman was signaling to the automobilists to call attention to their danger. People at the crossing said that there was no signal given to the automobile drivers and that the train was running at a speed of about 50 miles an hour. No arrangements had been made this afternoon about the funeral of Mr. Crawford. Immediately upon the death of Don Barrus and his friend, Zan Crawford, this morning, a meeting was called of several of the most intimate friends and business associates of Barrus at the Elks club, and arrangements were made to take charge of the remains and await word from the family. A telegram was sent at once to the brother of Barrus, Ralph Barrus at Richfield Springs, New York, telling of the accident, how it occurred and of Barrus's death. Barrus has two brothers and two sisters who reside in Richfield Springs, N. Y. or near vicinity. After the inquest and the embalming of the body, the Elks will take charge of the remains and follow the instructions of the family.

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BARTELS, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 4, 1910

Henry Bartels, a well known and well to do farmer of Wood River township, died early this morning at his home near East Alton, after a long illness from kidney troubles. He was about 57 years old and is survived by his wife and several children. He was born in Germany, April 16, 1853, and came to Illinois when 14 years old. He has always lived within a mile of where he died. He was well respected and his death will be regretted by all who knew him. The funeral will be held Sunday, and services will be conducted in the Lutheran church at Bethalto at 1 o'clock p.m. of that day.

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BARTELS, UNKNOWN WIFE OF HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 12, 1916          Dies From Burns

Mrs. Henry Bartels, aged 56, who was burned January 3rd when her clothes caught fire from flames under a large kettle in the yard, died at 11:30 o'clock this morning at her home east of Wood River. A physician spent the greater part of the night at the Bartels home doing what he could to relieve her suffering, but it was reported this morning that there was no chance for her recovery on account of the severity of the burns. She was burned about the head and breast, and the burns on her body affected her the worst. At the same time, her two sons, Charles and Louis, were slightly burned in attempting to rescue her but they have recovered. Mrs. Bartels, at the time she was burned, was engaged in boiling pigs feet in a kettle in the yard at her home. Near her were members of her family, and it was believed that prompt action on their part had saved her life, but she was worse burned than it was known at first. She leaves nine children and nine grandchildren. The funeral will be held Friday from the German Lutheran church at Bethalto.

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BARTH, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 24, 1916

The funeral of Frank Barth was held at 2:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon from the home on Pearl street to the City Cemetery. The services were conducted at the home by Rev. E. L. Mueller, and burial was in the City Cemetery. The large number of beautiful floral offerings told of the esteem in which he was held by all who knew him.

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BARTH, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 4, 1908

The funeral of the late George F. Barth, the well known saloon keeper who died Wednesday, will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, Pearl street and Vandalia road, to the City Cemetery. He will not be taken to church as at first reported. He was a member of the Fraternal order of Eagles, and the Benevolent Society, both of which orders will attend in a body.

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BARTH, GEORGE F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 10, 1907               Octogenarian Who Conducted Drug Store Dies

George F. Barth, who conducted a drug store in North Alton for about thirty years, died Monday night at a quarter to 12 o'clock after a long illness from mental and physical decay. He was a resident of the north side for forty-five years or more, and for some time followed the profession of a teacher. Later he engaged in the drug business and for several years was postmaster of North Alton. The drug business he sold about a year ago to E. A. Schaub and retired from active life. Shortly after returning from a trip to Europe several years ago which he made with Mrs. Barth, the latter died, and for the past ten years he has had the present Mrs. Anton Glassbrenner as a housekeeper. Mr. Barth was an educated, studious man and was always keenly alive to the issues of the day. He was public spirited and progressive also, and lent his voice and aid freely to any movement he thought calculated to make the world go forward. Among the older citizens he has many friends, and among the middle aged ones many former pupils who will hope that he was found rest and contentment "Over There." Dr. Barth was a native of Germany. He came to America when a young man and almost all his life here was passed in North Alton. He was past 82 years of age. The time of the funeral is not set. The body will be taken to St. Louis for cremation at his request.

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BARTH, JACOB/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 30, 1903            Tale of 1857 Murder Remembered

Frank Clement has in his possession a pamphlet published in Edwardsville in 1857, which contains an account of the murder of Jacob Barth, a peddler, near Troy, by George Gibson, Ed Barber and Joseph Watson.  Z. B. Job was Sheriff, and the murderers were captured early next morning near Lebanon. Their trial took place almost immediately after a mob had attacked the jail and had been repulsed. The prosecuting attorney was Philip B. Foulke, and the attorneys for the defense were Seth T. Sawyer, Friend S. Rutherford and John Trible. The murder was committed because Barth refused to let the three ride. They pleaded not guilty, but were convicted and sentenced to hang June 19, 1857. Watson was a mere boy, and his sentence was commuted, but the sentence was executed in the cases of the other two. Before execution the three culprits made a confession and said they had started out from Iowa with the intension of robbing people and committing murder if necessary. The only speech in the pamphlet is an impassioned plea for justice and for law and order by F. S. Rutherford, the conclusion of which is given below:  "Now violence has been threatened and I want to say in behalf of myself and associate counsel and the court, that no threats of violence, come from what quarter they may, wilt frighten us out of our sense of duty and propriety. For myself, I big defiance to mob law, and am ready at all times to promptly meet any attempts at the overthrow of law and order, and help to mote out summary justice as the attempt deserves. I am satisfied that twelve good men and true, can be found in this county to give any man a fair and impartial trial."  Of all the actors in this trial, Judge, Prosecuting Attorney Foulke, Attorneys Sawyer, Rutherford and Trible and Sheriff Job, the latter is the only one now living, after fifty years.  Mr. Rutherford and Mr. Trible became soldiers in the War for the Union, the first as colonel of the 97th Illinois Volunteers, and Mr. Trible as captain of Co. I, same regiment. Captain Trible was wounded in the knee at the battle of Arkansas Port, Arkansas, and was brought home to Alton where he died shortly after his return. Colonel Rutherford was taken ill in New Orleans while in command of his regiment, was brought home to this city where he died on the 20th of June 1864. Philip B. Foulke was elected Congressman from this district and is long since dead. Seth T. Sawyer died at a good old age in this city some years ago. Judge Snyder, who tried the case, died many years ago. Z. B. Job, then Sheriff, is still hale and hearty - and full of vim, as ready to stand up for his rights as ever, whether it be in the courts or elsewhere. He has passed the four score mark.

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BARTELS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 4, 1907

The funeral of William Bartels took place Monday morning from the home at Wanda to the Eden Evangelical church at Edwardsville, where services were conducted by Rev. H. Rahn. Mr. Bartels died Saturday of pleuro-pneumonia, following an accidental fall down an elevator shaft. He was one of the best known farmers of the Bottom. He was born in Germany, February 25, 1851, and was therefore at the time of his death aged 55 years, 11 months and 7 days. His wife was Miss Katharine Ermshausen, also a native of Germany, and who came to this country when a little girl. Mr. Bartels arrived in America when 16 years of age, going to Wood River township first. He and his wife were married in Edwardsville January 17, 1877. Since 1897 they had lived near Wanda. Mr. Bartels was one of foremost members of the Eden church of Edwardsville, attending services with the greatest regularity. He was never sick, and the accident which cost his life becomes all the more unfortunate for this reason. Surviving are his wife and six of the original family of ten children. They are: Mrs. Maria Gehlert, wife of O. E. Gehlert of Wood River township; Henry F. W. Bartels of Edwardsville; Emma, Herman and the twins, Julia and Julius, aged nine, the last four living on the home place. His father-in-law, Henry Ermshausen, now 71 years old, lives with them. There are four grandchildren, and Mr. Bartels has three brothers living - Henry of Wood River, Fred of Alton, and Charles who lives just west of Edwardsville.

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BARTLETT, CHARLES H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 7, 1921

Charles H. Bartlett, an aged resident of Godfrey township, died yesterday morning at 2 o'clock at his home after being ill about one week, from debility of old age. A sad feature of the death of Mr. Bartlett is that his aged wife is confined to her bed by injuries she received by falling at her home. She was in the yard and stepped into a mole hole, which caused her to fall and she injured her back and shoulder. Mr. Bartlett would have been 93 years of age the 7th of April. He and his wife were married nearly sixty-eight years and spent most of their time on their farm in Godfrey township. Mr. Bartlett was born at Boston, Mass., and he was married to Elizabeth Dow at Rutland, Vt., in 1853. They came west and settled in Godfrey township in 1858. Mr. Bartlett served one year in the army during the Civil War, in the 144th Regiment. He was a well educated man, possessed a ready mind and was a wide reader. Up to the last his mind remained clear and he was a most entertaining conversationalist and his company was sought by many. He was a good farmer, a good citizen and was highly esteemed by all who knew him in the neighborhood where he lived. He leaves, besides his widow, two sons, Charles W. and Fred Bartlett and four daughters, Mrs. Fanny Donnel of St. Louis, Mrs. Hannah Ingham of Brighton, Mrs. Carrie Hancock of Iuka, Ill., and Miss Edith Bartlett of Godfrey. He leaves also eleven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Bethany church, where he attended services for many years while it was a regular church, and services will be conducted by Rev. John W. Green of the Godfrey Congregational church. Burial will be in the Bethany cemetery.

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BARTLETT, ELIZABETH D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 19, 1923

Mrs. Elizabeth D. Bartlett, in her eighty-eighth year, died last evening at 6:20 o'clock in the home in which she had lived since she moved there in 1858, two miles north of Godfrey. Her death had been expected, as she had been in failing health for eighteen months. Most of the time in the last year she had been confined to her bed. She was attended by her children in her dying hours. Mrs. Bartlett was the widow of Charles H. Bartlett, who died two years ago, at the age of 92, from old age. The death of her aged companion in life was perhaps one of the causes of the breakdown of the health of the aged woman. She missed him keenly and one of her greatest consolations was that she would soon be reunited with him, in the life beyond the grave. Mrs. Bartlett was born in Holden, Mass., and would have been eighty-eight years of age the 23rd of December. She was married in the east and two of her children were born there. She came here about 1858 and passed the remainder of her life on the old home place in Godfrey where she reared her children. Six children survive her, Mrs. Fanny Donnell of St. Louis, Mrs. Thomas T. Ingham of Brighton, Mrs. John D. Hancock of Iuka, Ill., Charles W. Fred and Miss Edith L. Bartlett of Godfrey. She was interested in the Congregational church in which the members of her family held membership. She was beloved in the neighborhood where she lived, and to her family she was a good mother. In her declining years she received the most devoted attention of her family members. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home north of Godfrey and services will be conducted by Rev. Ray Barber, who is pastor of the Congregational church. Burial will be in the Bethany cemetery.

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BARTLOW, UNKNOWN WIFE OF FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1904

Mrs. Frank Bartlow, aged 45, died on her birthday Christmas day, at the family home north of Upper Alton, five miles. She had been ill since the preceding Tuesday with lung trouble. The funeral was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

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BARTLOW, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 20, 1911

William Bartlow, whose family live at Yager Park [Alton], died in the insane asylum at Jacksonville this morning, and the body will be brought here this evening.

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BARTON, J. H. (REVEREND)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 19, 1907           Pastor of Union Baptist Church in Alton Dies

Rev. J. H. Barton, pastor of the Union Baptist church at Seventh and George streets, died at St. Joseph's hospital Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock after a short illness. He was moved to the hospital one week ago and underwent a surgical operation there, since which he was in a very dangerous condition. Rev. Barton came to Alton eight years ago and during his stay here he has done a work among his people which has reflected great credit on the congregation of the negro Baptists in Alton. It was largely through his instrumentality that the new church was erected and the congregation was strengthened materially. When he came to Alton he found the congregation worshipping in an old frame structure where the new church now stands, and he took up the seeming hopeless work of trying to raise the necessary fund to carry out the plans. When finished, the church was dedicated with considerable debt overhanging it, but the congregation and builders had the satisfaction of possessing one of the finest little churches in the city. Rev. Barton undertook then to clear it of debt and he enlisted the active aid of many influential white people. He was recognized by the other members of the Alton Ministerial Alliance as being a conscientious worker and to his church he was a good pastor who will be deeply missed. His protests against wrong living at times were startling, but he was uncompromising as a leader and teacher and insisted upon his flock following as closely as possible in the paths of rectitude or they would be reminded of their delinquencies by the pastor. The church at Seventh and George street will be a monument to his memory.  Rev. J. H. Barton was born in Pontaton, MIssissippi, July 20, 1853. Come to Illinois in 1861, and was called to preach in 1878, was ordained in 1882, after being a state missionary for five years. He was called to take charge of the church at Bloomington, Illinois. He held that charge for ten years, and in 1898 was called to Alton, to which charge he has been most devoted. He leaves a wife, two daughters, two brothers and one grandchild. The funeral will be Monday afternoon at 2:30. The remains will lie in state from 10:30 to 1:30 Monday morning at the church. Rev. McDaniel, D. D. of Springfield will officiate, assisted by Rev. Hall of Bloomington.

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BASSETT, MARY E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1906

Mrs. Mary E. Bassett, wife of Edwin E. Bassett, died this morning at 1 o'clock after a brief illness from neuralgia of the heart. She would have been 65 years old Friday, the day of her funeral. Mrs. Bassett had been a sufferer from stomach trouble for several years, but it was not suspected that she had heart trouble until yesterday morning when she was stricken with a fatal attack. Members of her family were summoned, and they arrived last night. She was born at New Harmony, Ind., and came to Alton fifteen years ago to live. She leaves one son, R. E. Bassett of Chicago, and two step-sons, A. E. Bassett of Alton and William Bassett of Kansas City. Her husband survives her. The funeral will be held Saturday a.m. at 10 o'clock from the family home, about four miles southwest of Upper Alton, and burial will be in Mt. Olive cemetery near Wood Station, Rev. Simeon Hussey of Upper Alton will conduct the services. Mrs. Bassett's sudden death is a very sad affliction to the members of her family. She was an intensely devoted mother and was ever ready with her sympathy in the hour of trouble, and was always watchful after their interests.

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BASSETT, SYLVESTER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 29, 1914     Old Soldier, Kind-Hearted Christian Who Loved His Chickens, Dies

Sylvester C. Bassett, in his 79th year, died at St. Joseph's hospital Tuesday evening at 7:30 o'clock after an illness of four weeks. His death was due to old age. Mr. Bassett had longed to enter into the rest which for years he had professed to tell of his chickens and how he was ready to cease life's activities. He had lived a life of peace. In his serene old age, with very few kinfolks, even remotely connected, he spent his declining days caring for his chickens. The old man loved to tell of his chickens and how well he cared for them, and it was a fact that nobody ever got as big a percentage of eggs from their laying fowls as Mr. Bassett. He used to say when asked for his secret, "You must treat the chickens right, and they will lay for you," and that was all the information you could get as to his methods. The belief was general that the old man treated his chicken as his big, kindly heart would have treated a child, had one ever been given to him. He was never married. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted, and after the war he came to Alton. He was a deeply religious man, and an old time member of the First Baptist church. He was always busy. When he was taken down he said he wished he could live a few months longer, as he had many things he wanted to do. However, when he became so sick he had to go to the hospital, he ceased wishing for a hasty recovery of his health and strength, and his one desire was that he might realize the perfect rest he had long believed was awaiting him. The rest began at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday night when the kindly, peace-loving, big-hearted, Christian gentleman slipped away "through the gates." He leaves three nephews, R. E. Bassett; A. E. Bassett; and William Bassett. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the First Baptist church.

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BASSETT, UNKNOWN SON OF H. G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1904

Fosterburg - Death, the unwelcomed visitor, called at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Bassett on Wednesday night, Jan. 20, and claimed their only child, a bright baby boy aged 2 months, and in this at of Providence many joyous hopes were blighted, the light of home and the joy of their hearts was suddenly taken away. Funeral services conducted by Rev. Morey took place at the residence on Friday. In their sad loss they have the sympathy of their many friends.

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BATCHEIDER (or BATCHELDER), LAURA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 25, 1907

Mrs. Laura Batcheider, one of the oldest residents of Upper Alton, died Friday afternoon at her home on College avenue after an illness of several weeks with bronchitis, combined with the weakness of old age. She was in her 86th year, and had been a resident of Upper Alton for more than fifty years. Mrs. Batcheider was a native of Kentucky, but came to this part of the country in her young womanhood. She was married in Macoupin county, and her husband, who was a stock dealer, died in California over forty years ago. Mrs. Batcheider leaves four children, Mrs. H. C. Swift of Alton, Miss Laura Batchelder, and Mrs. Martha Newell of Upper Alton, and John Batchelder of Winfield, Kansas.  Mrs. Batchelder was the daughter of a Baptist clergyman, and during almost all her life she was a member of that church. She was very devoted to her church, and during her entire life she endeavored to live up to its teachings, reflecting in her own life the highest and best that her religion taught. She was loved and respected by all who knew her, but especially by those who were in her immediate family circle and her death is the cause of great sadness to her children.

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BATES, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 24, 1908          13 Year Old Lad Commits Suicide Rather Than Do Menial Work

Clarence Bates, aged 13, son of Mrs. Rosa Bates, cook at the Alton hotel, committed suicide by taking morphine Wednesday morning. The boy killed himself rather than do menial work around the hotel such as scrubbing and mopping the floor. His mother says that he had been unruly and refused to do the work assigned to him. She had threatened that unless he was obedient, she would have him sent to the reform school, and the boy, rather than do the work he thought belonged to women, took his life. Mrs. Bates and daughter Grace, aged 17, with the boy were staying at the hotel. The mother and daughter worked and the boy was supposed to do the work assigned to him for his board. He did not like the tasks and would shirk his work whenever he could. He would go across the street to the livery stable owned by H. J. Klunk, and there he would do all the work he could find to do. He was never paid for this work and seemed glad to do it to get out of his own work. He would sleep at nights in the livery stable. Mrs. Bates said that her son would frequently go to bed in her room at the hotel in the daytime to sleep all day long so he would not have to do the work he was expected to do there. Wednesday morning about 10 o'clock he entered the hotel after being absent some time, and was met by Mrs. Gibbs who told him to go to work doing his daily scrubbing. The boy said he would not, as he had quit there, and would not do any more of it. An hour later the boy was seen in the mother's room apparently asleep on the bed. His sister did not try to rouse him and nothing was thought of it until 5 o'clock when the sister found the boy on the bed and apparently in bad condition. She summoned her mother, who called Dr. Merritt. He found the boy almost pulseless and breathless. Efforts were made to rouse the boy and they were successful until 1 o'clock when the boy begged to be allowed to go back to bed as he felt much better. He went to bed again and continued to be in a stupor until 4:30 o'clock when he died. At the Klunk livery stable it was said the boy was a good workman and could wash buggies and do other work as well as a man. The men there thought he was a good boy, but had frequently heard him say he did not like to scrub and mop floors and do the other menial work he was called upon to do.

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BATES, MARTHA J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1919

The funeral of Mrs. Martha J. Bates, who died April 16th at St. Louis, Mo., was this afternoon from the Lock undertaking chapel and interment was in Oakwood cemetery, Upper Alton. Services were conducted by Rev. Robert Morris, pastor of the First Methodist church. Mrs. Bates was 79 years old, and was well known in Alton. She was a sister of Mrs. Lydia Rummerfield, of Alton, her only surviving relative. The body was brought to Alton last night.

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BATES, NINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 27, 1918

Nina, the six year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Bates of 270 Madison avenue, died this afternoon shortly after 1 o'clock after an illness of six weeks with pneumonia. She was thought to be recovering and her death came as a sudden shock to her parents and relatives. Poor heart action was thought by the attending physician to be the cause of the death. The death of the little girl comes as a deep blow to her parents, as only a week ago last Thursday another daughter, Mrs. Michael Thornsberry, was buried. The parents have five remaining children: Ernest, Loyd, Etta, Nettie and Amy. No funeral arrangements had been made this afternoon.

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BATES, SAMUEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1903

The body of Samuel Bates, colored, who was killed in Chicago Sunday, arrived Wednesday morning and the funeral took place from the depot to the City Cemetery.

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BATTEN, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1905                Old Resident of Liberty Prairie Passes Away

Joseph W. Batten died Monday night at nine o'clock, aged 85 years. Deceased has been a resident of Madison county and of Liberty Prairie for more than 50 years. He was a well known and substantial farmer, respected by all who knew him. His wife and several adult children survive him. He filled the office of constable many years ago, and had served as justice of the peace for twenty or more years. The funeral will take place from the family home in Liberty Prairie on Thursday morning at 10 o'clock.

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BATTERTON, JOHN R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 29, 1905        

 

Last Surviving Charter Member of First Illinois Odd Fellows Lodge Dies

 

John R. Batterton, the last surviving charter member of Western Star Lodge No. 1, the first Odd Fellows Lodge in Illinois, died Sunday afternoon at his resident in North Alton from senile debility. He was born September 12, 1812, and was in his ninety-third year. Mr. Batterton had been in failing health for several years, but during the last ten weeks he had been failing more rapidly. Sunday afternoon the physical machinery broke down very unexpectedly, and Mr. Batterton sank into the last sleep without any pain and before the members of his family could be summoned to his bedside. Mr. Batterton was born at Paris, Kentucky, but came to Alton in 1834 and had lived in the Altons ever since. He was a printer by trade, and in his younger days he was one of the most prominent residents of Alton. He was an industrious man, and by frugality amassed a competence which enabled him to live comfortably in the autumn days of his life. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him, and although most of the men of his generation have preceded him in departing from this life, still there are many living wh honored and respected him as a useful and upright citizen.    [Batterton was buried in the Alton City Cemetery]

 

 

 

 

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BAUER, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1909

Mrs. Annie Bauer, wife of John Bauer, died Sunday morning at 1:25 o'clock at the family home, 1020 Gold street, after a long illness from cancer of the stomach. She had been bedfast for three months. Mrs. Bauer was a member of the Mutual Protective League, and the funeral Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home will be attended by the members of that order. Rev. E. L. Mueller of the German Evangelical church will officiate. Mrs. Bauer leaves her husband and three sons, John, Edward and Harry Bauer. She leaves also one sister, Mrs. Kate Remhoff, of Wheeling, West Virginia, who was here recently and returned home a week ago. Mrs. Bauer was known as a good mother and a highly esteemed neighbor, and she was one of the most valued members of the Mutual Protective League. She had lived in Alton 32 years.

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BAUER, ELLA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 2, 1915

Her mind filled with love and concern over the welfare of her six children, Mrs. Ella Bauer, wife of Henry Bauer, died Wednesday evening at 6 o'clock in St. Joseph's Hospital, after having spent much of her time in her closing hours giving directions to her eldest daughter, Miss Louise, to the welfare and care of her six children. Mrs. Bauer's death followed a surgical operation performed on her to relieve a trouble which had arisen from an accidental injury of several years ago. Last summer when one of her children was injured, Mrs. Bauer nursed him night and day, and this, it is believed, contributed to her final breakdown. She was a devoted mother and no sacrifice or effort was too much for her to give to her children. Though she had been dying for three days, Mrs. Bauer retained consciousness to the very last, and with members of her family around her she devoted most of the time to counseling them, and telling them what she wished done in the care of her children. Mrs. Bauer's maiden name was Houston. She was 47 years of age, and beside her husband and six children - Frank, Louise, Henry, John, George and Mary - she leaves her mother and five sisters, Miss Ursula Houston; and Mrs. G. N. Land; Miss F. Houston; Mrs. William Hope; Mrs. Emma Warren; and Mrs. Anna Fisher. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home, Tenth and Alton streets. Rev. M. W. Twing will conduct the services.

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BAUER, CAROLINE ERNST/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1913           Wife of Well Known Undertaker Dies

Mrs. Caroline Ernst Bauer, wife of William H. Bauer, died at 3:45 o'clock Saturday morning at the family home, 634 East Third street, after a ten days illness with a complication of liver and bowel trouble. Uraemic poisoning was the final cause of her death. Mrs. Bauer's illness was not regarded as serious until Friday, and about noon it was noticed that she had taken a sudden change for the worse. She became unconscious and did not revive. Mrs. Bauer was 36 years and 6 months old. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ernst. All of her life she had lived in the same place, her death occurring on the same premises where she was born. Mrs. Bauer is survived by her husband, W. H. Bauer, also her parents; and a brother, Emil Ernst; and a sister, Mrs. Bertha Hoehn. She leaves also an adopted daughter, Martha. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning from St. Mary's Church.

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BAUER, CHARLES H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1906              Prominent Business Man Passes Away

Charles H. Bauer, head of one of the best known business houses in the city, died at his home, Fifteenth and Henry streets, Saturday morning at 5 o'clock after an illness of only a few days duration. His death was a great surprise to relatives and friends as it was not supposed he was seriously ill. Apparently he was in the best of health, strong and vigorous, and had many years of life to come. He was taken slightly ill last Tuesday while in St. Louis on business, and on coming home complained of a pain in his breast. Muscular rheumatism developed, which lingered around his breast and throat. Last night he took supper with his family and was seemingly in no dangerous condition. The malady went to his heart during the night, and he died at 5 o'clock while being attended by his wife. Mr. Bauer had lived in Alton since July 1895. He came here from Fulton, Mo., where he had made his home for thirty years. He was born in Porta, Westphalia, Germany, and was 59 years of age February 11 of this year. He came to America from Germany in 1866, just a year after the coming of the young woman who was subsequently to become his wife. The couple were married at Fulton, Mo., and lived there until removing to Alton. He was a member of the Presbyterian church at Fulton, but on coming to Alton he became a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church on Twelfth street, and he was a most devoted member of that church. He was a kindly dispositioned man, who was admired by all who knew him. He engaged in business here a few years ago in the Madison shoe store on Third street. One characteristic of the man was that he never spoke ill of any person and made it his practice to look upon the best side of everyone. He was a man of strong character, kind in his heart and liberal in his view of his fellow man. There was general regret among his business associates and friends when announcement of his death was made. Mr. Bauer leaves beside his wife, two daughters, Mrs. Louis Klaus and Mrs. John Paul; also one sister, Mrs. Gustave Plassmann of Nameoki. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Cumberland Presbyterian church.

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BAUER, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1912

Henry Bauer, aged 77, a retired farmer who formerly lived near Brighton, died suddenly from heart trouble at 12:30 o'clock Thursday morning after a brief illness. Mr. Bauer had been a long sufferer from asthma, but his death was not expected. He had retired from active work and lived with his daughter, Mrs. Henry Haag at Godfrey. He leaves many relatives in Alton and was well known here. He was born in Ringhofen, Nassau, Germany. He had lived many years in the vicinity of Alton and was known as a true gentleman, a good father and neighbor, and a very pleasant man to know. He was an old soldier and a membe4r of the G. A. R., having served in the 9th Illinois volunteers. He is survived by his wife, one son, Jacob of Brighton, and five daughters, Mrs. Louisa Moran of Stanwood, Wash., Mrs. John Adams of St. Louis, Mrs. D. M. Adams of East St. Louis, and Mrs. Henry Haag of Godfrey. The funeral will be held from the German Evangelical church in Brighton, Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock.

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BAUER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 12, 1910         Civil War Veteran, Alton Undertaker and Furniture Businessman Dies

John Bauer, aged 73, retired furniture dealer and undertaker, died Monday evening at his residence, 615 east Sixth street, from asthma and old age. Mr. Bauer had been seriously ill for about ten days. His health had been failing for several years about the time of his retirement from business, when he turned his furniture store and his undertaking business over to the management of his sons, George and William H. Bauer. He was not around his old place of business often in the past year, and the last time he was downtown was about two weeks ago. His family, knowing that he was failing in strength, encouraged him to be very careful and not to over exert himself, and reluctantly the old gentleman gave up active efforts. John Bauer was a native of Germany but had lived in Alton since he was 17 years of age. In his death Alton loses one of the few remaining of the old school business men. He had been an undertaker of the olden days in Alton, and he had sold furniture for many years. In his long career in business, without any effort on his part to build up such a reputation, the old gentleman had acquired a name for strict honesty and reliability. No one ever thought of questioning Mr. Bauer's word. When given it was good, and any statement he ever made was known to be true so far as he knew. Everyone trusted and respected him. He had a kindly way that made many friends. He was always ready to do a favor for anyone. Hundreds and hundreds of young couples he had helped to establish in housekeeping in Alton and surrounding country. He was always willing to help out young couples who were trying to get a start, as he had been poor himself. He had a partner at one time in his business career, but for a number of years up to the time of his retirement he had done business alone. He was a veteran of the Civil War, a brave soldier, and a good American patriot. He was known as a good citizen, a man who would say no ill of anyone, and a friend worth having. Mr. Bauer leaves his wife and six children. His daughters are Mrs. Charles Miesener, Mrs. Will Johler, and Miss Tille Bauer. The sons are Joseph, George and William H. Bauer. Mr. Bauer had been in the furniture and undertaking business about forty years. He was originally in partnership with John Sutter, and later engaged in partnership with John Hoffman.  In his forty years of business he had buried thousands of people, probably more than any other undertaker in this vicinity. Even during the past year he had helped out by conducting about a dozen funerals when his son had more than he could attend to. Some time ago Mr. Bauer turned over his furniture business to his son, George, and his undertaking business to his son, William. He was a member of the Odd Fellows order, also of the German Benevolent society. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and burial will be in City Cemetery. Services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller of the German Evangelical church.

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BAUER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 10, 1910

John Bauer, aged 56, was found dead in bed at his home, 1029 Gold street, Friday morning. He had been suffering from kidney trouble and dropsy, combined with heart trouble, and it is supposed that he became suddenly worse in the night and died in a short time thereafter. He leaves three sons, John, Edward, and Harry Bauer. His wife died last September. He had lived in Alton since he was one year old, having come here from Germany with his parents. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon from the home, Rev. E. L. Mueller officiating.

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BAUER, JOSEPH H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 30, 1918           Well Known Jeweler Dies

Joseph H. Bauer, aged 49, died at his residence, 820 East Sixth street, at 1 o'clock this afternoon after an illness which began about two months ago. His illness had not been regarded as being of an immediately dangerous nature, and his collapse was a great surprise to his closest relatives who were unprepared for the fatal termination. Mr. Bauer had for sixteen years conducted a jewelry store on East Broadway, and was one of the best known business men there. He was a son of the late John Bauer, who conducted a furniture store in Alton for many years, and of Mrs. Louise Bauer who survives her son. He leaves beside his wife, one daughter, Edna, aged 10 years, his mother, three sisters, Mrs. Charles Meissner of St. Louis, Mrs. William Johler, Miss Tillie Bauer, George and William H. Bauer, all of Alton. The cause of his death was kidney trouble, from which he had been a long time sufferer. The funeral will probably be held at 1:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon from the family home.

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BAUER, JUSTINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 17, 1920

The funeral of Mrs. Justina Bauer was held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Evangelical Church at Eighth and Henry streets in which she had held membership for many years. Notwithstanding a pouring rain, the church was filled with friends and relatives, and a remarkable feature of the funeral was the large number of old persons present, though the day was such as to justify them in staying at home. The services were conducted by Rev. O. W. Heggemeier, the pastor. The floral offerings were beautiful, and the grave was a mound of flowers which spoke of the esteem in which the aged lady was held by her relatives and many friends. The pallbearers were five grandsons, Edwin, Frank, Henry, John and George Bauer, and one great grandson, Paul Kopp. A quartet sang two selections at the church. Interment was in City Cemetery.

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BAUER, LUCAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 21, 1923                  Fourteen Foot Fall Breaks Neck of Lucas Bauer

Lucas Bauer, in his seventy-third year, was killed this morning by falling about 14 feet in a barn on the Maneke place in Godfrey. His neck was broken by the fall. Bauer, who is a widower and has no children, kept a carpenter shop at Bethalto and lived in the rear. He put in his time doing carpentry work and his services were in great demand about the country. He had been called to do some work on the old Deleplaine place in Godfrey township, and while there something went wrong with the apparatus used for hoisting hay into the barn and moving it about the barn, on the Maneke place. Mr. Bauer was asked to go to the Maneke place to make a repair and he did so. He had finished the work and was taking down an extension ladder on which he had been working, when he fell headlong to the floor of the barn and died instantly. Mr. Bauer had few relatives. He was a second cousin of the late John Bauer and he worked at one time for Mr. Bauer making coffins in Alton, when undertakers made some of their stock. He was a fine workman and an expert cabinetmaker. He was frequently called upon to make repairs and do fancy work in the line of his trade. He made a practice of visiting in Alton almost every week at the home of Mrs. Louisa Bauer, widow of his second cousin, and at the home of W. H. Bauer. When he was killed, word was sent to W. H. Bauer, and he took charge of the body and made the funeral arrangements as there were no closer relatives to take charge. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from the home of Mrs. Louisa Bauer, 61 East Sixth street, and the body will be taken to Bethalto for burial beside the body of his wife, who died in 1914. Mr. Bauer was born in Germany, but came to this country when he was 17 years of age and for fifty years he had lived in Bethalto and vicinity.

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BAUER, WEERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 18, 1923            Old Soldier Answers Taps - Fought After Surrender of Lee, Taking Ft. Blakely

Weert Bauer, veteran of the Civil war, and well known resident of Alton, died Saturday night at midnight at his home, 324 East Third street. He was in his eighty second year. Mr. Bauer had been in a bad way for some time from a malady incident to his age. He had made a remarkable rally two years ago when it seemed that he was about to die and surgeons amputating one of his legs, he recovered so that he was able to get about the streets and attend to his business affairs. He showed great recuperative powers at the time the amputation was performed, when many believed it would be impossible for him to survive the shock of the amputation. It will be recalled that a few years ago Mr. Bauer caused the arrest of St. Louis confidence worker who had swindled him out of $14,000 and his one purpose in life after that was to prosecute the swindler and see that he was punished. In this he succeeded. He had the satisfaction of knowing that the man who had victimized him, taking advantage of his great age, had been convicted and sentenced to the penitentiary and was serving out a term there, after having for many years found immunity in his frauds, Joseph Pellinski was the name of the swindler who persuaded Mr. Bauer that for a liberal sum of money he could help Mr. Bauer to find, by occult means, buried treasure in his back yard. When Mr. Bauer realized that he had been swindled, he kept the fact from his wife until it became absolutely necessary to tell her, just before general publicity was about to be given to the charges he had made against Pellinski. When the case came up for trial, there developed a waiting game. Pellinski hoped that Bauer would die and made every effort to stave off a trial, but at last it was necessary for him to go to trial. Bauer became desperately sick and the surgeons advised amputation of one leg as a last resort to save his life. It proved successful and Mr. Bauer recovered sufficiently to be able to go to court and there he told such a convincing story of his dealings with Pellinski that the jury convicted the swindler. At that time it was remarked that Mr. Bauer showed a wonderful memory for dates, places and names and all circumstances for a man of his years and it was impossible for clever cross examining by the lawyer for Pellinski to shake his story. Pellinski at last had to go to prison. Mr. Bauer never got any of his money back. Mr. Bauer was born in Germany and came to this country when he was 15 years of age. He enlisted in Co. A, 97th Illinois volunteers and saw service in many of the great battles of the Civil War. He participated in the last battle of the war, fought after Lee had surrendered, but before word of the surrender had reached Mobile where the battle was fought. The fight was for the capture of Ft. Blakely, and was a thrilling one. Mr. Bauer was one of the soldiers in the 97th regiment who crawled through the port holes from which the Confederates were firing their cannon, and in a hand to hand battle inside the fort captured the place at a heavy sacrifice of life. He was a man of strong physique. For many years he lived near Bunker Hill and was engaged in farming. When he retired he moved to Alton and had lived here ever since. Mr. Bauer leaves his wife, five children and three stepchildren. The children and Reiner Bauer of Nokomis, Herman Bauer of Moweaqua, William Bauer of Artesia, Calif., Mrs. H. E. Engleman of Conway Springs, Kan., Mrs. M. J. Broers of Gillespie. The step children are Mrs. Osterkamp of Gillespie, Mrs. Madison Busby of Reno and Fred Miller of Nokomis. The funeral services will be held Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the home, conducted by Rev. O. W. Heggemeier, and entombment will be in the Grandview mausoleum.

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BAUMAN, GENEVIEVE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1904

Mrs. Genevieve Bauman, aged 76, died Thursday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock from senile debility, at her home, Fourteenth and Alby streets. She was a native of Germany, but had lived in Alton many years. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 8:30 o'clock from the family home. [Burial was in St. Joseph's Cemetery]

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BAUMAN, JOHN H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 13, 1918               Retired Business Man Dies From Pneumonia

John H. Bauman, retired business man, died Tuesday afternoon at his residence, 714 Euclid place, from pneumonia, after an illness of about 10 days. Members of the family said that he did not have influenza, but that it was a case of pneumonia and that there was no special alarm over his condition until the last few days when his illness developed into a very dangerous stage. John H. Bauman was born in Alton and lived here all of his life. He was 65 years of age. For 28 years he was engaged in the grocery business in Alton, at Fourth and Belle streets. Prior to that he had been engaged in retailing bakery goods. One year ago he decided to retire from business and disposed of his stock of goods, but his successor was unable to hold on to the trade which Mr. Bauman had, and closed the store soon afterward. Mr. Bauman had, during his entire business career, enjoyed the complete confidence of everyone who transacted business with him. For years he had a high grade stock of goods, and he had a class of trade that was one that any grocer might value very highly. He was a very quiet unostentatious man, but he possessed many sincere friends who are grieved over his death. His wife had been in bad health for a number of years, and he had devoted much of his time to ministering to her. Her recovery from her illness was one of the greatest sources of satisfaction he had. Some time ago, determining that when there was so much need for men to help win the war, Mr. Bauman came out of retirement and took a job at the glass works. He lived long enough to know that victory had come to the cause of his country's flag, which he had so much at heart. Besides his wife he leaves one daughter, Mrs. R. H. Roadhouse, and one grandson. The funeral will be held from the family home, Thursday afternoon, at 2 o'clock, and will be private. Sevices will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Gibson, pastor of the First Presbyterian church in which Mr. Bauman had held membership for many years.

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BAUMAN, TEDEA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 18, 1907        Original Member of German Evangelical Church of Alton Dies

Mrs. Tedea Bauman, widow of Martin Bauman, died Sunday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Rupprecht, on Alby street in the north side. While she was failing in health for two weeks, her death was not expected so soon. Her illness was due to old age. All day Sunday she was up and around the home and went to bed about 7 o'clock. She died at 8:15 p.m.  Mrs. Bauman had been a resident in Alton and vicinity sixty years. She was born in Germany and came to Alton when a young woman. She was 82 years and 6 months of age at the time of her death. When the German Evangelical church in Alton was founded, she became a member, and she was one of the few survivors of the original members. She always maintained her connection with that church and was a devoted member, interested in all its work until advancing age made it necessary to absent herself from church services. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon. Services at the home will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller at 2 o'clock, and at the church about 3 o'clock. Burial will be in City cemetery. Mrs. Bauman leaves two children, Mrs. Fred Rupprecht, with whom she made her home, and J. H. Bauman, a well-known Alton business man. Throughout her life she was a faithful wife and mother and a good neighbor to all who were thrown in contact with her.

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BAUSCH, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 2, 1915

Henry Bausch died Tuesday night at his home in Godfrey township in his ninetieth year. He had lived for many years northeast of Godfrey in Godfrey township, and was a highly respected citizen. In 1855, at the age of 29, he emigrated from Germany a poor man, but by thrift and hard work he became a prosperous farmer in this country. Mr. Bausch was known for his integrity. He had a striking personality and was known by all as an ideal Christian man. He was a charter member and Elder of the Salem Presbyterian church, Godfrey. His gentle disposition made for him a host of friends. He will be missed by his neighbors for he exercised a strong influence in the community. Mr. Bausch was married in 1855 to Miss Sussana Scheidt. To this union eight children were born, five died in infancy, three remain: Mrs. Fred Koch, Annie and Henry Bausch Jr. The funeral services will be held Friday, June the 4th at 2 p.m. at the Bethany church, leaving the home at 1 o'clock. Interment at Bethany cemetery.

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BAUSMAN, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 31, 1921              Three Die Enroute to Hospital

While enroute to St. Elizabeth's Hospital to attend her daughter, who was to undergo an operation for appendicitis, Mrs. Mary Keaton, 28, wife of Martin Keaton, 2214 Bryan Avenue, Granite City, with Mrs. Mary Craig, 45, wife of Clement Craig, 2223 Missouri Avenue, Granite City, was instantly killed when the Craig automobile was struck by the Wabash fast passenger train at Granite City at 7 o'clock today. William Bausman, a son of Mrs. Craig by a former marriage, who was injured, died an hour later in St. Elizabeth's Hospital. Mrs. Keaton's daughter was on the operating table and the anesthetic was about to be administered, when her mother was killed. The operation was postponed. The daughter has not been told of her mother's tragic death. The bodies of the three dead have been taken in charge by Coroner Edward Mercer, who will conduct an inquest. The automobile was driven by Mrs. Craig. Information at the office of the coroner was that the automobile was going at a moderate rate of speed. Just as it reached the tracks, it was said, Mrs. Craig saw the speeding train and made an effort to throw the engine into reverse. This action failed to get the machine off the track and the speeding train crashed into it. The two women were instantly killed. The boy was rushed to the hospital, and every effort made to save his life, but failed. Clement Craig, husband of the woman driving the automobile, is mess sergeant at Jefferson Barracks. Keaton is a craneman at the Commonwealth Steel Co. At almost the same instant that the fatal accident at Granite City occurred, a Wabash train crashed into the rear end of a Chicago and Alton passenger train at Madison. The last coach of the Alton train was thrown from the tracks when the rails spread, and demolished. No one was in the rear car when the Wabash train crashed into it. Presence in the car would probably have meant certain death.

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BAYLESS, MALINDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 10, 1917               Grieved to Death Over Grandson Going Off to War

Grieving because her grandson, Ed Bayless, had gone away to France with the 12th Engineering Corps, Mrs. Malinda Bayless died this morning. She refused to be comforted since her grandson had left her. A number of years ago the father of the soldier boy, another Ed Bayless, had been killed in a coal mine accident at Staunton. He was the only son of the mother. There was one consolation for the mother. Her son had left a counterpart of himself, even in name, who could take the place of his father in her heart. Then the war came along. Mrs. Bayless was not pro-German. She was merely a very human sort of a person. She had lost one son, now she was to lose her grandson who had stepped into the dead son's place. It was no joy to her to see him step off in manly fashion wearing his uniform. The grandmother would not be comforted. She was quite certain she would never see him again, and she was right. She grew weaker day by day, in the two months since her grandson left the home. Mrs. Melinda Herndon Bayless was born in 1833 in Kentucky. She came to Illinois at the age of 2 years. She was a young woman when she united with the Christian Church. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Laura Spencer of Bethalto, and Mrs. Julia Nolan of Pittsburg, Pa., also 13 grandchildren and nineteen great-grandchildren. The funeral will be from the Spencer home Friday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at Bethalto.

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BEALE, ELIZABETH "AUNT BETTY"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 7, 1915

Elizabeth Beale, wife of Martin Beale, aged 75, died at her home on Highland avenue this afternoon from pneumonia, after a week's illness. She was a native of Staunton, Va. Her husband is one of Alton's oldest colored residents. The deceased was known as "Aunt Betty" Beale.

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BEALL, CHARLES B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 13, 1903      Senior Member of Beall Brothers Manufacturing Dies

Charles Beall, senior member of the firm known as Beall Brothers, manufacturers of coal miners tools and shovels, died Saturday night, April 11th, at 8:30 o'clock, after an illness of nearly two years from cancer of the liver. Had Mr. Beall lived until July 13 next, he would have been sixty years of age. He was born in Alton [b. 1843, son of John W. and Mary J. Hodges]. His father died when he was a lad eight years old. He learned the trade of machinist at which he was most skillful. During the War of the Rebellion, he was engineer of a gunboat, Ozark, on the Mississippi, with rank of Lieutenant. After his return from the service, he worked at his trade for a number of years. Later he formed a partnership with George D. Hayden, conducting a machine shop on West Second street. In 1882, in connection with his brother, Edmond, they formed the well-known firm of Beall Brothers, to manufacture coal miners tools on Belle street. They started with one trip hammer and only the two brothers. They were successful from the start. Their energy and determination have made the establishment one of the greatest manufacturing plants in southern Illinois. Mr. Beall was a kindly husband and father - his home and family were the chief attractions to him in life, and there he could be found when the business of the day was over. His loss to his family comes with a heavy blow, as it is the first break in a large family. His loss to the business interests will be deeply felt, and to intimate friends he was a kindly and considerate friend, unobtrusive but true as steel. In 1866 he married Miss Anna M. Whitehead, daughter of the late James Whitehead. His wife and eight children survive him, namely, J. W. Beall, Mrs. Horace Dixon, Charles L. Beall, and Misses Margaret, Edith, Effie and Elizabeth Beall, all of Alton, and Mrs. P. B. Gates of Colorado. The funeral will take place tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock from the family home on Henry Street.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 14, 1903

The funeral of Charles Beall took place Tuesday at 10 a.m.  Notwithstanding the storm of wind and rain, the residence of the family on Henry street was filled by friends of the deceased.  Rev. D. E. Bushnell, D. D., pastor of the C. P. church, conducted the services, assisted by Rev. H. K. Sanborne of the Presbyterian church. Dr. Bushnell read the Scriptures and delivered a comforting and most helpful address. Rev. Mr. Sanborne offered prayer and a quartette sang very touchingly, "In the Sweet By and By."  A profusion of rare and beautiful flowers, the gift of relatives and friends, filled the parlor and the house with their sweet fragrance. At the close of the services, a long cortege followed the hearse to the City Cemetery, where final exercises were said, and all that was mortal of Charles Beall, the good husband, father, neighbor and friend, was laid to rest to awake at the call of the Redeemer in renewed and eternal youth. The employees of the Beall Bros. Mining Tool factory and the Shovel factory turned out in a body, and marched to the residence and then to the cemetery, notwithstanding the storm prevailing during the morning. They also presented several floral pieces of rare beauty and design. The pallbearers were George D. Hayden, H. M. Schweppe, S. H. Malcom, William Ellis Smith, Robert McKissock, and T. H. Perrin.

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BEALL, EDMOND/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1920        Alton Businessman, Mayor, and State Senator Dies on Vacation in the West

Edmond Beall, former mayor and state senator, died this morning at Los Angeles, Calif., from a malady that attacked him early this week. Erysipelas with complications was the cause of his death. Mr. Beall had gone to Los Angeles with his wife to enjoy the winter. He was in good health when he left, and was having the time of his life, as his letters to the Telegraph and to friends indicated. There was no thought, until early this week, but what he would come back home in the springtime without having anything but the best of health while he was gone. Though some of his friends said that they had noticed he was failing somewhat in his energy, in the last few years, there were few men who had more life and vigor in them than he, and none who could enjoy a good time better, nor make others around him have so good a time. The news of his sickness given out yesterday, coupled with the word of his death that came this morning, was received with genuine sorrow all over the city. It was known Thursday night that his condition was most serious, but the later message that was received Friday morning was more reassuring. His son, Wesley Beall, had gone to California to join his parents there and arrived just about the time Mr. Beall was taken sick. He will accompany Mrs. Beall and the body of Senator Beall back to Alton. The story of the life of Edmond Beall is interwoven intimately with the history of the greater development of the city of Alton. He was born in Alton, and lived here all his life. His whole interest was centered in Alton, and his love and support for his native city never wavered. Denied in childhood the advantages of much of an education he made a wonderful success in life, and he helped more than perhaps anyone else in the upbuilding of the city, in making it physically better and finally in improving its moral conditions. Fourteen years he served his city as alderman in the city council; eight years he served as mayor; four years he served his senatorial district as state senator. But to speak of his service in official life and stop there would be leaving out some of the most important service he rendered to the community. As a citizen he was an invaluable asset for Alton. He believed in his home city, he invested every dollar of his fortune in Alton in tangible assets, and he contributed greatly as a business man and as an investor to Alton's prosperity. He contributed further by his contagious optimism about Alton. He spurred others on to greater efforts and he would always take the lead when he was asked. Many an organization in the city owed its prosperity to the guiding influence of Beall. The motto of his life was "______ now."  He loved to declare that nothing was considered impossible to be done, that was what he sought to do. This statement he often made in referring to his efforts to give a cleanup for Alton, and those who know how effective his cleanup campaign was in Alton and what obstacles he contended with, appreciated the victory he had won. Edmond Beall was born in Alton, September 27th, 1848, and was a grandson of one of the pioneers of the city. Belle street was originally Beall street, and was named for his grandfather, also Senator Beall's namesake. When Edmond Beall was seven years of age, his own father died, and it was only a few years after that that the young son was obliged to go to work. From that time his life was one of the greatest activity. He was a human dynamo for energy. He made quick decisions and acted on them. When he was a boy of twelve he entered the employ of the Alton Telegraph as office boy. Hard work had no terrors for him. He became an expert pressman and his knowledge of that craft never deserted him. He was a competent critic of press work. He engaged in the job printing business, which had been a part of the Telegraph office, purchasing it from the owners of the newspaper. A partner who was not too discriminating about mine and thine put the Beall finances on the rocks. He quit the printing business and went to work with his brother, Charley, who was operating a little blacksmith shop where mining tools were being hammered out by hand. That was the beginning of a great mining tool industry that was built up in Alton. The business grew and made good profits. The one time poor boy began to invest his earnings in Alton real estate. He had made it a rule of his life to save something no matter how little he made. He bought and built house after house in the city until he was possessed of more good houses than any other single real estate owner in the city. He always declared that he would never invest in any business he could not control, and for that reason put what money he had aside from his investment in business, in real estate in Alton. He never speculated, never lost any money in any wild ventures. As a boy of 15, he enlisted in the service of his country as a private. He claimed the honor of being one of the youngest soldiers in the Union army in the Civil War. In the year 1905, Mr. Beall, after many years of experience in city affairs, was induced to become a candidate for mayor of Alton. He served three successful terms of two years each, the only man in the history of the city who achieved that. During his term of office, he inaugurated a great improvement campaign. He paved approximately 20 miles of streets, built many sewers, and started Alton earnestly on the upgrade. It was the greatest period of public improvements the city had ever known. During his term of office he was prevailed on to become a candidate for state senator and was elected to that office. Though the shams of official life at Springfield irked him, he took a prominent part in legislative affairs and when invited to become a member of the Illinois Vice Commission to investigate vice conditions in the state, he accepted. He took a prominent part in that and later when a movie concern wanted to make a motion picture show out of the vice commission's report, Beall was one of the most prominent actors in the film production. It was the information he gained during the vice commission inquiry, showing cause and effect, that made Senator Beall resolve to quit the senate and get back home again and become a candidate for a fourth term as mayor. He declared he wanted to have the opportunity of giving Alton the cleanup she needed. He dared to come out on a platform in which he pledged absolute law enforcement. That was indeed a daring thing to do as Alton had always been dominated by organized vice, while the majority of people, opposed to vice, were unorganized. He was elected by a good majority and immediately began the cleanup in 1915. In the two years he was mayor he kept everlastingly on the job, despite discouragements, and at times apparent lethargy on the part of those whom he had expected to give him backing. He was so energetic in his leadership that, it is probably true, many thought he needed no support, but he craved it and often wearied of lack of interest of some whom he had confidently expected to help him. He completed his term in 1917. In the face of the fact that his physician warned him against continuing in the race for mayor against W. M. Sauvage, and the fact that Mr. Beall was about decided to withdraw, some of his friends persuaded him to remain in the fight. He continued the campaign and was defeated. He showed his good sportsmanship afterward by becoming a cordial supporter of his successful opponent. It was one of the characteristics of Mr. Beall that he could hold enmity against no man. He said that he would regard it as the finest epitaph that could be placed on his tombstone that he had no one whom he would go a step out of his way to do an ill turn. During his official career he demonstrated this by picking, at times men who had fought him to hold positions of importance under him. There are several striking instances of this attitude of mind of Mr. Beall. He wasted no time in hating anyone, and always argued that molasses was better fly bait than vinegar. One of the acts of Mr. Beall that attracted nationwide attention was his building of the Storks Nest flats in Alton, in which he encouraged people to live who had children. He loved children himself, and considered them a necessary part of every good home. He had in this view a cordial sympathizer of President Roosevelt, and the two were great friends. After his retirement from public office, and since he was out of business, Mr. Beall devoted his years to enjoying life. He bought a little farm to which he gave much attention and lavished on it much money. He was capable of enjoying life fully, and found the secret of being happy was never to let trifles worry him. He was the very essence of good cheer, was one of those plain, natural sort of persons who are all too scarce. His death is sincerely mourned by a whole city. Mr. Beall is survived by his wife to whom he had been married fifty years, and by two daughters, Mrs. L. Caywood and Mrs. Hattie Gill; and three sons, Wesley Beall, Edward H. Beall, and Roy Beall. One son, E. H. Beall, is in New Orleans and was summoned home by news of his father's death. The time of the funeral will be announced later.

 

Career of Edmond Beall At a Glance:

September 27, 1848 - Born at Alton, son of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Beall, pioneer residents of the city. The father of Senator Beall was born here in 1815. The grandfather of the late Senator moved to this city from Ohio in 1813, shortly after the city was founded.

1860 - Began work in office of Alton Telegraph as "printer's devil."

May 12, 1864 - Four months before sixteenth birthday enlisted in Company D, 133rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry, at the time youngest Union soldier from Illinois. Was mustered out of service at Camp Butler, near Springfield on September 24, 1865. Last service was assisting in decoration of old home of Abraham Lincoln.

1872 - Became engaged in manufacture of mining tools. Operation of plant begun on capital of $75. Industry has grown to be one of most important in district.

1905 - Elected mayor of Alton, and served three successive terms. Previous to this had been chosen alderman from the old fourth ward for 14 successive terms. Three terms as Mayor marked great progress in the city.

1910 - Elected State Senator, from 47th District.

1915 - Elected Mayor of Alton for fourth term.

1917 - Announced retirement from public life.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph February 2, 1920

The funeral of former Mayor Edmond Beall will be held next Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home on Twelfth street. The services will be conducted by Rev. Edward L. Gibson of the First Presbyterian Church, assisted by Rev. C. E. Combrink of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian Church. The funeral will be public. Burial will be in City Cemetery. It was given out today by Roy Beall and E. H. Beall that Mrs. Beall and son, Wesley, were leaving Los Angeles this morning with the body of the former mayor. They will arrive in Kansas City, Mo., Wednesday, and will be met there by Roy Beall and Mrs. Hattie Gill, and the party will, if proper connections can be made, arrive in Alton at 1:10 p.m. Thursday. Mrs. Beall has signified a desire that the funeral be held Saturday afternoon. She is reported to be standing up well under her affliction, though the loss of her devoted husband is a terrible blow to her. A letter that came to the Telegraph by Wesley Beall, which tells of the sickness of his father. Wesley Beall was not called there by sickness of anyone. He happened to decide to join his parents in Los Angeles and fortunately arrived just at the time his father was taken sick. The father had just gone to bed with an attack of erysipelas when Wesley arrived at the hotel. The letter concluded: "Father says he will come home just as soon as he is well enough." Word that came to the family in Alton indicated that Mr. Beall had gone for a trip into the mountains and that it had been too much for him. He had been suffering from shortness of breath at home, and when he went into the rarer atmosphere in the mountains, he suffered bad effects which caused him to collapse when he returned to the hotel. He was alone in his room and managed to get to a telephone and call for help. Immediately help was rendered him. That was the day that his son Wesley arrived in the evening. Members of the family see in the sudden decision of Wesley Beall to go to California almost an act of Providence. They reason that his presence there made it possible for Mrs. Beall to be much better taken care of than she would have been with none but strangers to comfort her in her affliction.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 7, 1920

The entire city of Alton took occasion this afternoon to honor the memory of their deceased ex-mayor and former state senator Edmond Beall. By reclamation of the mayor, all business was stopped for five minutes, bells were tolled, street cars stopped where they were, and practically the entire city mourned the loss of the best friend Alton ever had. There was a large attendance, not only of people from Alton, but many prominent men from out of the city were present, representative of the wide acquaintance of the former mayor had. The floral offering that were sent by friends were rich and numerous. It was perhaps the greatest display of flowers ever seen at a funeral in Alton, notwithstanding the fact that flowers were scarce and hard to get. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Edward L. Gibson of the First Presbyterian church, who was assisted by Rev. C. E. Comnbrink of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church. For years Mr. Beall had been a deeply interested member and regular attendant at the Bible class which Rev. Gibson conducts on Sunday mornings. In his eulogy of Mr. Beall, the officiating clergyman dwelt on the admirable characteristics of the deceased, his loyalty to his friends, his love for his town, and the work he did for his home city, both physically and morally. The clergyman and Mr. Beall had been intimate friends and the eulogy was filled with intimate knowledge that the speaker had of the deceased. The active pallbearers were: John McAdams, George Huskinson, William P_____, William P. Boynton, Dr. G. Taphorn, W. A. Tipton, Alex Cousley, F. F. Ferguson. The honorary pallbearers were: John McGinnes, George Allen, William Smith, Joseph W. Carey, George Levis, H. M. Schweppe, O. S. Stowell, G. H. Lane, Mayor W. M. Sauvage, Ex-Mayor J. C. Faulstich, C. B. Johnston, Ex-Mayor J. J. Brenholt.  By order of Mayor Sauvage, the City Hall was closed the entire afternoon out of respect for the deceased ex-mayor. Flags throughout the city generally were at half mast. One interesting mark of respect was at the Hippodrome, where at the appeared hour, there was a card displayed on the screen "In Memory of Edmond Beall" then for a space of five minutes the curtain was drawn on the stage after which the show was resumed.

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BEALL, UNKNOWN INFANT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 7, 1912

A son born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Beall June 5, died the day following and was buried yesterday.

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BEATTY, MARY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 6, 1911

Mrs. Mary J. Beatty died Monday evening at 8:40 o'clock at her home, 812 Langdon street, after an illness of four months from neuritis. Mrs. Beatty had been in a dying condition for weeks, and her vitality was the marvel of those who attended her. She had suffered intensely from the malady until a short time before her death, and her end came peacefully. She had lived in Alton about five one one half years. Mrs. Beatty's death occurred three days after the seventh anniversary of the death of her husband, F. J. Beatty. Soon after her husband died, Mrs. Beatty moved to Alton to live. She was born at Winchester, Ill., and was in her 66th year. She leaves five sons and two daughters, Robert I.; Perry R.; Harry G.; Joseph F.; Estel E. and Misses Alma and Mary Viola Beatty. She was a member of the Presbyterian church for many years. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the home, and services will be conducted by Rev. A. G. Lane, assisted by Rev. G. L. Clark. Burial will be at Jerseyville.

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BEAVERDALE, SADIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 27, 1906

Sadie, the 4 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Beaverdale, died at the family home at 811 East Third street, at 1 o'clock this afternoon. The funeral will take place from the home Sunday afternoon, and interment will be at Belletrees.

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BEAZLEY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 8, 1908

John Beazley, private night watchman in the business district, died Tuesday evening at his home on Belle street, aged 47 years. He was born in Lancaster, Ky., January 1, 1861. Beazley was familiarly known as "Dad" Beazley to everyone who knew him. He had been a private watchman for six years and had lived in Alton 12 years. He always took with him on his rounds his little dog, "Bob," who helped his master watch and who always was very efficient in attracting attention whenever anything of an unusual nature was going on. The dog once found a purse with $90 in it and carried it to his master. Beazley leaves his wife. He has no children. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home.

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BECHTOLD, LOUISA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 16, 1905

Mrs. Louisa Bechtold, wife of George N. Bechtold, died at the family residence on Park street in Upper Alton after a brief illness which culminated in the bursting of an abscess in her head, causing a rupture of a blood vessel. Mrs. Bechtold was ill only a few days. Her death occurred at 10:45 o'clock Saturday morning. She was a native of Germany and was 43 years of age. About twelve years ago she came to Alton with her family, and until recently conducted a milk dairy. Mrs. Bechtold leaves, besides her husband, four children, Mrs. Laura Boy of Carrolton, Mo., Mrs. Emma Burkhardt, John and Theodore Bechtold, all of Alton. The time of the funeral has not been decided.

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BECHTOLD, MATTHIAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 15, 1913        Death From Typhoid Fever

Matthias Bechtold, aged 26, died at Belletrees last night at 11 o'clock after an illness with typhoid fever. The death of Matthias is the first fatality in the family, although the fever has made a complete run through the six children of the parents. There were four sons and two daughters in the Bechtold family, and one after another they contracted the disease, and one after another they recovered - except the son, Matthias, who died. The cause of the epidemic in the family is not known. So far there has been no trace of the origin of the disease, but it is possible that all the others contracted it from the first member of the family who became ill. The funeral of Matthias Bechtold will be held Thursday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Michael's church at Belletrees.

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BECK, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 16, 1909

The funeral of Henry Beck - the last of his family - was held this afternoon from Klunk's undertaking rooms to the Cathedral, where services were held. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

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BECK, SOPHIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 2, 1904

Mrs. Sophie Beck of 706 East Second street died yesterday afternoon suddenly from heart disease, and was buried this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Cathedral.

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BECKEMEYER,  GOTTLEIB "GEORGE"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1903

George Beckemeyer, one of the oldest residents of Wood River township, died Monday morning after an illness from the debility of old age. Mr. Beckemeyer was born near Menich-Heffen, in Prussia, Germany, April 24, 1819. His wife, who is still living, was born less than four years before him. This remarkable couple celebrated their sixtieth wedding anniversary May 10 at the home of their daughter, Mrs. C. C. Paul, in Alton.  Mr. Beckemeyer came to America in 1840, and May 16, 1843 he was married at Cincinnati, Ohio to Caroline Wibbleman by Rev. William Nast, founder of the German Methodist church in America. They moved to the vicinity of Upper Alton in 1864, where they raised a family of children, five of whom are living. Since 1856, the death of Mr. Beckemeyer is the first break in the family. The surviving children are Mrs. C. C. Paul, Louis C. Beckemeyer, Miss Anna Beckemeyer, Mrs. A. N. Draper and Mrs. Henry Balster. Until a few months ago, Mr. Beckemeyer, assisted by his wife, continued to conduct a prosperous farm near Upper Alton, and declined to cease attending to the every day tasks incident to farm life. Their health was the best, their constitutions vigorous. The funeral will take place Thursday and the time will be announced later.

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BECKER, LEONARD F. (PVT.)/Source: Troy Call, January 1, 1900

Pvt. Leonard F. Becker, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Becker, is the first Marine township soldier boy to fall in action in France. The parents received a telegram last week from the War Department informing them of their son's death which occurred on Wednesday, October 9th. The last letter received from him was written on October 3rd and was received before the announcement of his death. Private Becker left here in September 1917 with the first contingent of soldier boys and received his first military training at Camp Taylor, Kentucky, being sent overseas last spring. He was 24 years of age and besides being survived by his parents, leaves two brothers, both of whom are in the army service.

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BECKWITH, MARTHA C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 22, 1919

Mrs. Martha C. Beckwith, 40 years of age, died this morning at 4 o'clock at her home, 1230 East Broadway, following a short illness. She leaves two sons, Russell and Elmer, one daughter, Susie, a brother, F. W. Wilcox of Helena, Ark., and a sister, Mrs. Julia Canham of Alton. Mrs. Beckwith was born in Alton and spent her whole life here. Funeral arrangements have not been completed, but burial will be private.

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BEDBURY, CLARA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1909

Mrs. Clara Bedbury, wife of John Bedbury, died in Chicago Saturday morning from pneumonia. She was 60 years of age. She leaves her husband and two daughters. The body will arrive in Alton tomorrow morning and will be taken to Milton cemetery for burial, which will take place at 10 o'clock. Mrs. Bedbury lived in Alton many years, and was connected with the Salvation Army.

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BEEBE, EVA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Wednesday, February 7, 1899
Fire caused the death of two young children this morning. Singularly enough the accidents happened in different parts of the city. About 9:30 o'clock a.m. flames were seen issuing from a shanty boat on the river front just below the Union depot. In the boat was a sick child, Eva, the four year old daughter of a family named Beebe. The mother had gone out to a neighbor's to get someone to go with her for a physician to attend the sick child, and when the fire was first noticed it was too late to rescue the little girl. The shanty boat was soon consumed, and the body of the victim was almost cremated. Her face, hands, and legs were burned completely away, and the body was unrecognizable. The child was lying on a low pallet, and the supposition is a spark of fire ignited the clothes and started the flames. The family came to Alton in their shanty boat on Christmas day from Peoria, and have been here since that time. The father has been working on the ice across the river, and did not learn of the accident until five or six hours after it occurred. William Rush, better known as "Curly," made a brave effort at rescue. He broke in the door, but met with a sheet of flames, and was compelled to run out. His whiskers were almost burned off in the attempt. Beebe and his wife have seen better circumstances. The husband has been sick and the first work he has had since coming to Alton was the last three days. Supervisor Elbie will send the couple to Peoria tonight, where they have relatives. Beebe could not bear to look at his child, and it was buried without him seeing it. Coroner Bailey held an inquest and the jury returned a verdict of accidental death from burning.
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BEECHY, ANTHONY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 1, 1905          Mysterious Explosion at Union Cap & Chemical Company Costs Life of Foreman

Anthony Beechy, aged 34, foreman of the fulminate department of the Union Cap and Chemical Co. at East Alton, was fatally injured in an explosion in the primer dry room yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock. He died at St. Joseph's hospital about four hours after the explosion. His face and hands were mutilated by the explosion, and he sustained internal injuries which caused his death. Beechy was conscious and able to talk up to his death, but could say nothing as to the cause of the explosion. He was alone in the primer dry room where the shell primers and detonators are dried after being treated to a coat of fulminate of mercury. The building, which was a small but very substantial one, was blown off the face of the earth. The report from the explosion was a terrific one, as there was between seven million and ten million primers in the building when the accident occurred. Beechy succeeded Harry Mills in the fulminate department after Mills was blown up a year ago. He came from Peninsula, Ohio, and his wife and three children live in East Alton. Coroner Streeper was notified of Beechy's death and impaneled a jury today to hold an inquest. The body will be sent to Peninsula, Ohio for burial tonight. Owing to the dangerous nature of the occupation of Beechy, he worked alone, and no one was with him when the accident occurred. His duties required the utmost care, and every precaution was taken to guard against such a casualty as occurred Tuesday afternoon. Such explosions will occur from time to time, but the Union Cap and Chemical Co., owing to their extreme caution, has been remarkably free from them. Immediately after the accident Beechy was moved to Alton by F. W. Olin, and was attended at the hospital by Dr. Pence. Nothing could be done for him, as it was seen at once that he had been fatally hurt. His only words were expressions of wonder at how the accident occurred.

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BEEM, MATILDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 24, 1912

Miss Matilda Beem, a member of an old time and well known Alton family, died at her residence, 1608 Maple avenue, this morning from hardening of the arteries. Miss Beem had been in reasonably good health until last Saturday, when she was found lying in the yard in an unconscious condition. She failed to regain consciousness and passed away this morning about 9 o'clock. Miss Beem had lived in Alton near all of her life. Her family were prominent in Alton and Miss Beem herself had a wide circle of acquaintances in the city. She devoted her time for many years to dressmaking, and was known as a skillful worker. She lived with her sister, Miss Annie Beem, who for many years taught school in Alton. Miss Beem is survived by three sisters, Misses Annie and Lizzie Beem; and Mrs. Kate Challacombe, all of Alton; and two brothers, John T. Beem, editor of the Duquoin, Ill., Tribune; and A. A. Beem of Ft. Jones, Calif. Miss Beem had been feeble all winter, but her condition was not regarded as serious. She was born in Pittsburg, Pa., in October 1836. She came to Alton with her parents when a child, and lived here ever since. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and services will be private. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

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BEEM, NICHOLAS J./Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, July 25, 1878

The remains of Mr. Nicholas J. Beem arrived in town Thursday A.M., from Chicago, in charge of his brother, Gen. Martin Beem. The funeral took place at 10 o'clock at the family residence, and was attended by a large number of friends and acquaintances. The services were conducted by Rev. T. G. Field, pastor of the Baptist church. After prayer and reading of Scriptures, the Reverend gentleman, in the course of his remarks, paid a merited tribute to the character of the deceased, especially as regards his devotion to his relatives and friends, and his unselfish preference for the good of others rather than his own. The discourse throughout was tender and appropriate, and feelingly commented on the sad bereavement the stricken family had been called upon to endure in the loss of the son and brother whose aid and counsel had long been their stay and comfort. At the close of the service the procession moved to the cemetery where the mortal remains of the departed were laid to rest by the side of his mother in the family burial place, which he had done so much to beautify and decorate. The bearers on the occasion were Messrs. W. D. Hodge, Fred Detrich, Edgar A. Auten, Frank Cotter, O. B. Stelie and Charles Russell.

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BEINEKE, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1914

Mrs. Mary Beineke, aged 64, widow of Conrad Beineke, died this afternoon at 3 o'clock at her home, 806 Union street, after a long illness. Mrs. Beineke conducted a little store on Union street for many years and was well known as a business woman, and highly esteemed by all who knew her. She leaves three sons and two daughters, Gus of Kansas City; Alfred of Greenburg, Pa.; Mrs. Guy Gum of Alton; and Mrs. Kate Collins of St. Louis. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

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BEISER, EDWARD L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 14, 1907

Edward L. Beiser, in his thirtieth year, manager and vice-president of the Vanpreter Mercantile company, one of the biggest business houses in Alton, died suddenly Sunday morning at his home, 728 east Fifth street, after a brief attack of heart disease. Mrs. Beiser was awakened about 4:45 a.m. by the sound of her husband's heavy breathing and being unable to arouse him, she hurriedly summoned Dr. G. Taphorn, who arrived just before the young man died. Dr. Taphorn said that about a week ago Mr. Beiser had visited his office and asked for treatment and on making an examination he found that he had heart trouble. He gave him treatment, and Mr. Beiser had seemingly recovered, as he did not return. He was seemingly in the best of health on Saturday night when he finished his day's work, and went home about 10 o'clock. Mr. and Mrs. Beiser were planning to have their four months old child baptized Sunday morning at the First Presbyterian church, and the last thing the father did was to lay out his clothing in preparation for attending the church Sunday morning to stand up with his wife and child at the baptism. He was married only a few years ago to Miss Myrtle Burkey, and the married life of the young couple had been most happy. He was a member of a prominent east end family of which four brothers and two sisters survive, Henry, William, Frank and Joseph Beiser, Mrs. C. A. Vanpreter, and Mrs. Charles Elerht. Since taking the position of manager of the Vanpreter store on Third street, he manifested a business ability which made the store very prosperous, and has also had made many friends throughout the city. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home on east Fifth street. Friends of Mr. Beiser may view the body this evening at the family home from 6 to 10 o'clock.

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BEISER, ROSINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1905

Mrs. Rosina Beiser, widow of Laudolin Beiser, after a year's suffering from liver trouble, passed away peacefully Friday evening at 7:50 o'clock at her home, 728 east Fifth street, surrounded by all the members of her family. She had been bedfast for three months and suffered excruciatingly at times, but bore it all with resignation and fortitude and uncomplainingly. She was the mother of thirteen children, six of whom preceded her to the other side. The survivors are Mrs. Charles Elerht, Mrs. Charles A. Vanpreter, Contractors Henry, Will and Joseph Beiser, and Messrs. Ed and Frank Beiser of the Vanpreter Mercantile Company. She is survived also by seventeen grandchildren, all of Alton, and a sister in St. Louis. She was born July 19, 1835 in Baden, Germany, but came to America when quite young, and to Alton more than fifty years ago. She was a kindly, helpful woman, a devoted mother, and sympathetic neighbor, and her death is deplored by all who knew her. The funeral will be Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church, where a Requiem Mass will be said by Rev. D. J. Ryan of Auburn Ill.  Burial will be in City Cemetery.

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BELK, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 6, 1910

A telegram was received this morning conveying the news of the sudden death of Charles Belk at Hoxie, Ark.  He was 79 years of age, and for fifty years farmed near Liberty Prairie. In recent years he had lived in Alton with his two daughters, Mrs. Frank Schaefer and Mrs. Wilbur Montgomery. Mr. and Mrs. Belk have been visiting their sons, Harry C. and Joseph Belk at Hoxie, when he died. The first telegram did not state the cause of death nor anything of the funeral arrangements. Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery left for Hoxie, Ark., Tuesday evening, where they intended visiting, and their arrival there will be a sad termination of what they planned would be a happy visit. Mr. Belk had been a prosperous farmer, and when he became too old to engage in farming actively he moved to Alton to be near his children. He was a highly esteemed man, and in the neighborhood where he lived he had a very large number of friends.

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BELK, ELIZA MONTGOMERY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 8, 1910

Mrs. Eliza Montgomery Belk, wife of T. W. L. Belk of Upper Alton, died Friday morning at 2:30 o'clock at the family residence on Washington avenue, after a long illness. She was just past 70 years of age, being born March 31, 1840, and she had lived all her life in Wood River township. She was born on a farm two miles south of Bethalto. Mrs. Belk was the youngest of a family of twelve children, and there is but one left, Mrs. M. A. Loveland, of Denver, Colo.  Mrs. Belk's father, William Montgomery, was at one time one of the largest landowners in this part of the country, and fifty years ago a sale of his land was held in Alton at which $100,000 was received. This was for only part of his land, and the ____ of land per acre was low. To each of his children Mr. Montgomery gave a big farm, and Mrs. Belk received one of them. She was married fifty years ago last August to T. W. L. Belk. She leaves beside her husband, six children, Mrs. Mary Worden of Upper Alton, Mrs. Lillian Sloper of Boise City, Idaho, Lee Belk of Bethalto, Mrs. Alice Hart of Memphis, Tenn., Ed Belk of Upper Alton, and Dr. C. A. Belk of Deer Lodge, Montana. All but Mrs. Sloper are here. Mrs. Belk sustained a paralytic stroke about fourteen years ago, and she was a cripple from that time until her death. Last February she had a second paralytic stroke and she never rallied from it. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the family home, and burial will be in the old Montgomery cemetery.  Rev. W. H. Bradley and Rev. M. B. Baker will have charge of the services.

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BELK, IDA MAE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 20, 1921

Mrs. Ida Mae Belk, wife of Lee Belk, retired Madison county farmer, dropped dead in the yard of their home at 2125 College Avenue at 8 o'clock today. Mrs. Belk was 48 years old. Mrs. Belk, with her husband, was working about the yard of their home. Both Belk and his wife were cutting grass, using sickles. Mr. Belk was about 15 feet from his wife when he heard her groan. He looked and saw her sitting on the ground. Suddenly she fell over. He immediately ran to her and found her unconscious. He called to neighbors, and while efforts were being made to revive her, a doctor was sent for. When he arrived, he pronounced her dead. Mrs. Belk, it was said, had been in good health. Her death, the physician said, was due to heart trouble. Deputy Coroner, C. N. Streeper took charge of the body and will conduct an inquest tomorrow. Mr. Belk formerly conducted the Montgomery farm, east of Upper Alton. For some time, however, he has resided in Upper Alton, following his retirement as a farmer. Funeral services will be conducted at the home on College Avenue at 3 p.m. Sunday, by the Rev. Theodore Cates, pastor of the Upper Alton Methodist church. Interment will be in the Montgomery cemetery. Mrs. Belk is survived by her husband. She was born in Brownsville, Tenn., and was married to Mr. Belk in St. louis, 26 years ago. They made their home on the Montgomery farm until 11 years ago, when they moved to Upper Alton.

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BELL, ALBERT "PAT"/Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, March 25, 1897

As was mentioned in the Telegraph Monday evening, Albert Bell, youngest son of Mr. James Bell, the liveryman, died Monday in a hospital at Terre Haute, Indiana. The young man left home unexpectedly last Thursday, in company with a young friend, and took with him a small amount of money that he had been saving. At Terre Haute, the money that the two boys had, had been spent and they slept in an exposed place. Not being accustomed to exposure, Albert Bell was taken very ill and was found in an almost unconscious condition by the police. In the meantime, his friend left for home and on his arrival here said nothing of the illness of Bell. The first information received was by telegram yesterday to Chief of Police Kuhn, stating that a young man had been found at that place very ill, and that just before becoming unconscious, after he was found, he had said that his name was Pat Bell of Alton, Ill. At first Chief of Police Kuhn could not think of anyone in town by that name but it was suggested that a son of Mr. James Bell had been nicknamed "Pat" and that he was the young man at Terre Haute. A telegram was sent at once by the father and about four o'clock a message was received stating that Pat Bell had just died. The unfortunate young man was only 20 years of age, and had managed his father's livery business for some time.

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BELL, ANDREW MARTIN VAN BUREN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1902        Old Cobbler Dies on His Work Bench

Andrew Martin Van Buren Bell, an old colored shoe maker and cobbler, was found dead on his work bench in his little shop at 1006 Common street, at noon Friday. Bell was a well known character in the neighborhood where he had lived a number of years. He had lived alone working at his trade of cobbling, which served with a small pension to keep him comfortably. The last few days he had been complaining of being ill, but the people who visited his shop to have work done thought nothing of his complaints and paid no attention to him. Friday afternoon, when a neighbor visited the shop, he found the door locked. Officer Parker and B. C. Few broke open the door to the house when informed that the door had not been open all morning. Bell was found lying over his work bench, cold in death, where he laid down to sleep on Thursday night. Deputy Coroner Streeper was notified of Bell's death and will hold an inquest this evening.

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BELL, BERNICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1913         Child Dies From Effect of Burns

Bernice, the 20 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Bell of 1306 Belle street, died this morning at the family home from the effects of being scalded last Monday at the family home. The child fell into a pan of hot water. The water was not believed to have been hot enough to cause fatal results, and in fact the slight burns on the child had healed over, and the child was apparently physically well. However, a spasm that affected the child last Tuesday showed indications of bad consequences from the scalding, and death resulted this morning. The attending surgeon said that the scalding had affected the nerves and the spine. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and the services will be conducted by Rev. Fr. Driscoll, of Jerseyville, a brother of the child's mother.

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BELL, DELLA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 27, 1914           Negro Woman, Old Slave, Died in Alton

Mrs. Della Bell, an aged negress who lives near Brighton and gets a pension as a soldier's widow, was picked up by the police from where she had fallen on the west side of the city hall Sunday night and taken to the police station. Dr. D. F. Duggan, who was first called, decided that there was nothing serious the matter with her. The police learned that she had been in the habit of coming to Alton and spending her paycheck for drink, and it was thought that she was suffering from the effects of alcohol. Dr. W. W. Halliburton ordered the auto patrol to take her to the hospital. He reported afterwards that she was not in danger, and would recover. She had one shoe off at the time she was found. Mrs. Bell died at St. Joseph's Hospital at noon today. Dr. Halliburton said her death was due to arterial sclerosis. She was born in Missouri, but came to Alton with the family of Col. William E. Moberly, and even though she was no longer a slave, she continued to live with the family as long as they stayed in Alton. She married after Col. Moberly went away, and she went to live at Brighton. She was one of the old-fashioned type of negro house servants of before the war. Dr. Halliburton said today that it would be necessary for the county to assume responsibility for her burial. It is said by people who knew her that she would come to Alton frequently to revisit the old home where she lived with the Moberly family, and it was on the last of these trips that she had her final collapse.

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BELL, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 19, 1913

The funeral of James Bell was held at 4 o'clock this afternoon from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Nick Seibold, 321 Langdon street. Services at the home were conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenny of the Cherry Street Baptist Church. Burial was in City Cemetery. Many old friends of Mr. Bell attended the funeral services.

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BELL, LEONARD P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 11, 1918          Lived 91 Years in Alton - Father Owned Meat Market in Upper Alton

Ninety-two years of age, and a resident of Alton almost all of that time, Leonard P. Bell died at the home of his son, George W. Bell, in McClure's addition, Wednesday afternoon, from old age. Mr. Bell had been in failing health for about three months. Until a short time before his death his memory was good and his faculties well preserved. The aged man was born within what is now the city of Alton, and he lived in Alton and near vicinity all of his life. Most of the time he was in Alton. The family of Mr. Bell were real old settlers. They might be entitled to call themselves the old originals. His father was born at what is Lockhaven, which was considerably more than 100 years ago. The father came to Alton to live when Alton was not even founded. It was in the days when Upper Alton was the real part of the city, and later lower town became a suburb of Upper Alton, Milton was a thriving village then. The death of Mr. Bell occurred not far from where he was born. The body will be taken to McClusky Saturday morning where funeral services will be held and burial will take place. The burial will be at McClusky because one son lives there.  (later ... Burial was in East Newbern Cemetery.)

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BELL, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1917

Mrs. Margaret Bell, wife of William W. Bell of 1306 Belle street, died Saturday evening at her home after a long illness with cancerous troubles. During her illness Mrs. Bell had gone through much in order to obtain relief, but to no avail. Mrs. Bell is survived by her husband and a large family of children. Mrs. Bell's eight children are: Clarence Bristow of Fowler, Kan.; William, John, Helen, Margaret, Katherine, Frank and Cecelia. She was just five days past her forty-third birthday. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery.

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BELLENGER, JAMES P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 9, 1911       Convicted of Manslaughter of Two, Man Dies in Chester Prison

"Col." James H. Bellenger died in the penitentiary at Chester Wednesday night. Bellenger was serving an indeterminate sentence for killing Hattie Watson, and still hanging over him was an indictment for the murder of Joseph Reilly in Alton at the same time. The killing happened September 1899 in Alton. Bellenger was jealous of the attention showed the Watson woman by Reilly, and one night he killed both of them. He was indicted for murder, and Col. Brenholt, who defended him, says he had the hardest fight of his life to save him from hanging and get him a penal sentence. Bellenger's hair whitened and he became physically broken in prison. Recently his mind failed and he was an inmate of the prison hospital all the time. He has no relatives who will do anything for him, so far as known. Col. Brenholt said today that at the trial of Bellenger all his family forsook him and refused to contribute toward a fund for his defense. He is believed to have a son living at Gadsen, Ala., and Col. Brenholt wired Warden Smith of the penitentiary to send word there. Until word is received from the son, if he is found, the body will be held. No attempt was ever made to get Bellenger out on parole, as the old charge of killing Joseph Reilly was still hanging over him. Bellenger conducted a time payment house in Alton up to the time of the double killing. Bellenger had been prominent in politics in Alton.

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BENBOW, AMOS EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1922         Formerly Dominant Force in Democratic Party - Founder of Benbow City

Amos Edward Benbow, for years one of Madison county's most familiar figures, died yesterday at 5 p.m. following an illness of three years, at the home of Mrs. Helen B. Messenger, 1406 Washington avenue, where he had made his home. He was 72 years old. Against the malady with which he was stricken three years ago, Mr. Benbow fought one of his typical battles, the kind that had made him a power in politics and business for many years. More than a year ago, he became critically ill, but by his indomitable will survived the crisis. A few weeks ago, however, he suffered a relapse which, it was thought, would hasten the end, and his niece, Mrs. Abie C. Flack, was called from West Carrollton, Ohio, to attend him. The death of Mr. Benbow removes from Madison county one of its familiar characters after a career noted for its picturesqueness. In his youth he displayed that will and ability which later made him a power in the Democratic party in the county and state, and a dominant factor in business. In the old days, when county tickets were nominated at party conventions, Mr. Benbow, or "Judge," as he was known to his intimates, was one of the most prominent members of the Democratic party. He knew politics thoroughly and had the faculty of gathering around him men who would follow his leadership. A large man, towering more than six feet and weighing more than 200 pounds, he was truly a dominant figure. In politics he was an opponent worthy of any man's steel, and those who engaged him in the battle of politics knew, when the fight was over, that they had competed with an adversary who fought so long as there was the slightest chance to win, and fought with every ounce of his energy. It was an unusual trait of the character of Judge Benbow that he rarely carried his political enmities outside the party. Some of his warmest friends were men of opposite political belief, or men he had opposed vigorously in his own party. A son of Richard M. Benbow, he was born in Wood River township on February 20, 1850. He was of distinguished ancestry, a collateral descendant of Admiral John Benbow, many years ago a famous officer of the English navy. Mr. Benbow's paternal grandfather was a life-long resident of England and owned an estate in Riffle Worchester, where he conducted the Stafford Bridge Inn. Richard was one of three sons who was being educated by his father for the Episcopal ministry. When started out on his journey for preparatory school, Richard Benbow gave up his intended career and boarded a steamer for America. After working in St. Louis, he settled at Fort Clark on the Illinois River, but later purchased a tract of land near the mouth of Wood River in Madison county. Edward Benbow attended the public schools of his native district, and then attended Shurtleff College for three years. Upon leaving college, he taught school for six years, his first position being at the Hull school. After that he engaged in the real estate business. In 1908 he platted Benbow City of which he was elected mayor. As head of that town, he made his famous fight against the encroachment of Wood River, insisting the place was Benbow City, not Wood River. Several years later he disposed of some of his land to the Standard Oil Co., and Benbow City ceased to exist. Mr. Benbow served two terms as mayor of Upper Alton. Other public offices held included constable, justice of the peace, assessor, collector and deputy sheriff. He represented his district in the Forty-fourth Illinois General Assembly. During President Cleveland's first administration, he was Deputy United States Marshal, for the Southern Illinois district, which included 69 counties. Mr. Benbow was a deep student of history, and was well informed on politics and government. He was a loyal Democrat and a great admirer of former President Wilson. One of his chief regrets was that he has been unable to vote regularly during the past two years. Mr. Benbow had been confined to his room for more than two years. Much of this time he was able to sit up and he read extensively, retaining his knowledge of local and national events. He discussed current topics with his visitors and showed the same vigor in his denunciation of things that displeased him and praise of those he liked. He always spoke of what he termed the certain triumph of the principles of Woodrow Wilson. He followed world events with the same close attention and was interested in the result of negotiations regarding German reparations. Mr. Benbow was a member of the Odd Fellows for 50 years, and several months ago was awarded the Veterans' Jewel by the Upper Alton lodge. The jewel was one of his most cherished possessions. Funeral services at the home of Mrs. Messenger at 2:30 tomorrow will be in charge of the Odd Fellows. Services will be conducted at the Upper Alton Presbyterian church at 3:00, and interment will be in Oakwood cemetery in the Odd Fellows' lot.

 

As president of the Upper Alton village board, Mr. Benbow is specially remembered for a proposition to give Upper Alton a water works system of which he was the originator. That was about thirty years ago when Upper Alton had no water, light, nor any other conveniences afforded now by public utilities. According to the proposition, Upper Alton was to issue bonds for $50,000 and a complete water works system was to be installed in the town. In those days $50,000 was a big sum, and it looked so big that it staggered the Upper Alton people. The proposition was known at that time as the "Benbow Water Works Scheme," and it was one of the most important questions that had ever been submitted to the people of Upper Alton up to that time. Many prominent people investigated the plan of Benbow, and after studying it from many angles, endorsed it. A great political fight followed, and the water works scheme was fought bitterly by what turned out to be the majority when the election was held while many others fought hard with Benbow to carry the bond issue. It was one of the bitterest fights, politically, Benbow ever experienced. While he lost in his water works fight, he made a fight that was not forgotten and for many years afterward Upper Alton people regretted that Benbow's plan for a water system was not carried out. In 1900, eleven years afterward, the mains of the Alton Water Co. were extended to Upper Alton and water service was given. The bond issue election in the fight to put through Benbow's water works scheme created factions among Upper Alton's voters, the effects of which were felt for years afterward, in fact as long as the village remained a separate corporation from the City of Alton. Years after Benbow went out of office as village president and even was out of politics altogether in Upper Alton, the two factions continued to fight and when any question came up or any individual was running for an office, the two factions took opposite sides in the matter.

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BENEZE, UNKNOWN WIFE OF J. W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 6, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. J. W. Beneze was held this afternoon from the home on Shield street to the German Evangelical Church, and thence to the City Cemetery. The six oldest sons of the deceased acted as pallbearers and carried the body to its last resting place. The services were conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller. Only the close relations were admitted to the services at the home, but a large crowd of friends attended the funeral services held in the church.

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BENHAM, JOSHUA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 22, 1907

Joshua Benham, aged 38, was fatally injured Saturday morning just before noon by being struck on the head by a heavy branch from the top of a dead tree, which fractured his skull near the base of the brain.  He never regained consciousness and died at 8 o'clock Saturday night. The accident occurred on the place of Frank Bartlow, near the Bethany church, north of Godfrey. Benham was working with his brother, Thomas Benham, who lives on the Sam Waggoner place. The two men were chopping down trees on the Bartlow place for William Roades of Miles station, and were separated a short distance. Joshua Benham was felling a tree and it is supposed that in falling, the tree tumbled against a dead tree and broke the top out of it, and the rotten top falling struck the chopped. When Thomas Benham called his brother to go to dinner and there was no response, he went closer to investigate and found his brother pinned under the branch and unconscious. He got him home and summoned Dr. I. J. Beard, but the man was beyond help. Benham leaves his wife and two children. The body was taken to Somerset, Ky., today for burial. One week ago Benham cut one of his toes off while chopping wood.

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BENISH, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 19, 1918

The funeral of William Benish was held this afternoon at the residence on Pearl street in Priest's Addition, and there was a large attendance of friends and neighbors at the services, which were conducted by Rev. W. T. Hanzsche, pastor of the Upper Alton Presbyterian Church. The death of the young man followed a severe illness with influenza, which later developed into pneumonia. The family came to Alton five years ago from Colorado, and they have made many friends in their neighborhood during the time they have resided here. The body will be shipped this evening to Uma, Colorado, the former home, where burial will take place.

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BENNES, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 11, 1923           Victim of Explosion at Western Cartridge Co., East Alton, 1923

Frank Bennes, one of the victims of the accident, was a well known resident of Alton. He had lived here since 1882 and was a glassblower for the Illinois Glass Co. until that company discontinued the use of glassblowers about nine years ago. He was 65 years of age and beside his wife, he leaves five children, Miss Leila Bennes, Paul Bennes, Frank Bennes Jr., Mrs. Don Brice and Mrs. R. S. Stansfield. He was a man who had been very prominent among the glassblowers in former days. For some time he had been working at the cartridge plant. Plans were made today to hold the funeral of Mr. Bennes Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church, if the two married daughters, Mrs. Brice of Pine Bluff, Ark., and Mrs. Stanfield of Drumright, Okla., arrive in time. Word from the two daughters was to the effect that they expected to arrive tonight.

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BENNETT, GRACE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 30, 1917                Victim of Tuberculosis, Dies in Sanitarium at Collinsville

A tragic close came to the efforts of Miss Grace Bennett to be the little mother of the family that was left her when her father died three years ago with consumption, and the mother had abandoned her family. Miss Bennett died Friday in a Collinsville sanitarium where she was sent by Alton people who read in the Telegraph some time ago the sad story of the impending fate of the girl. It will be recalled that the case was reported as being one requiring immediate attention. Miss Bennett, trying to keep together the little family, consisting of her sisters, Nellie, aged 16, and Elizabeth, aged 11, had broken down under the strain of being head of the family. She had been working hard to take care of her sisters and maintain a home. She had done the same three years before, when her father died, and she was his main standby, though but 14 then. When the story was read by Alton people, a subscription was made up, a sum paid in that would pay the girl's way at a sanitarium and homes found for the other two. Elizabeth is at the home of Mrs. John Dick, who will see that she is schooled and given proper training. The older sister is living with the Volz family on Franklin street and is able to work. The body of the dead girl will come home tonight and the funeral will be Sunday afternoon from the home of Mrs. Dick at Fifth and Ridge streets. After the funeral expenses are paid from the fund, the balance will be expended on the two girls who survive.

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BENNINGTON, DOCK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1922

Dock Bennington, for years an employee of the Mississippi Lime and Material Co., was fatally injured in St. Louis Saturday while at work on a government boat, dying in a hospital later on. Bennington was walking about the boat when he stepped on a loose plank. He was a large, heavy man, and the plank upended with such force as to strike him in the face and he was knocked into the river. He was rescued from the water and taken to the hospital where he died. The body was brought to Alton today, and taken to the home of a brother on Rodemeyer avenue, from whence the funeral will be tomorrow morning at 11 o'clock.

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BENNINGTON, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1922

Frank Bennington, aged 46, died last night after a long illness at his home in Alton. He leaves his wife and four sons. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon. Mr. Bennington had been a sufferer from tuberculosis.

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BENSMAN, HENRIETTA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 26, 1918

Funeral services for Mrs. Henrietta Bensman, wife of Andrew Bensman, were held this morning at 9 o'clock from the chapel at the Nazareth home. The services were conducted by Rev. Father Francis B. Kehoe, pastor of St. Patrick's church. The body was borne to St. Joseph's cemetery by the pallbearers, J. C. Eckhoff, Patrick Burns, Philip Thelson, Thomas McInerney, J. Rieger and M. Voges. At the cemetery services were also conducted by Father Kehoe. A profusion of flowers covered the grave.

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BERG, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 22, 1923

John Berg died last night at 11:25 at his home, 720 Alby street, after an illness of several weeks, due to arterial trouble. He was 71 years old. Mr. Berg became ill several weeks ago but was forced to leave his work only at times, always returning, until weakness finally forced him to remain at home. He gradually grew worse, and the end was not unexpected. Mr. Berg was born at Weldon Springs, Mo., March 26, 1852. He moved to St. Charles, Mo., when young, and was engaged in the blacksmith business there for several years. Twenty-five years ago he entered the employ of his brother-in-law, George A. Sauvage, who conducts a cigar store and billiard hall on Piasa street. He was married to Miss Kate Sauvage on April 5, 1885. It was while working at the Sauvage establishment that Mr. Berg made the many friends who mourn his loss. During his illness there were many inquiries daily as to his condition, by patrons of the place who had come to regard John Berg as an institution. He was a member of a group of older residents who gathered at Sauvage's almost daily to discuss topics of the day, a perpetuation of the old-fashioned custom of daily considering national and international events. Many were the arguments on politics and other affairs which ended one day only to be renewed the next, always ending with the smile that was evidence of friendship. Mr. Berg is survived by his widow, Mrs. Kate Sauvage Berg, a grandson, John Herbert Crocker; a brother, Ben, of St. Louis, and a sister who resides in St. Charles, Mo. Funeral services will be at the home at 8 p.m. Tuesday and interment will be in City Cemetery.

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BERGER, AUGUST/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 4, 1906

August Berger, aged 45, died from pneumonia this morning at his home on the Grafton road. His wife, who was a daughter of William Calame, died last summer. He leaves two daughters. The funeral will probably take place Thursday from the family home to Melville cemetery.

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BERGER, KATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 28, 1908

Mrs. Katherine Berger, wife of Henry Berger, a well known farmer living on the Chessen place at East Alton, died this morning at her home after a long illness with cancer. Mrs. Berger had been suffering intensely for a long time and was given every attention that was possible. She was 63 years of age. Mrs. Berger was a sister of Mrs. John Bauer and Mrs. Casper Unterbrink, and she leaves also four sons, George, William, John and Henry, and one daughter, Mrs. Albert Ringering.

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BERKHEISER, LEE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 7, 1917       Young Soldier Dies From Measles

Lee Berkheiser, aged 18, of Cuba, Ill., died this noon at St. Joseph's hospital from pneumonia following an attack of measles. He was a member of Co. I, 5th Illinois Infantry, which is one of two companies detailed for guard duty at the plant of the Western Cartridge Co. The young man was sick only five days, and from the hospital tent at East Alton he had been moved to St. Joseph's hospital when his bad condition became apparent. The statement was made by one of the officers today that the father of the dead soldier, John Berkheiser of Cuba, Ill., had come down to visit his two sons who are with Co. I. When he came, he found his son ill and he stayed. He was with him when death came at St. Joseph's Hospital. This is the second death resulting from measles in the camp at East Alton. The other victims, with one exception, have recovered and it is believed the epidemic has run its course. Horace Baker, the last of the victims, is suffering from pneumonia, but it is expected he will recover. The sick are kept in the hospital tent which has a wooden floor. The explanation given for the fatal results of the disease is that the young men were not used to outdoor life. Being away from home, they did not take the care of themselves they should have done. The other death was in another company. The body of Berkheiser will be taken to Cuba, Ill. for burial by the father.

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BERKLEY, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 11, 1907

Mrs. Catherine Berkley, a resident of Alton and vicinity for more than fifty years, died Monday morning at 4 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ferdinand Volbracht, after an illness of several weeks. She was about 80 years of age and is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Volbracht of Alton; Mrs. T. Deppe of St. Louis; and Mrs. M. Hollinger of Wichita, Kas.  The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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BERNARD, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 26, 1917             

Peter Bernard, aged 67, one of the heaviest men in Alton at the time of his death, died Thursday evening at 6:10 o'clock at his home on Central avenue. He was a pensioned employee of the Illinois Glass Co. For many years Bernard worked as batch mixer at the glass works, and was one of the most reliable and expert men in that department of the glass works. He always attributed his immense growth in weight to an injury he received years ago. He said that when the doctor started to getting results from treatment of an injured hip, he began to put on flesh and nothing he could do checked the gain. He was about 5 feet 4 inches in height, and when he started to gain in weight he was about 160 pounds. Before he stopped he had passed 325 pounds. He was forced to quit work at the glass works, as he was unable to get around any more and the Illinois Glass Co. pensioned him because of his long and faithful service. After he was paralyzed, one week ago, it required five men to turn him over in bed, so heavy was he, and his case was an extremely hard one to handle. He was a highly respected colored citizen of Alton. Anatomists reason that a man's height and weight is governed by little glands in the body. It is supposed that the injury to Bernard caused an abnormal activity of some gland that regulated weight, and that it caused this gland to work overtime converting everything that Bernard ate into fat. He felt well, aside from the difficulty in getting around. The funeral will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday from his home, and services will be conducted by Rev. George Brown of the A. M. E. church. Rev. Solomon Griswold, the blind preacher, a boyhood friend of the deceased, will preach the funeral sermon.

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BERNER, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 25, 1915

The body of Edward Berner, two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Berner, was brought to Alton this afternoon and taken to the home of John Berner, where it will be held until tomorrow morning. The funeral will be conducted at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning from the St. Mary's Church ot the St. Joseph's Cemetery.

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BERNER, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 19, 1916

Louis Berner Sr., in his 81st year, died at 11:30 o'clock Tuesday at his residence, 226 East Fifth street, from old age. Mr. Berner had been suffering the past five weeks from the effects of arterial hardening. In his whole life he had never been ill, and from the time that he began to show the effects of arterial hardening his case was a desperate one. The last two days he had been unconscious and members of his family were in attendance. Mr. Berner was born in Dormettintin, Wuertemburg, Germany, February 5, 1836. He was married in St. Louis June 13, 1863. He had lived many years in Alton, and here he conducted a shoe making and repair shop on Belle street for many years, with John Gaiser, who died a number of years ago. When it became necessary for the old firm to vacate the building they had occupied so long on Belle street, Mr. Berner retired. When he retired there was many a family in Alton who were hard put to find a successor for him in the shoe repair line, so satisfactory had all his work been. He was for many years a prominent member of the order of Odd Fellows and was secretary of Western Star lodge. He was a kindly gentleman, highly respected by those who knew him best, either socially or in a business way. He leaves his wife and seven sons, William of Chicago; Joseph of Bloomington; Louis, Harry and Frank of Alton; Oliver of Colorado; and Ray of St. Louis.

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BERNER, THERESA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 4, 1922     Grandma Berner Dies ... Lived in Alton Three Quarters of Century - One of the Oldest Citizens

Mrs. Theresa Berner, aged 95, died Sunday night at 8:20 o'clock at the home of her son, John Berner, 718 Langdon street, after a long illness. She had been suffering from a malady for several years but not until about four months ago was there any indication of rapid progress being made by the disease. She passed her ninety-fifth birthday a little over a month ago. Mrs. Berner was born in Germany and she came to America and to Alton when she was 20 years of age. She spent all of the remainder of her life in Alton and vicinity. She was the head of a large family of descendants. Only one son, John Berner, city treasurer, and two daughters, Mrs. John Crofton of Chicago, and Mrs. Frank Hansen of Carrollton, survive her. She leaves also four ____??  Jr., Miss Elizabeth Berner and Leo Berner of Alton; Miss Mamie Rippe, Mrs. Elizabeth Mohrmann, Mrs. Josephine Pawidusky and Mrs. Lucille Wright, of St. Louis; Charles Rippe of South Bend, Ind.; Mrs. Omar Hegle, Miss Elizabeth Crofton, Miss Theresa Crofton and John Crofton of Chicago; Catherine Hansen and Elizabeth Hansen, of Carrollton. She leaves also eight great-grandchildren. Recently Mrs. Berner lost her daughter, Mrs. W. F. Rippe, who died in St. Louis. At that time she was in bad condition herself and it was realized that she could not long survive her daughter. She never learned of her daughter's death. During her long life, Mrs. Berner had been a strong active woman, and she had been a good mother to her children. She was generally beloved by all her descendants and Grandma Berner, year after year, was the central figure in family gatherings, as she would annually add a figure to her birthdays. She was deeply interested in the work of her church, St. Mary's,  and bore an active part in the work there until her great age forced her to relinquish those responsibilities to others. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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BERRES, J. PETER/Source: Granite City Press-Record, March 15, 1920

Death claimed another one of Granite City's pioneer residents last evening in the person of J. Peter Berres, who died at 9:10 o'clock at Elixian Bros. hospital, St. Louis, where he had been undergoing treatment for tumor. The deceased was 65 years of age and a resident of 2144 E street. Two sons and one daughter survive, all residents of this city. Mrs. Margaret Parsons, Matthew and John Berres. Three sisters also survive, Mrs. John Zimmer and Mrs. Catherine Berres, of this city, and Mrs. Bernard Welte, of Pittsburg, Pa. He was ill but four months preceding his death. The body will be brought back to this city and kept at the family residence for a few days and then taken to Pittsburg for burial. The deceased has been a resident of this city for the past 22 years, being employed at the Granite City Steel Words as roller.

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BERRY, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 9, 1912

Mrs. Ellen Berry, wife of John Berry, died at her home on Sixth street last evening at 6 o'clock after a lingering illness. She was 45 years of age, and leaves a husband and five children, Mary, John, Ellen, Alice and James. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 8 o'clock at the home. The remains will be shipped to Wheeling, West Va., tomorrow on the Limited. Services will be held in St. Patrick's church at 8:30 o'clock tomorrow morning.

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BERTINO, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 10, 1921

Mrs. Mary Bertino is dead, her husband, Matt Bertino, and another man, John Quartino, are in a serious condition in a hospital at East St. Louis as the result of an explosion in the Bertino home at Maryville, Saturday night at 9 o'clock. The story given out is that a gasoline stove exploded setting fire to the house, burning the clothing completely off Mrs. Bertino and burning the two men from the waist up. All three were rushed to the hospital in East St. Louis in an ambulance, and Mrs. Bertino died Sunday. Rumors that the explosion was due to the operating of a home still could not be verified as yet, but the coroner's office said there would be a complete investigation of that angle, as of other angles of the case. There are seven children in the Bertino family and none of them were burned. The dead woman was 40 years of age. Her husband is 50 years of age.

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BEST, EARL/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Monday, December 14, 1931/Submitted by Myra Ann Best

Services For Earl Best Held Sunday - Funeral Held at Wegner Funeral Home in Staunton at 2 o'clock

Funeral services for Earl Best, 40, resident of near Worden, who was found dead in a barn on the Best farm Friday night, were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Wegener Funeral Home in Staunton. Rev. K. W. Kepner, pastor of the Worden Methodist Church officiated. Interment was made in the Staunton City Cemetery. Members of the Staunton American Legion had charge of the services at the grave. At an inquest held Saturday morning by Deputy A. J. Meyer, at Worden, a verdict that death was caused by heart failure was returned. Mr. Best was born January 23, 1891, near Worden, the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Best*.  He was a World War veteran. Surviving are his mother, Mary E. Best, three sisters, Mrs. Ora Sandbach, Mrs. William L. Grant and Mrs. Louis Bowles of Worden; four brothers, Charles, William, Monroe, and Edward Best of Worden and vicinity.

*This information is incorrect; Earl Ora Best was the son of Holland Jesse Best and Mary Elizabeth Camp Best.
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BEST, MONROE/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Friday, October 14, 1932/Submitted by Myra Ann Best  

Funeral services for Monroe Best, 47, who died Monday night in the St. Francis Hospital following a surgical operation, were held Wednesday afternoon at the Wegener Chapel, and were arranged similar to the services for a brother, the late Earl Best held on December 13, 1931. Rev. H. Kepner, pastor of the M. E. Church in Worden officiated. A quartet composed of Mrs. Margaret Allen, J. D. Courtney and Mrs. and Mrs. Hugh E. Menk furnished the hymns. Pallbearers were Christian Neal, Grover Kinnikin, John William and Albert Vesper and Nick Ramich. Interment was in the City Cemetery.

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BESTERFELDT, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 13, 1916

The death of Mrs. Ellen Besterfeldt, wife of George Besterfeldt, occurred at the family home at Ninth and Piasa streets Sunday morning at 1:30 o'clock, following a long illness which began last Christmas. Mrs. Besterfeldt is survived by her husband, two children, John Woodrow, aged 2 years; and Lucille, aged 5; as well as by two sisters, the Misses Mary O'Connor and Katherine O'Connor; and two brothers, John and Cornelius.  Cornelius arrived the latter part of last week from New York to be with his sister. Michael Keefe of this city is an uncle of Mrs. Besterfeldt. Mrs. Besterfeldt came here from Ireland about eight years ago, and after being here a short time was married to George Besterfeldt. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

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BESTERFELDT, SALINDAY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1921

Mrs. Salinday Besterfeldt, aged 78, died Thursday night at 10:20 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George Winger, of 709 Easton street, after a few hours illness. Old age, coupled with the heat, is said to have been the cause of death. Up until this week Mrs. Besterfeldt has been in fairly good health, and was visiting among her children in Alton and Elsah. She was brought to the Winger home only yesterday. She was a native of Kane, Ill. Her husband died twelve years ago. She leaves seven children, 18 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren, also a brother, James Bates, of Reeder, Ill. The children are Leander Besterfeldt of Elkhardt, Kan.; Albert Besterfeldt, Mrs. Addie Agney and Mrs. Mae Pellikan of Elsah, and George and Harry Besterfeldt and Mrs. George Winger of Alton. Funeral arrangements are incomplete, pending word from Leander in Kansas. Plans are being made to hold services at Elsah, Sunday afternoon.

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BETTIS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 18, 1907    Death Re-Unites Brother and Sister Who Refused to be Separated While Alive - Die Within Few Days of Each Other

Mrs. Sarah Barber, aged 83 years, died Monday night at St. Joseph's hospital from old age and weakness brought about by nursing a sick brother, William Bettis, through a long siege of illness at the home in Garden street. Both had been ill for some time and repeated attempts on the part of Mrs. Demuth and others to induce Mrs. Barber to go to the hospital where she could be cared for resulted in failure, as she refused to separate from her brother. He was equally positive in refusing to leave her. Last Wednesday Mrs. Demuth visited the home and found Mr. Bettis unconscious and Mrs. Barber very sick, and arrangements were at once made for the removal of both to the hospital. The police officers and Mrs. Demuth had a hard time moving the old couple. The sister wanted to go in the ambulance with her brother, and as there was not room enough for them to lie side by side it was necessary to make a two story effect in the ambulance. There was a swinging cot in the ambulance, and in this the old lady was placed after the man had been put in another stretcher on the floor. Mr. Bettis, who was 81 years old, was buried Sunday afternoon in the City Cemetery after services were conducted at the home in Garden street by the Rev. L. B. Lott, and Mrs. Barber was buried this afternoon, services being conducted at the same place. Many neighbors attended the funeral and floral offerings were numerous. Relatives of the aged couple living in Granite City have been in Alton several days and had charge of the funeral arrangements.

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[Betts ... see also Betz]

 

BETTS, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 13, 1909

Charles Betts, aged 59, died Tuesday evening at the family home on Edwards street in Upper Alton. His death brings to an end a very unusual arrangement between two brothers. Charles Betts lived with his brother, William, who is past 70. William Betts was an old soldier and a pensioner, and owns several houses in Upper Alton from which he derives an income. Charles, being in bad health, was unable to do much labor except the housework, and he did that. His brother, William, provided the living. Together the two brothers, both well along in years, lived in their house in Upper Alton. Charles did all the housework and the cooking and William for many years has been retired from any form of active duty. They had lived in Upper Alton close on to 45 years and much of that time they had spent together, keeping house. They had no need for servants of any kind, as Charles was an expert cook and could do his usual tasks well. The last few weeks he was failing rapidly in health. For several days he was confined to his bed, before his death. The death of Charles Betts is a sad blow to his older brother, who is bereft of his companion. The two brothers were very fond of each other and got along well. The funeral will be held Friday.

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BETTS, ELDEN SPRAGUE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 12, 1918         Lt. Elden Bettz Died Leading Troops

Lieut. Elden Betts, son of P. L. Betts of Alton, is reported by his best friend, Lieut. Thomas Gibson, of Chicago, to have been slain in action while leading the company, of which he was acting commander, up a hill, making a charge. The letter written by Lieut. Gibson was dated October 20, and was sent to his mother in Chicago, who communicated by wire this morning with the family of Lieut. Betts. It was said that the letter would follow in the mail. Further than the fact that Lieut. Betts had been killed and that it was while leading his machine gun company up a hill, no details were given. Lieut. Betts was a graduate of the first Ft. Sheridan officers training school. He was one of the few selected to be sent overseas after receiving commissions to study at close range. After going to France he was attached to the regular army and was given a rating as a regular army officer. He had been in Europe since September 11, 1917. His work had kept him very busy, but he would write letters home frequently, telling of his experiences and observations. His letters were such as to indicate that he had dedicated his life to the service, and that he was ready for anything that might happen. He was filled with a patriotic zeal, and a pride in doing his work well that indicated he would rise in rank. Killing of his officers had resulted in the command devolving on Lieut. Betts, but so far as known he had not been commissioned as a captain. He was serving in this capacity when he is reported to have lost his life. Lieut. Gibson's letter was the first hint the family had received that Lieut. Betts had been killed. Last week a report came that the young officer had been wounded badly, but how that story came could not be explained, as the family had not heard of it until asked about it. The family have telegraphed Washington for information on the subject. They consider, however, that the statement made by Lieut. Gibson is reliable, owing to the close friendship between them, they having been closely associated both as officers and friends since Lieut. Betts went into the service.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 20, 1918            Lieut. Elden Betts Death Confirmed

The reported death of Lieut. Elden Betts of Alton, son of Percy L. Betts, was confirmed by a War Department message which was received by the family today. The message, signed by an officer of the War Department, said: "I deeply regret to inform you that Lieut. Elden Betts, infantry officer, is reported killed in action October 9."   This message confirms a report sent by a friend of Lieut. Betts in a letter which was written by the friend to his own mother in Chicago, in which he described the battle and told of the death of his friend. Lieut. Betts was acting Captain of a machine gun company, and was ranked as a regular army officer. He had been attached to the 16th infantry. The family of Lieut. Betts did not give up hope until they had the official notice, though the interruption in his letters gave them some ground to worry. However, the incident of his being mosted as "missing" before had caused them to receive with reserve any information of any casualty to him. First Lieut. Elden Sprague Betts was a member of the Machine Gun Company, 16th Infantry. He was 25 years of age. He attended the First Officers' Training School at Fort Sheridan in May, 1917, and after his graduation went to France, going over in September of last year. Shortly after going to France he was put in the Regular Army, 18th Infantry. His entrance into the Regular Army occurred on November 15, 1917, after attending French Officers' Training School. Betts was in active fighting since January 1918. He was officially reported as killed in action October 9, by Harris, adjutant general. Extracts from a letter from Lieut. Thos. Gibson, on October 20 to his mother in Chicago, describing the Battle of Argonne Woods on October 9 follows: (during this battle Lieut. Elden Betts lost his life)  "About two weeks ago we went into the line again, relieving another division which had been driving. Two days after we took over the division we went 'over the top' early one morning. We made great progress, and captured a famous hill where the French had lost so many men a couple of years back. Then we waited several days until the division on our right and left caught up. We had gone too fast for them. We got our instructions to take the hill around where the Boche were entrenched strongly. There was a dense forest around the hill, and this is what we formed up in. When our barrage started, Fritz started one too, right on the woods with everything he had. It was surely hot. Lieut. Taylor was badly wounded by a shell and the command of the company went to me, so a second lieutenant and myself were left to bring the company through. Well, I got the company out and started forward. Fritz was not far off, and certainly in force. He gave us everything he had. Men and officers were killed and wounded all around me, and now I wonder how I ever escaped. We gave Fritz a good beating, however, and took our objective, and the next morning went forward three miles without having anything more than a few shells hurled at us. That night we were relieved. Poor Betts got his at the foot of the hill. Too bad. He was a fine fellow, and my best friend in France. When I get back I must get into communication with his people and tell them all about his great work."

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 10, 1921      Church to Dedicate Tablet in Memory of Soldier Killed in World War

Members of the St. Paul's Episcopal church will dedicate a tablet in memory of Elden Betts, one of the Alton soldiers who was killed in the World War. The tablet will be placed in the church, near the altar. It is planned to dedicate the memorial tablet on Oct. 9th, the third anniversary of the young officer's death. He was killed in action on Oct. 9, 1918. Elden Betts was the son of P. L. Betts of Twelfth street. At an officers' training camp he was commissioned a lieutenant, but by distinguished service rose to the rank of Captain. Many testimonials of his bravery and heroic death have been received from members of his company.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 13, 1921

The body of Lieutenant Elden Betts, one of the Alton soldiers killed in the war, will not be returned to Alton. Members of the family, when asked by the government if they desired the body returned, decided to let it remain in the military cemetery in France where it was buried. P. L. Betts, father of the young officer, who has had military experience, said they had decided it more feasible to let the body remain in France because there it is in a military cemetery, which will always be kept up as the resting place of the bodies of men who died in the service of their country. A memorial service for Lieut. Betts will be held in St. Paul's Episcopal Church on October 9, when a memorial tablet, presented by his father, will be dedicated.

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BETTS, FLORA MATTHEWS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 6, 1915

Mrs. Flora Matthews Betts, wife of Percy L. Betts, passed away Tuesday evening at 5:30 o'clock at the family home, 234 East Twelfth street. She had been seriously ill for a few days, though she had been troubled for a week before with what developed into a very grave malady. She was the daughter of Mrs. H. S. Matthews, and was in her fifty-sixth year. Almost her entire life she spent in Alton. The news of the death of Mrs. Betts caused much sadness among those who had known her well in Alton. Many of her friends did not know that she was suffering from a serious malady until they learned that the end had come. She had apparently been in the best of health. The beginning of her trouble ten days ago was a "rising" in her head which came to a climax in brain fever. Since last Saturday her case was recognized as being probably a fatal one. Mrs. Betts was, in her girlhood, very popular in Alton society. She was known for her beauty and her charming manner, and she possessed a very large circle of friends. She was married to Mr. Betts February 1, 1883, and after residing a while at Minneapolis and Chicago, returned to Alton where she and her husband have made their home ever since, and have reared their family of three, Misses Edith and Marjorie Betts and Elden Betts. To her family she was a devoted mother and wife, subordinating herself and all other interests that she might enhance the best interests of those who were nearest to her. She was known, however, as a kindly, charitable woman, and her heart was generous and she was ever thoughtful of the comforts of others. She possessed a beautiful Christian character which will be a pleasant memory to her family in years to come. She leaves besides her husband and two daughters and son, her aged mother, Mrs. Matthews; a brother, H. C. Matthews; and a sister, Mrs. T. P. Nisbett. The funeral will be held from the family residence on Twelfth street at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon. Interment will be private.

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BETZ, A. F./Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, March 25, 1897                 Alton & North Alton Businessman and Assistant Supervisor on Alton County Board

After an illness of several months duration, Mr. A. F. Betz, an old and well known citizen of Madison county, died at his home in North Alton Monday [March 22, 1897] morning at 11 o'clock. Mr. Betz was a native of Germany, being born in Heisterburg Nassau in March 1831, and had just passed his 66th birthday three days ago. He came to America in 1848 and was married in Philadelphia in 1852 to Miss Louise Arens. After their marriage they came to Alton, where for many years he was engaged in a mercantile business. About fifteen years ago he moved to North Alton and has since conducted a store in that village. Mrs. Betz died seven years ago. Two sons survive the father, Mr. H. A. Betz of Alton, and Mr. Louis Betz of North Alton; also two adopted children, Mrs. John Heileman of Marysville, Kansas, and Mr. Charles Bradfisch of St. Louis. Mr. Betz was respected by all who knew him, being a man of a just and upright disposition, having all the qualities of a strict business man and good citizen. He has for twelve years represented Alton township in the County Board as one of the Assistant Supervisors, in which body he was highly respected, and his advice and influence heeded. In 1895 he was Chairman of the Board. He was also a member of the North Alton School Board. There was a large assemblage at the home of the late A. F. Betz yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, to pay the last tribute of respect to the deceased. The services were begun at two o'clock and were conducted by Rev. William Hackman of the Evangelical church, of which Mr. Betz had been a member. There were many beautiful floral offerings expressive of sympathy that could not be spoken. There was in attendance a number of associates of Mr. Betz in the County Board and many others from abroad. A long cortege followed the body to the City Cemetery, where it was laid away for its last long rest. The pallbearers were Fred Pilgrim, Nic Seibold, William Gerhardt Sr., Jacob Youngck, E. J. Deterding, F. J. Ebbert.

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BETZ, HENRY A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 27, 1905                     Prominent East End Business Man Dies

Henry A. Betz, aged 48, died Sunday evening at 6:30 o'clock at his residence, 614 East Fourth street, after a long illness from a complication of diseases, which resulted in paralysis. He had been bedfast for two months, part of the time at St. Joseph's hospital, but a few weeks ago he was removed to his home, as it was apparent that he could not recover. Mr. Betz was a son of A. F. Betz of North Alton, and for a number of years was engaged in business in North Alton. He had been engaged in a mercantile business for over twenty years, about thirteen years of the time being in Alton. He conducted a dry goods store on east Second street, next to the Wyss pharmacy, and later he moved to the present location of his store. He was married in 1881 to Louise Spangenberg of Whitehall, who survives him. He was a member of the Odd Fellows' order, the retail merchants and the German Benevolent society. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence, Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann officiating.

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BETZ, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1904                    Popular Singer and Musician Passes Away

Louis Betz passed away Monday afternoon at 4:20 o'clock after a long and painful illness at his home on State street near the Grafton road. He was aged 42 years 9 months and 15 days, and was a native of Alton. He leaves a wife and three children, Ferdinand, aged 13, Louise, aged 10, and Adolph, aged 7.  H. A. Betz, the East Second street merchant, is his brother, and he leaves also a foster brother, Charles Bratfisch of St. Louis. Deceased was a son of the late supervisor, A. F. Betz, and has conducted the general store left by the latter at his death 7 years ago. He was gifted in many ways, and possessed a magnificent voice which frequently charmed social and church audiences in the Altons. The funeral will take place Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to the City Cemetery, Rev. Theo. Oberhellmann officiating.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 17, 1904

The funeral of Louis Betz took place Wednesday afternoon from the home in North Alton, where services were conducted in the presence of a large number of friends of deceased and of the family, by Rev. Theo Oberhellmann of the Evangelical church of Alton. Interment was in the City Cemetery, and the cortege was a long one. Many lovely floral offerings were sent by those who in other days had experienced pleasure or solace in the voice of deceased as he sang at some social gathering, at the funeral of a friend or in some church. Many are the reminiscences which are being brought up by old friends and acquaintances of Mr. Betz, relating to his remarkable faculty for feats of memory in music. He had one of the most remarkable memories any musician ever had, and a keen sense of the artistic. It is related by one friend of Mr. Betz that he assisted a singer once who had forgotten his music and had none for the accompanist. The singer whistled his music over to Mr. Betz, and Mr. Betz accompanied him on the piano from memory without a mistake during the subsequent program. It is said that he could play at sight the most difficult opera scores written. Musical critics said that Mr. Betz was endowed with a grand opera voice, the finest nature ever gave a man, and that had he devoted his attention to study for grand opera, he would have taken a place among the most brilliant stars of the profession. When the musical world lost Louis Betz many years ago, it suffered a loss which was irreparable. His sweet, pure voice charmed many an audience and drove care from many a mind in years gone by. The memory of the enjoyment he gave with his music in his younger days will linger late, and while Louis Betz never rose to what he should have been in the musical world, his friends and music lovers in general, with sad regrets, will say it might have been.  The pallbearers for Mr. Betz were Matthew Hoffmeier, H. W. Bauer, John Mathie, W. H. Gerhardt, William Blakele, and Charles Siebold. A quartet consisting of W. H. Gerhardt, H. E. Rumsey, W. C. Gates and Jamie Logan sang several selections at the service.

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BEVAN, FRANCES L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 19, 1909

Mrs. Frances L. Bevan died at the home of her daughter in Upper Alton Sunday afternoon at 4:45 o'clock from old age and injuries due to her falling about ten days ago. She is one of Madison county's oldest residents, dying at the ripe old age of 97. She was born in New York City on March 27, 1812. She was married there, and her husband died when she was 22 years of age. She came in 1861 to Upper Alton, where she has resided with her daughter ever since. She leaves one daughter, Mrs. William E. Gray, and four grandchildren and many great-grandchildren. Mrs. Bevan was always of a very bright and happy disposition. She was proud of her great age, and often wished to live to be a centenarian. She was the oldest of seven or eight old people living in Upper Alton within a few blocks of each other. She celebrated her birthday a few weeks ago, and on that day received a letter of congratulation from William Elliot Smith and family, who are traveling in Europe. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock from the home. The Rev. George D. Knights will officiate. The burial will be in Oakwood cemetery. Mrs. Bevan always lived with her daughter, and the two had never been separated for any great length of time. Her death was due to a general collapse following a fall from a chair in her home ten days before she died.

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BEVANEY, PATRICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 13, 1918                       Venice Soldier Dies

Patrick Bevaney, the first soldier from the Tri-Cities to succumb, died yesterday at Camp Taylor, Ky., near Louisville, from an attack of pneumonia. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Bevaney of Venice. His body will be brought back for burial at his home city.

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BEVENUE, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 15, 1923

Joe Bevenue, an employee of the Sparks Milling Co., who was injured a few days ago while at work in the elevator, died this morning at one o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital, from the effects of injuries to his head. A surgical operation performed to relieve the pressure on his brain proved unavailing. A St. Louis surgeon, an expert in brain surgery, was called here by the Sparks Milling Co. in the hope of saving the life of the injured man, but he was unable to give any further relief. The coroner's inquest was held this morning. The evidence indicated that Bevenue had been "soaping" a wooden pulley to make the belt pull harder on it, and that while so doing he became entangled and was thrown with great violence to the concrete floor, striking his head so hard that the skull was fractured. He was the son of William Bevenue, a well known farmer in Godfrey township. Employers of the accident victim say that he was a hard working, reliable man. He worked at various times at the Sparks mill and had also worked for the Mississippi Lime and Material Co., and at both places he was highly valued.

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BEVINEN, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 6, 1877

Died, very suddenly this morning about seven o'clock of heart disease, Mr. Joseph Bevinen, at his residence at Rocky Fork. He arose as usual, dressed himself, sat down on a chair, fell back, and his daughter caught him. He groaned a few times and expired in five minutes. He was about 65 years of age and leaves several children to mourn his death. He was a very old settler, a good neighbor, and a favorite with both white and colored people, always ready to lend a helping hand. His funeral will be held tomorrow (Sunday), September 2d, at 10 o'clock a.m. from the family residence. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

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BEYERS, THERESA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 14, 1906

Mrs. Theresa Beyers, mother of John Simons, died last evening at 6:30 o'clock after a long illness from old age, at the home of her son, 914 east Second street. She would have been 73 years of age in August. Mrs. Beyers was a native of Germany, but came to America when a young woman. She was married three times, and all her husbands are dead. She leaves only the one child, with whom she made her home. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Patrick's church, and burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

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BIBB, CARRIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 27, 1880

Died, at her residence in Middletown, Alton, Illinois, of consumption, Tuesday morning, November 24, 1880, Mrs. Carrie, wife of Mr. Scott Bibb. Mrs. Bibb was born in Harrodsburg, Ky., March 15, 1853. She was married to her now bereaved husband, November 22, 1877. She had been confined to her bed three weeks and three days. She bore her illness with a patient and uncomplaining spirit. She leaves a husband, three brothers and one sister and a father, and a host of friends. She was faithful and true in the church and Sabbath school of the A. M. E. church. She died a genuine Christian. The funeral took place on Friday morning at 11 o'clock, at the A. M. E. church, after which her remains were buried in the Upper Alton cemetery.

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BIBB, ONA/Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, September 8, 1881

Mrs. Ona Bibb, an old resident of the city, died Saturday, the 3d of September, at 6:15 p.m. at the age of 58 years. The funeral took place Tuesday at 2 o'clock from the family residence in Middletown. The services were conducted by Mr. R. Jacobs.

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BICKEL, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 9, 1907                 Former Ice Dealer Passes Away

Louis Bickel, aged 76, died Monday evening at 8 o'clock at his residence, 517 Liberty street, after a long illness. His death had been expected to take place at any time within the last few weeks, as he was sinking steadily. Surrounded by members of his family he passed away in his home. Mr. Bickel had lived in Alton since 1849, and was one of the oldest and most prominent residents of the city. He was engaged in business in the city for many years, and as an ice man will probably be best remembered by the present generation. He was a man of kindly nature, a lover of children, and in former years when Mr. Bickel was driving his ice wagon there was not a boy in town who did not know that wagon and follow it to get pieces of ice which the generous owner was always free in giving away to them on hot days. Mr. Bickel was intensely devoted to his family. Two of his children died after reaching years of maturity, but on their children he lavished the affection which he had formerly displayed toward his own. He is survived by his wife. During the years Mr. Bickel was engaged in business in Alton, he had accumulated a valuable estate and he was among the wealthiest residents of the city. Mr. Bickel was born in Baden, Germany. He came to Alton when he was 17 years of age. When the Chicago & Alton was opened up between Springfield and Alton he was an engineer on that railroad. Of the four children born to Mr. Bickel, only two, Mrs. W. F. Hoppe and August Bickel, lived to maturity. Beside his wife he leaves four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. He leaves two sisters, Mrs. Hamm, living in Germany, and Mrs. Gable in Chicago. He leaves a brother, August Bickel, in Exeter, Nebraska. The funeral will be held Friday morning. Services will be held in private at the family home, after which funeral services will be held at 9 o'clock in St. Mary's church.

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BICKEL, MARIE NORBERTA KOHIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 28, 1919

Mrs. Marie Norberta Kohin Bickel, one of Alton's well known octogenarian residents, died Sunday morning at 6 o'clock at the family home, 517 Liberty street. Mrs. Bickel was the widow of the late Louis Bickel. Four children were born to them, but all preceded the mother to the grave. They were Louis Hoppe, Marie, August, and Louis Bickel. Four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren are living. The grandchildren are Marguerite and Louis Bickel, Louis Hoppe and Mrs. F. C. Behrens. The great-grandchildren are Frederick and Carl Behrens, Louis and Gertrude Hoppe. A daughter-in-law, Mrs. Anna Bickel, and a son-in-law, W. F. Hoppe, also survive. Mrs. Bickel was a native of Kehl, Baden, Germany. She was born June 6, 1834. She came to America in December, 1853, landing at New Orleans. From there she came to Alton and has been a resident of this city for 65 years. Mrs. Bickel was one of the best known residents in the part of the city where she lived, and had a wide acquaintance in Alton. She was known in her neighborhood and among her friends as a woman possessed of a motherly disposition, and she was known for her acts of kindness she rendered to those about her. In her family circle she was greatly beloved, and during her illness she was given the constant, devoted attention of those who were in her home. She was deeply interested in the return of her grandson, Louis Bickel, who was in the service during the war. He came home a month ago, gratifying a wish of the aged lady that she would be able to see her grandson and have him with her during the remaining days she would have. Mrs. Bickel belonged to a well known family in Alton. Her husband was for years engaged in the ice business in Alton. When all her children passed away before her, the motherly heart of Mrs. Bickel took in their children and their grandchildren and on them she lavished the affections which had been for her children. Funeral services will be held Tuesday morning at 10 a.m. from St. Mary's Church. Burial will be in the City Cemetery. The members of the family have requested that flowers be omitted.

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BICKELHAUPT, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 16, 1918

Mrs. Ida Yager received word today that her sister-in-law, Mrs. Margaret Bickelhaupt, a sister of the late J. G. Yager, had died in St. Louis, and would be buried at Edwardsville Monday. Mrs. Bickelhaupt, who was a very old woman, leaves one sister, who is 92.

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BIEHLER, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 22, 1913                Benbow City Councilman Dies Suddenly

The death of Joseph Biehler, a Benbow City Councilman in Benbow City, last night marks the second sudden death of Benbow City Councilman within the past month. The first was the death of William O'Hearn. Both were prominent figures in the politics of the village since its organization, about five years ago, under A. E. Benbow. Mr. Biehler was said to be going to his room in the Biehler Building, about 10 o'clock, and was reaching with his key to unlock the door of his room when he was stricken. The men downstairs in the saloon heard a noise, and running upstairs found him dead. The death was supposed to have been caused by heart trouble. Mr. Biehler had at one time been a drinking man, but of late he had sworn off and was drinking little. Mrs. Biehler is also critically ill, and a week ago was moved from the Biehler Building to the home of Mrs. Rosa Veach, in order that the noise of the saloon would not annoy her. She was not told last night of the death, but was informed this morning. There are no children. Mr. Biehler was about 65 years of age. He was at one time a policeman in East St. Louis. A few years ago he fell from a wagon and sustained a fractured hip, and as a result has walked lame ever since. Mr. Biehler has at times served as marshal and street commissioner in Benbow City. The body was moved from the Biehler Buildng to the office of Mayor Benbow. coroner's Undertaker Berner was called and the inquest was set for this afternoon. The funeral has not been set, but it is supposed that the body will be taken to East St. Louis, his former home, for burial.

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BIERBAUM, ELIZABETH C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 2, 1913      Pioneer Resident of Fosterburg Dead - Fifty Years Residence in County

Mrs. Elizabeth Bierbaum, aged 78 years, died at her home, three miles north of Fosterburg, Saturday afternoon. She is the widow of Fred Bierbaum, who preceded her to the grave three years ago. Mrs. Bierbaum came to the Fosterburg district from Germany, fifty-six years ago, and was married five years later to Mr. Bierbaum. One son, Louis, of Fosterburg, and two daughters, Lizzie and Lena, who reside in the old home, survive her. She has been a member of the German Methodist churches of Alton and Fosterburg for the past fifty years. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock, and will leave the residence at 10 o'clock. Burial will be in the Oakwood Cemetery in Upper Alton. Mrs. Bierbaum was a devout Christian woman, and has always been active in church work, even to her old age. She is one of the few remaining pioneer residents of the Fosterburg farming district.

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BIERBAUM, ERNEST/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 28, 1899, Friday  

Ernest Bierbaum, one of the wealthiest and best known citizens of Foster township, died Thursday morning at his home after a short illness with pneumonia and paralysis combined. A stroke of paralysis rendered him helpless a few weeks ago, the third he had sustained, and later his illness developed into a bad form of pneumonia. He was born in Germany November 3, 1833, and came to this country many years ago. He was a thrifty farmer and from his farm in Foster township he made a small fortune, which will leave his family comfortably situated. Mr. Bierbaum was quite a young man when he arrived in Alton. He went to work for Dr. Long at his home on the Grafton road and worked there for a number of years. Later he rented a farm where is now one of the most thickly settled resident portions of Upper Alton, opposite Shurtleff College, then known as the Kendall place. He subsequently purchased the place where he died, and has since resided there. He was known all over Madison county and was respected by all who knew him. He leaves a family of seven children, all of mature years, and all married. They are: Mrs. Mary Offer and Mrs. P. H. Paul, of Alton; Mrs. Lizzie Graul, of Brighton; Mrs. Sophie Miller of Nokomis; Mrs. Julia Feilbach and Henry Bierbaum of Fosterburg; Ernest Bierbaum of Godfrey. The funeral will be Sunday at 10 a.m., from the family home near Fosterburg. Interment will be in the cemetery there.

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BIERBAUM, RUDOLPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 5, 1906                Alton Business Man for Thirty Years Dies

(Note:  parts of this obit was extremely hard to read)

Rudolph Bierbaum died Sunday morning at ____ o'clock at his residence, ...... from apoplexy, ....funeral will be held Wednesday .... at 1 o'clock from the German Methodist church of which he was one of the leading members and an interested supporter.  Mr. Bierbaum's death was a great surprise .... the entire community. He was apparently in good health Saturday night when he retired for the night. He had been in his ...... all evening, and had attended to the closing of his store personally. He went to his home about 10 o'clock and retired about a half hour later. He had suffered two paralytic strokes in the past three years, the first a very severe one and the second a light one. He recovered from both of them, although it was feared for a while that he would not get well, and he was able to attend to his business as usual. Shortly before he died, he roused his wife, who was in the bed with him, and grasped her by the hand. He was then unable to speak to her distinctly, and no doubt had felt the approach of death. Mrs. Bierbaum attempted to help him, but before a doctor could be summoned he had passed away. Mr. Bierbaum was born in Germany and came to Alton 55 years ago when he was seven years of age. He was engaged in business in Alton thirty years. He was highly esteemed as a business man and was strictly honest in all his dealings.  He leaves his wife and three children, F. A. Bierbaum, cashier of the Alton Savings Bank, Misses Lillie and Loretta Bierbaum.  He leaves two brothers, Frederick and William. He was married to Miss Christina Paul, March 23, 1871.  Of his five children, two preceded the father in death. For thirty-eight years he was an active, energetic and prosperous business man of Alton. No one ever questioned his honesty or integrity. He led an ideal Christian life, and the admonition of Christ was ever before his mind, "Seek ye firrst the kingdom of God and its righteousness and all things will be added unto you."  He was a leading member of the German M. E. church where he held important offices. He was a pillar in the church and will be greatly missed by young and old. He was a regular attendant at the Sunday school where he held the office of superintendent for many years. He had promised to teach a class for one of the teachers Sunday, who was out of town. He leaves beside his wife, Christina C. B., three children, Frank A. B., cashier of the Alton Savings bank, Miss Lille M. and Miss Laretta M., four grandchildren, two brothers, William and Frederick B., many relatives and friends to mourn his loss. The body will lie in state from 2 to 5 p.m. tomorrow that all who wish to view it may do so.

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BIERMAN, PAUL H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1912               Attorney, Former Civil War Drummer Boy, Dies

Paul H. Bierman, aged 67, died at his residence, 2218 Belle street, Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock from paralysis. His death had been expected for several days, and the members of his family were called to attend him.  Two years ago he was stricken with paralysis and he gave up all business affairs at that time and retired to his home in Alton. Mr. Bierman was born in Alsace Lorrain, Germany, May 16, 1845. He was two years old when his parents took him to St. Louis, and until twelve years ago when the family moved to Alton, Mr. Bierman passed his life in St. Louis. He practiced law in St. Louis and was also engaged in business. He was secretary and treasurer of the McCabe-Bierman Wagon & Carriage Co., at one time was secretary of the North St. Louis Mutual Fire Insurance Co.  He was a director of the Fifth National Bank of St. Louis, and for four terms was a member of the House of Delegates in St. Louis. He was very active politically. Five years ago his wife died at the present home of the family in Alton. He served as a drummer boy in the Civil War. Mr. Bierman is survived by five sons and two daughters, Edward P. Bierman of South McAlester, Okla.; Paul J., Ralph D., Carlisle G., of St. Louis; C. C. Bierman of Springfield; and Misses Ada and Ione Bierman of Alton. The funeral will be Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Paul's Episcopal church, and the burial in Bellefontaine cemetery in St. Louis.

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BILDERBECK, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 2, 1904

Mrs. Anna Bilderbeck, widow of Rudolph Bilderbeck, died this afternoon at her home, 1144 Fletcher street, after an illness of six weeks. She was a resident of Alton many years and was 73 years of age. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from German Methodist church. Mrs. Bilderbeck leaves six children, Messrs. Justice, Henry and Charles Bilderbeck; and Misses Maggie, Annie and Katie Bilderbeck.

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BILDERBECK, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 30, 1909

Henry Bilderbeck, aged 44, died Thursday morning at 6:10 o'clock at his home, 1607 Fletcher street, after a long illness from lung troubles. While engaged at work at his trade a year ago he was accidentally injured by a board slipping and striking him on the side. At first he thought nothing of the injury, but later the effects of the blow became apparent, and Bilderbeck was ill most of the time. He was unmarried. He leaves two brothers, Justus and Charles Bilderbeck, and three sisters, Misses Maggie, Annie and Kate Bilderbeck, all of Alton. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon, probably from the family home.

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BILDERBECK, PERLEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 18, 1913         Drowns in Mississippi off the Steamer Illinois

Perley Bilderbeck, aged 24, son of Mr. Augusta Bilderbeck of 16 East Ninth street, was drowned in the Mississippi River off the steamer Illinois, Sunday afternoon about 3 o'clock. J. F. O'Connell, another member of the Alton division of Illinois Naval Reserves, was nearly drowned and was rescued by Hewitt Winkler. The two young men were on the front end of the "Illinois," watching some young men swim. O'Connell had been in the water and was wearing a bathing suit. Bilderbeck, who was night watchman on the "Illinois," was fully dressed. The young men engaged in a friendly scuffle, and Bilderbeck stepped backward. In doing so, he stepped off the edge of the boat, and as he fell he clutched O'Connell by the neck of his bathing suit, dragging O'Connell into the river with him and taking him down. O'Connell could swim, while Bilderbeck could not. However, O'Connell was so impeded by the hold Bilderbeck had on his collar, that he could not escape, and only the tearing of the shirt released him and permitted him to be saved. Bilderbeck went down after O'Connell broke his hold and was drowned. Almost drowned, O'Connell was dragged out by Winkler, who was a witness of the drowning. Immediately after the drowning efforts were begun to recover the body. The water was about 12 feet deep and the current very swift at that place, and the body was carried on down the river away from the scene of the tragedy. Perley Bilderbeck leaves beside his mother, one brother, who was in Belleville. The body was recovered about six hours after the drowning. The inquest was held this afternoon by Coroner J. M. Sims. The members of the Alton division of Illinois Naval Reserves will attend the funeral in a body, this being a custom of long standing where one of the members of the division dies. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

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BILYEW, ANN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 5, 1908

Mrs. Ann Bilyew, aged 85, who had lived in Bethalto almost all her life, died yesterday after an illness of a few days from old age. Mrs. Bilyew had been weak but was not ill, and her death was a surprise to her many friends. She was a native of Indiana, and lived awhile in Kentucky, but almost all her life was passed in Bethalto. She made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Uzzell. She has one son, a daughter, and a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the Methodist church at Bethalto, Rev. Sowers officiating. County Superintendent of Schools, J. U. Uzzell of this city, is a grandson.

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BIRDSALL, MINERVA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1907

Mrs. Minerva Birdsall, aged 84, who died at Jacksonville, Ill., a few days ago, was brought to Alton this morning for burial. Mrs. Birdsall's death followed a stroke of paralysis. She was the widow of James Birdsall, who for many years was engaged in the dry goods business in Alton on Third street, and lived at the corner of Fourth and George streets. Burial was in City cemetery. The body was accompanied by George Killam of Jacksonville.

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BIRT, CATO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 13, 1913

Cato Birt, janitor of Lovejoy school, died Saturday at his home after a short illness. He was an old soldier and a pensioner. The funeral was held this afternoon.

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BISSINGER, JOSEPHINE (nee JOEHL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 7, 1921             Wife of Louis E. Bissinger Dies

Mrs. Louis E. Bissinger, aged 70, died this afternoon at 2:15 o'clock at St. Joseph's hospital, where she underwent an operation on Tuesday. Her condition was known to be serious and her death was not unexpected. She was taken to the hospital a week ago last Sunday for treatment. She is survived by her aged husband to whom she was married 53 years ago. She also leaves her two sons, William and Louis Bissinger, and three daughters, Mrs. Charles Krids, Miss Carrie Bissinger, and Miss Mary Bissinger. Mrs. Bissinger was born in St. Louis, but lived practically all her life in Alton. Her maiden name was Josephine Joehl. The Bissinger home is at 638 East Seventh street. Mrs. Bissinger was a well known Alton woman, and since her condition became so serious, friends have been very much interested. Her illness began three years ago. The arrangements for the funeral are incomplete, but it is expected that Mrs. Bissinger will be buried Monday morning.

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BISSINGER, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 6, 1923           Old Soldier Who March With Gen. Sherman, Public School Man is Dead

Louis E. Bissinger, for many years prominent in public life in Alton, member of the school board, member of the Alton post office force, and holder of other positions, died at his residence last night after a long period of disability from old age. His death had been expected for a long time and for days he had been unconscious, apparently sleeping, and he passed out quietly as if in sleep. The death of Mr. Bissinger removes a man who had been deeply interested in the public schools of Alton. He perhaps had the longest career of free service to the schools to his credit than any other Alton man. He would be reappointed year after year to the school board, children growing up and becoming men and associating themselves on the school board with Mr. Bissinger, and almost all of the time he remained a member. He was regarded as being one of the best posted men in Alton in public school affairs, in his time of service, and he rendered incalculable service to the school system in Alton. He was inclined to be a progressive, but not a radical. He was chairman of the finance committee of the school board for many years and kept in close touch with the finances of the board. While he was not penurious in handling school funds, he was careful, and though there were some very unusual calls for expenditures during the days when he was chairman of the finance committee, it is known that always good value was obtained for the money spent. He devoted much time to school work and it was only when his age made it necessary he willingly retired from the service of the public schools. During all the years he served, it should be remembered, he never could receive one cent compensation, his only pay being his satisfaction over helping in what was his pet hobby, the school system. Mr. Bissinger had been living in retirement, having given up his duties in the post office where he had served many years. His declining years were saddened by the death of his wife and the serious illness of one daughter and the absence of another daughter, far from home. He clung to his work in the post office until it became necessary for him to give it up owing to physical disability due to advancing age. Mr. Bissinger was born in Stuttgart, Germany, December 17, 1841, and was in his eighty-second year. He came to Alton when he was 17 years of age. For about 27 years he conducted a general merchandise store at Broadway and Cherry street. In the past 26 years he had been connected with the Alton post office. He was retired from that service when he reached the age limit. He was an alderman from the old fifth ward in the Alton city council, was supervisor of Alton township and was also assistant assessor and special tax collector. He served in the Union army during the Civil War, and made the march with Gen. Sherman through Georgia, "from Atlanta to the Sea." In the more than 20 years he served on the school board, he was finance chairman of the board 16 years. In the Alton post office he had charge of the postal savings department when he was instituted. More than 40 years he was a member of the German Benevolent society. He leaves five children, Louis Blissinger Jr. of Eaglewood, Cal., Mrs. Sue Kribs of Chester, Ill., Miss Carrie Bissinger of Honolulu, Hawaii, Mary Bissinger and William E. Bissinger of Alton. His wife died in January 1921 after over 55 years of married life. Mr. Bissinger was a devout Catholic and a member of St. Mary's church where he attended regularly until physically disability forced him to remain at home. He had been sick just three months to the day, when he died. The trouble began with the bursting of a blood vessel in his leg, then he took the grippe and never rallied. He had been unable to recognize anyone for a week. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning from St. Mary's church. Post office employees will serve as pall bearers. Burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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BITTS, UNKNOWN WIFE OF WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 27, 1920

Mrs. William Bitts, 77 years of age, died at her home in Bethalto Monday afternoon. Death was due to hardening of the arteries, from which the deceased had been suffering for the last two years. Mrs. Bitts is survived by four children - two sons and two daughters. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from the family home. Burial will be in the Bethalto Cemetery.

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BLACK, ALEXANDER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 14, 1903

The funeral of Alexander Black, the aged colored man who dropped dead Friday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Poindexter, on West Seventh street, was held Sunday morning from the Poindexter home, where services were held by Rev. Barton. Interment was in City Cemetery.

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BLACK, ED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 2, 1912                    Dies in Ambulance from Delirium Tremens

Ed Black, the negro who was arrested Saturday afternoon after he had made a disturbance at the Armstrong quarry while suffering an attack of delirium tremens, died on the way to the hospital last night, supposedly from heart disease. His peculiar actions attracted the attention of the police most of the day, and Sunday night shortly before he died his condition seemed to take such a turn that it was thought best to remove him to the hospital. The body was turned over to Undertaker Lock, who will hold him until a sister, living on Papin street in St. Louis, can be communicated with. Coroner Streeper held an inquest today, the last he could hold, as he went out of office at noon.

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BLACK, GEORGE A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 15, 1903

The funeral of George A. Black was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of his mother, Mrs. Lucy Black, Fourth and Langdon street. Services were brief at the home, and were conducted by Rev. J. H. J. Rice, of the Congregational church. There was a large attendance of relatives and friends of the family at the services. Burial was in the City Cemetery.

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BLACK, HARVEY L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 9, 1918            Well Known Business Man, Head of Hapgood Plow Co., Dies

Harvey L. Black, head of the Hapgood Plow Co., president of the First Trust and Savings Bank, and for many years a leader in the civic and business life of Alton, died Monday morning at 5:15 o'clock. He never regained consciousness after he was stricken with apoplexy Saturday morning in his office, attending to some business matters. At the home of his mother, Mrs. Lucy Black, to which he was taken when he was first stricken, he failed to rally and on Sunday it became evident that he had no chance of regaining consciousness. At the time of his death he was attended by his wife, his aged mother, his sister, Mrs. George A. Sauvage, his son-in-law, Frank Chapman, and other members of the family. His only daughter, Mrs. Frank Chapman, is very sick with influenza at Cleveland, Ohio, and was unable to come to her father. Harvey L. Black was born in Apple River, Wis., March 28, fifty-six years ago. He had been a resident of Alton for many years, and had been connected with the Hapgood Plow Co. since he came to Alton. Beside the relatives who were with him when he died, and his daughter, he leaves two brothers, Joseph of Jennings, La., and Ben of Paicenes, Cal.  During his period of residence in Alton, Mr. Black had always taken a very strong interest in all public affairs and was a leader in many civic movements. He was known for his great liberality and his intense interest in many good causes in the community. At the time of the retirement of C. H. Hapgood from the plow company which bore his name, Mr. Black took over the controlling interest and managed the business from that time on. He continued at its head and was engaged in winding up its affairs preparatory to his retirement from business there, when the fatal stroke came as he was seated in his office. The war had greatly complicated the difficulties of continuing the business of the firm, and the wrecking of the engine that operated the plant caused the decision to hasten the time for suspending. Mr. Black was engaged in negotiating for the taking over of the plant by other interests to be operated at the time the suspension was announced. Mr. Black was known as a man of hearty good cheer, unbounded hospitality and sympathy for his fellow man. It was a marked feature of his life that he was always ready to give a lift to anyone so far as it was within his power. He never filled any city offices, but he had always taken a marked interest in those who were seeking to fill them and he had high conceptions of his duty as a good citizen, and he fulfilled them. It is recalled that at the time the first war fund of the Red Cross fund was being raised, it was Mr. Black's subscription that was the biggest of any that was made by Alton people. This was typical of the heart interest of the man. The funeral will be held on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home of his mother, Mrs. J. P. Black. The family request that there be no flowers.

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BLACK, JAMES M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 12, 1921

James M. Black, 59 years of age, died Friday morning at 5 o'clock, after an illness of two years suffering from paralysis at the family home in Hartford, Ill. He is survived by his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Wanda Doerges. The funeral will be held Sunday morning at 11 o'clock from the home.

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BLACK, LUCY JANE (nee DIMMICK)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1920

Mrs. Lucy Jane Black, widow of Joseph Black, died this morning at 2 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George A. Sauvage, 506 East Fourth street, following an illness of a month. Mrs. Black was in her 85th year, having celebrated her 84th birthday, November 6, last. The illness of Mrs. Black became serious several days ago, but her friends had hoped that she might recover. Her death causes general sorrow in the city. Mrs. Black was born at Apple River, Ill., and came to Alton 40 years ago. Before her marriage to Joseph Black, her name was Lucy Dimmick. During her residence in Alton she made many friends by her kindly disposition and loving nature. She was known as a woman fond of her home. She was a member of the Congregational church and was prominent in the activities of that church. Her husband died 20 years ago. Mrs. Black was the mother of the late H. L. Black, former president of the Hapgood Plow Co. She is survived by two sons, J. P. Black of Jennings, Ia., and B. E. Black of San Juan, Cal., both of whom are in Alton, and a daughter, Mrs. George A. Sauvage, with whom she made her home. The funeral will be held Monday at 2:30 p.m. from the home of Mrs. Sauvage where services will be conducted by the Rev. C. C. Smith, pastor of the Congregational church. Interment will be in City cemetery.

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BLACK, UNKNOWN WIFE OF WILLIAM T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 15, 1917

Mrs. William T. Black, wife of the well known Washington avenue business man in Upper Alton, died Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the family residence at Washington and College avenues. The death of Mrs. Black today ends one of the most remarkable sieges of illness ever known in Alton. Her strength of endurance was almost unexcelled. Mrs. Black's illness commenced on the fifth day of January 1906, and continued until today. Had Mrs. Black lived until the fifth day of next month, she would have been sick twelve years. On that day twelve years ago she was visiting at the home of a brother of her husband on Fourth street. She had left home shortly after dinner with the intention of spending the afternoon at the home of her brother-in-law. While there she suffered a stroke of paralysis which rendered her helpless. Her condition was very serious from the start, and a carriage was secured and Mrs. Black was removed to her home in Upper Alton the same afternoon. Instead of improving, Mrs. Black's condition appeared to grow worse and at many times she was supposed to be in a dying condition only a short time after she suffered her first stroke of paralysis. Since her illness commenced and Mrs. Black was supposed to be very near her end, she has outlived many of her near friends who were well and hearty at that time. Mrs. W. T. Black was born in Kansas, and came with her family to Melville when she was very young. She was raised in the neighborhood of Melville, and spent all her life in the neighborhood of Alton. She was 50 years old at the time she was paralyzed, and was 62 years old at the time of her death. Mrs. Black never walked after the date of her first stroke of paralysis. She was conscious up to 12 o'clock last night, and recognized all the members of her family. She leaves besides her husband, six children, Misses Belle, Emma and Mildred Black, and William, Ray and Warren Black, all of Upper Alton. She also leaves three grandchildren. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Patrick's Church and burial will be made in Oakwood Cemetery in Upper Alton.

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BLACK, WILMOT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1912                  Young Man Killed While on Tour of France

Wilmot Black, aged 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey L. Black, was fatally injured at Dole, Jura, France, some time Monday or Monday night. A telegram came Tuesday morning to the First Trust & Savings Bank, of which H. L. Black is president, telling the news that a fatal accident had befallen H. Wilmot Black, and asking for instructions as to what disposition was to be made of the body. Telegrams were sent at once to have the body prepared for shipment home. The nature of the accident was not given in the telegram. It was sent by the Hanover National Bank of New York, which was advised by its London bank that news of the accident had been sent to the London bank. The young man, who was touring Europe, carried a letter of credit issued by the Alton bank, on the New York bank, and in turn transferred to the London bank for convenience. When the young man was killed, and the London banking connections were established, the London bank was informed, which in turn transmitted the message. The sad news was given to the father this morning by the cashier of the First Trust and Savings bank, D. A. Wyckoff, and on his going home Mrs. Black was informed. The mother has been in a very bad state ever since receiving the word of the death of her only son. Wilmot Black was a student at Yale, and immediately after taking his examinations, and before he knew the successful result, he departed for a motorcycle trip through Europe. He was fitting himself for literary work, and desired to make a close view of life of the European people. He traveled through England and Scotland on his machine, but according to letters his parents had, he intended to abandon the motorcycle on going into France and to travel in public conveyances. Just how the accident could have occurred to him is not known, but his family had a suspicion that he perhaps had changed his plans and was taking the motorcycle along to France, and that while riding it he met with the fatal accident. Mr. and Mrs. Black and their daughter, Mrs. Frank Chapman, who was at home, were preparing to leave in a few days for an extended trip and had their traveling necessities packed and were ready to make the start. All plans for the trip were cancelled immediately. Wilmot Black was a graduate of Alton High School and he entered preparatory schools after leaving Alton to get ready for entrance examinations at Yale. Mrs. Lucy Black, with her daughter, Mrs. Sauvage, was about to start on a trip too, and today was to have entertained at dinner her son, H. L. Black and his family. They were to have held a family reunion at noon, but the party was broken up by the news of the death of Wilmot Black.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 1, 1912

Through the assistance of Clarence Funk, of the International Harvester Co., details of the accide3nt that caused the death of Wilmot Black came to the parents today. Mr. Funk, who is a cousin of Mr. Black, interested himself in the matter and cabled the international Harvester agent at Lyons, France, near Dole, to go there and learn of the details of Mr. Black's death. The agent cabled back that Wilmot Black was killed in a motorcycle accident at 8 o'clock Monday morning. While trying to avoid running down a bicycle, he ran into a heavy wagon and his skull was fractured in the collision. He lived for nine hours, but was unconscious all of that time. From the advices received it seems that everything possible was done for the young man and that every care is being taken of the remains and all possible is being done to allow the shipment back to this country as soon as possible. It is expected the body will leave Havre, France, Saturday of this week. If the boat is missed on August 3, it will be necessary to wait until August 10 for the issuance of the permit.....

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BLACKBURN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 29, 1908

John Blackburn died today at St. Joseph's hospital after a lingering illness, aged 48 years. The body will be taken to the residence of his sister, Mrs. Charles Goudie in Forest Park. The hour for the funeral has not been fixed. Deceased was a son of William Blackburn, a brother to Mrs. Charles Goudie and Mrs. Edward Hall of Market street, and William Blackburn who lives in Newbern.

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BLAIR, EDMUND H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1907     Real Estate Dealer and Member of City Council Dies

Edmund H. Blair died Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock at his home, 1008 Henry street, after a brief illness. He would have been 45 years old in November. The announcement of Mr. Blair's death was sad news in Alton. Since he was taken ill a few weeks ago, his condition was the subject of much inquiry by his anxious friends, but there was no one who believed that he was in serious danger until a few days before his death when a doctor's consultation confirmed the suspicion that Mr. Blair was fatally ill. He had been suffering with a slight attack of lung trouble some time ago. Recently he had an attack of the grippe and the disease settled on his lungs, aggravating the malady from which he had suffered. His decline from that time was rapid. Three weeks ago he was attending to his business as usual, and no one of his friends and business associates knew that anything was wrong with his health. He was considering the question of becoming a candidate for re-election as Fourth ward alderman, "if the people desired his services," he said, and he would doubtless have been a candidate as his constituents esteemed his services very highly. When he was taken very ill he wrote a letter to Mayor Beall in which he stated that he could not further consider the question of being a candidate and he desired to withdraw his name, as he felt he could not do justice to himself nor his constituents in his condition of health. Mr. Blair was born in Alton and was a son of Mr. and Mrs. John L. Blair, both of whom are living. He had lived in Alton most of his life and was engaged in the real estate and insurance business. His reputation for reliability was first class and he had the confidence of everyone. He was connected with the Baptist church in an official capacity and had been a member of that church since he was a young man. He had built up a very prosperous business, by careful attention to it, and he was known in the business world for his persistent industry and his honesty. He was trusted by everyone and he held many positions of trust in estates, which he discharged in a manner satisfactory to all who had relations with him. He leaves his wife, three sons and a daughter, also his parents and five sisters, Mrs. E. L. Edwards, Mrs. A. L. Abbott, Mrs. E. M. Caldwell, Misses Sadie and Edith Blair. The funeral of Mr. Blair will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the First Baptist church.

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BLAIR, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 21, 1913

Because there was not any smoke curling from the chimney of the home of George Blair in Benbow City on this cold morning, Village Clerk William Beers broke into his home to learn what the matter was, and found Blair cold in death, stretched on the floor of his home. Three days ago, because of illness, the old gentleman had to give up his duties of agent of the interurban at Benbow City. He went home, and it was believed that he was getting along nicely. This morning, when the village clerk came by the Blair home and noticed no smoke curling from the chimney, and when he knocked, there was no response. He then broke the door in and found Mr. Blair on the floor. Dr. E. G. Gottschalk, who was called, said Mr. Blair had been dead for at least three days. Mr. Blair is 71 years of age and came to Benbow City from Roodhouse, Ill., where he was a prosperous grain buyer. His wife and a son, Robert Blair, still reside there. Mr. Blair had resided in Benbow City about three years. The remains were turned over to the coroner. Mr. Blair is the third prominent Benbow City resident to die suddenly the past few months. William O'Hearn and Jos. Biehler, who went before him, were prominent in the affairs of the little city. The remains of George Blair, who was found dead in his home in Benbow City, were removed to Alton today by Coroner Undertaker Berner, where the inquest will be held in a day or two. In the meantime, word will be sent to his relatives at Roodhouse to ascertain what disposition to make of the body.

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BLAIR, HANNAH (nee ANDREW)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 25, 1907

Mrs. Hanna Blair died early Sunday morning at her home on Main street in Upper Alton, aged 91. She was found dead in her bed at 5 o'clock by Mrs. Lucretia Stocker, who had been living with her and taking care of her. Mrs. Blair was one of Upper Alton's five nonagenarians. She had long lived alone until last April, when her friends and neighbors persuaded her to have someone live with her and take care of her. At that time Mrs. Stocker moved in and has since given her constant attention and the old lady became very much attached to Mrs. Stocker. During the past two months Mrs. Blair had been bedfast, and at times was delirious, not being able to recognize anyone. Six weeks ago a physician said she would not live through the night, but she showed wonderful vitality in clinging to life as she did. Lately she had been calling Mrs. Stocker several times during the night by tapping on the wall with a cane. Saturday night Mrs. Stocker was in the room with Mrs. Blair shortly before midnight, when she went to bed and did not waken until 5 o'clock, when she thought it strange she had not been called by the tap on the wall. She went into the next room and found Mrs. Blair dead. Mrs. Blair's maiden name was Hannah Andrew, and she was born in Pennsylvania September 9, 1816. She came to Upper Alton with her family when she was about sixteen years old. She was married here to Joseph Blair on January 30, 1853, by Rev. J. A. Robinson, who was at that time pastor of the Methodist church. The couple had two daughters who died many years ago, one of them being burned to death accidentally.  Joseph Blair died in 1873, and since that time Mrs. Blair lived alone. The only relatives she is known to have are a nephew and a niece, Mr. A. L. Andrew of Palmyra, and Mrs. Mary Ross of Jacksonville. They were notified today of the death of Mrs. Blair. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Upper Alton Methodist church, Rev. M. B. Baker officiating.

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John L. BlairBLAIR, JOHN L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 19, 1915           Aged Resident, Prominent Business Man, Dies

John L. Blair died at his residence, Fifteenth and Langdon streets in Alton, Friday afternoon from old age. His death was expected as he had been sinking steadily and the past few days had been so weak that there was evidently no chance of his surviving much longer. He had been very ill for the past two weeks, but prior to that time failing sight had added to another affliction, failing of his hearing, and of late Mr. Blair had been able to take little comfort out of those who were around him and anxious to do for him whatever they could. The end came at 1:15 o'clock. Mr. Blair would have been ninety four years of age on Sunday. He was born in Montgomery county, Tennessee, March 21, 1821. About sixty-eight years ago he came to Alton from Carrollton, Ill., where he had married and was in business. He engaged in business here and succeeded rapidly. He said that he discontinued the retail grocery business in 1852, four years after he started. He continued in a wholesale way. He had as his partner Roger Atwood, and the firm, in the year 1863, did a half million dollars worth of business, which was a remarkable business in those days. In 1849 Mr. Blair became interested in the gold strike in California. With a partner, Achilles Ballinger, his brother-in-law, he bought 300 cows to drive them across the plains. They paid about $15 each for the cows and arriving in California, sold them at a good profit. Out of the 300 cows which were started, only five died on the road. Each cow gave a good advance on what was paid for them. They sold the milk from the cows for 75 cents a quart. Mr. Blair was a member of the First Baptist church for sixty-seven years, and was by far its oldest member. He had always been a reader of the Telegraph from the day he came to Alton, until failing sight made it impossible for him to continue. Mr. Blair was a public spirited man, always ready to promote any good enterprise, civic or religious. It is related that not many years ago when he was nearing ninety, he protested and insisted upon the paving of a street along his home property on Middletown, at a time when most men would be avoiding taking up any new responsibilities. He was an expert in the garden and until a few years ago persisted in doing his own gardening about his place. Mr. Blair served for many years on the Alton School Board. Soon after he came to Alton he took up interest in the very indifferent school system we had then, and he kept hammering away until he saw results coming from his boosting for better school. It was under his pushings with that of other men, that the school system in Alton became absolutely free, and it was Mr. Blair who was chiefly responsible for the erection of Lincoln school, then a stupendous enterprise for Alton in order to put over the Lincoln school plan Mr. Blair was one of two men who ran for city council to give two more votes in favor of the enterprise. Commenting, not long ago, on the fact that he used to distribute free school tickets to children whose parents could not afford to pay tuition, Mr. Blair said, "I see many who have made wonderful progress from the education they got on those free tickets years back." Mr. Blair is survived by his wife, who has been an invalid and unable to leave her chair for many months. He leaves also six daughters, Mrs. Lucy M. Edwards, Mrs. A. L. Abbott, Mrs. Caldwell, Misses Sarah E. Blair and Miss Edith M. Blair. Funeral arrangements have not been made.  [March 22, 1915 - Burial was at City Cemetery.]

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BLAIR, OSCAR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 22, 1920

The remains of the victim of the fatal railroad accident which occurred Saturday morning near the Illinois Glass Plant here, were positively identified Saturday night at the morgue as those of Oscar Blair, 54 years of age and a resident of Upper Alton for the past 13 years. The circumstances surrounding the identification are singular in that the mystery is unraveled as predicted. When Mr. Blair, who lived at 1311 Main St. in Upper Alton, failed to return home at the usual time Saturday night, his wife, having read the Telegraph, became anxious and phoned her husband's employer in the boxing department at the Glass plant. She was informed that he had not been at work all day, and then expressed her fears suggesting that the employer visit the Deputy coroner's morgue. The employer, W. G. Seabold, visited the morgue and established the identity of the dead man. The failure of ascertaining the man's name earlier in the day is attributed to the fact that he had always worn glasses, but when hit by the train his glasses were lost. However, they were found late Saturday afternoon and brought to the morgue with the result that upon the arrival of Mr. Seabold the remains were immediately identified. The deceased had been employed in the boxing department of the Glass factory for approximately 13 years, and was well known to his fellow employees. He usually walked to work, and in so doing passed many acquaintances, but this was of no avail, owing to the absence of his glasses. He is survived by his wife. Funeral services will be held at 7:30 Tuesday morning from the home at 1311 Main Street, Upper Alton, and the remains will be taken to Glasgow, Illinois at nine o'clock. Interment will be at the latter place Tuesday afternoon.

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BLAIR, SARAH ELIZABETH (nee ATWOOD)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 20, 1916

Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Atwood Blair, aged 86, widow of John L. Blair, died Saturday night at 10 o'clock from old age and asthma, after an illness of only a few days. Her case was recognized as being very serious only on the last day, when she declined rapidly. Had she lived until Sunday, she would have seen the first anniversary of the death of her husband. Mrs. Blair came to Alton in the early fifties as an educator in a private school that was conducted for a few years by the father of C. W. Leverett, and one of her pupils, still living and who recalls her kindly, is Mr. Leverett. She came to Alton a very attractive young woman, gifted as an educator. Her maiden name was Atwood. She returned to New Boston, Mass., her home, and was followed there later by John L. Blair, who claimed her as his bride and brought her to Alton to reside permanently in 1855. She had lived in Alton ever since. Her husband was always deeply interested in the cause of education, and he only knew how much he owned his interest in that cause to the urgings of his wife. Mrs. Blair had been in feeble health for several years. She was badly crippled by a fall a few years ago, which kept her disabled the remainder of her life. At the time she was hurt, it was not believed that she would live long, but her wonderful vitality and recuperative powers caused her life to be spared far beyond the time it was believed she must go. She was a devoted member of the First Baptist Church and she lived her religion conscientiously. She raised a large family of children, of whom five daughters survive her: Mrs. Lucy M. Edwards of Alton; Mrs. Annette B. Abbott of St. Louis; Mrs. E. M. Caldwell of Alton; and Misses Sarah E. Blair and Edith M. Blair. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home. Mrs. Blair was born in New Boston, N. H., December 12, 1829. She was married to John L. Blair, October 3, 1855. Beside the children who survive her, she had two sons, John W. Blair and Edmund H. Blair, both of whom are deceased. She was a woman of beautiful character, and she leaves a large number of friends who remember her for her many acts of kindness and her many efforts to make the way smoother for others during her life. The time set for the funeral will be the first anniversary of the burial, and also of the birth of her deceased husband.

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BLAKE, EUGENE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 29, 1919           Young Veteran of Many Battles Dies From Appendicitis

Eugene Blake, recently returned from France, where he had the distinction of going over the top five times, died last night at St. Joseph's Hospital during an operation for relief from appendicitis. He was 24 years old. Blake made his home in Wood River before leaving with a contingent of drafted men, and has lived there since his discharge from the service. In France he was attached to the 30th division, 119th Infantry, to which were attached Sydney Gaskins and Albert Rupert of Alton. Gaskins is home, having been wounded and discharged, while Rupert died in action. Rupert was talking to Blake just before the time he was killed. He was a collector of buttons from the uniforms of German officers, and on the day he was killed said to Blake: "I guess I'll have to go out and get some more buttons." It was shortly after that he was killed. Blake was in many battles in the region of the Argonne forest, where American soldiers participated in some of the most sanguinary battles of the war. He escaped serious injury in many of the fierce battles. After "going over" five times his arm was shattered with shrapnel. He lay for two months in an English hospital, and for some time it was thought his arm would have to be amputated. For a time fears were felt for his life. The hero of many battles who had withstood the supreme test of facing death and refused to give up when it seemed impossible to save his arm, worked until three o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the Standard Oil Co. refining plant at Wood River, where he was employed. On Tuesday he was taken to the hospital and last night he died. Blake was a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Blake, formerly of Alton. The father is at present residing in Arcadia, Fla. He leaves two sisters at Jacksonville, and two sisters and a brother at Arcadia in Florida. He was a nephew of Mrs. E. J. Morrissey of this city. The funeral probably will be held in Alton, but no arrangements have been made.

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BLANKENSHIP, WINIFRED P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 23, 1922

Word was received in Alton today that Mrs. Winifred P. Blankenship, wife of Robert Blankenship, had died in East St. Louis. The family formerly lived at 1025 west Ninth street in Alton. She had been an invalid for a long time and her death was due to tuberculosis. James Klunk went to East St. Louis today to bring the body to Alton for burial here.

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BLASA, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 11, 1907

Charles Blasa, aged 66, whose home was on the "coal branch" in the north side, died this morning after a long illness with cancer. He leaves six children and three step-children. The body will be taken to Otterville, Ill., for burial.

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BLASE, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1915

Henry Blase of Upper Alton died this afternoon at the St. Joseph's Hospital after an illness of several weeks. His death came about after it was believed that he was to recover from a serious illness of several weeks ago. About one month ago he was suddenly taken ill and it was feared at the time that he could live for only a few days. He was removed from his home to St. Joseph's Hospital where he lingered for several days, and finally his condition improved and he was taken to his home on Main street in Upper Alton. He was taken worse and removed to the hospital this morning and died this afternoon. Mr. Blase was well known in Alton and the vicinity. He is a glassblower and has lived in Upper Alton for many years. Besides a wife he is survived by one son, Carl, and two daughters, Addie and Eurilla. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

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BLATNICK, JOSEPH/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, June 17, 1935                  Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

Joseph Blatnick, 27, former Glen Carbon coal miner, was found dead along the tracks of the Nickel Plate Road midway between this city and his home Sunday morning by George Schwalb, a railroad track walker who was making his dally Inspection trip. Blatnick's legs had been severed. Deputy .Coroner Charles W. Marks is of the opinion that he was struck by a freight train. Mr. Marks said that the nature of the injuries indicated death resulted within a few moments. None of the train crews operating trains during the night reported striking the man or observing the body after the accident. Mr. Blatnick is said to have declined to ride home with two friends. It is believed he was walking along the tracks. The body has been taken from the Straube Funeral Home to the family residence at Glen Carbon. Mr. Blatnick was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Blatnick and was born at Glen Carbon on July 8, 1908. He attended school there. His grandfather, Joseph Hoffman died at Glen Carbon on May 1. Besides his parents he Is survived by three brothers, Charles Blatnick, village treasurer, Raymond Batnlck, Glen Carbon and John Blatnick, Staunton. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock from the family residence. Rev. H. J. Bredehoeft of Eden Evangelical Church will officiate. Burial will be made at Glen Carbon Cemetery.

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BLOEMKER, RUDOLPH/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Tuesday, March 13, 1934

Rudolph Bloemker, 68, of this city, died at the hospital at the Madison County Home here yesterday afternoon. He had lived in Edwardsville for 20 years. His wife, Mrs. Sophia Bloemker, preceded him in death. Funeral services will be held at the Dauderman Funeral Home in Alhambra tomorrow afternoon with services at the Salem Church at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in the Salem Cemetery. Mr. Bloemker is survived by four sons, Ernest Bloemker, Alhambra; William Bloemker, Decatur; Rudolph Bloemker, Springfield, Mo.; Gustave Bloemker of Los Angeles, Cal.; one daughter, Mrs. Ida Willcockson, of Kansas City, Missouri; eleven grandchildren, one brother, Ernest Bloemker, Alhambra, and a sister, Mrs. Sophia Suhre of Edwardsville.

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BLUME, GUS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 29, 1912                  Laborer Found Lying Dead Across Bluff Line Track

Gus Blume, a laborer who had been working around Oldenburg, was found lying dead beside the railroad track this morning by Charles Wedig. It was supposed that Blume, who was walking the track, became caught in some ties and held fast and could not get out of the way of the train. He was at the saloon at Oldenburg Sunday night, leaving there about 9 o'clock and started for his home. That was the last seen of him until his body was found beside the track.

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BOALS, JULIETTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 9, 1908

Mrs. Juliette Boals, wife of M. H. Boals, died very suddenly this afternoon at the family residence, Sixth and Langdon streets, at 4:15 o'clock. Her death was very unexpected.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1908

Mrs. Juliette J. Boals, wife of M. H. Boals, died suddenly at the family home on Sixth street about four o'clock Saturday afternoon, as stated in the Telegraph Saturday evening. The immediate cause of her death was heart failure. Mrs. Boals was taken suddenly ill Friday afternoon, but apparently improved rapidly so that on Saturday the members of her family went to business and to the High school meet as they had planned. About the middle of the afternoon on Saturday there was a sudden change in her condition, and before the physician or the absent members of the family could arrive she had lost consciousness and never rallied. Mrs. Boals was born in the vicinity of East Alton, January 9, 1845. She spent her childhood and youth in Alton, graduating from the Illinois Female college in Jacksonville.  April 10th, 1867, she was married to Manuel H. Boals, whose home she has blessed and hallowed for the past forty-one years. She was the mother of six children, Miss Minnie M. Boals, William J. Boals and Harry G. Boals, all of Alton; and Frank S. Boals of Champaign, Ill.; La Rue R. Boals and Mrs. Fred L. Eberhardt of Newark, N. J.  Upon another, John L. Boals, she bestowed all the love and care of an own mother. These, together with the stricken husband, whose constant and devoted companion she has been through the long years, mourn the loss of one who was a marvel of unselfishness and patience in the care and love she gave them and in the retiring but gracious aid she always extended to others when it lay within her power to give it. She has been closely connected with the Congregational church since its early history, and until a severe illness somewhat impaired the vigor of her health, she gave loving and valuable service to its life and work. When she was forced to lay that activity aside, her large family of children stepped in to fill the breach, but she never lost her active sympathy and interest in its welfare. One half-sister, Miss Mae Quigley, and a step-brother, William Quigley, with the neighborhood in which she lived, have lost a firm friend and an unfailing help in sickness and trouble. Funeral will take place Tuesday afternoon at half past two o'clock from the family home, 502 East Sixth street.

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BOALS, MANUEL H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 6, 1919                Retired Business Man, Ardent Camper, Dies

Manuel H. Boals, in his eighty-seventh year, died at his residence, Sixth and Langdon streets, Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock following a general breakdown. He had been failing in strength for a long time, but beginning March 15th he had been confined to his room all of the time and most of the time to his bed. He had been seeing some of his children last week, Mrs. F. L. Eberhardt of Newark, N. J., and Capt. Larue R. Boals of the U. S. army, and they had departed just the day before the final breakdown came. Since their departure his decline had been rapid. Mr. Boals maintained a remarkable record. The last of the original Blue Grass hunting club to stick to its traditions of making a yearly camping outing, Mr. Boals would not cease his annual pilgrimages to the wilds of the Illinois river, up to two years ago. Long after almost all the other members of the old time camping club were dead, Mr. Boals would go for his trips and would put in a week or two roughing it. Two years ago he made the last trip when his son, Harry, was married and a camping trip was decided on as the form of trip the honeymoon would be. He was a man of great strength and energy, and before his retirement from the planing mill and lumber business had been an active figure in Alton's business circles. Mr. Boals was born in Franklin, Pa., April 31, 1833. He came to Alton when he was 21 years of age and followed the trade of carpenter. Soon afterward he engaged in business and also conducted a lumber yard. The planing mill and lumber yard were the result of the demands of the constantly growing business of the firm of contractors. Mr. Boals succeeded his partner in the business and for many years conducted the planing mill on east Broadway on the site recently sold to the Savidge Tractor Co. Advancing age caused Mr. Boals to retire from business a number of years ago, turning it over to his sons, who continued until fire destroyed the mill a few years ago. The business was never revived after the fire. Mr. Boals was a member of the Congregational church of many years standing. He was twice married, first to Marina Logan, and by that marriage he leaves one son, John Boals of Bisbee, Arizona. He was later married to Juliette Vaughn and by that marriage he leaves seven children: Miss Minnie Boals, William J. Boals, Harry G. Boals of Alton; Mrs. Lutie Eberhardt of Newark, N. J.; Dr. Frank S. Boals of Staunton, Neb.; and Capt. L. R. Boals now at Camp Sherman, Ohio. His second wife died May 9, 1908. Mr. Boals was for many years an active and deeply interested member of Piasa Lodge No. 27, A. F. & A. M., continuing his connection there up to the time of his death. He was regarded as one of Alton's most substantial business men, and had a large circle of friends. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 5 o'clock from the family home, Sixth and Langdon streets, where short services will be held. The Masonic fraternity will have charge of the services at the grave. Burial will be in City cemetery. Flowers will be omitted.

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BODE, WILLIAM A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 3, 1922           Old Publisher of German Language Newspapers Succumbs

William A. Bode, for many years publisher of German language newspaper in Alton and at St. Charles, Mo., died Sunday morning at 8:55 o'clock at his home, 432 east Eighth street, in Alton, after being an invalid for nine years. He had been sinking rapidly the last week of his life and his death was no surprise to the members of his family and his intimate friends. When he was first taken down nine years ago, it was believed that his illness was of little consequence, but he was never able to be about again. The malady which proved fatal was the hardening of the arteries, which was followed by a progressive paralysis that made rapid progress in the last week or ten days. Mr. Bode is best remembered in Alton and vicinity as the publisher of the Alton Banner, and later of the Alton Journal. He had disposed of his interest in the Banner and after a while launched the Journal, which suspended when Mr. Bode was taken sick and was no longer able to give it his personal attention. He belonged to the old school of publishers who not only wrote their own copy, but also set the type from which the printing was done. He never lost interest in printing and members of his family said that in his closing days, just before complete collapse came, in his delirium, the old publisher was trying to always to hasten his work of getting the type set, ready to go to press on time. In newspaper offices the number 30 is the symbol of completion, and when 30 came for him, he was still working hard so that he would be "on time." Mr. Bode was born at Hanover, Germany, and he would have been 73 years of age the 29th of this month. He came to America with his parents when 2 years old, and they settled at St. Charles, Mo. He learned the printing trade and published the Democrat at St. Charles. Thirty years ago, he came to Alton to take over the Alton Banner, and continued on that paper for many years. He was highly respected in Alton and at St. Charles and he was known both as a good man to his family and as a good citizen. Had he lived until the 7th of April he would have been able to have celebrated his fiftieth anniversary of his marriage to Mrs. Bode, who survives him. Beside his widow, he leaves five daughters, Mrs. W. W. Thousand, Mrs. Frank Wilson, Mrs. I. D. S. Shepler, Misses Hilda and Ella Bode. He leaves also three grandchildren, and two brothers, Christian and Henry Bode, both of St. Charles. His only sister died less than a year ago. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home, and burial was in City cemetery.

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BODENDEICK, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 16, 1911

Williiam Bodendeick, for 35 years a resident of the village of Bethalto, died at his home there at 11 o'clock Thursday morning after an illness of several years with asthma, ending with a severe attack of the grip. He was 63 years of age, and had followed the trade of a cooper in Bethalto, up to the time of the burning of the factory. He leaves a daughter, Mrs. William Stoehr of Boise City, Idaho, and funeral arrangements will not be made until she is heard from.

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BOEDEKER, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 18, 1922

The funeral of Henry Boedeker will be held Sunday, with services at the home on Lampert Street, at 1:30 o'clock and at the Lutheran Church on Central avenue at 2:00 o'clock. Boedeker died yesterday morning after an illness of three years. Four sons, Charles, Anton, George and Louis Boedeker, and two sons-in-law-, Arthur Laux and George Davis, will serve as pallbearers. Interment will be in the family lot in City cemetery.

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BOEDY, LENA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 8, 1918

Mrs. Lena Boedy died Thursday at 827 East Sixth street in a house in which she lived for the past twenty years. Mrs. Boedy, who was 79 years of age, had been in good health up until Wednesday when she was taken suddenly ill. Medical aid was given her, but she did not rally and died Thursday night at 11:30 o'clock. Mrs. Boedy resided in Alton for thirty-two years. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. George Pile, with whom she made her home, and Mrs. Mary Hahn. Five grandchildren, three great grandchildren, and seven step-children. Mrs. Boedy was an excellent neighbor and will be greatly missed by her large number of relatives and friends. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church. Interment will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

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BOEHM, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 17, 1906            Quarrel on Belle Street Results in Death

Fred Boehm, a laborer, was instantly killed by George Dalton of 1209 Belle street at Dalton's home, by being struck a blow over the eye and knocked backward down one step, striking his head on a stone step. The trouble is said to have started over a dance given in the neighborhood. On Saturday night Boehm met Dalton in Thomas Broderick's saloon, where Dalton had stopped while on his way for some medicine for his sick wife and child. Boehm, according to Dalton's story, began quarreling with him and challenged him to fight. Dalton refused and slipped out of the saloon and went back home. Boehm, who lived next door, followed him, and on arriving at Dalton's home he renewed his challenges, and according to Dalton he declared his intention of entering the house and whipping Dalton, who struck Boehm a blow in the face and knocked him down. Dalton is small of stature and a light weight, while Boehm was strong and heavy. After Boehm fell heavily to the sidewalk, Dalton, with a neighbor, dragged him to his own porch and left him there. Dalton then proceeded to get the medicine for his wife and child, and was afterward arrested.

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BOEHM, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 24, 1909                             Civil War Soldier Dies

Louis Boehm, aged 76 years, died yesterday afternoon at his home in Union street from dropsy, after a long illness. He was a native of Germany but came to this country when yet a youth. He enlisted in the Civil War on the side of the union, and served throughout that struggle. He leaves a wife and one daughter, Mrs. Conrad Hartmann of Springfield, Ill.  The funeral will be held Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church, and burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.  Mr. Boehm was a veteran of the Civil War and drew a pension. Recently he procured an increase of pension to $20 a month after considerable difficulty. His evidence that he was 75 years of age was hard to get. The very best he could procure in this country was that of a twin sister who lives in Minnesota, but her statement as to the time of her brother's birth would not be received by the pension department. After considerable delay, the old soldier managed to procure a certified copy of the birth records of the family in the family Bible in Germany, and when this was filed Mr. Boehm received the pension. Before he received it, he expressed doubt that he would live to get the desired increase, but he did and had drawn one payment of the $20 a month allowance.

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BOEHM, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 14, 1920

The funeral of Mrs. Mary Boehm was held this morning from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry Gissal, to St. Mary's church where services were conducted by Rev. Fr. Joseph Meckel. There were many old friends of Mrs. Boehm at the funeral services. Burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery. The pallbearers were Minard Joehl, Chris Eckhard, John Manns, John Schmidt, Joseph Wuellner and Lawrence Hellrung.

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BOEKER, CHARLES/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Friday, April 17, 1896

Charles Boeker, aged 10 years, died Monday night [April 13] at the home of his brother, F. H. Boeker, on Fillmore street, of diphtheria. The funeral took place Wednesday to Prairietown.  The boy came to this city on Sunday, April 5, to learn the trade of shoemaker. He worked at K. Lorch's store the next day, and on Tuesday was taken sick and after a week's suffering died.

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BOEREKER, LEO THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 12, 1908

Leo Thomas, the little eight months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Boercker, died Sunday, October 11th, of bronchitis, at their home on West Seventh street, after an illness of nine days. The family have the sympathy of their many friends in the loss of their only son who was the pride of his parents' hearts and who are now heart broken over his sudden death. The funeral will take place Tuesday at 2 p.m. from the Cathedral. Interment in Greenwood cemetery.

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BOESCHERT, BRIDGET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 18, 1919

Mrs. Bridget Boeschert, wife of Martin Boeschert, died Tuesday morning at 7 o'clock at the family home, 632 east Ninth Street, after an illness of more than a year from cancer. She was born in Alton, the 4th of May, 1860, and had spent all of her life in the one neighborhood. She was a member of the order of Ladies of the Maccabbess, and one of its oldest members. She leaves beside her husband, four children: Walter, Felix, Paul, and Louisa. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church Thursday morning at 9 o'clock.

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BOESCHERT, ROSE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 11, 1907

The body of Mrs. Leo Boeschert arrived this noon from St. Louis and burial will be in this city. She was Miss Rose Cahill before her marriage less than a year ago. Mrs. Boeschert leaves two sisters in Alton, Mrs. John Dooling of 918 east Sixth street and Mrs. James Hershman. She leaves also her father, Joseph Cahill, and a brother, Raymond Cahill, at Gas City, Ind.  The body was taken to the Dooling home and the funeral will be held from there to St. Mary's church Friday morning.

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BOETTGER, EMIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1920

The funeral of Emil Boettger was held this afternoon from the Moro Presbyterian church, and was largely attended by relatives and friends. Interment was in the Moro cemetery. Boettger died near Dorsey last week, being a victim of lockjaw.

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BOH, MARIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 10, 1904

Mrs. Marie Boh, aged 82, a resident of Alton fifty years, died this morning after a long illness. She was a native of Hessen, Germany. The funeral will be held from her home, 615 George street, Thursday at 9 a.m.  Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann will officiate.  [Interment was in City Cemetery]

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BOHART, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 1, 1923

John Bohart, aged 82, died this morning at 1:20 o'clock at the home of his son, Charles Bohart, 219 West Thirteenth street, following a week's illness with pneumonia. He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. P. Bock of Ferguson, Mo., and two sons, Charles and Henry, both of Alton. Funeral services will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from SS Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.

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BOHART, UNKNOWN WIFE OF H. J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 12, 1911

The death of Mrs. H. J. Bohart occurred at 9:10 p.m. Monday at the family home, 121 West Ninth street, after an illness of several weeks of typhoid malaria. She was 28 years of age. She leaves no children, and is survived by her husband. She was born in Cheltenham, Mo., and was married on Christmas Eve, 1907. The date of the funeral has not yet been fully settled upon, but the services will be held at the home. Mrs. Bohart had been in poor health for a number of years.

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BOHEANS, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1921

George Boheans died Monday afternoon at the family home near Bethalto. His death was caused from asthma of which he had been a sufferer for several years. The deceased is the father of Mrs. George Oetkin of Wood River. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the family home.

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BOHLEN, GERTRUDE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 12, 1907         

Mrs. Gertrude Bohlen, aged 84, died very suddenly last night at her home near Fosterburg. She had been in what was considered her usual health and there was no thought of her being in a dangerous state. She was able to be up and around her home and during the latter part of the afternoon she went out in the ____ to drive some pigs out of the yard. She had lived with her daughter, Mrs. John Schulte. A child of Mrs. Schulte saw his grandmother fall over in the yard and ran to see what was thr trouble. A physician was _____ after the aged lady was carried into the house, but it was said that she was dead. Mrs. Bohlen had lived in the vicinity of Fosterburg more than 60 years. She was the mother of three children, Mrs. ______, Mrs. Minnie Schau, and Mrs. _____ Obermueller. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 11 o'clock from the Dorsey church.

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BOHNENSTIEHL, MRS. JACOB SR./Source: Troy Star, April 26, 1894

Mrs. Jacob Bohnenstiehl Sr., in the vicinity of Black Jack, died Tuesday morning. The funeral took place from the family residence this afternoon at 2 o'clock, services being held at the Protestant Church.

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BOLLMANN, CAROLINE/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, January 20, 1892

Mrs. Caroline Bollmann, wife of Henry F. Bollmann, died Monday morning [Jan. 18], aged 39 years, 2 months and 7 days. She was born in Pin Oak township, being a daughter of the late Ernst Kriege, November 11, 1852. She married Henry F. Bollmann February 2, 1871. She was the mother of nine children. Her husband and eight children, the oldest 19 years and the youngest ten days, survive. The funeral took place yesterday. The services were held at the German M. E. church, Rev. John Schlagenhauf officiating. The remains were interred in Woodlawn cemetery. The pallbearers were: William Giese, Henry P. Stulken, William Stulken, M. Dieken, William Schaake, and Ernst Englemann.

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BOLLMANN, ELIZABETH/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, December 30, 1891

Mrs. Elizabeth Bollmann, aged 80 years, 9 months and 16 days, died at the home of her son, Herman, near this city, last night [Dec. 29], at 6 o'clock. Old age had been _____ on her for some time, and two weeks ago she took sick with la grippe, which was the immediate cause of her death. The funeral will take place tomorrow morning, at 11 o'clock, from the residence of her son, Herman, to the Ger____ .... The remains will be interred in Woodlawn cemetery. She was born March 13, 1811, in Linen Province, Westphalen, Prussia, and came to this country in November 1865, settling near this city. She has resided here since. When about 20 years of age she married William Bollmann. They had eleven children, seven of whom are living. They are Ernst Bollmann and Rika Stolte, of this city, Sophia Kattker of Cincinnati, Ohio, William Bollmann and Lizzie Kettlekamp of Nokomis, and Henry and Herman, of this city. She leaves 40 grandchildren, 6 great grandchildren and a host of friends to mourn her demise.

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BOLTON, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1907

Thomas Bolton, colored, aged about 95 years, died last night at his home near the Corbett brickyard. He was father-in-law of Henry Mayo, and the funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock. Burial will be in Rocky Ford cemetery.

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BONE, OLA L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1904

Miss Ola L. Bone, aged 26, died Sunday morning from pneumonia at her home in the east end place on Illinois avenue. The funeral was held this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home, and services were conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenny.

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BONN, JOHN P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 13, 1914

John P. Bonn, aged 80, died Friday evening at Edwardsville, and was buried in Edwardsville Sunday. He was the father of Edward Bonn, who is employed in the Alton post office. Mr. Bonn worked as a teamster making regular trips between Alton and Edwardsville, before there was any railroad, and hauled freight. He is remembered by many of the older residents of Alton.

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BONNELL, FRANK ARTHUR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1918

Frank Arthur Bonnell, the 4 months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Bonnell, of 412 Central avenue, died this morning with pneumonia. The funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon from the home, and the burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Bonnell suffered the loss of a child several months ago, the death of their son today being the second child to die within the year.

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BONNING, EDNA (nee SMITH)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 29, 1920

Mrs. Edna Smith Bonning of Appledale, Washington, died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George F. Smith of the Bethalto road, yesterday afternoon at 2:30. Mrs. Bonning came here two days before Christmas for the first visit home since her marriage four years ago. She was suddenly taken ill about a week ago, and it is understood that the cause of her death was a complication of troubles resulting from influenza. She was 28 years old and had lived in East Alton until the time of her marriage to William Bonning. She was a graduate of the Alton High school, and was a teacher for two years in the Kennedy school, one year in the Godfrey school, and then went to Appledale, Washington to teach. While there she met Bonning. Mrs. Bonning is survived by her husband, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George F. Smith, two brothers, George and Charles of East Alton, and one sister, Mrs. William Groves of Wood River. The couple had no children. Mrs.Bonning's parents and grandparents have always lived in East Alton, her grandfather being one of the early settlers. Her death comes as a severe shock to relatives and friends. Her husband has been sent for, and will arrive some time Sunday. No funeral arrangements will be made until he gets here.

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BONNING, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1920             Dies One Week After Arriving in Alton for Wife's Funeral

William Bonning, 30, of Appledale, Washington, died last night at St. Joseph's hospital, following an illness with double pneumonia. He died just one week after arriving in Alton and ten days after his wife, Mrs. Edna Smith Bonning. Mrs. Bonning, formerly Miss Edna Smith, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Smith of the Bethalto road, went to Appledale four years ago to teach school. There she met Mr. Bonning. Mrs. Bonning returned here two days before Christmas for her first visit home since her marriage. She became ill a few weeks ago and died on Wednesday, January 28. Her death was the result of an attack of influenza. While Mrs. Bonning was taken ill, her husband was told of her illness by wire and he immediately began the trip here. Mrs. Bonning died while her husband was enroute to Alton. During the trip he became ill with influenza and shortly after coming to Alton was removed to St. Joseph's hospital. He arrived in Alton Sunday, February 1, just a week before his death. When Mr. Bonning came to Alton it was the first time he had seen the parents of his wife. He was the owner of a ranch in Washington and was said to be wealthy. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bonning, a brother, Charles and two sisters, Miss Ethel Blonning and Mrs. Victor Ross, all of Appledale. The parents of Mr. Bonning have been notified of his death. No arrangements for the funeral or shipment of the remains will be made until the parents have been heard from. Mr. and Mrs. Bonning had been married four years. They had no children.

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BOONE, MARY A. "POLLY"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Saturday February 11, 1893

Edwardsville Democrat - We learn that the Mary A. Boone, colored, who died in Alton recently, over one hundred years old, and to whose last will and testament reference was made in the last issue of the Democrat, was in the early 30's a resident of Edwardsville. She was then the wife of James Crow, who was familiarly known by the sobriquet "Jim Crow." They resided in a one-room log house which at that date stood where the long brick house stands now occupied by Edward Dippold and family, in lower town. After the death of Crow, she married Boone, also a negro, of Alton, and it was he and not she, that was brought to the northwest country by Daniel Boone. There are probably not more than two persons here about at present, cognizant of the foregoing facts, Mrs. Jane Buckmaster of Alton, and Mrs. S. J. Torrence, of this city.

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BORCKMANN, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1907

Mr. Charles Borckmann, an undertaker in Alton many years ago, died this morning from old age, in her 84th year, at his home in the rear of 640 east Second street. His death had been expected for several weeks, as he was growing weaker and there was no hope for his recovery. He had lived in Alton since he was a young man, about fifty years, and for many years was engaged in business in the city. He leaves beside his widow, four sons and one daughter. He was a member of the Odd Fellows order for many years and the funeral services will be under the auspieces of that order. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

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BOREN, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 6, 1911         Commits Suicide by Drinking Carbolic Acid

Harry Boren, a laborer committed suicide at his home at 1731 Alby street at 1:45 Monday afternoon by drinking carbolic acid in the presence of his entire family. No reason could be given for this deed by his wife, except that he had been out of work for some time. He is said to have bad trouble with his wife. On arriving at his home, he made the remark that he was going to leave. With this remark he entered a small bedroom and closed the door. A short time later his wife entered the room and found him in the act of drinking the acid. She attempted to knock the bottle from his hand, but he resisted, and drank the contents of the bottle. Mrs. Boren received a severe burn upon her arm where some of the acid struck her. He took the acid at one o'clock, and at one forty-five was dead. He leaves a wife, one child, and five stepchildren; also parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Boren, and a brother Lemuel Boren. Boren took out an insurance burial policy in the Alton Mutual society a few days ago, which would have allowed his wife about $300, but he forgot to pay his dues and so the policy is void.

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BOREN, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 18, 1921

The funeral of Mrs. Martha Boren will be held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock from the home of her son, J. N. Boren on Bluff Street, with Rev. Twing officiating. The interment will be in the City Cemetery.

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BOREN, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1918

The funeral of William Boren will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of his son, L. Boren, 458 West Bluff street, and ..... [unreadable]. Burial was in City Cemetery.

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BOSCHERT, CELIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1908

The funeral of Mrs. Celia Boschert was held this morning from St. Mary's church, and was attended by a large number of friends and neighbors of deceased and of the family. Floral offerings were numerous and the grave in St. Joseph's cemetery was well covered with these mute but expressive tokens of sorrow and esteem.

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BOSCHERT, LEO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 10, 1909

Leo Boschert, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Boschert, died Wednesday morning at the family home, 713 east Sixth street, after an illness of 18 months. He was in his 22nd year. He had been suffering from an incurable disease, and in the hope of improving his health he went away from home, but the change was not beneficial and he returned. About 17 months ago he lost his wife, at the time of the birth of their child. The infant survived its mother. A brother, August, died very suddenly last October. He leaves his 17 months old son, his parents, four brothers and two sisters. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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BOSCHERT, MARTIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 7, 1911

Martin Boschert, aged 83, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Girth, 723 Clement place, Tuesday evening at 7 o'clock. His death was due to a fall in which he fractured a rib Saturday night. The aged man rose from his bed because of the intense heat and he walked out and the change, combined with the injury to his rib, developed pneumonia from which he died. He was born in Baden, Germany, where he lived until young manhood, and then came to America. He had resided in Alton nearby 60 years. He resided with his daughter since the death of his wife a few years ago. Mr. Boschert is survived by two daughters, Mrs. John Girth and Mrs. Gabriel White, and two sons, Martin and Edward Boschert. The funeral will be Thursday morning from St. Mary's church.

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BOSCHERT, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 13, 1909

Mrs. Mary Boschert, wife of Joseph Boschert, died Monday morning at her home on Sixth street between Liberty and Ridge, from the effects of a fall she sustained the latter part of last week. Mrs. Boschert was out in the yard trying to shovel snow the day of the first snowfall last week, and while so engaged she slipped and fell, striking the ground as she was trying to save herself. She must have twisted her body in trying to break the force of the fall, and she caused a rupture of some of her internal organs. The attending surgeon said a surgical operation might help her, and one was performed, but this proved ineffective and this morning Mrs. Boschert died after intense suffering. She was 22 years of age and had been married a little over two years. She leaves besides her husband, one child. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Hartmann, and is survived by a family of brothers and sisters. In the past two months Mr. Boschert has lost in addition to his wife, two brothers and a sister-in-law, and the hand of affliction seems to be resting very heavy upon him. No funeral arrangements have been made.

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BOSLER, ALONZO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 16, 1912                Falls Between Cars and Is Beheaded

Alonzo Bosler, 18 years of age, a workman in the Beall Bros. plant at East Alton, fell between two cars on the Big Four plug near the foot of Langdon street at six o'clock last night, and was beheaded by the car wheels passing over his head. Those who were near Bosler at the time state that he was trying to get out where he could get off the train as soon as it reached the station platform, and in some manner sat up on the railing of the car platform. Suddenly he slipped through the opening between the two cars and disappeared from view. There was no outcry from Bosler, but when he fell a cry went up from the other workmen and the train was stopped. When he was found he had been completely beheaded by the wheels passing over his head. Bosler resided with Mr. and Mrs. Albert Neitzel of 930 Alby street. He has a brother at Kimswick, Mo., who has been notified. coroner C. N. Streeper has taken charge of the remains. Bosler was to have become a benedict in April, his engagement to Miss Nellie Zimmerman of 1028 Market street having been announced. The young man was well liked in the circles he moved in, and his tragic death has caused much sadness among his friends. He leaves six brothers and three sisters, but none of his relatives reside in Alton. The remains will be shipped to Kimswick, Mo., for burial.

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BOSOMWORTH, ALICE R./Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, June 17, 1935              Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. Alice R. Bosomworth, wife of the late John Bosomworth, who died in O'Fallon June 14 at 11:05 a. m. Funeral services were held Sunday in O'Fallon with burial in the Oak Lawn Cemetery near Edwardsville.

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BOSTWICK, MARY M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 3, 1913

Mrs. Mary M. Bostwick, in her ninety-fourth year, died Sunday morning at her home, 116 north Main street in Upper Alton, from weakness of old age. Her condition had been very bad for the last few days of her life, and it was realized that the aged woman was sinking steadily. During her illness, and in fact during all of the advanced years of her life, Mrs. Bostwick was given the constant attention of her only son, John Bostwick, who gave up business pursuits that he might look after his aged mother, who insisted upon having him with her all the time. Mrs. Bostwick had lived in Alton since she was nine years of age, when she came here with her parents. She was born May 30, 1820 in Canandaigua county, New York. They came by stage coach to Cincinnati, and from there down the Ohio and up the Mississippi by boat, an ordinary flatboat, which her father had provided as an ark in which to move his family to Alton, which was then one of the most promising points in the western country. Two years ago, in giving account of Mrs. Bostwick's life for an anniversary edition of the Telegraph, a writer said of her: "She is still a girl at 92, she never has lost interest in the boys and girls, their courtships, their marriages, and subsequent events in their careers." This was literally true. The aged woman had solved the secret of keeping young by maintaining an interest in the younger people. Her eye was always set on the future instead of on the past, though her memory went far back into the years that had departed, and she could recall many interesting tales of things that were. One of the saddest events in Mrs. Bostwick's life was the death of her daughter, Mrs. T. P. Yerkes, a few years ago. She leaves two children, John bostwick and Mrs. Dora Spauling, now a resident of California, and prevented by ill health from attending her mother's funeral. she leaves three grandchildren, Mrs. Tracey Thomas and Mrs. Chamblin, Dr. L. L. Yerkes, to whom she was strongly attached, and the funeral hour was not set until Mrs. Thomas, who was in the south, could be communicated with and informed of her grandmother's death. The funeral of Mrs. Bostwick will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the home on Main street. Rev. W. M. Rhoads, who has been a neighbor of Mrs. Bostwick many years, will conduct the service.

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BOSTWICK, JOHN/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, September 20, 1855

Another of our old citizens, John Bostwick, Esq., died in Chicago on Wednesday last. Mr. Bostwick has at times occupied a prominent place in this part of the country for many years, having been a bold operator in real estate, his fortune at times greatly varying. We understand he had lately been successful in laying the foundation of a handsome fortune in Chicago. His funeral will take place today from his residence.

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BOSTWICK, JOHN H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 24, 1923          Veteran of Civil War

John H. Bostwick died yesterday morning at St. Joseph's hospital, aged 82. He had been sick a long time and for several months had been in St. Joseph's hospital for treatment. He had been living in his old home up to that time, because he preferred to stay there in the surroundings he had known so many years. He was known generally as "Uncle John," and he was held in the warmest affection of hundreds of people, few of them anywhere near his age. He had the faculty of making friends among the younger folks, and he was a charming personality who for years was a well known figure in Alton, where he was born and where he had spent all of his life. Perhaps the longest time he was away from Alton was during the Civil War when he served in the 10th Illinois Regiment throughout the war. Most people will remember him best as a clerk in various dry goods stores in the Third street business district. For many years he was engaged at the Haagen store. He was devoted to his mother, one of Alton's old time residents, who came here with her parents in 1829, and who lived here until she died, far along in the nineties, a number of years ago. Mr. Bostwick devoted his life to his aged mother, and the two lived together until her death. He was prominent in Masonic bodies and was one of the most faithful in his attendance upon Masonic affairs. When he was so old and feeble that he should not have been out, his presence was marked at times when bad weather, deterred those younger and stronger from being present. Mr. Bostwick was born on the property now embraced in the Western Military Academy holdings. He never married. He leaves the following nieces and nephews: Dr. L. L. Yerkes, Mrs. Blanche Yerkes Thomas of Little Rock, Ark., Mrs. Bessie Spalding of Chicago, Dr. John Spalding and Robert Spalding of California. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Yerkes home, 1520 Washington avenue. The Masonic fraternity will have charge of the funeral, the services to be conducted under the auspices of Franklin lodge. Mr. Bostwick was a member of Belvidere commandery, also of the Scottish Rite bodies and of the Mystic Shrine. Burial will be in the Oakwood Cemetery.

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BOTT, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1921

Mrs. Mary Bott, aged 68, was found dying in bed about 3:30 o'clock this morning by her aged husband, George Bott, who was waiting on her. Mr. Bott had been sitting up talking to his wife just a few minutes before, and he became alarmed at her sudden silence. He investigated and found that she was apparently in a state of collapse, possibly from heart trouble. A doctor was called and he found her dead. Mrs. Bott had been in her usual health when last Thursday she slipped and fell on the ice, sustaining injuries which caused her considerable trouble, but did not forbid her being around her home. She had been up and about her home Christmas day, and yesterday, and there was no cause for any alarm over her condition. Her death was a great surprise to everybody. Mrs. Bott moved to Alton about three years ago from Brighton, where the couple had lived many years. The family were living at 84 East Elm street at the time Mrs. Bott died. Beside her husband, she leaves five children: Oliver Bott and Mrs. James Barnard and Walter Bott of Brighton; Paull Bott of Bunker Hill; Mrs. Thomas Bushnell of Logan Street in Alton; and Mrs. George Grabe of Brighton. There had been a family gathering on Christmas day and the children had gone home Sunday after having had a fine time with their parents. Mrs. Bott had entered into the spirit of the Christmas holiday with eagerness. Every child in the neighborhood had been remembered with gifts of some kind by the kindly dispositioned old lady in whose heart Christmas was an all the year round reality instead of once a year holiday. She leaves a large circle of loving friends who mourn her death and sympathize sincerely with her aged husband who is deprived by death of his partner in life. The funeral will be held Thursday in Brighton at the Evangelical Church, interment will be in the Bott Cemetery. The funeral party will leave Alton at ten o'clock Thursday morning.

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BOWDEN, JOHN CO./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 2, 1911

John C. Bowden, aged 45, was stricken with apoplexy at his place of business on Second street near Oak, while waiting on a lady who was making some purchases in his store Friday afternoon at 5 o'clock. Mr. Bowden complained of being unable to see, and the lady who was being waited upon called for help and also called a doctor, who had Mr. Bowden removed to his home on College avenue. He remained conscious from 5 o'clock until 8 o'clock Friday evening, and died at 4 o'clock Saturday morning. Mr. Bowden came to Alton in 1904. He was married four years ago to Miss Leila Clark, who gave piano lessons; and he leaves beside his wife, one son, who is one year old. He also leaves his mother, two brothers and one sister who reside in the south. Mr. Bowden came to Alton from Lakeland, Fla.  The time of the funeral has not been set, as it was decided to wait until the relatives in the south could be notified. Mr. Bowden was a cousin of Mrs. T. N. Marsh of Upper Alton. He was highly regarded in the neighborhood where he conducted his store. The death of Mr. Bowden was a great surprise to everyone who knew him. He seemed to be in his usual state of health when he was attending to business all day Friday.

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BOWEN, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 21, 1921                  Civil War Veteran Succumbs   ....   Former Drummer Boy

Henry Bowen, aged 78 years, died Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock at the family home on the Grafton Road, after an illness of two weeks, suffering from complication of disabilities. Mr. Bowen was a veteran of the Civil War. At the age of fourteen years, he entered the service as drummer boy, later enlisting in the army. He received injuries to his left leg while in service, and has always had trouble with it at intervals. The deceased is survived by his widow and three sons: George Bowen of Melville, Harry Bowen of Jersey County, and Frank Bowen who resided with his father on the Grafton Road. Funeral arrangements have not been made as yet.

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BOWLES, ELMER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 7, 1917                  Auto Accident Claims Life

Elmer Bowles, aged 25, was killed, and Charles "Punk" Hagen, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Hagen, suffered three broken ribs and many other bruises about the body as the result of a collision between the Ford in which they were riding and a State street car, north bound near the Krug Floral gardens, at 9:35 o'clock Friday evening. The wrecked auto is owned by Harry Stice of Alton. The young men were coming south on State street at the time of the accident, and were racing a Ford owned by the Butler Market and driven by Len Larrison. Jack Butler also in the car. The Ford in which Hagen and Bowles were riding was one they had rented for the evening from Harry Stice. As the two Fords neared the street car, Hagen, who was driving the car that was struck, attempted to cross the track in front of the car. The street car struck the Ford squarely and demolished it. Both of the young men were thrown out of the auto when it was struck by the car. They were able to talk and at first it was believed they were not seriously injured. Larrison gathered them in the Ford he was driving and started to take them home. On the way downtown he left Charles Hagen at the home of his father, James Hagen, near Sixteenth and Belle street. By the time he arrived at the City Hall with Bowles in the car, the latter was dead. The body was turned over at once to Deputy Coroner William H. Bauer. Later investigation showed that Bowles had suffered from two broken shoulders and a bad bruise over the heart. The bruise over the heart is believed to have caused his death. Bowles was a painter by trade and has been living with his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bowles of 305 East Sixth street. The father was not home at the time of the news being brought of the death of his son. He and his daughter, Mable, were visiting out of the city. Word was sent to them at once, and they arrived in Alton today. Besides a father and mother, Bowles leaves a wife, from whom he has been separated for several months, and two brothers, Floyd of Alton and J. C. Bowles of Centralia, Mo. The body will be removed to the home of his parents this evening, and the funeral will be held at four o'clock Sunday afternoon from the home to the City cemetery. Mayor William Sauvage started an investigation of the case today. He ordered that Butler and Larrison report to his office at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon, and they agreed to come. Residents along State street say that the two cars were going at a very high rate of speed, and because of this fact Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer announced his intention this morning of making an investigation along that line. The Deputy Coroner is of the opinion that speeding on the streets should be stopped, and when informed by upper State street people that the practice was a common one on that street, he believed it was proper to take up that line of investigation. The coroner's inquest this afternoon placed no blame on any one for the accident, the jury being noncommittal. One of the interested attendants at the inquest was the Mayor, who had declared his intention of securing all the information he could with regard to violation of city ordinances regulating automobiles.

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BOWMAN, ANDREW/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 14, 1904           Drowned Off Eagle Quarter Boat

Andrew Bowman of Madison, Indiana, a ship carpenter attached to the Eagle fleet, who was at Alton with his two brothers, William and Charles Bowman, and his half-brother, John Murphy, working on the Eagle wharfboat, was drowned early this morning. The men were living on the Eagle quarter boat while at Alton. About 2 o'clock the watchman on the Spread Eagle heard a splash in the water, but thought nothing of it. At 6 o'clock in the morning when the brothers rose for the day, they noticed that Andrew Bowman was missing from his bunk, but that his clothing was where he had put it the night before. The men at once guessed that their brother was drowned and had fallen in the river while walking in his sleep. The three surviving brothers were up until a late hour Monday night, and when they turned in they found Andrew Bowman in bed and asleep. Capt. Fluent, assisted by John Murphy, began dragging in the river along the Eagle wharf boat, and after the first drag picked up the body of the drowned man, clad only in the underclothes he had been wearing. It is supposed from a mark on the leg of the man that when near the edge of the quarter boat he stumbled over a timber and pitched overboard. Although he had worked on the river many years and was 27 years old, Bowman could not swim a stroke. He probably sank in the swift current, was drawn under the quarter boat and drowned without a struggle. The body was turned over to Undertaker W. H. Bauer this morning to be prepared for burial. Bowman is said to have been a quiet, industrious man and one of the best ship carpenters in the employ of the Eagle Packet Company.  Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest this afternoon over the remains of the drowned man, and a verdict of accidental death returned by the jury.

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BOWMAN, CASTINE LILLIAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 31, 1917

The Bowman family on Coopinger Road have had more than their share of bad luck during the past six months. When four-year-old Castine Lillian, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andred Bowman, died this afternoon, it was the fourth death in the family in the past six months. Winfield Bowman, the grandfather of the child that died today, and Winfield John Bowman and Loretta Bowman have all died in that time. On last Wednesday evening, their home was swept by fire and the damage was very heavy. The funeral of the baby will be held at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the home, and the services will be conducted by Rev. A. C. Geyer. The burial will be in the Melville Cemetery.

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BOWMAN, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1904                            Alton Contractor Dies of Typhoid Fever

Charles Bowman, the well-known contractor, died Thursday morning at 9 o'clock at his home, 723 Alby street, aged 45. Mr. Bowman's case had been a dangerous one from the beginning of his illness last Thanksgiving day. His friends who knew him best feared throughout his illness that he would be unable to rally from the weakness to which it had reduced him. At no time in the last month had there been much hope for his recovery except a few days ago when he seemed to make a last rally, and his family and friends were much encouraged, but Tuesday night he was much worse and he sank steadily until death ended his suffering. Mr. Bowman's death has caused a sense of loss to all who knew him. Few persons in the community could have left such a gap as his departure has made. Every man who knew him was his friend, and his honesty and integrity were never questioned. Such was his reputation as a contractor and builder that those for whom he did work trusted him implicitly and it was Charley Bowman's record that he always lived up to his contracts. His illness was brought on by worry over some contracts upon which he was working. Delays in the arrival of material prevented his completing them on time. He exhausted his strength in his efforts to fulfill his contracts and secure the delivery of material, and when illness attacked him his system was so run down from constant worry that he was unable to withstand it. The death of Mr. Bowman is a personal loss to all his friends as well as to his family, to whom he was most devoted. Always genial and ready at all times to cover with the mantle of charity the shortcomings of others, he merited the universal good will of his fellows. His men were devoted to their employer's interests and all of them are speaking of his kindness and sympathy with them. As a builder, his reputation was first class; as a friend it was inestimable. Mr. Bowman's first important contract in Alton was that of erecting Temple theatre, upon which he first established his reputation. He was engaged at various time on contracts in Waco, Texas, St. Louis and other cities, and everywhere he made the same record as at home. His most recent work was on the Alton bank building with his partner, A. Kleinschnittger. The Chautauqua hotel also, the firm has in course of construction. Mr. Bowman is survived by his wife and two children, Herbert and Mate. His brother, Will Bowman of Lewis, Indiana, arrived last night. Mr. Bowman leaves two brothers, William Bowman of Lewis, Indiana, and Edward Bowman of Alton; two sisters, Mrs. Maty McDonald of Terre Haute and Mrs. Laura Far of Mulhall, O. T. [Oklahoma Territory].  He was born in Sullivan county, Indiana, and would have been 45 years old next May 8. He came to Alton in 1880 and lived here since, where he married Miss Kate Templeton.

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BOWMAN, EDWARD M./Source:  Alton Evening Telegraph, March 31, 1926         "The Most Useful Man in Alton"

Edward M. Bowman died yesterday in a hospital at Boston, Mass., following an operation for the relief of a malady that had been causing him trouble for a long time. His death was expected as word that was being received from his bedside was of a disquieting nature. The body of Mr. Bowman will be brought to Alton for burial in City Cemetery, a place in which he had taken deep interest. The funeral will be Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock, services to be held at the home of William M. Duncan on Twelfth Street. The burial service in City Cemetery will be private. It was Mr. Bowman's wish that there be no flowers at his funeral. The passing of Mr. Bowman takes away one of the most useful men Alton ever had in it. It is recalled by a newspaper friend of his who realized how useful Mr. Bowman was being to his native city, that Mr. Bowman always insisted on being kept free from any newspaper prominence. He had a somewhat cynical view, perhaps borne of observation, that if a man wished to be useful, and continue so, it was necessary that he should not appear to be useful. He thought that immediately when there was any notice taken of a man's prominence envy would be aroused and criticism would weaken his usefulness. Acting on that professed belief, Mr. Bowman went on working quietly, tirelessly, for his home city and institutions that were in it and not until he left Alton was he satisfied with any words of praise for what he had done for his home. When he left he took with him the expressions of hundreds who knew that he had been a useful man for Alton. In connection with his public enterprises here it may be said that he laid the foundations for the present financial solidity of the City cemetery. He gathered the names and addresses of survivors of old families owning lots there and but for his ceaseless correspondence and patient search information could not have been available for carrying on the after work of establishing the cemetery's finances for years to come. He was deeply interested in the Hayner library and it is recalled that before he left Alton he gave to that institution a great collection of books on Abraham Lincoln he had made in his long career as a student and collector of Lincolnia. The list of institutions and organizations and public works Mr. Bowman supported would be a long one. It may be said that he always was ready to start a subscription list to help solve financial problems. When a gathering of men or women would be planning to do something, Mr. Bowman would patiently listen to the talk of what was to be done, then he would ask the all important question, "how are you going to pay for it?" That always prefaced a little lecture of the subject of getting the money first and then planning afterward to spend it. Always he would start the fund with a cash gift. It was the same if it was a political meeting, a Grand Army encampment or whatever it might be. He was the father of the good roads movement around here, spending his time, his money and giving the movement the benefit of his intelligence in promotion. He gave the good roads movement a start here when it was dragging slowly. Mr. Bowman was born in Alton, and was a resident here most of his life. He graduated from Washington University and the St. Louis Law school, after which he engaged in the practice of law for a number of years. He lived in the Black Hills in the Dakotas, and served as a county attorney and also as a member of the Legislature while there. He also served as county attorney for Decatur County, Kan. He was married in Alton to Miss Bertha Drummond, Oct. 17, 1893. There are two children, John D. and Edward M. Bowman. Mr. Bowman resided on Euclid avenue for a number of years. He was interested in large realty holding in Alton and vicinity, but in later years had disposed of what he owned here. One of the characteristics of Mr. Bowman was to make ready for all contingencies and it is known by some who had business dealings with him that before his going to the hospital he carefully attended to all business matters so that if the attempt to get relief did not turn out well, and his illness proved fatal, there would be little or nothing to trouble his family in the way of business complications.

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BOWMAN, HILKA (nee OETKEN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 26, 1916

Mrs. Hilka Bowman, widow of Henry Bowman, died at 11 o'clock Tuesday night at her home in Bethalto. She had been sick since last Saturday with pneumonia. Mrs. Bowman was an old resident of Bethalto and was in her seventy-first year. She leaves two sons, Henry and _on, and three daughters, Mrs. Frank Starkey, Mrs. Charles Oetken, and Miss Minnie Bowman. She leaves also one sister, Mrs. Thomas Laughlin, and three brothers, John, Benjamin and Tobe Oetken. The funeral will be held Friday from the Methodist Church at Bethalto.

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BOWMAN, HORATIO J. SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 19, 1920                Alton Business Man Dies in Jacksonville Sanitarium

Horatio J. Bowman Sr. died this morning at 2 o'clock at Jacksonville, following a long illness. Mr. Bowman was 70 years old. With the passing of Mr. Bowman, Alton loses a citizen long known in business circles. Mr. Bowman took over the dry goods business of his father, after the parent had successfully conducted it for more than 50 years. The business was continued by the son until six years ago. Mr. Bowman was born in Alton in July of 1850. He was the son of Horatio B. and Selina R. Bowman. In 1881 he was married to Miss Virginia Job of this city. He was connected in the dry goods business with his father for a number of years, and in 1880 bought the store from the parent. The Bowman family first came to Alton from Wilkes Barre, Pa., and was said to have been one of the first families to use anthracite coal in that region of Pennsylvania. The elder Bowman started in business about 1837, the name of the store being the Bowman, Neas and Johnson Co. The son worked in the store and eventually became its owner. Mr. Bowman has been in failing health for several years. He entered a sanitarium at Jacksonville about two years ago, when his health began to fail. A few days ago news reached here of the seriousness of his condition, and it was said then that recovery seemed impossible. He served on term in the Alton City Council. Mr. Bowman is survived by his widow, Mrs. Virginia Bowman, and two sons, two daughters, and a brother. The sons are: Horatio J. Bowman Jr. of Alton; Fred Bowman who resides on a farm near East Alton; and the daughters are: Mrs. Edward Watson of Patterson, N. J.; and Mrs. Roe D. Watson of this city. The surviving brother is Edward M. Bowman, who now resides in Boston. The funeral will be tomorrow at 3 p.m. from the family home on East Twelfth Street, and will be private. Interment will be in City cemetery.

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BOWMAN, TILLIE (nee BRUEGGEMANN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 28, 1920                              Wife of Alton Physician Dies

Mrs. Tillie Bowman, wife of Dr. L. M. Bowman, died at 11:30 o'clock Thursday night at her home, 1105 East Fifth street, after an illness which began last July, but which developed into an acute stage three weeks ago. Mrs. Bowman had been suffering from kidney trouble and had been steadily losing her power of vision. Almost coincident with her being prostrated in her final illness, her sight failed fast and the last two weeks she was totally blind. Apoplexy caused her death. Mrs. Bowman was born and reared in Alton, and spent her whole life here. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Brueggemann, and all of her father's family died before her except one sister, Mrs. Henry Wutzler, who survives. Mrs. Bowman leaves beside her husband and one sister, two children, Louis and Mary Esther Bowman. Mrs. Bowman had been a devoted member of the Ladies' Aid Society of the Evangelical church. She was highly esteemed in the neighborhood where she lived and had a very large circle of acquaintances. It had been known for a week to her family and intimate friends that there was no chance of recovery and that the end would probably be very soon. She had been married fifteen years to Dr. Bowman. She was born in Alton, November 5, 1870, and would have been fifty years of age her next birthday. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home, Rev. O. W. Heggemeier officiating. Burial will be in the City Cemetery.

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BOWMAN, UNKNOWN WIFE OF SAMUEL F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 24, 1919

The body of Mrs. Samuel F. Bowman, who died Saturday afternoon at her home near Roxana, was shipped to Mt. Rose, Ill., and the funeral was held from the Catholic church there today. She leaves her husband and two sons, a boy 16, and one three and a half years old.

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BOWN, NANCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1912

Two deaths in one room, a middle aged woman and a three months' old girl, occurred at 1205 Belle street this morning. The fatal illness of Mrs. Nancy Bown, aged 54, was the direct cause of the infant death. A son of Mrs. Bown, Walter Bown, had been sitting up all night taking care of his mother. In the same room was the bed of Alice Tryon and her baby. Alice Tryon had been taking care of Mrs. Bown. This morning when the mother of the infant rose to look after the house, Walter Bown laid down on the bed, worn out from fatigue, according to the story told, and unintentially rolled over on the infant so that the child was smothered to death. While the excitement following the death of the infant was at its height, Mrs. Bown died, and it was not known she was dead for some time. Mrs. Bown had been in the hospital suffering from dropsy, and after she returned home a tumor developed. She weighed about 300 pounds. The case of the infant's death was referred to Coroner C. N. Streeper, who will conduct an inquest.

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BOYCE, BENJAMIN H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 16, 1906

Benjamin H. Boyce of Indiana avenue died this morning from consumption after a long illness, aged 45. He leaves four children. Two years ago he came to Alton with his little son to live, but the boy was soon obliged to assume responsibility for the care of the father. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon.

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BOYCE, BRIDGET M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1922

Mrs. Bridget M. Boyce, wife of John Boyce, died at her home, 1306 east Fourth street this morning at 6 o'clock after a long illness. She was 59 years of age. Beside her husband she leaves two sons. The body will be taken to St. Charles, Mo., Friday, for burial.

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BOYCE, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 29, 1923                    Youth Father Dies Suddenly Beside Wife

Death claimed James Boyce of 2436 Seminary street very suddenly this morning. His last act of his life was to hand to his wife a bottle of medicine from which the wife administered a dose to a sick baby who was occupying the same bed with the parents. According to the story told by the family, Mrs. Boyce was roused by a coughing spell of the little child, Nora, aged 4, and she roused her husband to ask him to hand her a bottle of medicine which was on a chair beside the bed. Mr. Boyce complied with his wife's request. The wife administered the dose of medicine to the child and she handed the bottle back to her husband and asked him to replace it on the chair beside the bed. Mr. Boyce again raised his hand to take the bottle from his wife, and Mrs. Boyce noticed that while she touched his hand he did not take the bottle from her. Instead, the hand of her husband dropped to the bed, and when she investigated she found him apparently asleep. She heard her husband make a sound, and she attempted to rouse him, but it was in vain. Mr. Boyce was dead. He was 39 years of age. Mr. Boyce had been a strong, healthy man all of his life. Those who knew him said that he was never sick. He was a steady man, employed at the plant of the Illinois Glass Co. He leaves besides his wife, four children, Hortense, aged 9; Mary Elizabeth who will be 7 tomorrow; John, aged 5 and Nora, aged 4. Mr. Boyce worked all day yesterday and on going home in the evening cut his lawn grass after supper. He seemed in the best of health until about 3 o'clock in the morning when he was suddenly stricken by death. His wife called in the neighbors and they called Dr. Williamson when Mr. Boyce collapsed, but when the doctor arrived he found Mr. Boyce was dead. He was born May 3, 1884 at St. Peters, Mo. The family moved to Alton in 1905. He had been employed at the glass works eighteen years. In later years he has worked as a stopper grinder, after working as a packer for a long time. He married Miss Nora Horn of Upper Alton in May 1913. He had just recently bought a home on Seminary street. He was a good father and husband and his interest was centered in his home. His death is the second one in his family, his mother having died eighteen years ago. He leaves beside his wife and four children, his father, John W. Boyce, proprietor of a shoe repair and novelty shop at 1304 East Broadway, one brother, John C. Boyce of Alton, two sisters, Mrs. Harrison Woods of Alton and Mrs. Bertha Kline of St. Charles, Mo. He was a nephew of Dan Bolan of St. Charles, Mo., and Mrs. T. Delmore of St. Louis. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon, and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

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BOYD, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 10, 1910

The funeral of Charles Boyd was held from the family home in Godfrey yesterday. Services were conducted by Rev. George S. Hoots of the Godfrey Methodist church. There was a large attendance of friends and relatives of the young man at the funeral.

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BOYD, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1904

A piece of meat choked to death Frank Boyd, a glassblower, well known and with many friends in Alton. Boyd has been working at Litchfield this >>>>, and on Sunday while eating dinner a piece of beef lodged in his throat and could not be removed in time to save his life.

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BOYD, JOHN FERGUSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 29, 1907

John Ferguson Boyd, aged 82, died at St. Joseph's hospital Thursday morning after an illness of seven weeks, resulting from a fall at his home in Godfrey. Mr. Boyd had a paralytic stroke following his fall, and members of his family believed that it was due to the stroke that he had the fall. He had lived in Godfrey since 1848, and was therefore one of the oldest residents of that place. He made his home for many years across the track from the Chicago & Alton depot. He leaves his wife and six children, John C. Boyd of Peoria, James M. Boyd of Decatur, Frank T. Boyd of Chicago, Mrs. A. W. Crawford of Girard, Mrs. Belle Wood and Charles Boyd of Godfrey. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and Rev. H. A. Cotton of the Congregational church at Godfrey will officiate.

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BOYD, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1906

Mrs. Mary Boyd, wife of Stewart Boyd of Carrollton, Mo., died Wednesday evening at the home of her father in Upper Alton after an illness which began last Friday, from pneumonia. Mrs. Boyd leaves eight children, six girls and two boys, the eldest 17 years of age and the youngest 19 months old, besides her husband. She came here March 8 to make her home with her father, George N. Bechtold, in Upper Alton, and to take the place of her mother who died a short time ago. Mrs. Boyd brought her eight children with her and her husband began making arrangements to dispose of a business he had at Carrollton and would have been here in a few days. He closed a deal yesterday for the sale of the business interests he held there and was about to start for Alton when he received a telegram from his wife's father telling him to lose no time but come at once to see his wife. He arrived here at 10 o'clock, about six hours after the death of his wife, and the homecoming was a sad one indeed. He did not know his wife was so ill. It is said that Mrs. Boyd contracted a severe cold by trying to do her own washing, and it developed into pneumonia. She was not used to doing such labor and the disease which resulted proved fatal. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock from the German Evangelical church, and burial will be in City cemetery beside the body of her mother whose place she came here to take in the family home.

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BOYD, WASHINGTON H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 28, 1923

The passing of Washington H. Boyd, who died in Godfrey on Christmas Day, is made the occasion of a letter from Dr. James Squire of Carrollton, an old Godfrey boy. Dr. Squire was a schoolmate of Boyd, and they went into the army together during the Civil War. Boyd's father helped build Monticello Seminary. Boyd and Dr. Squire always went to Grand Army encampments together. Dr. Squire calls attention to the fact that Mr. Boyd named his son, William, for Col. William R. Morrison of the regiment in which he served, the 49th Illinois. Dr. Squire said in his letter: "Washington H. Boyd, who died Christmas Day at his home in Godfrey, was the first Civil War soldier to enlist 'for the duration of the war.' He enlisted with his neighbor boy, Lieut. James Maguire, and me, in Company F of the 49th Illinois, under Col. William R. Morrison. Boyd was flag sergeant of the regiment, and carried the regimental flag. That regiment was first in the battle at Fort Donelson. Next they were in the battle of Shiloh on April 6, 1862. Both Boyd and Maguire were wounded, each in the left leg, at the same time. Maguire was sent to Cincinnati and placed in a hospital. After being there a few days he was told that they would amputate the leg. Inquiring whether he could go back in the service minus a leg, he was told he could not, and he refused then to have the amputation done, saying he would rather die. He did die a few days later from gangrene. He was the first Civil War soldier from Godfrey to die. He was a fine looking Irish boy, a son of Patrick Maguire. Sergeant Boyd was sent from Shiloh to St. Louis, placed in a hospital and a few days later, with his shattered leg still unattended, he came on to his home in Godfrey. He was in bed four months, pieces of bone and the bullet coming out. His son, Will Boyd, has the bullet. After five months he returned to the service and served clear through the war. He suffered all through life from the wound in his leg. Yet he lived to be 84 years of age. Those two Godfrey boys were brave heroes. Boyd carried the regimental flag in many battles thereafter. Over 140 men enlisted from Godfrey. No draft was needed, as our quota was full. Only four of them are left there now - Frank Boyd, a brother of Washington Boyd, John Ulrich, Ed Webber and William Hynrman."

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BOYER, ALVIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1919

Alvin Boyer, 30, died at the home of his mother, Mrs. Helen Boyer, of 228 W. Seventh street, Friday afternoon, after a lingering illness. Boyer was survived by his mother and one half brother. The funeral arrangements have not been completed.

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BOYLE, ELIZABETH (nee EPPINGER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 14, 1916

Mrs. Elizabeth Boyle, aged 32, wife of Frank Boyle, was found dead in bed at the Savoy Hotel at nine o'clock Friday morning by her husband. Mrs. Boyle has been ill for some time, but her death came very unexpectedly. Last evening Mr. and Mrs. Boyle retired as usual, and she seemed to be in good spirits. At five o'clock this morning Mrs. Boyle awoke and asked her husband for a handkerchief. This was the last she spoke. At nine o'clock when Mr. Boyle awoke, he found his wife dead in bed beside him. Mrs. Boyle is survived by her father, Frank Eppinger. She was born in Litchfield and came to Alton about eighteen years ago, and made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Immenga. Twelve years ago she was married to Frank Boyle, and they have made their home in Alton since. Lately, Mr. and Mrs. Boyle have been making their home at the Savoy Hotel. Mrs. Boyle has been ill and failing for some time, and for the past four months she has been under the constant care of physicians. The physician who was summoned this morning stated that he believed she had died from a paralytic stroke. Her death came so quick that even her husband, who was sleeping beside her, did not know she had died.  (January 17, 1916 ... Burial was in Greenwood cemetery)

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BOYLE, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 13, 1912

James Boyle, section foreman on the Bluff Line, died at St. Joseph's hospital yesterday afternoon after an illness of two months. An effort was made by the Bluff Line railroad to trace up relatives of Boyle, but no success attended the results. The body was taken in charge by Undertaker James Klunk, who will continue the investigation.

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BOYLE, KATE K./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 8, 1908

Mrs. Kate K. Boyle, aged 75, died Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock at her home, Sixth and Market streets, after an illness of nine days. Her death was due to a general breakdown of her health, and from the very first her illness was believed to be fatal. During her illness she was given constant attendance by her daughter, Miss Lizzie Boyle, who was the only person connected with her in any way. Mrs. Boyle had known for many years. Her husband died in 1885. He was Thomas M. Boyle, a business man in Alton for many years. Mrs. Boyle was born in Philadelphia, June 1, 1833. She came to Alton forty years ago and had lived in the city ever since. She was a devoted member of the First Methodist church. Recently she sold her home, a double house, and was having a new cottage erected next to it on Sixth street at the time she was taken ill. Worry over the details of getting ready to build her home, together with a weakened state of health, probably caused her breakdown. She was an active, vigorous woman with good business ability, and was always very deeply interested in any business matters in which she might be engaged. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home at Sixth and Market streets.

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BOYLE, LEO A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 20, 1923

Leo A. Boyle, proprietor of a soft drinks place and a cigar store, died very unexpectedly this morning at 4 o'clock at his home on Easton street. He was taken sick last night and about 11 o'clock was moved to his home. He continued very bad during the night and at 4 o'clock he died. Boyle had been charged with the sale of illicit whisky in his place of business, the Midget bar, and having been taken into the Federal court several times, the last case against him which he fought before a jury, brought him a penalty of six months in prison. The jury found him guilty and Judge Fitzhenry fixed the punishment at imprisonment instead of a fine. Boyle attempted to get a modification of the sentence by Judge Fitzhenry, claiming in court that he had ceased the sale of liquor, but his statement was countered by affidavits of prohibition officers that between the time the motion of Boyle was filed in court and the day of the hearing liquor had been bought in the Midget bar by prohibition agents. This brought the sentence on Boyle and he took an appeal to the United States court of appeals to avoid going to jail for six months. He has been back home ever since then. In court Boyle told that he was in bad health and could not stand a jail term, and Judge Fitzhenry remarked that they had good doctors to take care of prisoners and that he would be as well there as any place else. It was said today by Dr. D. F. Duggan, who took care of Boyle last night, that Boyle had been suffering from heart trouble for a long time, and that he had been getting worse of late. Worry over his health, Dr. Duggan said, caused the sudden end more so than any worry over the impending prison term which it seemed might come as the result of Judge Fitzhenry's sentence, as it was not regarded possible that the court of appeals would reverse Judge Fitzhenry. Beside his wife, he leaves three children, Morris, Leo and Edmund, also his father, Charles Boyle, one sister, Mrs. Louis Angel, and two brothers, Frank and John Boyle. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at nine o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

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BOYNTON, JESSIE MAY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1908

The death of Mrs. Jessie May Boynton, wife of City Comptroller William P. Boynton, was unusually sad, and there are some very pathetic features to it, aside from the grief which her immediate family and her friends feel at the loss of the young woman. She became the bride of the city comptroller last June, having resigned her position in the public schools as a teacher at the close of the school year. She had been a very successful teacher, having held positions with great credit to herself and good to the schools, in North Alton and in the Alton public schools. She was the youngest teacher ever in the North Alton schools, and it was with considerable doubt that the directors accepted her, because of her youth, but she soon demonstrated her complete fitness for the work, and left much regretted there. A beautiful home has been in course of preparation for the couple since their marriage, on Twelfth street. The couple have been taking great interest in getting their little home ready for themselves and had been much disappointed over being delayed in getting it finished. They had expected to occupy it long ago, but death has now forbidden that Mrs. Boynton should ever live in the neat cottage. Her husband had, with his own hands, done much of the work of getting the house ready, and both had been putting the labor of their hands as well as their fondest hopes into the making of their pretty home. Mrs. Boynton was the daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth L. Harris of 920 Burns street, at whose home she died. She was a prominent worker in the First Baptist church and Sunday school, and was known for her many endearing attributes of heart and mind which she put into her work, be it in church, in school, or at her home. She possessed a beautiful disposition and was beloved by all who knew her. A few weeks ago, while on the eve of a great happiness which was to give her a new experience in life, she was attacked with uraemic poisoning. Her condition became so grave that on last Sunday it became evident that death was almost inevitable. Convulsions had set in and consultations of physicians were held. Desperate remedies sometimes used in such cases were applied and Mrs. Boynton began to show signs of some improvement. There was some hope of her getting well until Thursday morning, when another consultation of physicians was held and all hope was abandoned by the doctors. She passed away Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock surrounded by members of her family who are stricken with deepest grief at the loss of her beautiful life. Mrs. Boynton was in her 30th year and was a native of Alton. She leaves beside her husband, her mother and a family of brothers and sisters, Mrs. Hugh Jameson, Will Harris, Roland P. Harris, Frank Harris, Miss Bertha Harris, Melvin and Harvey Harris. The funeral of Mrs. Boynton will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the First Baptist church.

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BOZZARTH, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1906             Drinks Carbolic Acid

Thomas Bozarth, aged 42, a well known glassblower, died at his Upper Alton home, Brown and Manning streets, Sunday evening after drinking one ounce of carbolic acid. He had been drinking heavily on Sunday and his suicide was probably due to that fact. He purchased the acid at E. B. Joesting's drug store while on his way home, telling the druggist that his wife needed it. He walked home part of the way with D. M. Kittinger, a neighbor, but did not intimate to him that he intended to kill himself. On entering the house he said he was going to bed, and going to his room he was accompanied by his wife. Mrs. Bozzarth stepped out of the room after taking off his overcoat and then he turned to his daughter, Mrs. Robert Dawson, and told her that he had drank carbolic acid and he took from his pocket an empty bottle. The daughter called to her mother and Mrs. Bozzarth summoned Dr. Yerkes, who found the man beyond help. Bozzarth died a short time afterward. Bozzarth had frequently made threats to kill himself when drinking, and neighbors say that about a year ago he did make an attempt to kill himself, but was prevented doing so. He had been working in St. Louis at his trade but came to Alton a few days ago to work here. He leaves his wife and two children, William Bozzarth and Mrs. Robert Dawson.

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BRACHT, CARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 26, 1923

Carl Bracht, for forty three years a resident of Alton, died last night at 10:30 o'clock at his home, 707 East Seventh street, after an illness that covered a period of eighteen years, with asthma. He was seventy two years of age. For nine years Mr. Bracht had been in such a bad condition he had been unable to do any work, and was almost a constant sufferer from the malady which proved fatal. He was a contractor and a good workman. Most of his time he put in at building sewers and sidewalks and similar work. For many years, when a difficult piece of work needed to be done, Mr. Bracht was the man who would be most sought. His services were in great demand and it was necessary to speak in advance for him, because of his reputation for doing a workmanlike job. He was born in Germany and came to this country when a young man. He was a member of the Harugaris, and also of the Evangelical church. He leaves his wife and seven children, Charles of St. Louis, Mrs. Charles Kidwell of Minneapolis, Minn., Mrs. George S. Hailer of Chicago, Louis, William, Enos and Harriet Bracht of Alton. He leaves also twelve grandchildren.

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BRADISH, ALICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 22, 1910

Miss Alice Bradish, one of the best known women in Alton, died Saturday night at 11 o'clock at her home, Eighth and Langdon streets, after an illness of less than 36 hours. Her death had been expected for twenty-four hours before it occurred. Miss Bradish's sickness mystified everyone. She had been caused some trouble for several years by a growth in her stomach, and had been under treatment of doctors, but she would not go to the hospital to undergo a surgical operation as she was advised to do. She returned home from a visit at Clayton, Mo., Friday evening, and soon thereafter a surgeon's attention was necessary as she began to suffer great pain. Her latest trouble was diagnosed as due to a rupture of some organ from the malady that had been annoying her, and it was evident that she could not survive long. After her death an examination was made and it was found that a perforation of the intestine had resulted from the growth at the bottom of her stomach. Miss Bradish was a native of Alton. Her life had been devoted to her motherless family and was one of self sacrificing devotion. Not only was she the mother to her widowed father and her motherless sisters, but also to two nieces and a nephew. She was a seamstress, and a good one. Her whole life was work for others and she never thought of herself. She was busy almost up to the end, as she had desired. She had frequently expressed the hope that she would not break down and be unable to work, and that she might die in the harness. She was a devoted member of the First Baptist church. She leaves beside her aged father, one brother, William, two sisters, Mrs. ___ Springer and Miss Emma Bradish, two nieces, Misses Nellie and Edith Bradish, and a nephew, Charles Yo_um. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the family home.

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BRADISH, DELOS F. (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1914

The funeral of Capt. Delos F. Bradish was held this morning from his late home on Langdon street at 10 o'clock. Services were conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing of the First Baptist Church. There were many old friends of Capt. Bradish and of the family at the funeral, and many floral offerings from friends. Burial was in Oakwood Cemetery in Upper Alton, and internment was private. The pallbearers were W. C. Gates, Smith Reilly, Charles Goudie, William McHenry, B. F. Bowler and William Thorn.

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BRADISH, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 3, 1918                Well Known Boat Builder & Farmer Dies in Godfrey

William Bradish, member of a pioneer Alton family, died early this morning at his home in Godfrey township after an illness from a complication of ailments. He was a native of Alton and spent most of his life here. Some years ago he bought the Godfrey farm and had been living there since with his sister and niece. He never married, and is survived by two sisters, Miss Emma Bradish who lived with him, and Mrs. Jerry Springer; two nieces, Mrs. Clinton Irwin and Miss Edith Bradish. Three nephews also survive, Charles Yoakum and the two Springer boys. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 11 o'clock from the home where services will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing, pastor of the First Baptist Church, and interment will be in Oakwood Cemetery.

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BRADLEY, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1918                Alton Butcher Killed by Accident

Charles Bradley, a well known resident of Upper Alton, was fatally injured Sunday morning in Granite City in a motorcycle accident as he was riding home on a machine with Ernest Miller. The two men, both employed at the Luer Packing Co. plant, had bought a motorcycle together and they had been getting it repaired in a St. Louis shop. They went to St. Louis to ship it home by boat, but failing to get to the boat landing in time to catch the steamer, they decided to ride the machine home. They were passing through Granite City when they came in collision with a motorcycle ridden by Charles Waters of Granite City. Neither Waters or Miller was hurt, but Bradley, who is supposed to have leaped from his machine or was dislodged from it by the impact, struck on his head and sustained injuries which proved fatal a few hours later in the Granite City hospital. The Granite City police arrested Miller on a charge of careless driving, but he gave a $50 bond. After the death of Bradley they concluded they wished to make the bond heavier, and asked the Alton police to arrest him in Alton. An officer was sent after him to take him to Granite City. It was not alleged that there could have been anything more than carelessness in the driving. Miller said, after being arrested, that he was unwilling to go to St. Louis for the motorcycle because of it being Sunday and the use of gasoline was forbidden, but he said that their missing the boat forced them to ride their machine home. Bradley has figured in a number of accidents in the vicinity of Alton. One time he was hit by the Big Four Plug and knocked a distance of thirty feet. It was believed then that he was fatally injured, but he recovered. At another time he was riding down Washington street on a bicycle after dark. He had no light and did not notice a pile of sand that had been placed on the street. He was thrown from the bicycle and badly injured.

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BRADY, ELIZABETH MURPHY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1903

The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth Murphy Brady took place Sunday shortly after the noon hour, services being conducted in the Cathedral. Besides a large funeral party from St. Louis, a very large number of Alton friends and relatives attended the funeral of one they had all known and esteemed in life, and whose sudden death was a severe shock. Floral offerings were many and beautiful. Interment was in Greenwood.

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BRADY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1907           Drinks Carbolic Acid - Commits Suicide

John Brady, of 926 west Seventh street, drank carbolic acid and died within fifteen minutes later at his home on Wednesday evening. He had been drinking and shortly before he took the acid he met his son's wife, Mrs. John Brady, on the street and told her he intended to kill himself. She paid no attention to what he said and told him to go on home. He did, and kept his word about the acid. Before Dr. Taphorn, who was called to attend him, could reach the Brady home, he was helpless. He drank so much of the acid that his stomach was burned through. Brady was well known in Alton, having lived here many years. He was employed on various railroads at Alton and was known as a good workman. The deputy coroner, A. I. Keiser, was notified of Mr. Brady's death. Mr. Brady was about 55 years of age, and is survived by his wife and six children, most of whom are grown. He came to Alton with his family about 25 years ago, and has lived here since. He was an expert railroad track man, and his services as a "boss" or foreman were eagerly sought by different railroad companies. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning from the Cathedral.

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BRADY, JOHN P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 15, 1912

John P. Brady died at his home, 228 West 7th street, Thursday evening following a long illness. He was a switchman, and had suffered from injuries received in an accident about ten years ago from which he never recovered. This accident took place on the Summit where he was switching out a car for a side track. He was hanging from the side of the car when he was knocked off by a standing switch, which had been placed so near the rails that it did not clear. Several ribs were broken, he was hurt internally, and his head badly injured, and an injury to his neck that twisted it from its normal position. A damage suit was brought in the Circuit Court in which he received judgment for damage in the sum of $8,500. The case was carried by the road to the appellate court, where the judgment of the lower court was affirmed. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen of Alton in which his family will receive a benefit from the fund allowed its members, amounting to $1,500. He leaves a wife and six children. His mother also survives him, and two brothers and two sisters.

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BRADY, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 21, 1903                   Victim of the Trains

Sunday morning the crew of the Big Four Flyer, making their early morning run to St. Louis, discovered the body of a boy lying near the tracks at the foot of George street. Investigation showed it to be Joseph, the 13 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Brady of Seventh street. The lad was picked up and taken home where Dr. G. Taphorn attended him. He had some severe injuries about the head and the scalp was badly torn. He never regained consciousness but lived until about midnight Sunday when death came to his relief. He did not go home Saturday night, and his father and brothers hunted high and low for him until after midnight Saturday. He was subject to epileptic fits and employees of the Spread Eagle say he had one on the steamer Saturday night after it landed here. Trains and Boats had a wonderful fascination for him, his father says, and it was impossible to keep him away from the wharf boat and railroad yards. It is thought he had not fully recovered from the sickness he had on the Spread Eagle when he wandered east in the Big Four yards and that he remained too close to the track and was struck and shoved aside by some train Saturday evening. The funeral will be Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

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BRADY, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 20, 1915       Six Year Old Boy Accidently Killed by Brother - Blew Boys' Head Off

Louis Brady, aged 6, was killed instantly at eight o'clock on Sunday morning when his brother, Joe, aged 11, aimed a double barrel shotgun at him and fired one barrel accidentally. The older brother did not know the gun was loaded. The gun was one that had been borrowed on Saturday evening by John Brady, another brother, aged 15. John was preparing for a hunting trip on Sunday and secured the gun for the purpose. He placed it near the kitchen stove in the home at 228 West Seventh street. On Sunday morning he overslept and did not go hunting. When Mrs. Louise Brady, the widowed mother of the three boys, saw two shells on a shelf near the stove after the fire had been started on Sunday morning, she told her son, John, to do something with the shells as she feared that the heat of the stove might cause them to explode. John placed the two shells in the gun and went to church. A short time afterwards, when the two boys and one sister, Margaret, were alone in the house, Joe picked up the gun and supposing that it was not loaded, he pointed the gun at the head of his six year old brother. When he pulled the trigger the load of one and one-eighth ounces of number six shot, tore off the top of the little brother's head and scattered his brains over the entire room. The mother and the older brother were called home from church two blocks away by the news of the death of the little boy. An inquest was conducted over the body of the lad on Sunday afternoon by Coroner J. Morgan Simms. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death, but added that both John and Joe Brady were guilty of gross carelessness. The verdict also included a clause to warn the public against allowing children to play with guns. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at ten o'clock from the Cathedral to the Greenwood cemetery.

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BRAMLET, LULU E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1903

Lulu E., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Bramlet, aged 2 years and 15 days, died Sunday afternoon at the family home, 2114 Johnson street, and the body was sent to Eldorado, Illinois today for burial.

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BRAND, EDWARD L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 6, 1916            Old Timer Mail Clerk Dies

Edward L. Brand, aged 55, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Tuesday at midnight, following an operation for hernia which was performed a few days ago at the hospital, in hope of saving his life. The trouble was in such a stage, however, that there was no chance of giving any permanent relief and death followed. He had served for 30 years as a mail clerk on the Chicago & Alton. He continued his duties though the trouble which was afflicting him caused him much trouble. About 8 days ago he became so bad that it was necessary for him to give up his run and come to Alton for an operation. Mr. Brand was a remarkable man. He had never made a large salary, yet he was a saving man and had good business instincts and is reported he leaves an estate of $50,000, though his salary was never high. He was one of the best men in the government's employ. It is related of him that he was always ready with good counsel to advise young mail clerks, and he would tell them to save their money and make themselves independent. He was one of the most highly respected residents of Brighton, and his financial standing was the very best there. He was a director of a bank in Brighton. He was an Odd Fellow and a faithful member of the order. Mr. Brand leaves his mother, Mrs. Magdalena Brand, who has been spending a few months with her niece, Mrs. R. P. Morrow. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Frances Brand, and a daughter, Miss Grace Brand. The funeral will be at Brighton Friday morning.

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BRANDENBERGER, IDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 2, 1919

Mrs. Ida Brandenberger, 68, of 1530 Highland avenue, died suddenly Monday morning, after an illness of a few hours. Her death came as a shock to her many relatives and friends. She attended to all her household duties on the day before her death. At 9 o'clock in the evening she crossed the street to visit at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. F. Smith, and shortly afterwards she was taken suddenly ill. She lapsed into unconsciousness and died at 2:30 o'clock on Monday morning. Her death was due to uraemic poisoning. Mrs. Brandenberger was well known in the eastern part of the city. She had many friends who will regret her death. She was an active worker in the Congregational Church. Mrs. Brandenberger is survived by three sons, Louis of Alton; William of Terre Haute, Ind.; and Walter of East St. Louis. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Otto Flach, and Mrs. C. F. Swain [sic] of Alton; one step-daughter, Mrs. Henry Meyers of Vernoni, Mo., and the following brothers and sisters: William Walter, Mrs. Fred Green, Mrs. Ed Yager, Gus Walter, Louis E. Walter of Alton; and Frank E. Walter of Tulsa, Okla. The funeral will be held from the home at 1530 Highland avenue at 3 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon. The services at the home will be public, but the services at the cemetery will be private.

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BRANDEWIEDE, FRANCIS (JUSTICE OF THE PEACE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 26, 1912         Oldest Justice of the Peace in Alton Dies

Francis Brandewiede, aged 87, died Monday afternoon at 5 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Strubel, on West Ninth street, after an illness of about five years from paralysis. Justice Brandewiede was the oldest justice of the peace in Alton, and had served for twenty four years in that office. He had also served four terms as clerk of the City court of Alton, retiring nearly four years ago because of physical disability. He was stricken with paralysis in his office one day about five years ago, and was removed to his home. He made a strong effort to overcome the physical disability, and he announced that he would adopt the cure of good humor, in the hope that it would regain for him strength and vigor and that he expected to live to be over 100 years of age. He did become able to get downtown occasionally, and was in the best of spirits until about a year ago when he began to show indications of a failing of strength. Soon after he was stricken with paralysis, his aged partner in life, his wife, was taken ill and died, and this loss was a sad one for the aged invalid. At the time the wife was very sick it was not known but that the husband might be the first to die, but he regained part of his strength. Recently senile gangrene set in and some of his toes were amputated. Afterward it was believed necessary to amputate one of his legs, but his condition was so bad the surgeons decided not to do it, after putting him under the influence of chloroform, and when he recovered from the anesthetic, Justice Brandewiede expressed the deepest regret that the operation had not been proceeded with. He was a man of high education, a cheerful disposition, and was very capable in the positions he filled. He served as police magistrate by appointment of the mayor for a number of years, before Alton became entitled to elect such an officer. He leaves three daughters, Mrs. William Braham, Mrs. John Strubel, Mrs. William Fletcher; and three sons, William and Edward of Alton, and Frank, the oldest son, whose whereabouts is not known. Mr. Brandewiede was the oldest member of the cigar makers union, and maintained his membership there up to his death. For many years he was engaged in the manufacture of cigars in Alton. Mr. Brandewiede was born in Germany, and he came to America when he was 14 years old. He lived in St. Louis for a number of years. He became a citizen of the United States in 1854. He was a long time member of the order of Odd Fellows. The funeral will be held from the Strubel home Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. Arthur Goodger of St. Paul's Episcopal church officiating.

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BRANDEWIEDE, THERESA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 12, 1908

Mrs. Theresa Brandewiede, wife of Francis Brandewiede, died Friday evening at the home on Main street after an illness of two days from uraemic poisoning. She had not been in good health for several years, but was able to be around most of the time, and with her aged partner in life she passed her declining days in complete happiness. Her husband's illness, which began several years ago with a paralytic stroke, was the cause of considerable uneasiness to Mrs. Brandewiede. The aged couple had traveled down the vale of life like two lovers. They exemplified the truth of the belief held by many that marriage was no failure, and that the last days of a life partnership could be as happy as the honeymoon. The domestic life of the couple was ideal and beautiful for their children to contemplate. The loss of his wife is a sad blow to the surviving husband who has passed his 82nd year, and whose condition due to great age has been aggravated by the helplessness of partial paralysis. Mrs. Brandewiede was born in Sachsbach, Germany in 1843. She came to America shortly before her marriage in St. Louis to her husband, Francis Brandewiede, then a young cigar maker. During the Civil war the couple moved to Alton and made their home in Alton ever since. They raised a family of five children, Mrs. William Graham, Mrs. John Strabel, Mrs. William Fletcher, Messrs. William and Edward Brandewiede. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home on Main street, and services will be conducted by Rev. H. M. Chittenden.

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BRANSON, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 27, 1903

The body of one of the most eccentric men ever known in the vicinity of Alton, James Branson, will find burial in Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis. When Branson died at St. Joseph's hospital one week ago last Friday, Deputy Coroner Streeper undertook to find who his relatives were. He found a brother of Branson in St. Louis, who said he could do nothing toward burying the body of the deceased, and that he had been unable to get along with his brother for many years. He could tell nothing as to where Branson's family could be located.  Mr. Streeper kept trying to locate some relative, and at last found an adopted daughter in Chicago, Mrs. J. L. Thomas, who has written that she will be here Monday to take her foster father's remains to St. Louis, where she will have them buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery in her lot. Mr. Streeper says that he endeavored to find some property which was disposed of in a will left by Branson, but so far has been unable to locate any of it. Branson left a long will in which he made many bequests of valuable property, but it is believed that the property existed only in the imagination of the maker of the will. He could have made his home with his adopted daughter, but refused to do so, saying that he preferred to enjoy his liberty and lived near East Alton.

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BRATTON, EMMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 6, 1908

Miss Emma Bratton, daughter of Joseph Bratton of Liberty Prairie, aged 35, died last evening from tuberculosis at the home of the family. She leaves her parents, two brothers and two sisters. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon.

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BRAUNAGEL, EMMA (nee SCHNEIDER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 23, 1906

Mrs. Emma Braunagle, wife of Frank Braunagle, died suddenly Friday evening at the family home, 824 east Third street, after a brief illness from uraemia. Mrs. Braunagle was apparently in good health Friday evening when she began to prepare for the evening meal. She had ascended a flight of stairs carrying a small pan containing some flour, and when she reached the top of the stairs she sat down to rest and fell over unconscious. Dr. G. Taphorn was nearby and he was summoned to attend her, but could do nothing. She died about fifteen minutes later without regaining consciousness. Mrs. Braunagle was 34 years of age, and her maiden name was Emma Schneider. She leaves two brothers, W. F. Schneider, the city treasurer, and Herman Schneider of St. Louis. She leaves a sister, Mrs. Peter Wells of Brighton, her husband and one child. Mrs. Schneider's [sic] illness was a great surprise to her family as no one knew that she was not feeling well. Her death was a sad shock to her relatives and her friends. She was a life-long resident of Alton. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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BRAUNAGEL, LOUISE (nee EHRET)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1921

Mrs. Louise Braunagel, aged 60, died this morning at 9:40 o'clock at the family home, 822 East Fourth street, after an illness which began four weeks ago. For the past few days her condition has been serious and her death was not unexpected. She was the wife of Emil F. Braunagel, and the mother of eight children. Her maiden name was Louise Ehret. She was born, raised and married in Alton and was one of its best known residents. She was a member of St. Mary's Church. She leaves three sons, Henry and John of Wichita, Kan., and Louis of this city, and five daughters, the Misses Mayme, Lucie, Josephine and Minnie of this city, and Sister Peter Claver of Porto Rico [sic], a member of the Notre Dame Order. She also leaves two brothers, John and Joseph Ehret of this city, and one sister, Miss Elisabeth Ehret of Evansville, Ill. There also survives four grandchildren. Plans for the funeral are incomplete. The funeral will probably be held Saturday morning from St. Mary's Church.

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BRAY, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1914

Mrs. Anna Bray, wife of William Bray, the Ridge street restaurant proprietor, died Sunday morning after an extended illness that developed acute features a week or ten days ago. Mrs. Bray had been almost completely helpless from rheumatic troubles for nearly six years, and spent much of the time in a chair. She had to be helped to bed and from it for more than three years of the time. The immediate cause of death is given as rheumatic paralysis and pneumonia. She was 55 years old, and besides her husband leaves two children, Pearl Bray of Evansville, Ind., who is now here; and Miss Retta, a daughter who has been in a St. Louis hospital for some time. Efforts are being made to keep the young lady from learning of her mother's death. Funeral services will be held this evening at 8 o'clock at the Bray home in East Second street, by Rev. G. L. Clark, and the body will be taken Tuesday morning to Elsah for burial. The mother of Mrs. Bray died a few months ago at the Bray home and was buried in the Elsah cemetery.

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BRECKENRIDGE, LUCY (nee LONG)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1917

Mrs. Lucy Breckinridge, a long time resident of Alton, died at the family residence October 17th, at 6:30 p.m., after a brief illness of 48 hours. She was the daughter of the late Colonel Stephen H. Long, U. S. A., and was born in Philadelphia. In January 1853 she was married in Louisville, Ky., to Dr. Marcus Prevost Breckinridge. After a few years in the south, she came to Alton in the early sixties and had lived at the present home for 50 years. She had been a member of the Episcopal Church for many years. She is survived by three children, Messrs. W. L. and Richard Breckinridge of Chicago and Mrs. T. A. Taylor of this city. Six grandchildren, W. L. Breckinridge 4th, and Frank Breckinridge, Ashley Marcus, Lucian and Theodosia Taylor. Two great-grandsons are now serving in the U. S. A.

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BRECKWEG, RAYMOND/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 4, 1918

Raymond Breckweg, 17 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bowis Breckweg, died at 9:30 o'clock this morning at the home of his parents, 1114 East Fourth street, after a brief illness with peritonitis. He is survived by his parents, two brothers and three sisters. Arrangements for the funeral have not been completed.

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BREEDEN, ANNA E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 19, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. Anna E. Breeden will be held from the home, 2104 Hickory street, to the North Side church Saturday afternoon at two o'clock. Services will be conducted by Rev. Brewer.

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BREGENZER, ELIZABETH (nee METZOTH)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Thursday, March 1, 1923

Mrs. Elizabeth Bregenzer, wife of Jacob Bregenzer, died yesterday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bertha Heidrichs, of 440 12 East Broadway. Mrs. Bregenzer has been ill for fourteen days, following a stroke of paralysis. Her maiden name was Metzoth. She and her husband were married in the old St. Mary's church 53 years ago. Some time after their marriage the couple left Alton but returned to Alton to take up their residence seventeen years ago. Mrs. Bregenzer is survived by her husband, Jacob, five daughters, Mrs. Margaret Schilling and Mrs. Elizabeth Sprenger of St. Louis, Mrs. Clara Burmester, Mrs. Catherine Corzine and Mrs. Bertha Heidrich of this city, and three sons, J. E. of Alton, J. J. of Delhi, and Edward of Dow. She also leaves twenty grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. The body has been removed to the Klunk Undertaking Parlors at East Broadway and Alby street, where it can be viewed by friends. The funeral will be held Friday morning from the Undertaking Parlors to St. Mary's church, where Requiem High Mass will be celebrated at 9 o'clock. Interment will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

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BREMER, CONRAD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 1, 1905

Conrad Bremer, aged 65, a prominent farmer of Nameoki, was found dead in the field at his home yesterday noon. He had gone to the field to cut corn, and about noon time his son went to join the father and was shocked to find the body of his father lifeless in the field. Bremer had lived near Nameoki for many years, and was regarded as one of the oldest residents there. He leaves a large family and was a well-to-do farmer. The funeral will be held Saturday morning.

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BRENDLE, HELENA/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, April 17, 1919

The funeral of Mrs. Helena Brendle, whose death at Alton was briefly told in the Intelligencer yesterday, will be held here Friday afternoon. Her death was due to old age. The body will be brought to Edwardsville Friday afternoon. This being Holy Week, services are not permitted in Catholic churches. The body will be taken to the door of St. Boniface church at 3:30 o'clock for final blessing by Rev. C. T. Stolze. Burial will be St. Mary's Catholic cemetery. Mrs. Brendle was one of the old time residents of Edwardsville, and will be remembered here by many. She spent most of her life in this city. She was born in Baden, Germany in August 1831, and had attained the tipe old age of 89 years 7 months and 14 days. She came to America, settling in Edwardsville, when 18 years old. Four years later she was married to Joseph Brendle of Edwardsville. Most of her married life was spent in an old building just north of the old Wabash HOtel. She possessed a clear mind and could relate many interesting incidents pertaining to the early history of Edwardsville. Her husband and two sons, Leopold and George Brendle, preceded her in death many years. The nearest relatives are seven grandchildren, Harry, Lawrence, George and Robert Brendle of Edwardsville; Mrs. Mamie Whitacre of Fullerton Cal.; Mrs. Frank Foley of Denver, Colo.; and Leo Brendle of Escondido, California. There are also six great grandchildren.

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BRENNAN, O. J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1908              Killed by C. & A. Train Trying to Save Railroad Velocipede

To save a speeder, as a three wheel railroad velocipede is known, O. J. Brennan, a line man employed on the C. and A., was instantly killed two miles north of Granite City last night. Brennan was trying to lift his speeder off the track to save it from being struck by the train which passed through Alton at 6:50 p.m.  He could have saved his own life easily, but he was determined if possible to save the machine on which he was riding, and he did not have time. He was struck on the side of the head and probably never breathed afterward. Mr. Brennan formerly lived in Alton. He had been employed by the Alton in the line repairing department for 25 years, and during that time had never lost a day's pay. He had three children when he lived in Alton a few years ago, and all of them died from diphtheria within a week. They were buried in Greenwood cemetery. He went to Springfield and there another child was born, only to fall a victim of the same disease. His wife is in Springfield. The body of Brennan was taken to Granite City where an inquest was held today. Brennan was a man of gigantic strength. It was his duty to repair broken telegraph lines and generally he traveled alone. It is related of him that frequently when he would discover poles had been blown down or had fallen, he would make repairs alone. He would dig a hole and make a trench along the line of the fallen pole, and then by lifting the small end of the 30 to 35 foot pole he would start raising it, walking along underneath the heavy weight and raising it, until he got the pole into a position where it would slip into the hole. Then he would set it in an upright position and string his lines again. The feat could be performed by very few men. The body of the dead lineman was taken to Springfield this noon for burial.

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BRENTON, J. D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 28, 1922                    Falls Down Elevator Shaft at Catholic Orphanage

J. D. Brenton, an elevator construction workman, was fatally injured this morning by falling down an electric elevator shaft at the Catholic orphanage on State street. He died as he was being taken into St. Joseph's hospital, to which place he was rushed immediately after the accident. Brenton was assisting in installing a passenger elevator at the new orphanage building. A scaffold on which he was working was defective and one of the braces gave away under him. This allowed him to fall from the scaffold and dropped him to the concrete bottom of the elevator shaft. It is supposed that he landed on his head as his injuries seemed to be chiefly about his head. There was no indication of anything having fallen on top of him from the platform on which he had been working. Immediately after the accident, Brenton was picked up and taken to the hospital in an ambulance, but before he was carried into the hospital, he had died. The distance Brenton fell was about 28 feet. The Wimmer Construction Co., having the general contract for the orphanage, did not have the home address of the victim of the accident. He lived in St. Louis and was sent here to install the elevator in the new orphanage. The firm for which he worked was notified of the fatal accident, and through them the effort was to be made to find the relatives of the deceased.

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BREWER, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 29, 1910                  Burned to Death in His House

Charles Brewer, who with his brother John kept house on a farm two miles from New Douglas, was burned to death and his body consumed in their home, Friday night about 11:30 o'clock. John Brewer, who came home late after his brother had gone to bed, was responsible for the accident. According to a story which came from New Douglas today, John Brewer returned home late, and it is supposed he was intoxicated, as he was a drinking man. After entering the house, he accidentally overturned the lamp, and it set fire to the house and John ran outside. He ran around the little three room building, and opening another door he shouted for his brother to come to him, as the brother could not get out the way that John had gone, because of the flames. John says that he heard his brother shouting for help, but he was unable to get to him on account of the quick spread of the flames. The opening of the other door had caused a draft which swept the fire through the house, and before Charles Brewer could get out of bed he was overcome by smoke. Very little was left of his body, and the house is nothing but a heap of ashes. Coroner Streeper directed his deputy (Roy Lowe of Edwardsville) to go to New Douglas tomorrow and hold an inquest. Charles Brewer was about 43 years of age. The two brothers had a little place and they lived together. Neither had ever married.

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BRICKNER, EMIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 13, 1903               Killed in Premature Blast

Emil Brickner, a quarryman employed by John Armstrong, was killed this afternoon about 3 o'clock by the premature discharge of a blast. He was charging the blast when the explosion occurred. Brickner was blown in the air and fell with a large mass of rock, part of the loosened stone falling a distance of 25 feet on him. One arm was blown off, one hand blown to pieces, both eyes blow out and horrible injuries were inflicted to him on the body and head. Brickner fell from a ledge a distance of 25 feet. He died about 3:30 o'clock.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 14, 1903

Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest Wednesday evening over the remains of Emil Brickner, the man killed by a premature explosion of a dynamite blast in the Armstrong quarries Wednesday afternoon. There were few eye witnesses of the explosion, as all the men in the quarries were otherwise engaged. A series of holes had been drilled in the rock and these were to be charged with dynamite. Brickner, being a careful man, it was his duty to tamp the dynamite into the holes with a wooden rod. The cause of the explosion is not known. Several women living in boats at the river saw the accident. They said that Brickner was blown at least 25 feet into the air and then fell over a ledge about 25 feet, making a fall of fifty feet in all. The unfortunate man was fearfully mangled by the flying pieces of rock, and never regained consciousness. A verdict of accidental death was found. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the family home.

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BRIGHT, JEFFERSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 19, 1910         Killed In Explosion at Equitable Plant

Jefferson Bright, aged 48, was instantly killed in an explosion of the corning mill at the Equitable Powder Works, about 10:45 Saturday morning. Aaron Patterson, who was fifty feet away, was so shocked by the explosion that he ran wild for a few minutes, tearing his shirt off of his back before being caught by several of the men in the yard. Mr. Patterson was the only one in the building, which was 20x_0 feet, and was supposed to be putting the heavy 80 pound cakes of crude powder into the mill to be ground up into fine powder. Patterson had just driven up his mule and cart to the door of the corning mill, and as a load of the ground powder was not ready for him, he walked away fifty feet and sat down on a log. When the explosion occurred the mill and wagon were blown into the air. The mule, which had been nicknamed "Maude," was killed. Mr. Patterson was knocked to the ground by the explosion and had his face and shoulders bruised. When he arose and started running, he was so excited that he tore his shirt off of his back fearing that it was afire. He was afterwards taken to the dressing room and taken care of. He was able to get home without any help. Bright's body was hurled with the debris a distance of thirty or forty feet up the hill near where the mill stands, and landed across a small ditch running into Wood River. His legs were twisted and broken and the undertaker says that nearly every bone in his body was broken. His head was not badly crushed. It is believed that there were about fifty blocks of powder lying in the room at the time of the explosion, which would make about 4,500 pounds of powder. The officials at the powder works say they do not know how much powder went off, and they said they could not place an estimate on the damage. George Lawrence, Patterson's assistant, was about 150 feet away and was coming to get a load of powder. He was knocked down, but was not hurt. The men in the press, Charles Young and Robert Kiebelt [or Klebelt] four hundred feet away were stunned for a minute. Although a few windows were knocked out in the press room by the explosion, no one was hurt. Jeff Bright had worked for the powder plant for sixteen years. He was born and raised in East Alton, and had been councilman in East Alton at different times for the last ten years. Mrs. Bright received the news through her son, who works at the plant. She took the matter very calmly. She said that Mr. Bright left the house laughing this morning, thinking that his daughter, Mrs. Mae Philips of Pocatello, Idaho, was coming next week to visit him. Mrs. Philips intended to leave today, but may be delayed for a few days on account of the railroad strike. A telegram has been sent telling her of her father's death, which will be sad news to the daughter who was coming home after being absent for nearly a year. Mr. Bright leaves a widow and four children. The three sons are Louis A., John H. and William J., all of East Alton. Coroner C. N. Streeper has moved the body to his undertaking establishment in Upper Alton, and will hold the inquest Monday night.

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BRILL, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 27, 1915

Michael Brill, aged 76, died last night at the home of his sister, Mrs. L. R. Stiritz, at Clifton Terrace, after a five weeks illness from pneumonia. The funeral will probably be held Tuesday.

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BRISSEY, MYRTLE (nee SIMPSON)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1911

Mrs. Myrtle Simpson Brissey, wife of George W. Brissey, and daughter of Elias Simpson, died at St. Joseph's hospital at 1 o'clock Monday morning from tuberculosis of the bowels. She had undergone three surgical operations in hope of gaining relief, but the malady finally proved fatal. She was 26 years of age and leaves two children. The body will be buried at Batchtown, her native place, tomorrow, and will be taken there tonight.

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BRITTINGHAM, ELIZA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 10, 1903

Mrs. Eliza, widow of John Brittingham, aged 68, died Thursday night at St. Joseph's hospital of dropsy of the heart. The funeral took place Friday afternoon, interment being in City Cemetery.

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BROCK, ALICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 26, 1920

Julius Brock, colored, shot and killed his wife about 1 o'clock today with a shot gun in their home at Federal, east of Alton. No cause had been found for the killing. The woman received the charge of shot in the neck and arm and side, and died instantly. The husband fled and at last report had not been arrested. Neighbors said that a few minutes before the shooting the couple passed their houses and were apparently friendly enough. Some quarrel must have developed at the home and the husband in mad fury took his gun and killed the woman. The couple had been living at Federal for three years, the man being employed at Federal Lead plant.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 27, 1920

According to the testimony of Ellis Martin and his wife at the coroner's inquest Wednesday morning, Mrs. Alice Brock, a negress, was killed with a shotgun as a result of the fact that a chicken dinner which she had prepared did not please her husband, Jesse Brock, who is being sought by the police for the slaying. The Martins, who also are negroes, testified before Deputy Coroner William Bauer that they had accompanied Brock to his home for dinner Tuesday. The repast, they related, struck them as being quite suitable, but failed to meet with the approval of Brock, who went into a rage and berated his wife. Seeing that a quarrel was imminent, the guests said they went into another room of the house, from which they could hear scuffling and an exchange of hot words. While the quarrel continued, the couple declared they went to the home of a neighbor two doors away, from which they heard the report of the shotgun. When they returned to the Brock home, they found the woman dead, a part of her skull having been blown off by the charge. Brock had fled, but was reported to have been seen near the house later in the evening. Letters written by the slain woman, which had not been mailed, were found in the house, showing that she believed her husband wished to be rid of her and had tried to drive her away from home. A telegram received by Deputy Coroner Bauer from the brother of the victim, Thad Stewart, announced that he is on his way here, having been recently discharged from the Missouri Penitentiary.

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BROCK, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 18, 1918                Dies From Fall at Laclede Steel Plant

James Brock, aged 65, one of the best known colored men in Alton, died at St. Joseph's hospital, Sunday morning at 8:30 o'clock, from the effects of accidental injuries sustained in a fall at the engine room of the Laclede Steel Co., Saturday morning. Brock, who was a very capable mechanic, and had been working for years about the engine rooms of various plants, was engaged in oiling the engine standing on a platform. Whether he was struck on the head by a chain, or he slipped off the platform is not known. He was found lying on the floor with his skull crushed and his jaw broken. He was unconscious. He was immediately taken to the hospital where he was given surgical attention, but he never regained consciousness. Brock was known as a steady, dependable man, and for many years was very influential among his own people. The funeral will be held from the home, 611 Division street, to SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

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BROCKMAN, CHARLOTTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 19, 1917

Mrs. Charlotte Brockman, old resident of Alton, died at the County Poor Farm today, content to pass away since she knew that she was to be buried in Alton. One of the last requests she made was for an interview with the Overseer of the Poor. She had Joe Hermann promise that he would have her buried in the Alton City Cemetery beside her son. She wanted to be buried by William Bauer, who had been a friend of the family for a number of years. When the oversser of the poor promised that her wish would be fulfilled, she said she was willing to die. The body will be brought to Alton this evening and the funeral will be held tomorrow morning from the Bauer Undertaking establishment to the Alton City Cemetery.

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BROCKMEIER, HENRY/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, May 3, 1893             Ex-Supervlsor Henry Brockmeier Expires After Only a Few Days Illness
Edwardsville lost one of its best farmers and citizens by the death of Henry Brockmeler, which occurred at his residence four miles southwest of the city on Friday evening, April 28th, at eight o'clock. He had been ill only a week and was apparently not in serious condition. His affliction was lung trouble the result of a cold which he contracted several weeks ago. Henry Brockmeier was born Dec. 5, 1828, in Eldachsen, District Minden, Province Westfalen, Prussia, Germany (sic). In 1848 he came to this country and after a short stop at Philadelphia came to Madison county which has been his home since. He first located on Pleasant Ridge then removed to Ft. Russell where he resided until about 22 or 23 years ago when he took up his residence on his farm near the Bluffs. He began life with small financial means but he possessed that industry and frugality that is characteristic of the people of whom he was a representative and he acquired a competency some years ago to which he continued to add gradually until he was recognized as one of the most solid farmers of this section of the county. Though never seeking position, much preferring the state of private citizen,he was chosen to fill various positions of an official character, and for several years served as assistant supervisor of Edwardsville township. In 1852 he married Dora Deterding. By this union he had eight children, five of whom are living, two sons and three daughters. She died July 19, 1871, after having lived with him in happy union for nineteen years. On April 17, 1872, he married Dina Sanna. Three sons were born of this union one of whom is living. He leaves surviving a widow, three sons: Charles F. who is one of the substantial young farmers of the township; Gus who has been helping take care of the home place, and Eddie a young man of fifteen are at home; three daughters, two married to successful farmers, Levina, wife of Louis Giesemann of Ft. Russell, and Mary, wife of Christ. Rathert of this township, also Dora who is at home. He also leaves a sister, Mrs. Minna Schwarz, of this city. The funeral took place Sunday morning at 10 o'clock from the family residence to St. Paul's (Brockmeier) church. Rev. Phillip Hiligardt preached the sermon and paid an eloquent tribute to the dead. After the services the body was conveyed to the Peters cemetery. The pallbearers were: Charles Roewekamp, Herman Kromer, Henry Buehring, Herman Peters, Bernhard Funstermann and August Neunaber. The residents for many miles around were in attendance and many from this city drove down, notwithstanding the heavy rains which had fallen during the night and the day previous. Among those from a distance who had come to pay the last mark of respect were Mrs. John Woestmann, Mrs. Dora Hill, Mrs. Charlotte Penningroth and Mr. and Mrs. Wm Meinsen of St. Louis, and Henry Busking and Fred Doehring, of Shelby county.

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BROCKMEIER, SOPHIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1920

Mrs. Sophie Brockmeier, wife of Ernest Brockmeier, died in St. Louis last night at 11:40 o'clock at the home of her son, Henry Brockmeier, of 4505 West Easton avenue. Mr. and Mrs. Brockmeier sold their farm three miles north of Godfrey, the first of the month, and went to St. Louis to reside with their son. Mrs. Brockmeier was in her 82nd year. She is survived by Henry and Fred Brockmeier, Mrs. Lizzie Burger, Mrs. Mary Milner, Mrs. Ida Priesmeyer, and Mrs. Julia O'Connor. The remains will be taken to Godfrey and funeral services will be held from the Bethany church Sunday at two o'clock. Interment will be in Bethany cemetery.

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BRODERICK, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 5, 1913

Joseph Broderick, aged 40, died Friday evening at his home, 316 Dry street, after an illness of four years. Mr. Broderick was a well known Alton business man and was the senior member of the firm of Broderick Bros., which had been in business for 21 years. He was also in the contracting business and completed several street contracts in Alton and Upper Alton....He is survived by his wife and three sons, John, Edward and Joseph; also two brothers, Thomas and Edward; and a sister, Mrs. David Fleming. He was a very successful business man, and bore an excellent reputation. He belonged to a well known old Alton family, and had a very large number of good friends and acquaintances. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

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BROGLIE, ELEANOR/FLORA/MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 14, 1911         Triple Drowning of Broglie Sisters

As the closing event of a happy day in Camp Transient, where two of the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Broglie were spending the day with the oldest, the three girls, Flora, Eleanor and Mary Broglie, aged 16, 14, and 12, were drowned while taking a farewell skiff ride. Eleanor and Mary had intended staying over Sunday in camp, but found so many there they concluded to go home. They had been in the river bathing, and afterward the skiff ride was proposed, just before train time. Thomas Harr rowed the boat, and Rodgers Wyckoff, the 8 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Wyckoff, was in the party. The drowning occurred in the slough between Scotch Jimmy's Island and the main shore at the mouth of Piasa Creek. About 18 people had been staying at camp, chaperoned by Mr. and Mrs. Evan Christoe, and on Saturday about a dozen visitors went up to spend the day. All these people witnessed the drowning and helped to recover the bodies. The accident was due to an effort to run the rough water where a stone dam extends across the slough. Water pours over this dam and makes a little fall and an eddy. The only deep water anywhere around was where the skiff turned over below the dam and threw its five passengers out. Thomas Harr, who rowed the boat, caught his oar against the dike when the skiff was floating sidewise, and the girls were shouting with glee at the ride through the rough water. The current carried the boat against the fast oar and caused the boat to dip water. The girls, terrified, jumped to one side and the boat went over, bottom side up. Rodgers Wyckoff alone had presence of mind to catch the boat and he finally climbed up on the bottom and floated safely until rescued. The three girls, according to the evidence of Tom Harr at the inquest, threw their arms around him and all were drowning, when Harry managed to break loose. The girls soon sank, but Eleanor was still afloat, and Harr took her by the hair and started to tow her ashore, but had to give it up because of his own weakened condition and the girls' impeding struggles. Harr saved his own life. The horrified campers tried to get to the place in time to help the struggling three girls and young man, but were too late because of the distance they had to travel. Within a half hour after the drowning, the girls' bodies were recovered. They had been carried by the current down a short distance, where they rolled up in shallow water and were seen and picked up. Efforts were made to resuscitate them. Harry J. Christoe, who was in the party, climbed to the home of E. A. Riehl on the bluff, and telephone to Alton for doctors. Dr. Enos was found and he directed by telephone what movements to make to revive the girls. Christoe, to save time, shouted the directions from the hill top to the campers down at the water's edge, and they, putting the girls over a tree trunk, began the efforts to resuscitate them. Some barrels were rolled down from the hill top at the Riehl place, and the summer boarders at Riehl's helped. Only one of the girls, Miss Flora, showed any signs of coming to, but she could not survive. The three girls were laid in a row on the bank, after an hour of effort, and the attempt to revive them was given up. In the meantime, the parents, who had been summoned, were hurried in an auto by Fred Lehne to the scene of the drowning, accompanied by C. J. Jacoby and Rev. F. S. Eitelgeorge. Mrs. Broglie was not permitted to see her children. The father did not know that all his children had lost their lives until he gazed on their faces as they lay dead on the ground. Then he almost collapsed. The mother, frantic with grief, was kept on top of the hill, and when told the truth she had to be restrained from joining her children in death, as she wanted to throw herself in the river. Mr. Jacoby took charge of the bodies, and in the meantime coroners of two counties were hurrying to the scene. The drowning occurred almost at the line between Jersey and Madison. coroner Streeper went up in the Goddess, which towed the Sport. The Goddess was left at Illini Yacht club, and the Sport, of less draft, made the trip in shallow water up the slough to the scene of the drowning. When the coroner arrived he learned the bodies were out of his jurisdiction, and he waited for Coroner Hunt to arrive. By lamplight, the inquest was held, then the bodies were put in two row boats and carried down to Illini club island, where they were loaded in the Sport and towed down to Alton. The members of the camping party broke up and came home, except a few who stayed around to pack up the camping outfit and look after the bodies. The boats arrived in Alton at midnight with the bodies, which were taken to the Jacoby undertaking rooms. There they were prepared for burial. The three girls who lost their lives were prominent in the German Methodist Sunday school. The funeral tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock from the German Methodist church will be a sad event in that church. Six persons, members of a confirmation class with the middle girl, will serve as pallbearers. The pallbearers for the other girls will be young ladies from the Sunday school. The music will be furnished by the choir of the First Methodist church. The Broglie family, and especially the mother, have seen their share of trouble. The mother bore six children, all of whom are dead now, and the couple have nothing left. The father worked at Beall Brothers East Alton plant as a machinist, and the family lived on West Thirteenth street. Immediately after the girls sank, Clinton Miller and William Sinclair rescued the Wyckoff boy from the bottom of the skiff, and McLean Watkins, in a boat, rowed to the spot where the girls had sunk, and in the rough, dangerous water, he tried with a hook to recover the bodies, thinking that by quick recovery the lives might be saved. The current, however, carried the bodies away toward the sandbar. The members of the camping party unite in saying that the Harr boy did not invite the girls to go rowing, but that it was their own proposition and he merely accommodated them by serving as oarsman. The ladies in the party could do nothing more than was done after the bodies were recovered and efforts to revive them failed, and so they were sent home on the train. The bodies will lie in state at the German M. E. church from 2 p.m. today until 10 a.m. tomorrow, where all interested can call and view them. The pallbearers will be:  For Miss Mary: Berlie Jungblut, Effie Jacoby, Mary Althoff, Loretta Bierbaum, Viola Dortz, May Paul.   For Miss Eleanor: The confirmation class of last year - Casper Jacoby Jr., Clarence Brueggemann, Elmer Bierbaum, Wallace Colonitts, Lucile Lehne, Olga Wells.  For Miss Flora - Harry Paul, Ernest Jacoby, Paul Jacoby, F. Meisenheimer, Ph. Graul, Fred Weber.  Rev. Eitelgeorge, assisted by Rev. W. T. Cline of the First Methodist church, will officiate. Two sons who died and are buried in Pittsburg will be taken up and brought to Alton for re-interment by the side of their sisters in Alton cemetery.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 15, 1911

Three white caskets containing the remains of the three young girls of the Broglie family were the center of interest in the German Methodist church, which drew an immense throng this morning. The sympathy of the entire community with the family in their triple bereavement was undoubted. The expression of it had been so strong as to leave no room for questioning it. There were heaps of floral offerings, and there were many sincere handclasps and sympathetic words for the family. In the church where the girls were well known, there was the deepest of grief. The services were conducted by Rev. F. S. Eitelgeorge, assisted by Rev. W. T. Cline of the First Methodist church. The musical numbers were sung by the members of the choir of the First church. During the time yesterday the three bodies lay in the German Methodist church, the place was thronged, and an usher counted the people who passed through. They numbered three thousand, according to the pastor of the church, Rev. F. S. Eitelgeorge, and fully another thousand people passed through the church this morning to view the remains. It was estimated that two thousand people attended the burial in the city cemetery, and all along the route taken by the funeral procession, the streets were lined with people who gathered to see the procession with three hearses and three sets of pallbearers pass.

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BRONSON, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 20, 1903

James Bronson, an old resident of East Alton, died this morning at the hospital. He was 75. The time for his burial is not set, and an effort is being made to communicate with some of his relatives in St. Louis.

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BROOKESBEANE, FRANCES J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 3, 1909

Mrs. Frances J. Brookesbeane, wife of George Brookesbeane, the old ferryman, died Friday evening at her home, Eighth and Piasa streets, after a long illness, aged 62. She underwent a surgical operation a few days ago for the removal of a water tumor, which had grown to great size, and she never survived the shock. She was a daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Maxwell, who is over eighty years of age, and a sister of Chief of Police John Maxwell. She leaves one sister, Mrs. Mary Roller. Mrs. Brooksbeane leaves also four children. The couple had been married 35 years, and had lived all that time in Alton. The funeral of Mrs. Brooksbeane will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

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BROOKS, FINLEY G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1905

The body of Finley G. Brooks, the former East Alton business man who died Monday at his home in Granite City, accompanied by a large funeral party arrived in Alton about noon today and was taken to the Washington street M. E. church where services were conducted this afternoon by the pastor, Rev. C. L. Peterson. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

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BROOKS, FRED W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 31, 1916               Old Soldier Dies at Quincy

Fred W. Brooks, an old soldier, for many years a resident of Alton, died in the Soldiers' Home at Quincy Sunday, after a long illness with cancer. Mr. Brooks had resided at the Soldiers' Home for three years, since the cancerous trouble began to be serious. He was in his seventieth year. When a boy he came to Alton with his parents, and when the war broke out he went to St. Louis with a company of Upper Alton boys and enlisted in the army. He served during the entire war, and afterward he married Miss Emma Wiest, his widow. The couple were the parents of eleven children, seven of whom survive him - Mrs. George Knowles; Mrs. Eugene Lavenue Jr.; Mrs. Eugene Rice; Gentry L. Brooks of Alton; Mrs. B. W. Wilson of Quincy; Fred E. Brooks who is in the U. S. Army in the Philippines; and Dan F. Brooks who is in the United States Navy and at present is stationed in the Philippines. He leaves fifteen grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Mr. Brooks made a request that he be buried among his comrades at the Soldiers' Home in the beautiful cemetery provided there and this request will be observed.

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BROOKS, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 20, 1909

The funeral of Mrs. Margaret Brooks was held this morning at 9 o'clock at the negro Baptist church. An inquest was held by Coroner C. N. Streeper last night, and the verdict returned was death from heart disease.

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BROOKSBEANE/BROOKSBEAM, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 12, 1916     Old Ferryman Crosses the River, Makes His Last Trip

George Brooksbeam, aged riverman, was removed from his home on the river front to St. Joseph's Hospital this afternoon in a very serious condition. He has but a short time more to live, and he wanted badly to live the remainder of his life alongside the old Mississippi river. He protested bitterly when the authorities went to his shack on the river bank and told him he would have to go to the hospital. Brooksbeam is one of the best known rivermen in Alton. For many years he operated a ferry business at Alton. He was in the business when he rowed people across the river for ten cents. Later, he purchased a gasoline boat and named it the "No Credit." For a time he worked for the Eagle Packet Co., and then he left the river for a short time to work for Uncle Sam, carrying the mail from the post office to the trains, but he finally returned to the river front to live. There is a little shack on the banks of the beloved Mississippi River he wanted to die in. He would rather have just a little glance of the river than all the conveniences which could be offered him at the hospital. When he learned that all of the shacks along the river front were to be removed and he would have to go to the hospital, he told authorities that he wanted to pay his own way to the hospital.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 16, 1916

The last trip was made at noon today by George Brooksbeane, old time ferryman at Alton. The old ferryman, who for many years had ferried people back and forth on the river at Alton, himself embarked on a trip where he was merely a passenger, over whose route he had no control any longer, and a spectral ferryman took him over the river to the great beyond on the other side. He had been a sufferer from kidney trouble and had been ill in a cabin near the river he loved so well. He survived only a few days after he was taken to the hospital. There, though given the kindest of treatment in a clean bed, the old riverman yearned for the lapping of the waves and the moist smell of the water. About 80 years of age, he took voyage on the dark river, and his days of ferrying were over. In all the years he ferried at Alton, Brooksbeane never had an accident. A ferryman, he never could swim, and only once, it is related, was he ever in the river, and that was when a drunken passenger dragged him over at the shore and Brooksbeane got wet to the skin. For several years he disdained the use of power, other than the old "armstrong," and he propelled his boat with oars. At last he succumbed to the modern idea and bought a boat with a gasoline engine. Sheathing it in tin to resist the ice, and with an antique engine, Brooksbeane ferried for some time. He had accumulated quite a sum of money, it is said, by his family, but he was never showy in his dress or his way of living.

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BROOKSCHEN, JOHN/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, January 6, 1892

John Brookschen, who has been staying with Frank Lohman on Sand Prairie, Nameoki Township, died Friday [Jan. 1] and was buried Sunday at Collinsville. He was 21 years old.

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BROTHERS, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 5, 1910            Death From Lockjaw - After Having His Feet Frozen

George Brothers, aged 38, died at St. Joseph's hospital Saturday morning from lockjaw, resulting from having his feet frozen. Brothers came to Alton last week and went to the Buck boarding house on Illinois avenue, where he had been boarding a year before. Brothers said that while working on the Missouri Pacific railroad sweeping snow from switches during the cold weather in December, he froze his feet. He was taken to the Missouri Pacific hospital at St. Louis and was given treatment there, and was discharged last Saturday. He arrived in Alton on Sunday, and was very lame. He had to be taken to St. Joseph's hospital, and there lockjaw set in. Dr. Winn, who attended him, believed the man's case was hopeless several days ago and a letter was sent to his brother, Joseph Brothers, at Oakwood, Ill. to attend him. The brother came to Alton and stayed several days, making arrangements for the shipment of the body to Oakwood in case of death. The body will be sent away tomorrow.

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BROWN, ANGELICA (nee KAUFFMAN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 18, 1920        Former Red Cross Secretary Succumbs to Illness

Mrs. Angelica Kauffman Brown, wife of Shelby A. Brown, died Tuesday afternoon about 3 o'clock in a hospital in Galesburg, Ill., where she had undergone two surgical operations. She was attended by her mother, Mrs. T. H. Kauffmann, and an aunt, Mrs. Joseph Silver, at the time of her death. The passing of Mrs. Brown caused much sadness in a large circle of friends and acquaintances of the young woman. She had been married the first day of last December to Shelby A. Brown, to whom she had been engaged since before he answered his country's call to arms. The marriage in the First Methodist church in Alton was a big event in Alton society circles. Miss Kauffmann had been most active in the work of the Red Cross, and when the headquarters of Alton Chapter was opened, she was selected as executive secretary and continued in that capacity until November 1, when her resignation became effective, in anticipation of her marriage. She had been very helpful to many hundreds of returned soldiers after peace was declared and there are many of the boys who came back from war who will always remember kindly the keen interest she took in helping them straighten out tangles that seemed to them almost impossible of solution. She had previously served in the Jennie D. Hayner library, and there too she had shown a marked efficiency in her work, which attracted the attention of the Red Cross directors when they were selecting an executive secretary. Miss Kauffmann was deeply interested in the work of the First Methodist church in which she had held membership from girlhood. She was one of the original members of the Winifred Dague Travel club, a Methodist social organization. She was also a member of the Zeta Beta Psi sorority. Mrs. Brown was taken sick three weeks ago with a malady that was not at first correctly diagnosed. She was operated upon for appendicitis two weeks ago last Saturday, and it was found that it was not what was needed. A second operation to relieve other bad conditions was determined upon and this occurred last Saturday, two weeks after the first one. Her condition was very bad from the very first, and there was most discouraging tiding coming from the bedside of the young woman. Mrs. Brown was born at Lexington, Mo., and when she was a few months old the family moved to Alton. She had made her home here ever since, until she went to Galesburg a few months ago, the bride of Shelby A. Brown, former assistant secretary at the Alton Y. M. C. A. She would have been 28 years of age next Saturday. Beside her mother she leaves one brother, Hugh, and a sister, Miss Helen Kauffmann. The body will be brought back to Alton tomorrow morning. The time of the funeral will be announced after the party arrives here. A telegram from Mrs. Kauffmann this afternoon stated that the funeral of Mrs. Shelby Brown will be held Friday afternoon from the home to the City Cemetery. Mrs. Kauffmann and Mr. Brown will arrive at 6:50 tomorrow morning.

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BROWN, ANSEL L./Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, October 10, 1930/Submitted by Jane Denny

Simple Service to Mark Burial of A. L. Brown. Final Plans Completed Today for Oldest White Native Whose Ancestors Came to County Years Ago. Member of Odd Fellows in 1869. Paternal Grandfather Located at Alton Before 1800 and Others in Edwardsville Soon Afterwards.
Brief, simple services with ritual service of Odd Fellows were planned today for the burial of Ansel L. Brown, who died yesterday afternoon at this home on Hillsboro Avenue. Rev. J. K. Brennan, rector of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church will conduct the Episcopal services at the Brown residence at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon. Members of the Odd Fellows will then take charge of the burial at Woodlawn Cemetery. Death of Mr. Brown removed the oldest native white resident of Edwardsville, whose ancestors were among the earliest arrivals in Madison County. He was a baby of three years when his parents established a home on the grounds where Mr. Brown resided for 80 years. His mother was Miss Sarah Lusk, daughter of John T. Lusk, who settled in Edwardsville in 1805. His maternal grandmother was Lucretia Gillham, member of a family which settled in the county in 1803. The paternal side of the family goes back to Dr. Erastus Brown who came from the east and settled at Alton just before 1800. Dr. Brown's wife had died in the east and he came to Alton with two small sons, one of them being Edwards Salisbury Brown, father of Mr. Brown. Being in close contact with the very first arrivals of Madison County, Mr. Brown became interested in history of the county. Through the relationship he gained much information previous to 1860 and he remembered many of the outstanding events of recent years. Last summer he accompanied the writer on an afternoon's visit to many of the historical spots of Edwardsville. Several of the most interesting places were pointed out. One in which Mr. Brown was particularly interested that afternoon was the scene of the home of Thomas Kirkpatrick, later the place of convening the first county court in Illinois. In 1882 Mr. Brown acquired the Edwardsville Democrat and published it for over 40 years. He was not a practical printer but took great interest in the plant. Even after the newspaper was suspended, he maintained the shop and frequently visited it. Only a few days ago the equipment was removed and the second floor of the building leased by Edwardsville unions. Mr. Brown did not marry until later in life, on January 1, 1891. His widow was formerly Miss Minnie Trost. Besides the widow, four daughters and a son survive. They are Mrs. A. H. Tuxhorn, Mrs. W. H. Hotz, and Ansel Brown of Edwardsville; Mrs. Elmer Jahns of Detroit, Mich., and Mrs. I. H. Watson of Chattanooga, Tenn. A half sister, Mrs. C. N. Travous, of Edwardsville, and a half-brother, H. L .Torrence, of Portland, Ore., also survive.
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BROWN, EDWARD D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 18, 1910

Edward D. Brown of Fosterburg, aged 47, died at St. Joseph's hospital this mroning following a surgical operation for the relief of rupture. He was a short heavy man, and surgeons did not give him assurance that an operation would be successful. He desired to take the chance and the operation was performed last Saturday. He failed to recover. He leaves one sister, Mrs. Ed Titchenal of Fosterburg. The funeral will be held Sunday, and burial will be in the Short cemetery. Brown formerly lived at Palacius, Tex.  He was a member of the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and Woodmen of the World.

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BROWN, EDWARD SALISBURY/Source: Jane Denny

Born in Upper Alton, Madison County, IL, Edward Salisbury Brown was the son of Dr. Erastus (c. 1778-1833) and Brittania (Easton) Starr Brown (1780-1822). His uncle, Rufus Easton, founded Alton, IL. His mother's first husband was Samuel Starr and the father of William E. Starr (1803-1843), the future husband of Elvira Amanda Stephenson (1809-1881), daughter of Colonel Benjamin (1769-1822) and Lucy (Swearingen) Stephenson (c. 1788-1850) of Edwardsville, IL. Thus, Edward S. Brown was a brother-in-law of Elvira Stephenson. The circa 1820 Colonel Benjamin Stephenson House is presently owned by the City of Edwardsville and administered by the Friends of the Stephenson House. It is open to the public and serves as a teaching museum:
http://www.stephensonhouse.org/default.asp  .    Edward Salisbury Brown married Sarah Jane Lusk, daughter of John Thomas and Lucretia (Gillham) Lusk, on 10 Apr 1846 in Madison County. At his death at age 30 in 1850, he was survived by his wife and two children: Ansel Lusk and Mary Lucretia Brown. Mary Lucretia died in September 1850, just two and a half months after her father. After Edward's death in 1850, his widow later married John Torre/ance

Obituary, Source: Alton Telegraph and Democratic Review, July 12, 1850  (copy is courtesy of Hayner Public Library):
Died – At his residence in Edwardsville, on Tuesday, the 9th, last, Mr. Edward S. Brown, in the 30th year of his age. Mr. Brown was the son of the late Dr. Brown, of Upper Alton, and was born and raised in this county. As a man, he was somewhat reserved, but was possessed of a warm and affectionate heart, and the highest sense of honor. In the discharge of his duties as an officer of the county, he was prompt, energetic, and faithful – as a husband and father he was kind and indulgent. After an illness of six days, during which although his sufferings were very great, he was called upon take his long, long sleep of death. He has been taken away from us in the bloom of manhood, and has left an affectionate wife, two lovely children, and numerous friends to mourn his loss. Peace be to his ashes.

"History of Madison County, Illinois," 1882 (Brink):

1850 - July Term - Death of E. S. Brown -- At a special term of the county court of Madison county, held on the 18th of July, 1850, the following preamble and resolutions were adopted:
"WHEREAS since the last adjournment of this court, it has pleased the all wise and merciful Creator of the universe to remove from our midst our esteemed associate, Edward. S. Brown, late treasurer and assessor of Madison county; and WHEREAS we are desirous of rendering a tribute of respect to the memory of our deceased friend who has endeared himself to us by his many virtues and manly deportment, therefore be it

Resolved, That while we humbly submit to the decrees of God, we deeply deplore the untimely death of our friend and fellow citizen Edward S. Brown; that in his death the county of Madison has lost an able, impartial and faithful officer, and the community a valuable and worthy citizen; That we deeply empathize with the bereaved family and friends of the deceased in their sad affliction; and That the clerk of this court present to the family of the deceased a copy of these resolutions and also cause the same to be published in all the public newspapers of the county.

Edward's brother, Judge William Tyler Brown (1817-1874), was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery. Judge Wm T. Brown's picture appeared on an entire page of the 1873 Illustrated Encyclopedia and Atlas Map Of Madison County, IL.
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BROWN, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1910

Mrs. Elizabeth Brown, widow of the late Charles Brown, died Sunday night after a brief illness at her home, 612 east Third street. She was 84 years old the sixth of this month. Mrs. Brown was born in England and came to Alton more than fifty years ago. She leaves one daughter, Mrs. George Alt, and four grandchildren. She was a charitable, kindly woman, and counted as friends all who came in contact with her, and her death will be regretted by all of these. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home.

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BROWN, INGABEE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 20, 1914        80 Years Resident of Foster Township Dies

Ingabee Brown, aged 80 years, died Thursday evening at 6 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. H. Culp. Death came after seven years' disability, following a paralytic stroke. Mrs. Brown, who was a member of one of the best known old families of Madison County, was born in Foster township and she died just across the line in Wood River township. She was the widow of Cordian C. Brown, who died at the old home place in Fosterburg in 1895. Ingabee Brown was born at Fosterburg February 8, 1834. She was in her 81st year. She was the daughter of John Vannata, a pioneer resident of Madison county. She was married to C. C. Brown in Fosterburg, March 25, 1854. They bought a few years later, the farm adjoining the village of Fosterburg, known for many years as the Brown place. They farmed on this place during the remainder of the life of the husband, and after his death the widow continued to operate the farm. Seven years ago she was stricken with paralysis, and became helpless from the start. Her daughter, Mrs. S. H. Culp, had the aged lady moved to her home where she cared for her ever since, and until death relieved the sufferings of the aged lady last evening. During the last four days her relatives knew the end was near and she lost strength very rapidly during that time. A short time before Mrs. Brown was stricken with paralysis, she gave her farm of 140 acres of fine land to her only child, Mrs. S. H. Culp, reserving an 8 acre tract upon which there is a small house, where she thought she might want to go back to live some time. She did not live to carry out her plans, however. Mrs. Brown leaves one daughter, Mrs. Culp, and one brother, Jacob Vannata of Dorchester. There were originally in her family three brothers and one sister, but they are all dead except the brother at Dorchester. She leaves four grandchildren, the sons of S. H. Culp, and three great-grandchildren, two being the children of John Culp Jr., and one the child of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Culp. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock at the S. H. Culp residence east of Upper Alton. Services will be conducted by Rev. W. J. Crawford and burial will be at Fosterburg Cemetery.

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BROWN, J. A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 20, 1909               Man Dies From Exposure and Neglect - Body Found After a Week

The body of a man supposed to be J. A. Brown of Montreal, Canada, was found Sunday morning at 11 o'clock on the Chicago & Alton right of way, 500 feet north of the Chicago & Alton cut off crossing, within the limits of the village of East Alton. The man had been dead about 16 hours, Coroner Streeper believes, from the condition of the body. It is known that he had been lying there for over a week, and three times train crews in passing had reported that someone was lying beside the track, but it is claimed that men sent out to search failed to find him. The first report was given Thursday to the C. & A. operator by a trainman who had seen him from the top of a freight train, and a man sent out said he could not find him. Another report was given Friday and the last report was given Saturday. On Sunday morning a report was given to Village Marshal Hawkins of East Alton, and he sent Muncie Palmer to investigate. Palmer found the man dead in a clump of weeds about half way down the C. & A. embankment. The weeds had been rolled down for a distance of ten feet, as though the dying man had rolled around in great agony before death ended his sufferings. He doubtless had no food or drink. The only clue to the cause of the man's death was a wound on the ball of his right foot, which he had been treating himself. Some antiseptic gauze was wound around the foot and the man had been using some ointment on it. It is supposed that becoming worn out from his travels and by the injury on his foot, he sat down and could not rise again nor attract attention as he was in and out of the way place. He probably died from neglect and exposure, and the jury empanelled by Coroner Streeper came to that conclusion in their verdict. The body had just started to decompose.  coroner Streeper says the man was about 50 years of age, 5 feet 6 inches in height and weighed about 130 pounds.  He had sandy hair and mustache, and was slightly bald on the front of his head. In his pocket was a letter written by C. R. Brown of Montreal, Canada, of the C. R. Brown Manufacturing Co., and the tenor of the letter indicated that the men were brothers. Coroner Streeper will hold the body and is attempting to communicate with C. R. Brown as to the disposition of the body. The letter which was found in the dead man's pockets from his brother contained a pathetic request from his brother that he return home and visit his wife and family, whom he had not seen for many years. It contained reference to the fact that it would be news to him to learn of the death of his mother and of his "dear child Annie," four years ago. Another slip of paper showed that he had voted in Iowa at the last election, and the letter which was found on him was addressed to a town in Iowa.  The jury found that the C. & A. railroad officials were guilty of neglect in not notifying the East Alton village council or some one in authority to care for the man when they learned he was on ____ property .......

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BROWN, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 13, 1904             Suicides in Courthouse in Edwardsville

James Brown, a young farmer living near Edwardsville, committed suicide Friday afternoon in a toilet room at the courthouse in Edwardsville. He used carbolic acid and left no word or note explanatory of his act.

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BROWN, JESSE I./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 9, 1918

Jesse I. Brown died this morning at 2 o'clock at the family home at 518 East Third street, after an illness with pneumonia. He is survived by his wife and a three year old child, also by his parents, two brothers and two sisters of Kane, Ill. The body will be taken to Kane tomorrow for interment.

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BROWN, JOHN/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, January 8, 1857

Lieutenant John Brown fell dead on yesterday, while employed rendering lard at Smith's warehouse in this city. He was subject to apoplectic fits and his sudden death is attributed to this cause. He enlisted in a military Company which went out to the Mexican war from this city, under Captain Baker, and was severely wounded in the battle of Buena Vista, having received a musket ball in the breast. He was the recipient of a pension from the Federal Government. Subsequent to the battle of Buena Vista, he was elected Lieutenant in his Company, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of his predecessor.

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BROWN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1906        Alleged Murderer of Senator Daniel B. Gillham Killed on C&A Tracks

John Brown, who was convicted of the murder of Senator Daniel B. Gillham of Upper Alton, and served a penitentiary term, completed the record of tragic deaths of the men implicated in the death of Gillham, by being killed Saturday night while walking on the Chicago & Alton tracks near East Alton. Starkey, who went to the penitentiary with Brown, died in prison, and James Wyatt, on whose alleged perjured confession Brown was convicted, committed suicide in jail in Platt county while awaiting trial for horse stealing and after making what purported to be a confession of Brown's innocence. Brown was talking to Alfred Demuth just a few minutes before he was killed. He was on his way to his home on the James Johnson place near East Alton, and was sober. It is said he was not a drinking man. He was struck by the train, and by some it is believed that he made no effort to avoid being struck. The body was brought to Alton and taken in charge by Coroner Streeper, who held an inquest today. Brown's career was an interesting one. He was convicted of the crime of murdering Daniel B. Gillham on the alleged confession of Wyatt, who turned state's evidence. Brown was working for Gillham at the time. Gillham was killed by a burglar whom he discovered and tried to capture in his house. Wyatt's story was that Brown was the man and that Starkey and himself helped. After Wyatt's confession was made in the Platt county jail, Dempsey Abel, Brown's brother-in-law, who had been trying to establish Brown's innocence and had spent everything he could get hold of in behalf of the convicted man, renewed his efforts. His old home and everything went to save Brown, and when Governor Tanner finally commuted Brown's sentence from life imprisonment, Abel took Brown home with him. From that time Brown systematically tried to alienate Abel's wife's affections from her husband. Mrs. Abel was Brown's sister. A divorce suit resulted, and after almost a half century of married life the couple separated. Brown had been very industrious after his release from the penitentiary, and by savings from his day's labor he had in his possession when killed certified checks for $390 and a certificate of ownership of twenty shares of building association stock, of considerable value.

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BROWN, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 17, 1920

Joseph Brown, 89, was found dead in a house on the farm of Robert Kennedy Jr., near Bethalto, last night. He had been employed in doing odd jobs for farmers in that vicinity and made his home in the house on the Kennedy farm for a number of years. Brown was not married and is not believed to have any relatives. Burial will be in Vaughn cemetery near Bethalto tomorrow morning.

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BROWN, LUCY JANE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1920

Mrs. Lucy Jane Brown died Sunday afternoon at her home on Prospect street after a prolonged illness. Her health has been failing for several months, and death was not unexpected. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter M. Brown. She was born in Carrollton, April 28, 1848, and in 1873 was married to Thomas C. Brown. They moved to Alton 19 years later. Mr. Brown died August of 1916. Mrs. Brown is survived by three children: Mrs. Carlton A. Munger; Gertrude E. Brown; and Paul C. Brown; one brother, John Brown of Nebraska; and three sisters: Mrs. Annie B. Robarts, Mrs. John D. Robarts, and Miss Sarah Brown, all of Greenfield. Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon from the home, 422 Prospect street, at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. C. E. Combrink, pastor of the Twelfth street Presbyterian church will have charge of the services. Interment will be in the Brighton cemetery.

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BROWN, LUKE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 13, 1909

Coroner C. N. Streeper of Upper Alton is holding the body of Luke Brown in his undertaking rooms in Upper Alton, in the hope of finding his mother somewhere in Virginia in order that an insurance policy of $240 made payable to his mother might be made good. Brown had not written to his mother for seven years. When he took out the policy he just made it payable to his mother, wherever she would be living at the time of his death. Now she cannot be found and it is known that at the time of his death, which occurred two months ago, he did not know where she lived. Brown died in Alton two months ago. Luke always wanted to have a fine funeral. He carried the $240 insurance because he thought that a $240 funeral would be about the right thing. His friends say that he ought to have the $240 funeral, but the embarrassing feature is that the money cannot be collected from the insurance company until the mother is found or proved dead....Coroner Streeper says he can hold the body indefinitely, and has no fear that Luke will not be a very presentable corpse, no matter how long the funeral may be deferred....

 

BROWN, MARY (nee CARSON)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 12, 1918

Friends learned with great regret Thursday evening of the death of Mrs. Mary Brown, which occurred at her home on West Ninth street at 3 o'clock in the afternoon. Death came after many years of suffering, during which the well known woman bore her illness with great resignation. Mrs. Brown was born in the East, in what is now Philadelphia, Pa., in 1832, and spent her childhood and early girlhood in the East. Her maiden name was Mary Carson. At an early age she was married to Robert Hamilton, and at 21 was left a widow with one child. After the death of her first husband, her health began to fail and she decided to come to Illinois to join her brothers, who had been West for some time, finally settling in Alton. Fifty years ago she was married to Robert Brown, who died many years ago. For over forty years she has resided on West Ninth, formerly Main street, on the same lot on which the home in which she died was erected. Since coming to Alton she has been a member of the Presbyterian Church, first belonging to the Twelfth Street Presbyterian Church, and later putting her letter in at the First Presbyterian Church on account of its downtown location. Until the last number of years she was actively connected with church work, being among the oldest members of the church. She is survived by three sons, William Hamilton of Wilmington, Del., Robert M. and Adam C. Brown of this city. Also by one granddaughter and several great-grandchildren in the East, and by six grandchildren residing in Alton. The Alton grandchildren include the Misses Margaret L. Brown, Mildred Brown, Esther Brown, Margaret Brown, Robert and Walter Brown. The funeral of Mrs. Brown will be held Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home at 1313 West Ninth street, services to be conducted by Rev. Edward L. Gibson, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church. Friends are invited to attend services at the home, but burial in City Cemetery will be private.

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BROWN, ROBERTA (nee MITCHELL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 26, 1923

Mrs. Roberta Brown, wife of Joseph M. Brown, died this morning at 7:40 o'clock at her home, 617 Bond street, from paralysis, in her fifty-second year. Mrs. Brown belonged to an old time Alton family. Her maiden name was Mitchell, and her family lived on the coal branch in the North Side in the days when coal mining was a great industry here. The Mitchell family of the "Coal Branch" were among the best known of the families there, and among the most respected. Her father was Robert Mitchell. Her death was quite a surprise though she had been in bad health for several years. She had been able to be up and around her home until three weeks ago, when she was taken down with a malady that was not regarded as being immediately serious, even though she had suffered two slight strokes of paralysis in years gone by. Last night, some time after midnight, she sustained a final stroke of paralysis which proved fatal about seven hours later. Mrs. Brown was married to Joseph M. Brown twenty-five years ago, and on the seventeenth of last April the couple celebrated their silver wedding anniversary. Last evening she was feeling so much better that she was sitting up in bed and was reading her daily newspaper. She seemed to be much improved and the collapse that came after midnight was therefore the greater surprise to the members of her household, who were wholly unprepared for it. Mrs. Brown is survived by her husband, Joseph M. Brown, and three sons, Paul, Garrett and Hibbard Brown. She leaves also four brothers, James, Alex and John Mitchell of St. Louis, and R. G. Mitchell of Bloomington. She was a devoted member of the Elm street Presbyterian church and during her residence in the North Side was a faithful attendant at the services there. She leaves a large number of friends in the church and in the neighborhood where she spent so many years of her life, who sincerely mourn her passing. Funeral arrangements had not been made today.  [Sept. 28, 1923:  Burial was in Oakwood cemetery]

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BROWN, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 23, 1912

The engineer and head brakeman of a work train, an extra, No. 62, were killed in an accident on the C. P. & St. L. at Riehl's Station at 12:30 today, and four of the crew injured. William Williams, engineer, and Thomas Brown, head brakeman, were killed, and Williams the fireman, C. C. Riker, Richard Linder, W. A. Day, and Charles Briggs were injured, but none of the five seriously. The engine was backing up the road when at a point a half mile south of Riehl's Station the engine suddenly jumped the track and toppled over on its right side. The engineer jumped and was caught by the headlight of the engine and thrown beneath the wreck. He was badly crushed. The head brakeman, Thomas Brown, was caught in the cab and his body crushed and scalded to death by the escaping steam. Both of the dead men live in Springfield, the engineer was about forty years of age, and Brown about twenty eight. C. C. Riker of Alton was bruised and his leg injured; the others, Day, Briggs and Linder are but slightly hurt and were able to walk to the doctors office after they were brought to Alton. The fireman, Williams, Williams of Springfield, saved himself by leaping from the side of the engine opposite to the side that fell into the ditch. He is not injured beyond being bruised from his leap. A rescue train was dispatched from Alton to the scene of the wreck bearing a surgeon and assistants, which brought to Alton the dead and the injured. The cause of the accident, according to the report of Frank Johnson of the local yard service, is unknown. The engine had been dispatched to Dow to pick up a portion of a wreck and it was moving up the track backwards, at Lock Haven the engine would have been turned. The track was apparently in good condition at the point the engine left the rails. The injured were given attention at the office of the surgeon of the road in Alton, and all were able to travel without assistance. The engineer and the fireman bear the same name, but they are said not to be related.

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BROWN, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 23, 1914

Thomas Brown, a wealthy farmer of the Bethalto neighborhood, died suddenly from apoplexy last night. He was found dead in the stockyard around his barn where he had been feeding his horses and cattle. His death was probably instant. Mr. Brown was apparently in good health when he left the house. He leaves his wife, two sons, Edward and John Brown, and three daughters, Misses Cella, Mamie and Gertrude. The funeral will be Monday morning from the Catholic church at Bethalto.

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BROWN, WILLIAM T., JUDGE/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, March 4, 1874/Submitted by Jane Denny

Early Monday morning the melancholy news that judge Wm T. Brown had committed suicide spread like wildfire through the city. It was astounding in every respect and almost beyond belief. For a week past the judge had been very much depressed, and only a few of his most intimate friends were aware of the cause. The whole trouble arose form his inability to make a settlement with the county commissioners. Delegations have visited the county court demanding a statement of the county finances, and the press has clamored for a detailed accounting. The judge dreaded exposure and was afraid that he could not raise enough money to make up the deficiency. When asked what his deficiency way, he stated that it was about ten thousand dollars, and upon this statement three of his friends agreed to furnish the money, and visited him at his residence on Sunday for that purpose. ...That night about 10 o'clock he got up from his bed, unbeknown to his family, and in a short time returned and told his wife that he had tried to drown himself but couldn't sink. He was rubbed dry and put to bed again. He begged his wife to say nothing about it, and this is the reason why she did not call in the neighbors to watch him. He was very restless all night, and at six o'clock in the morning he wanted to go out. His wife told him he could not go out unless she went with him. He consented to this, but as soon as the back door was open he ran straight for the well, his wife and step daughter following. The well in question was the stock well, situated back of the stable, and is about one hundred yards from the house. He climbed over the curb and was lowering himself through the opening feet first, when his wife and daughter grabbed him by the shoulders but he was too heavy and dropped, leaving part of his shirt in their hands. His wife screamed for assistance and immediately lowered a rope and told him to take hold of it. He said, "It is too late, I am determined to go." His dead body was taken from the well about forty minutes afterwards. The death of judge Brown has spread a gloom over the whole city, and there is hardly any one but what feels that his financial affairs might have been adjusted. He was the acknowledged leader of the Democratic party and was the most popular man in the county. His great generosity is what ruined him. He was literally the poor man's friend. He will be buried today. Peace to his ashes.
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BROWNING, SARAH ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 23, 1920        Old Resident Who Came to Alton in 1834 Dies

Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Browning, near her 88th birthday, died Monday night at 9:15 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Adam C. Miller, 1528 Seminary street, from old age. Mrs. Browning had been in fairly good health until lately, when she suffered a breakdown due to her great age and she never rallied. Mrs. Browning was a resident of Alton since she was two years old, when she came here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Weed. She had made her home in Alton ever since. She was born in Newport, Ky., December 14, 1832. She was married in Alton, December 24, 1854, to Baker Browning, who died twenty six years ago last April 1. Mrs. Browning was for many years a member of the old Cumberland Presbyterian Church, now the Twelfth Street Presbyterian, and she attended there regularly until about twenty years ago, when she went to Upper Alton to live with her daughter, Mrs. Miller. There it was convenient for her to attend the College Avenue Baptist Church, and she went there whenever she was able. She leaves three daughters, Mrs. Alonzo Miller, Mrs. Adam Miller, Mrs. William E. Hubbell; and one son, Fred B. Browning. She leaves also one sister, Mrs. Jennie Hill of Rochester, N. Y., and one brother, John B. Weed of Quincy. She leaves also ten grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren, making twenty-six living descendants in all. The funeral will be held at 2:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon from the home of Mrs. Adam C. Miller, 1528 Seminary street, and services will be conducted by Rev. David T. Magill of the College Avenue Baptist Church. Burial will be in the City Cemetery.

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BRUCE, UNKNOWN DAUGHTER OF JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 26, 1912

The nine year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Bruce, colored, died at the family home this morning from typhoid fever.

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BRUCH, VICTOR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 14, 1897
The funeral of Victor Bruch took place at 2 o'clock this afternoon from St. Mary's church. The assembly at the church was the largest that ever was seen within the walls of the new St. Mary's. A conspicuous feature was the wealth and beauty of the floral tributes from friends. At the conclusion of the services friends were permitted to take alook at the face, and then the body was borne to the hearse by six friends. The pall bearers were H. B. Starr, Henry Brueggemann, Andrew Schuorr, A. Kremer, Joseph Holl.  [Note: burial was in Greenwood (St. Patrick's) Cemetery]

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 28, 1897
The saloon and fixtures of the late Victor Bruch will probably be disposed of to the Lemp Brewing Co. of St. Louis, who will place the business in charge of an agent. Negotiations are in progress today towards this end. The Lemps will continue their beer agency at the old stand, and for this reason purchase the saloon. There are seven applicants for the agency and a number for the saloon.

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BRUEGGEMAN(N), AARON LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 13, 1918

After a short illness with influenza, A. L. Brueggeman, Manager of the Alton Clean Towel Service, died at his home Tuesday afternoon. His mother, Mrs. L. G. Brueggeman, died and was buried last week. A. L. Brueggeman was born on the 10th of May in 1885, and was at the time of his death 33 years of age. He was a native of Alton, and was a popular young man. He was known throughout the city, where for some time he has been distributing towels to the people in the business section. He is survived by his wife, Grace, and a 7 year old daughter. Also by his father, L. G. Brueggeman, and a brother, Fieldon Brueggeman, who is at Humphrey, Va. Aaron Louis Brueggeman died at the home of his father at 1026 Easton street Tuesday at 4 o'clock. He was a member of Robin Hood Camp ofj Alton, who will conduct service at the graveside. His brother is in the service. The funeral will be held from the residence at 10 o'clock on Friday.

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BRUEGGEMANN, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 27, 1913     Aged Woman Suicides in Her Home - Shot in Left Breast

Mrs. Carolina Brueggemann, aged 74, widow of Adolph Brueggemann, for years a business man in Alton, was found dead in her bed at her home, 609 George street, at 8 o'clock Tuesday morning by her son, L. G. Brueggemann, and a neighbor, Allen Keiser. A bullet hole in her left breast and a 38 calibre revolver on the bed beside her indicated how she had died. It was supposed that she had committed suicide, though rumors were rife for a while that she had been killed. The aged woman must have shot herself Monday morning in her home, as a package of meat she had bought that morning was still lying untouched where she had left it. The discovery of the dead woman was made by her son, Louis, who went to see her and could not get in. He called a neighbor, Allen Keiser, to confer with him about his mother's failure to respond to his rap on the door, and Mr. Keiser went over. He could see the aged woman lying on the bed beside a window, but could not make out whether she was alive or dead. Mr. Keiser counseled breaking into the house and when the two men went in they found that Mrs. Brueggemann was dead. There was no writing left to indicate why she was dead, nor had any of the neighbors heard her saying anything that would indicate she intended to kill herself. The appearance of Mrs. Brueggemann indicated she had first taken off her outer dress, and sitting on the bed had fired the shot, then she had tumbled over dead, without a struggle. The bullet had evidently gone into her heart and caused instant death. Mrs. Brueggemann had lived alone for many years and was known to be rather eccentric. She was possessed of considerable property, and owned the place where she died. Mrs. Brueggemann suffered a paralytic stroke recently. She had suffered from failing eyesight also. She had for a long time had an obsession that someone was about to kill her. She had instructed her neighbors only a few days before that if they failed to see her around some morning, to make investigation as she might be dead or might be very sick. She made a morning practice of going to the home of Allen Keiser and greeting the family. It was not noticed by the Keiser family until L. G. Brueggemann called attention to the fact that Mrs. Brueggemann had not been around. She leaves four sons, Adolph, L. G., Robert, and Frank Brueggemann. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from her home. It will be private.

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BRUEGGEMAN, CRISSIE MARGUERITE [nee SCHRETZ or SCHUETZ]/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 18, 1922     Young Mother Drops Dead As She is Lifted in Bed for First Time

The sudden death of Mrs. Charles Brueggeman who died this morning about eight thirty at her home in Fosterburg, caused a deeper cloud of sorrow to settle over the little town of Fosterburg, which has had three other inhabitants claimed by death this week. Ten days ago a little daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brueggeman and the family and friends believed the mother to be in a good condition. Her sudden death this morning came as a great surprise to all who knew her. She had not complained, but had been looking eagerly forward to this day as the one in which she might sit up for a short time. Upon being lifted to a sitting posture, she complained as feeling a little faint and was consequently laid back upon the bed. She died instantly. A physician was called and he pronounced the death due to apoplexy. Mrs. Brueggeman before her marriage last March was Crissie Marguerite Schretz [sic], daughter of George Schutz, and has lived her entire life at Fosterburg. Beside her husband, little daughter, and father, she leaves two brothers and two sisters. Will Schuetz of Brighton, George of California, Mrs. H. K. Sanders of Alton, and Mrs. Theodore Elberg of Fosterburg. No funeral arrangements have been made as yet. Charles Brueggeman is the sexton of the Fosterburg cemetery and the death of his wife right at this time makes it doubly hard for him.

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BRUEGGEMAN, FRANK or EMIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 14, 1915   [Note: Headline stated Emil was killed. Article stated that Frank was killed.]

Word came today to the family of Emil Brueggemann that Frank Brueggemann, aged 28, was instantly killed by lightning Friday while he was in the yard at the home place of his father, William Brueggemann. He was married, but leaves no children. The funeral will be held Monday at 2 p.m. from the Fosterburg M. E. Church.

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BRUEGGEMAN, HELEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 7, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. Helen Brueggeman will be held Friday afternoon from the family home on Easton street.

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BRUEGGEMAN(N), HENRY (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 2, 1917           Former Four-Time Mayor and Postmaster Dies

Capt. Henry Brueggemann, four times mayor of Alton, eight years postmaster at Alton, and for many years prominent in Republican party councils, died Saturday night at 8 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital, where an operation was about to be performed on him for the relief of an abscess of the gall bladder. The news of his death caused a great shock in the community. It was known he had been in poor health for many years, and that he was a frequent visitor to health resorts, but no one of his intimates realized his condition was such that it would give grounds for any alarm. The surgeons were unable to perform the operation as he quickly collapsed and died a short time afterward. Capt. Brueggemann had led a very active life. With an ability as a leader of men, he devoted much attention to the political game, and for many years he was recognized as one of Alton's foremost citizens. During the course of his political career he made many bitter enemies, but the same qualities which gave him the enemies gave him friends who would go through fire and water for him. It is significant of the broadness of his mind and his desire for peace and friendship that a number of years Capt. Brueggemann himself undertook to placate the enemies and he died with many of them his staunchest supporters and admirers and without a man in the city who would not wish him well. Capt. Brueggemann was a native of Germany, born at Saltsoffem, Firtsantum, Lippedettmoldt, November 25, 1845. When nine years of age he came to American, and immediately to Alton. He lived here almost all the remainder of his life, except for a period in young manhood when he lived at Brighton, and for another period when he was in California. He enlisted in the 97th Illinois Volunteers at Alton, January 5, 1864, and was mustered out of service May 1, 1866, after being transferred to the 97th Regulars at Galveston, Tex. He was married at Alton, November 14, ____, to Adelaid Rahmund-Schmidt, who survives him. [much of the rest of the obit was torn, and not readable.]  ...He leaves one living sister, Miss Minnie Brueggemann, of Warsaw, Ill. One other sister, Mrs. Hannah Hoffman, a native of Alton, died Friday morning and was buried at Warsaw Sunday afternoon. He was deeply concerned over her condition and when telegrams would come he would insist on reading them himself, though very sick. Miss Minnie Brueggemann, after attending her sister's funeral Sunday, came to Alton to attend the funeral of her brother. The funeral of Capt. Brueggemann was held at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the family home, Fourth street and Langdon. The services were conducted by Rev. Heggemeier of the German Evangelical Church. There was ____ attendance of friends at the ____, among them being men in ______. Congressman Rodenberg _____, as did many present and ____ county and city officers........

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BRUEGGEMAN, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1918                  Killed In Runaway

Louis Brueggeman, 44, was killed in a runaway at Fieldon Monday afternoon. According to word received at Alton, he was assisting in a harvest field at the time the accident occurred. He was born in Alton and lived here until three years ago. Then, on account of the installation of the automatic machines at the Illinois Glass Co., he gave up glass blowing and went to farming. For the past three years he had been farming near Fieldon. Brueggeman had many friends in Alton. He was a lover of the river, and spent much of his spare time boating and fishing. He is survived by a wife, Ida, and three children, Helen, 7: Lena, 6; Mary Esther, 18 months. He also leaves three sisters, Mrs. L. M. Bowman, Mrs. Henry Wutzler and Mrs. William Roller.

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BRUEGGEMANN, UNKNOWN CHILD OF MARTIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph July 14, 1906

The 25 months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Brueggemann died yesterday afternoon after an illness with diphtheria. The funeral was held today in private, owing to the nature of the disease. Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann conducted services at the grave in City Cemetery.

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BRUEHL, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 20, 1910

The funeral of the late Joseph Bruehl was held this morning in Melville, and friends of the dead farmer from Alton, Newbern and many other points attended. The funeral service was held in the Melville church, and Rev. H. A. Cotton officiated. The pallbearers were John and Augus Vollmer, A. T. Hawley, William Brinkman, and George Stiritz of Melville, and Max Barrioz of Alton. Burial was in the Melville Cemetery.

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BRUMLEVE, BESCHKE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1919              Funeral of Mrs. W. Brumleve

Funeral services for Mrs. Beschke Brumleve, of Fosterburg, which were to have been held Thursday afternoon, were postponed on account of the inclement weather, and were held this morning at 11 o'clock from the family home. Rev. Frederick C. Webber, pastor of the Fosterburg Baptist church officiated, and the burial was in the Fosterburg cemetery.

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BRUMM, BESSIE AND MARIE              Alton Father, Daughter And 6 Playmates Drown In Mississippi

[Note:  See Michael Reilly obituary for more information]

Source: Syracuse, New York Post Standard, August 6, 1904   

While bathing in the Mississippi river tonight, Michael Riley, his daughter and six of the latter's little girl friends were drowned. One child was rescued. Riley lived near the river in the southern part of the city and was accustomed to bathe on the beach in front of his home after his return from work. Tonight his little daughter begged to go with him. and Riley took her and seven of her girl friends to the beach with him. When they entered the water, Riley bade the children join hands and they all waded Into the river and walked along a sandbar which stretches out into the stream at that point. They had gone some distance from the shore, when suddenly the whole party disappeared beneath the water, having in the darkness stepped from the sandbar, into the deep channel. The children struggled and screamed, fighting desperately to reach the sandbar, where the water was only a foot or so in depth. Riley who is said to have been a good swimmer. Is thought to have been made helpless by the girls clinging to him and hampering his efforts to save them. The only one in the party to regain the sandbar was Mary Timiny, 8 years old. The child is unable to tell how she saved herself. Riley was 32 years old, and the ages of the children drowned ranged from 8 to 14 years. Four of the bodies have been recovered.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 8, 1904

The funeral of Bessie and Marie Brumm, the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Brumm, was held at the family home on Brown street at 3:30 o'clock. Services were conducted by Rev. W. H. Bradley, pastor of the Presbyterian church. The Brumm home was filled with sorrowing friends and relatives who wished to pay a mark of respect to those who had departed, and of sympathy to the bereaved family. There were many very beautiful floral offerings among which were beautiful pieces from the Presbyterian Sunday school and from each of the rooms at the public school the girls had been in. The following acted as bearers for both caskets: Minor Watson, Roland Dudley, Spurgeon Hawkins, Clarence Sargeant and Earl McDow. Their were also twelve little girls, schoolmates of the deceased, for honorary pallbearers. After services at the home, a very long funeral cortege followed the remains to Oakwood Cemetery, where burial took place.

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BRUMMER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 11, 1923           Victim of Explosion at Western Cartridge Co., East Alton

William Brummer, a machinist who lost his life in the blast, was formerly from Bunker Hill. He was a member of a large family there. A few years ago he lost a brother in an accident in a coal mine. Mr. Brummer was 45 years of age. He leaves his wife and one son, the latter aged 16. The family resided on Main Street in East Alton. Nine years ago he took his place at the western Cartridge plant. It is said that he was just entering the room to do some work on some of the machines when the blast occurred, which cost him his life. A brother was working in the same room, Walter Brummer, and was among the first to learn of the fatality to his brother. He was a member of the Wood River Masonic lodge. The funeral will be held Thursday at 2 p.m. at East Alton, Rev. F. D. Butler officiating. The body will be taken to Bunker Hill for burial Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

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BRUNDLE, HELEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 16, 1919

Mrs. Helen Brundle died this afternoon at 314 West Fourth street. She was 89 years old. She died at the home of Leo Wingate, her grandnephew. Miss Theresa Wingate and Mrs. O. Blackburn are nieces. The funeral will be Friday at Edwardsville.

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BRUNER, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 24, 1916       Widow of Captain John A. Bruner Dies

Mrs. Ellen Bruner, widow of Captain John A. Bruner, died at the Masonic Home for old folks at Sullivan, Ill., after a long period of disability. The body will be buried Sunday afternoon from the Lock undertaking establishment on State street, where it will be taken on arrival from Sullivan. Mrs. Bruner leaves one son, John Bruner. The word that Mrs. Bruner had died was received by F. E. Harris, master of Piasa lodge, A. F. & A. M., Thursday, and the further information came that she had requested her body be taken back to Alton to be buried beside that of her husband who was buried in the City cemetery. Arrangements were accordingly made by Mr. Harris for this request being complied with. Mrs. Bruner was a resident of Alton many years. She came here as a bride, soon after she had married Capt. John A. Bruner, then running in the trade between St. Louis and New Orleans. The family resided on State street for a number of years. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Bruner conducted a boarding house which was famous for the high quality of service she rendered. She had a very high class of patronage. When her strength failed and she was unable to take care of herself, she entered the Masonic Home at Sullivan, her husband having been a member of the Masonic order, and there she passed the remainder of her days. Failing eyesight helped to darken the closing days of her life. It is planned to have the funeral Sunday at 2:30 o'clock from the Lock parlors, and Rev. E. L. Gibson of the First Presbyterian church will conduct the service.

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BRUNN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 21, 1905          Employee of Alton Sand & Transportation Drowns in Mississippi River

John Brunn, aged 41, an employee of the Alton Sand and Transportation Co., was drowned Tuesday night by falling into the river from the deck of the steamer Ruth, near Lover's Leap. Brunn was employed for loading cars with sand at the incline track and was considered one of the best men in the employ of the company. According to the story told by Jerre Matthews, who was with Brunn on the boat just before the accident occurred, the two men had been drinking a bucket of beer and after finishing the beer Matthews heard a splash, and running back he called loudly for Brunn but got no response. Concluding that his fellow workman had been drowned, he notified Messrs. Robert Curdie and James Maupin, who made an investigation and were satisfied that Brunn had fallen into the river. Brunn had worked for the sand company about five weeks, and during that time said but little about himself. Nothing was known as to where he came from nor whether he had any family. A partner of the drowned man who can probably tell where Brunn's family may be found, as they had worked together many years, is in a hospital in St. Louis where some injuries he sustained a week ago are being treated. The place where the man fell overboard is a bad one, as the current is swift and the water very deep. Boys were swimming today over the place and were diving near shore indicating a considerable depth of water. It is probably the body was carried down the river and will not be found until it floats.

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BRUNNER, BRUTUS S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 25, 1904          

Brutus S. Brunner, for many years a well known foundry man in Alton, died Sunday morning after a long and painful illness from uraemic poisoning. Mr. Brunner's condition had been dangerous for several weeks. Thursday he lapsed into a state of coma and did not rally. Death resulted Sunday morning about 5 o'clock. Mr. Brunner was born near Basle, Switzerland, June 19, 1833. He had lived in Alton nearly 50 years, having come to this city in 1856. When only seven years old he came to America with his father and settled near Cincinnati, where he remained until he came to Alton. During all his career in Alton he was known as an industrious, frugal man, and bore the best of reputation for integrity and honesty. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him. Mr. Brunner is survived by a brother, Leander Brunner of St. Louis, and a sister at Cincinnati. He leaves his widow, one daughter, Mrs. Nellie E. May, and one son, George S. Brunner. Mr. Brunner was twice married. His first wife was Sarah Emery, and they were married July 4, 1857. He was married January 19, 1895 to Miss Emma J. Holden, who survives him. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, Sixth and Market streets.

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BRUNNER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 2, 1903       Prominent Farmer Found Dead in the Mire

Sunday morning William Brunner, a well known and respected farmer living in Fort Russell township between Bethalto and Edwardsville, after struggling desperately for hours in the mire, finally succumbed to exhaustion and was suffocated by the soft earth that had slowly drawn him into its embrace. His body was found by a party of searchers in the center of the wheat field. It is thought that he attempted to make a short cut across the field to his house. Brunner had been missing since Wednesday. A searching party explored the farm and surrounding fields. It was not until nearly an hour afterward, however, that the body had been found. Brunner was stretched at full length, and was almost completely covered by the soft, clinging mud. He had evidently started to cross the field and had succumbed after a desperate fight for life. Deputy Coroner Charles E. Hoskins of Edwardsville held an inquest. The jury's verdict was that Brunner had become mired and through physical exhaustion had been drawn by the ooze and smothered. He was about 50 years of age, well known in Alton, and lived alone.

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BRUNO, PASQUALE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1917         Mystery Surrounds Killing of Italian ... Friends Say Nothing

Pasquale Bruno, an Italian, was murdered Sunday evening about 8 o'clock in front of Ohley's store in Yager Park. He was shot through the head and died instantly. The principal witness to the killing told a story which was hard to connect up with the fact that the dead man appeared to have been shot through the head from the front. Bruno, about 45 years of age, lived in Yager Park, batching with another Italian. He worked at the Laclede Steel Co. plant. The killing savors strongly of a vendetta. The police searched carefully and closely for some information that would throw light on the mystery, investigating many angles, but found nothing that would give any clue to the murderer during the night. This morning the investigation was taken up again, with no satisfactory results. The story told by the witness who said he was very close when the shooting was done, was that he saw one man apparently pursuing two, in Washington Garden. The garden had no dance there and no crowd. The gates were open, however. Whether the chase started outside, was continued inside the garden and then out again, he could not say. His story was that one of the men who was apparently fleeing stopped at the gate to Washington Garden as he emerged and stood there. The other man who was apparently fleeing kept on running. The man behind, the witness said, fired with a revolver and Pasquale Bruno fell dead. Then both the other two men made their escape. The police were notified at once and took charge of the body of the dead man until Deputy Coroner Bauer could be summoned. Investigation during the night left the killing in mystery. Even the man who roomed with Bruno could tell nothing, he said, of who Bruno's associates might have been, what the cause of the killing might have been, or where Bruno had been staying. Bruno had been idle for a month due to an injury to his hand. He was said to have been a very quiet, orderly man, and was never in trouble with anyone. The reticence of the fellow countrymen of the dead man, especially of those who were in position to know something of Bruno, indicated that there was some fear on their part to tell what they might know. Deputy Coroner William Bauer found in a search of Bruno's clothes the sum of $233.23 in bills and silver money. This would indicate, apparently, that the murder was not for the purpose of robbery. Chief of Police Peter Fitzgerald and several officers went to Yager Park today to make an investigation. Deputy Coroner Bauer said he would swear in the jury this afternoon, but would defer the inquest for several days in the hope of getting the murderer, or some clue to his identity. John Fritz, who lives at Washington Garden, said he had just gone upstairs for the night when he heard the three men running toward his place. His attention was attracted by the loud noises they were making as if from great efforts to breathe. He concluded that they must have been having a hard struggle or a long run. The man who was afterward shot seemed to be in great terror, and the sounds of his breathing could be heard a long distance as he tried to escape. Fritz started down stairs to render help, and as he was descending the stairs he heard three shots. Going out he found one man dead, two others running away. One man went over Lampert street, and the other toward the steel plant. Fretz [sic] said his son witnessed the shooting, but he ia a little boy and his story is rather confused. The other witness could give but a poor description of the man who did the killing.

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BRUNTON, DAVID A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 2, 1917                 Civil War Veteran Dies

D. A. Brunton, for many years a Justice of the Peace in Wood River township and a Civil War veteran, died last night at midnight in his home in Bethalto. Justice Brunton had been sick two years. He was 82 years old at the time of his death, and had lived in Bethalto over 70 years. He served in the Civil War and later on became a justice in Wood River township, a place he held for many years. Two years ago he retired from office on account of his failing health. He leaves one son, William Brunton of Bethalto. The aged father and the son have lived together for seventeen years, and kept house themselves during that time. The wife and mother died at that time, and as the son never married the two continued to live together. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock and the service will be held in the home. Burial will take place at Bethalto Cemetery, Justice Brunton was a member of Bethalto Post G. A. R., and the members of the post will attend the funeral in a body.

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BRYANT, DAVID/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 14, 1916

David Bryant, aged 60, died this afternoon at 1:30 o'clock after a long illness with dropsy. Mr. Bryant died at his home at 625 East Sixth street. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. A. O. Geyer officiating.

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BRYANT, ELSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 14, 1920

Elsie Bryant, daughter of Mrs. Flora Bryant of 625 East Sixth street, died this morning in St. Louis. The body will be brought to Alton for burial.

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BRYANT, FRANCES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 6, 1904

Mrs. Frances Bryant, widow of John Bryant, died at her home, 116 west Seventh street this morning after a long illness. She was a very old resident of Alton, and the mother of a large family of children. Her husband was an old soldier.

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BRYANT, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1913          Old Soldier Dies

John Bryant, aged 75, a former resident in this vicinity, died at the Soldiers' Home in Quincy Thursday morning. The body will arrive here Saturday morning at 9 o'clock and will be taken direct to City Cemetery, where services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller. General debility was the cause of his death. He leaves two daughters, Mrs. Jacob Malson and Mrs. J. Champine of West Alton, Mo., and two sons, Theodore and Alfred Bryant of Alton.

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BRYSON, ELMER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1910            Drowns Near Skinny Island, As Father Helplessly Watches

Standing upon the end of a sand bar near the head of Skinney Island below the city [Alton], Levi Bryson was forced to see his son, Elmer, aged twenty years, and a friend, Ray Holt, meet their death in the water, himself powerless to help them, at 10 o'clock Saturday morning. Elmer had been away from the city for the past three months visiting, and returned Thursday with Ray Holt, a lad of eighteen years, who resides in Pana, Ill.  They were staying at the Bryson home, 1017 east Third street. Bryson had been telling his friend all about the river, and this morning the father, with his son and Holt, and a lad by the name of William Glassmeyer, decided to take a walk to the river and have a good look at it. They chose the long sand bars below the city for their walk, and were there early this morning. Sauntering along the edge of the water for some time, it was suggested that they go swimming. Bryson and Holt threw off their clothes and were soon in the water. The water where they first went in was very shallow, and as neither of the lads was an expert swimmer, they spent their time mostly in wading. They left the bank quite a distance and wandered a little downstream. When starting for the shore at a point below where they went in, Holt came to a deep hole and was in it before he knew it. The current was strong and he could not hold himself. He shouted for help, and Bryson, evidently not knowing the depth of the water, started to his aid. As Bryson was nearing Holt, he also got in the deep water and soon was floundering as was Holt. Bryson then shouted for aid and the father on the bank, seeing then that the boys were in danger, started for the water, but was unable to reach them at all. He was almost drowned himself in trying to get back to the shore. Glassmeyer ran for a boat which was tied to the bar, but stated that it was chained to a stout post and he could not loosen it. He states that if he could have gotten the boat when he went for it, he could have saved one of the lads at least, and perhaps the two of them. Harry Bilderbeck, who was fishing on the end of a dike just a short distance from the end of the bar, ran to his boat and was soon on the scene. Mr. Bryson was by this time upon the bank almost frantic. Ed Poor, a fisherman, who was running a trot line in that vicinity, with his boat and his fish hooks and the assistance of Bilderbeck, began dragging for the body. The body of Bryson was found in a short time and was pulled to the bank and tied there to await the coming of the coroner, who had been sent for. At one o'clock the body of Holt had not been found. The hole where the two were drowned is only a short distance away, and upon the same bar where Michael Riley and the six little Upper Alton girls were drowned several years ago. Mr. Bryson might have saved his own son, but he misunderstood the cries of help from his son to be calls for help for the other boy. Mr. Bryson thinks his son took a cramp and that this caused the drowning of the Bryson boy, who was a good swimmer. The father says he is a good swimmer himself, but he waited too long laboring under the mistake before he went to help his son. Young Bryson had been working at Assumption, Ill., and returned home only Friday. Bryson leaves his parents and a brother, Harley Bryson of Moweaqua. It was Harley's 24th birthday today. Holt leaves an invalid mother, two sisters at Pana, and two brothers in North Dakota.

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BUCHANAN, E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 9, 1918           Killed When 22 Caliber Primers Exploded at Western Cartridge Co.

E. Buchanan, 55, was fatally injured at 3 o'clock Monday afternoon at the Western Cartridge Co. plant when two trays of 22 caliber primers exploded. Lester Simms, three feet away, escaped with slight injuries. Buchanan was doing the same work that he has been doing for the past four years, and he had never been injured in that department before. There were 7,000 primers on the trays. One had been dumped and he was in the act of dumping the second when the accident occurred. The fulminate in this caliber is placed in the shell itself and the amount is very small. The force of the explosion struck Buchanan on the upper limbs. He died soon afterward. Surgeons who attended him believed that he died from shock more than from the wounds. It is not believed that he would have died at once from the wounds he received. The accident occurred in the drying room. There was no one but Buchanan and Simms in the building at the time. Simms is unable to say what was the cause of the accident. Buchanan lived at East Alton. He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Mable Yost of East Alton, and his wife, who lives at Whitehall. Mrs. Yost is employed at the cartridge works. She was in a priming room, only a short distance from the building in which her father was killed. The body will be shipped to Whitehall this evening, and the funeral will be held there Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

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BUCHEN, FRANCES A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 30, 1914

Mrs. Frances A. Buchen, who, with her daughter, Mrs. Mabel Nichalis, resided at the home of J. P. Thornton on Prospect street, died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning after undergoing a surgical operation for relief of the effects of hernia. She was moved to the hospital late Thursday evening and was operated upon but failed to rally. She was 65 years of age. Mrs. Buchen came here from Decatur last June to make her home. She leaves one daughter and three sons. The body will be taken to Sharpsburg, Ill., and burial will probably be there Sunday afternoon.

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BUCK, ANTHONY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1903

Anthony Buck, aged 26, died Tuesday evening at his home on Dry street after a long illness with lung troubles. He was a native of Springfield, Mo., but lived many years in Alton. He leaves a wife and three children. His parents also survive. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to the City Cemetery.

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BUCK, CARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1923            Had reputation for being high grade artist at making turtle soup for outings

Carl Buck, a well known glassblower, with a wide acquaintance about the city of Alton and vicinity, died this morning at 9:40 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Walter Heidemann, in Wood River, after a long illness. He did not yield to sickness until two weeks ago last Sunday, when he found it necessary to abandon the struggle to keep on his feet. With the strength of iron which he possessed, he had combated an insidious malady which for a long time had been sapping his strength. He was born in Alton, April 4, 1869, and spent most of his life here. He learned the trade of glassblowing at Alton and worked for the Illinois Glass Co., until that company ceased to use blowers. Then he went to work at Streator, Ill. The past two years he had served as custodian at the Alton post office. He continued that work until some time in November when he found he would not be able to attend to the duties. Last September he moved to Wood River and had made his home there ever since. The death of Carl Buck will be of the greatest interest to the great number of people who knew his skill, really an art, at cookery. He was a member of the old Onion Club, for years, and on their camping expeditions which they would take every summer, Carl Buck was the chef. His ability to make turtle soup was the one great achievement of his career. Those who used to eat his turtle soup always esteemed it as one of the finest of good things to eat. It was a substantial item on any menu. He devoted most of his spare time to seeking turtles and he would park the turtles alive in his cellar and draw on his supply as he would need it. Not long ago he served a turtle soup supper at the Evangelical church brotherhood meeting in which he held membership. It was probably his last time to serve forth that dainty to any gathering as his health broke soon afterward and he became disabled. His last trip for turtles he made in October, to Brighton, and took a long walk. He caught cold on that trip and his decline was rapid after that. He is survived by his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Heidemann. The time of the funeral will be announced tomorrow.

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BUCK, HATTIE (nee ASHLOCK)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 15, 1910            Young Mother Gives Birth, Then Dies From Pneumonia - Infant Dies With Her

Mrs. Hattie Ashlock Buck, wife of Fred Buck, aged 25(?), died this morning at her home, 214 east Front street, after an illness that began last Monday evening with pneumonia. Her condition was recognized as a very grave one yesterday, and the birth of a little child to the young mother last night was too much for her in her weakened condition. Her case became hopeless, and those of her family who were summoned to attend her. Her mother, Mrs. William Ashlock, was ill with pneumonia herself, but is recovering. The father, Capt. William Ashlock, had gone to Independence, Kansas, on a visit, and it was impossible to get a message to him last night telling of the change in her condition. Mrs. Buck had lived in Alton all her life. She was married to Fred Buck about six years ago, and she is the mother of two boys, Everett and Harry, aged 4 1/2 and 2 years respectively. Her little infant died with her. Mrs. Buck was a happy, contented dispositioned woman, a good mother and wife and a dutiful daughter to her parents with whom she lived. Her death is a sad affliction also to a great number of friends she had possessed in Alton. She leaves beside her husband, children and parents, a brother, Harry L. Ashlock, and a sister, Mrs. John Wright. The funeral will probably be held Monday afternoon from the family home, if Capt. Ashlock, the father, can get back from Independence.

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BUCKINGHAM, SOPHIA W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 26, 1919      Grand Niece of Signer of Declaration of Independence (Roger Sherman) Dies

Mrs. Sophia W. Buckingham, widow of W. H. Buckingham, died Tuesday evening at 9:40 o'clock at her home, 402 Prospect street, a week after she suffered a physical breakdown. She was born in New York City October _1, 1834, and was in her eighty-sixth year. Mrs. Buckingham's death had been expected ever since she began to show signs of a physical breakdown about a week ago. She had been in the best of health, had been sick but very few days in her life, and she was remarkable for the preservation of her strength and all her faculties. She was a woman of intellectual culture, her mind was keen and alert, and she was a charming and interesting conversationalist. She was a great reader and her interest in what was going on in the world made it possible for her to maintain her cheerfulness even after all of her friends had passed on before her, and she had but two children left. She had seen much of sorrow in her life, but she never lost her cheerfulness and she was a friend who was highly esteemed by all who knew her. To talk with her was sure to impress one with the fact that she had to a most remarkable degree retained her mental powers, and though her friends of her own age had long ago died, she made many friends among the younger set who valued her acquaintance. Mrs. Buckingham was a member of a distinguished Colonial family, being a grand niece of Roger Sherman, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and through her line there has come a valuable ring which was worn by Roger Sherman at the time he signed the Declaration of Independence. For fifteen years she had made her home in Alton. Her husband, who was auditor of the Vandalia railroad, died 41 years before her. Her daughter, Mrs. Mary Hanna, died a few years ago. In the latter years of her life, Mrs. Buckingham resided with her daughter, Miss Anna Buckingham, who took most devoted interest in the mother and ministered to her every want. In the closing hours the daughter and the son, Joseph W. Buckingham, were constantly with her. Sunday afternoon she was no longer conscious of what was going on about her, and remained that way until about 15 minutes before  she died when she revived, recognized her family at her bedside, then slipped away. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Paul's Episcopal Church, in which she had held membership. The services will be conducted by Rev. Frederick D. Butler. Friends of the family are invited to the church services, but interment will be private.

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BUCKLEY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 15, 1915

The funeral of John Buckley will be held tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home on Alby street.

 

Alton Evening Telegraph, July 23, 1915

Ralph Buckley, who father, John Buckley died and was buried last week, was given surgical relief at the police headquarters late Thursday night, after he had called there and offered to surrender himself into custody. His neck and both wrists had been gashed and considerable blood had been lost. The story told by Buckley was that he lived in a tent near Hop Hollow on the river bank, and that he had stolen a lot of property and had it concealed in his tent, and he said that his conscience impelled him to surrender and suffer the consequences.....Capt. John Nixon sent police to investigate the tent of Buckley, and found nothing there. It developed that there was good reason for believing that Buckley was mentally deranged.....

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BUCKLEY, RALPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 17, 1917               Young Man Commits Suicide

Ralph Buckley, while suffering from mental disorders, shot himself to death at the home of his mother, Mrs. Ida Buckley, 1506 Mack avenue. He had been in bad health for a long time and his mind was affected. Sunday he was found dead in the basement of the home, with a great hole in his abdomen which had been torn by a charge of shot he had fired into himself with a shot gun. In his pocket was a razor with which he had evidently intended to finish the job if the shot gun failed to do the work. Buckley had been an inmate of the insane hospital at Jacksonville, and had been allowed to come home. It was planned to send him back to the hospital. He made an unsuccessful attempt at suicide some time ago. Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer took charge of the body and held an inquest Monday morning, a verdict of suicide being returned. It was the 75th inquest the deputy coroner has held since last December, and the third case of suicide in that time.

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BUCKMASTER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 28, 1896                   Alton Postmaster

The citizens of Alton were greatly shocked to hear of the death of Postmaster John Buckmaster, which occurred last night at his home. No. 10 East Third Street, from heart disease. The news of his death was not generally known until this morning, and caused a pall of sorrow to hang over his large circle of acquaintances in Alton. Mr. Buckmaster had been feeling poorly for several weeks, although he has attended to his accustomed duties. Any undue exertion, such as walking up the hills, greatly fatigued him, and he was compelled to stop and regain his breath. Sunday morning he felt worse, and his sister, Miss Julia Buckmaster, tried to prevail on him to remain in bed, but he got up and was around during the day. He retired at 7:30, and shortly after Miss Julia heard his labored breathing, while sitting in the parlor on the lower floor. Rushing upstairs, she found him unconscious. Dr. Taphorn, who happened to be near at hand, was called in and administered injections to regulate the beating of the heart, but it was evident that death was near, and the last breath was drawn at 8:30 o'clock. John Buckmaster was the son of the late Hon. Samuel A. and Mary J. Buckmaster. He was born in Edwardsville, January 8, 1838, and would have been 59 years of age next January. Most of his life has been spent in Alton, and he was known by almost every resident. For fifteen years he has conducted the tobacco business at the present location on Piasa street, and his reputation as an entertainer of crowds and an apt story teller was widely known. Kindly in disposition, generous and genial, outspoken in all his beliefs, he was respected by all with whom he came in contact. Two years ago, because of his popularity, he was agreed upon as the compromise candidate for Postmaster of Alton and was appointed by President Cleveland. During his administration the affairs of the office have been conducted in a capable and efficient manner. Many improvements have been made in the service, and through his efforts the new location for the post office was secured. Mr. Buckmaster took great interest in the improvement, and was very anxious to get into the new quarters. His mother, Mrs. S. A. Buckmaster, two sisters, Miss Julia Buckmaster and Mrs. Kizzie B. Jones, and a brother, S. A. Buckmaster of Heckla, South Dakota, are the surviving members of the family. The time of the funeral has not yet been set, but will probably take place on Wednesday.

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BUCKMASTER, JULIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1912                Woman Postmaster Dies - Daughter of Colonel Buckmaster

Miss Julia Buckmaster, the only woman who ever filled the office of postmaster at Alton, died at her home, 1121 State street, at 10:15 o'clock Wednesday morning after an illness of several weeks duration. She was very ill prior to that time, but it was believed that she would recover. About ten days ago she became much worse and her death was looked for by her friends who were attending her. Miss Buckmaster left a request that her burial be within 24 hours after her death, that there be no display, no flowers, and that in every respect the funeral be simple and a modest one. The requests will be carried out, so her friends said today. Miss Buckmaster leaves a sister, Mrs. Kizzie B. Jones, who makes her headquarters in New York, and a brother, Samuel Buckmaster, who lives in the West. Miss Buckmaster was altogether a very remarkable woman. She was a daughter of Samuel A. Buckmaster, one of the most prominent Democrats in the state, and at one time an aspirant for the Democratic nomination for governor of Illinois. He was warden of the southern Illinois penitentiary when it was located at Alton prior to 1858, and was one of Alton's foremost citizens. Miss Buckmaster inherited an intellect that was a strong one. Her mind was active and her wit was biting and sharp. She was known as a good friend to have, and she had a large circle of friendships among people who cherished the acquaintance. She was a woman of remarkable literary talent, and did much writing. She had an interesting style of writing. When her brother, John Buckmaster, died after a brief interim during which her brother's bondsmen had charge of the post office, she was appointed to fill the position until the expiration of his term. Miss Julia was thus given the distinction of being the only woman postmaster the city ever had. She was engaged in the insurance business for many years, and was active and aggressive in her search for business. She had practically given up all that work and was in retirement. The Telegraph had planned Miss Buckmaster would write an article for the diamond jubilee number of the paper, but her sickness prevented. She wrote a note a few days ago, saying that she believed she would be able to attend to the commission, but she was unable to do it. She did write an article which will appear in the new book of Alton, being published by J. A. Reed.  It is not believed that Miss Julia's brother and sister will have time to get here before the hour of her funeral. Miss Buckmaster was born in the warden's residence of the Alton prison during the term of her father's wardenship. She was educated in the Alton schools, and then attended a young ladies' school in Philadelphia. She stamped all she did with a personality that was distinctive. She was a leader, and during her early womanhood she was a social power in Alton society. She possessed a degree of genius and an ambition that would have raised her into great prominence, had she pursued the course of her natural bent of mind. She had been a correspondent for St. Louis papers, where her material was well received. And this way her desires ran, but she never schooled herself to the rigid drudgery that is necessary to develop the power that spells success. She was a prominent member of the Woman's League. In her private life, she gathered about her friends who were her most loyal admirers, and she dominated, led, and was followed most unansweringly by them. She possessed peculiar traits, as one would expect from her mental qualities. She was aware of her approaching death and calmly made arrangements that referred to her funeral. She selected the undertaker, her friend, Mrs. John Lock, for whom she gave the directions. Her illness followed a visit she made a friend a few days after Christmas, when she was not in good health. She never recovered from this exposure.

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BUCKMASTER, MARY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 2, 1906        Pioneer Woman, Widow of Col. Samuel A. Buckmaster Dies

Mrs. Mary J. Buckmaster, widow of the late Colonel Samuel A. Buckmaster, whom she married January 24, 1837, died Monday morning at her home, 1121 State street, at 6:30 o'clock, after a long, painful illness which she bore with patience and fortitude. She was conscious almost to the last moment, and she fell into the eternal sleep like a tired child falls into slumber after the pleasures and trials of a long day. Mrs. Buckmaster was born in Madison county September 8, 1819, when the county and country were little more than wilderness, and she lived in the most stirring and progressive times in the world's history. She knew the world history too, most thoroughly, and was posted in all current events, politics, statesmanship and literature. She was an omnivorous reader and never forgot what she read. She saw Alton and Madison county grow from a settlement to one of the most populous and important counties in the west, and for many years she was an active force in helping to make this development and progress possible and certain. Her husband, Colonel Buckmaster, was a power in politics in Illinois for many years and filled many positions of honor, and trust and emolument, and she was the spirit that directed him in his undertakings, cheered him in his defeats and encouraged him to do more and better things in his achievements. She was a power for good in developing a religious sentiment in the county also, in early days, and could always be found ready to help in any cause calculated to uplift the people. She lived to see the most important inventions of the world brought to their present usefulness and magnitude, and she was quick to take advantage of the benefits afforded by each invention as it was presented. Frail physically, she would have made her impress on the world's politics as Susan B. Anthony did, if she had not loved home and family more than politics or power. She was of gentle nature, tender of the feeling and solicitous of the welfare of others, and the memory of her gentle unselfish nature will live long with all who knew her. She is survived by three children, Samuel A. Buckmaster of South Dakota, Mrs. Kizzie Jones of New York City, and Miss Julia Buckmaster of Alton, who always remained with her mother and who gave her tenderest care at all times. A grandson, Mr. Eugene Buckmaster, also survives and resides in Alabama. The late John Buckmaster who died while postmaster of Alton was also her son. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

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BUCKMASTER, SAMUEL A. (COLONEL)/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 21, 1878                  Politician and holder of Alton Penitentiary lease

Decatur Republican:  Col. Samuel A. Buckmaster of Alton, whose death is reported in our news column, was for many years one of the most prominent Democratic politicians in the State. He had been a member of the house for some years, after a long absence from active politics, and was a candidate for the senate at the late election, but was defeated by his Republican opponent, Mr. Parkinson.

 

Bunker Hill Gazette:  Col. Sam. Buckmaster, of Alton, died on Tuesday. He was a life long politician, and his public career was eventful. He was speaker of the lower house of the Illinois legislature in 1863, when it was prorogued by Gov. Yates.

 

Chicago Tribune: Samuel A. Buckmaster died at his home in Alton, Tuesday, after a brief illness. For a third of a century, Col. Buckmaster's name has been prominently connected with the political history of the State, and always closely identified with that of the Democratic party, of which he was an active member. Casey and Buckmaster were many years lessees of the Illinois Penitentiary. In 1863, Col. Buckmaster was Speaker of the House, and a member in 1877.

 

The State Register gives this incident, concerning Col. Buckmaster, that occurred in 1861:

In the Spring of that year, the rebel element of St. Louis was dominant and aggressive, and proposed to capture the United States arsenal, a short distance below the city. Capt. Lyon, afterwards Brigadier, was in command, but his force was small and entirely unable to resist a determined attack of the rebel troops at Camp Jackson, the leaders of which ardently desired possession of the great stores of material and arms in the arsenal. It was thought impossible to remove the stores, as they would be seized by the rebels as soon as brought outside the walls. Col. Buckmaster formed and executed a plan by which the stores were removed by night from the arsenal, taken by boat to Alton, and thence brought to this city, where they were safe from any attempt by the enemy. Col. Buckmaster always stood by his friends, and the news of his death will no doubt bring to many men the recollection of substantial benefits he has conferred.

 

Chicago Tribune:  Two men have lately died in this State who, while living, had taken an active part in public affairs, and were widely known and esteemed by their friends. One of them was Col. Samuel A. Buckmaster, of Alton, who for nearly forty years had been conspicuous in public affairs, and at times active in its politics. He was at numerous times elected to the Legislature, and at one time was Speaker of the Lower House of the General Assembly. He was also, for many years, lessee and contractor with the late Samuel Casey in building the State Prison at Joliet. Both were men of great popularity, and numbered every acquaintance among their friends. Mr. Buckmaster, though the older of the two, survived Mr. Casey a number of years. He was a clear headed business man, a sagacious politician, a successful leader, strong partisan, and through his active life preserved his kindness of heart, liberality of feeling, and genial, impressive manner, unbroken and unchanged. He was a candidate at the late election for the State Senate in Madison county, but was defeated because of a split in his party.

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BUCKOUT, SARAH E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 18, 1910

Mrs. Sarah E. Buckout, widow of Benjamin Buckout, died at 12:30 noon Friday, after an illness of several months with asthma. She was 74 years of age, and had lived in Alton many years. Mrs. Buckout had been in failing health for six years. Her death occurred at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John L. Wood, 200 east Fifth street. She leaves two sons, William Clark and Irving Buckout, and two daughters, Mrs. Wood and Mrs. John McKee. The funeral will probably be held Sunday.

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BUDDE, ALOYSIUS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1921
Aloysius Budde, 26 years old, the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Budde of College avenue, died this morning at 3:15 o'clock at St. Joseph's hospital where he was taken last Saturday afternoon in the hope that he might be benefited by treatment there. The young man had been ill four weeks. Stomach trouble appeared to be the affliction that started the decline of the young man. His case was not supposed to be at all serious until about ten days ago when his weakened condition commenced to make itself know. After suffering for four weeks and most of the time unable to eat anything, the condition of the young man caused his family to be alarmed. Three physicians had been consulted and it appeared impossible to do anything that was beneficial to him. Last week it was decided to take him to the hospital for treatment but his strength was so slight the move was postponed. He showed a slight improvement and on Saturday the physicians advised moving him to the hospital. He lived just two days after being taken to the hospital. He was 26 years old and was born east of Upper Alton and lived all his life here. He leaves three sisters besides his parents.

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BUDDE, EMMA (nee RECKER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 7, 1923
Mrs. Emma Recker Budde, wife of Frank Budde, died Tuesday night at 9:30 o'clock at the family home, 3301 East College avenue, at the age of 54 years. Mrs. Budde was stricken with paralysis two weeks ago. She was a native of Fosterburg. After her marriage, she continued to live in Fosterburg for a time but eighteen years ago came to Alton to live. Her husband has been employed at the Illinois Glass Company for many years. Mrs. Budde was before her marriage Emma Recker and a member of a well-known Fosterburg family. She is survived by her husband, Frank Budde, and three daughters, Lillian, Florence and Emily. A son, Aloysius, died two years ago last August. She also leaves one brother, Gus Recker of Alton and five sisters, Mrs. Anna Camp of Alton, Mrs. William Harris of Brooks, Ore., Mrs. Charles Porter of Tekoa, Wash., Mrs. August Budde, Vancouver, Wash., and Mrs. Herman Reuter of Oakley City, Okla. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church with interment in St. Joseph's cemetery. The Rev. H. B. Schnelton will sing the Requiem Mass.

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BUDDE, GERTRUDE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 3, 1907

Mrs. Gertrude Budde died Tuesday morning at 2:30 o'clock after an illness from bronchitis and the grip. She was the widow of William Budde, who died in 1887, and four children survive: Joseph and John J. Budde, Mrs. Frances Hoettger, and Miss Mary Budde, all of Alton. She was born August 2, 1830 in Hettinghausen, Westphalia, Germany, and came to Alton with her husband in 1854, residing here continuously since. She was an active church worker and a very charitable woman whose taking off will cause sorrow to all who know her. The funeral will be Thursday morning from St. Mary's church.

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BUDDE, HELEN (nee WEIRICH)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 19, 1917

Mrs. Frank J. Budde died at the family home on Main street in Upper Alton last evening after a long illness during which everything known to medical skill was done to relieve her suffering. For many months Mrs. Budde received treatment in hospitals throughout the country under the direction of her brother, Dr. William Weirich of Jacksonville. Over a week ago, Mrs. Budde returned from St. Louis, and continued very ill until the time of her death. She had been in St. Louis the last time for five weeks. Mrs. Budde was born in Germany in 1873 and came to America in 1881. Her maiden name was Miss Helen Weirich. In 1881 she was married to Frank J. Budde, and if she had lived until next year she would have celebrated her twenty-fifth wedding anniversary. She is survived by her husband, Frank J. Budde, and a large family of children: Sister Damian of Nebraska; Teresa, Marie, Alphonse, Helen, Lucille, Charles and Dorothy, the youngest being a child of eight. She is also survived by two sisters and two brothers, Mrs. Joseph Jun of this city; Dr. William Weirich of Jacksonville, Ill.; Professor Henry Weirich of Effingham, Ill.; and Mrs. John Wetstein of Electra, Tex. Her daughter, Sister Damian, and her sister, Mrs. John Wetstein of Texas, will be unable to attend the funeral. Mrs. Budde also leaves her aged father, Henry Weirich, 73 years old. Mr. Weirich has been making his home with his daughter and her family. Mrs. Budde has always been an active worker in St. Mary's Church, where she has a large number of friends, who will regret her loss, and sympathize with her afflicted family. The funeral will be held Monday at nine o'clock from St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery. She was a member of St. Elizabeth Branch of the Western Catholic Union; also of St. Mary's Council of the Catholic Knights and Ladies of America.

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BUDDE, IDA (nee MILLER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1904

Mrs. Ida Budde, nee Miller, wife of Joseph F. Budde, the well-known East End business man, died this afternoon after a long illness at the home on North Street.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 4, 1904

The death of Mrs. Ida Miller Budde, wife of Joseph F. Budde, which occurred Wednesday afternoon at the family home, 642 North street, was the result of nearly a year's illness with lung trouble. Mrs. Budde was married but little over a year ago, and at the time of her marriage there was nothing to indicate that her married life would be cut short so soon. The fatal disease manifested itself soon afterward and continued to develop until death resulted. She was 24 years of age and had lived in Alton all her life. Mrs. Budde will be buried Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.  [Internment was in St. Joseph's Cemetery]

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BUDDE, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1905

Joseph Budde, aged 28, died Monday afternoon at 3:45 o'clock in Jacksonville, Ill., where he was confined in an institution for the insane. Since he was removed to Jacksonville his mental condition became much worse, and for the last few weeks his decline was rapid. The body arrived in Alton Tuesday morning from Jacksonville, and was taken at once to the home of his mother, Mrs. Theresa Budde, Eighth and Henry streets. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church. Mr. Budde was engaged in business in Alton since he was a very young man. He was first with his brother, John Budde, on Third street, and afterward he started a store at Second and Ridge streets, but recently when his mind became unbalanced he was obliged to give up, as his decline in health had been rapid. For more than a year Mr. Budde brooded over the possibility of losing his mind, and grieved greatly over the coming of what to him seemed a certainty. He spoke of his fears to some of his intimate friends and advisers, and he always spoke of the approaching horror with some resignation, but with infinite pathos. Brooding may have hastened the development of the malady, but in regard to its coming he was a fatalist and believed it was inevitable.

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BUDDE, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 2, 1916

Joseph Budde, aged 57, a well known farmer who resided twenty-three years three miles north of Upper Alton, died at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon at his home, after a three years illness from a cancerous trouble. Mr. Budde was born and raised in the vicinity of Alton, and lived all his life near Alton. He is survived by his wife, five sons, and two daughters: Joseph of San Francisco; Leo of Granite City; Walter of Fosterburg; Emil of Alton; Otto, Irene and Mary, who reside at home. He leaves also a grandchild and one half-brother, Henry Dinker, and two half-sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Dwyer and Mrs. Emil Ernst. His mother is Mrs. Mary Dinker, who is 87 years of age. The funeral arrangements have not been completed, but the services will probably be held Monday morning from St. Mary's Church.

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BUDDE, MICHAEL [MELCHOIR]/Source: Alton Telegraph, February 13, 1902
Michael Budde, aged 73, died Tuesday night at his home two miles east of Upper Alton in Foster township, after a long illness. His death was due to hemorrhages from the lungs. Mr. Budde was the father of a large family who are among the best known people of that part of the county.

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BUDDE, PAUL/Edwardsville Intelligencer, June 27, 1927/Date of Death: June 19, 1927
St. Mary's Church was crowded at 10 o'clock Wednesday for the funeral of Paul BUDDE, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben BUDDE of the Fosterburg Road, who was slain last Sunday evening during a hold-up at Canal bridge in which he made a valiant stand against two flashlight bandits. Every pew was filled for the last rites at the church and the cortege of automobiles which formed the funeral procession to Oakwood cemetery was a one. Solemn requiem mass was sung with the Rev. Father J. J. Brune as celebrant, the Rev. Father R A. Heinzmann as deacon and the Rev. Father H. B. SchneKon of Brussels as sub-deacon. The floral tokens as well as the large attendance were evidence of the general regret at his tragic death and a tribute to the unusual courage which he displayed in of overwhelming odds. Active pallbearers were members of the Alton Council of the Knights of Columbus of which he was a member. They were George Springman, M. G. Ryan, E W. Brown, Anthony Jun and William Manns. Honorary pallbearers were chosen from the Holy Name Society of St. Mary's parish. They were, Victor Wardein, John Flori, Joseph Klinke, Ray Wardein, Louis Jun and William Stutz.

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BUDDE, THERESA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 19, 1916

Mrs. Theresa Budde, aged 78, died at her home, 636 Central avenue, at ten o'clock last evening after an illness of some time. Mrs. Budde was born in Osterden, Germany, on April 2, 1838. She moved to the United States in 1857 and was married the same year to Henry Budde. She is survived by three sons, Chris of Alton, and John and Gus of Godfrey; and one daughter, Sister Raymond of St. Mary's. The funeral services will be held on Monday morning at 9:30 o'clock from the St. Mary's church to the St. Joseph's cemetery.

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BUDDE, THERESA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 27, 1915

Mrs. Theresa Budde, aged 70, died at her home at Eighth and Henry street at two o'clock Saturday morning after an illness of fifteen years. She has been seriously ill for the past three weeks, and her death has been expected hourly. Mrs. Budde was a resident of Alton for over sixty years. She came to the United States from Germany when she was seven years of age, and since that time has made her home in Alton. She was married twice in Alton. After her first marriage the couple made their home at Eighth and Henry streets, and Mrs. Budde has lived there since. She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Gustina Miller; two brothers, Laurence Budde of Alton; and Peter Budde of Moro; one daughter, Mrs. Joseph Leady; and two step-children, Mrs. Theresa Struif and Frank Budde; and seven grandchildren. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Monday morning from the St. Mary's Church to the St. Joseph's Cemetery.

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BUDDE, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 21, 1909

The funeral of Mrs. Joseph Budde was held this morning from St. Mary's church, where a requiem high mass was said in the presence of a large gathering of friends, neighbors, and relatives. The members of the St. Mary's branch of the Catholic Knights and Ladies of America attended in a body, and contributed one of the many lovely floral offerings. Burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery. The following gentlemen acted as active pallbearers: Nick Wolf, Peter Leuck, Peter Reyland, Vincent Wardein, Adam Morick, and John Merkle. The honorary pallbearers, members of the C. K. & L. of Illinois, were ladies; Mesdames C. A. VanPreter, J. Dunschen, Frank Struif, V. Wardein, J. W. Schmidt and Lizzie Budde. Mr. and Mrs. Budde celebrated the silver anniversary of their marriage last week.

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BUENGER, CHARLES/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, June 3, 1911/Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

Retired Farmer Drops Dead.
Charles Buenger, one of the wealthiest citizens of Edwardsville, dropped dead last evening of apoplexy as he stood on the Courthouse Square, engaged in conversation with a friend. Mr. Buenger is survived by an invalid wife. Until a few years ago Buenger was a farmer, having a large tract of land near Edwardsville, but retired after he had accumulated a fortune. He was 58 years old. [Charles Buenger was born in Jul 1858 in the Kingdom of Hannover, son of William Buenger and Katherine Mithofer. He immigrated in 1863. He was survived by his widow, Minnie Niemeyer and daughter Augusta.]

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BUESSER, MAGDALENE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 14, 1911

The funeral of Mrs. Magdalene Buesser will be held tomorrow morning from St. Mary's church at 10 o'clock.

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BUETTEMEYER, SELMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1919

Deputy Coroner Ledly of Edwardsville was engaged today, making an investigation of the death of Miss Selma Buettemeyer, a young Edwardsville woman, who fell dead in a bathroom at her home Sunday. During December Miss Buettemeyer suffered an attack of influenza, but did not have medical attention. Since then she has been ill, and while no physician attended her, her mother procured medicine from a doctor. It was stated today that an autopsy might be necessary to establish cause of death.

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BULKLEY, MARY BLAIR (nee RICE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1916

Mrs. Mary Blair Bulkley, widow of Justus Bulkley, for many years a professor in Shurtleff College, died this morning at the residence, 3015 Leverett avenue, in her 85th year. Mrs. Bulkley's death had been expected for three days. She had been in comparatively good health all winter, up to a couple of weeks ago when she had a slight attack of grip. Her case was not at all serious and she seemed to recover from the illness almost completely. A week ago last Sunday her final illness commenced. Bright's disease developed and her attending physician at once found that her case was serious. Three days ago she became unconscious and remained in that state until this morning at 7:30 o'clock when death came. On account of Mrs. Bulkley's usual good health and her very active life, the announcement of her death comes as a surprise to many of her friends. She was a woman of great vitality and even though she was 84 years old she attended to her business affairs at all times in her usual businesslike manner, took great interest in all the happenings about town, and especially in her neighborhood and in fact, she did not show her great age at all. Many of her friends about the city did not realize that her illness was of such a serious nature. Mrs. Bulkley had been a resident of Upper Alton 36 years after becoming the wife of Rev. Dr. Justus Bulkley, one of the old time Shurtleff College professors. She was born in Amhearst County, Virginia, the daughter of Samuel Blair Rice. She was married three times, the first at the age of 22 years to Dr. Richard Coleman in Virginia. To this marriage two children were born, one died in infancy and the other one at the age of 17 years. Those were the only children Mrs. Bulkley ever had. Her second marriage was to David B. Head. The wedding occurred at the home of Mrs. Bulkley's sister, Mrs. Ella Templin at Quincy. Her third marriage was to Dr. Justus Bulkley, 36 years ago, the marriage taking place at the home of Mrs. Templin at Quincy [Illinois]. They came to Upper Alton immediately where they both lived the remainder of their lives. Dr. Bulkley died at the Leverett avenue residence in 1899. Mrs. Bulkley leaves two brothers and one sister, Thomas A. Rice of Upper Alton, and William L. Rice of Bristoe, Va., being the brothers living; and Mrs. Ella Templin of Columbua, Mo. Mrs. Bulkley was born August 16, 1831, and was 84 years old her last birthday. A niece, Miss Daisy Templin, and a nephew, Roger Templin, resided with her. Mrs. Bulkley was a member of the College Avenue Baptist Church during the years she was a resident of Alton, and she was a very devout worker in the Baptist church all her life. She was a Christian woman of the highest character and was loved and respected by a very large number of friends and relatives. Her death is mourned generally about the community in which she lived so many years. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

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BULL, ALONZO D. (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, November 30, 1893

Dr. Alonzo D. Bull was stricken suddenly by death Saturday morning [November 25] in his dental rooms at No. 113 West Third street. Without the slightest warning of the approach of the dark angel, he left home this morning at the usual hour. About 9:30 o'clock a.m. the girl who leaves his St. Louis paper called at the office and saw the form of the Doctor lying on the couch. He made no move at her approach and she hastened to notify someone. Mayor Brenholt happened to be passing the office and heard the girl's story. He hastened upstairs and found the Doctor lying on a couch with his hands folded on his breast. Efforts to arouse him proved unavailing. Dr. Davis was immediately summoned, but could do nothing, as death had occurred sometime before. Evidences showed that in attempting to make the fire he was taken sick and had vomited. He then went to the back room to the water basin where he again vomited. He then laid down on the sofa where he expired. Alonzo D. Bull was born in Oberlin, Ohio, October 20, 1821. He came to Alton in 1878 from Carrollton and has been engaged in dentistry ever since. He resided in Alton a short time prior to locating in Carrollton. He was a gentleman of many sterling qualities and one of Alton's most respected citizens. He leaves a wife and six children to mourn his sudden demise: Misses Lou and Minnie Bull, Mrs. F. J. Rue, Mrs. H. E. Hart, Dr. H. B. Bull of Fairfield, and Dr. H. D. Bull of Jerseyville.

 

Inquest: Coroner Kinder was summoned to hold an inquest over the remains of Dr. A. D. Bull today. The jury consisted of Henry Brueggeman, foreman; E. C. Taylor, Joseph Crowe, Henry Weaver, George T. Bailey and Fred Schielle. The verdict was that deceased came to his death from an attack of neuralgia of the heart at 9:15 o'clock Saturday morning. The funeral of Dr. A. D. Bull took place at 2 o'clock p.m., Tuesday, from the family residence on Market street. A large assemblage of friends gathered to pay their last tributes of respect. The Masons, of whom deceased was a member, turned out in a body. Rev. L. A. Abbott conducted the services in an impressive manner at the home. The funeral cortege then took up the march to the City Cemetery, where the last services were conducted by the Masons, and the remains were interred. The pallbearers were Messrs. J. A. Brunner, J. W. Ash, James Brown, F. W. Brueggeman, George Gray, W. B. Pierce.

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BULL, ELEANOR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1903            Widow of Dr. A. D. Bull Dies

Mrs. Eleanor Bull, widow of Dr. A. D. Bull, died Friday evening at 6:30 o'clock after a long illness at her home, 1815 Maple street. She was almost 75 years of age, and the greater part of her life she had spent in Alton. The condition of Mrs. Bull has been recognized as being very serious for several weeks. A few days ago her children were summoned to attend her, as it was believed she was then in a dying condition. Since that time the progress of the disease has been steady and rapid. Death came to her last evening as she was surrounded by members of her family, and was quiet and peaceful, as it was fitting the close of a placid life should be. Mrs. Bull was the widow of Dr. A. D. Bull, who was for many years a well known practicing dentist in Alton. Dr. Bull died about nine years ago. Mrs. Bull was the mother of Henry Bull of Fairbury, Dr. H. D. Bull of Jerseyville, Mrs. A. W. Rue, Mrs. A. R. McKinney, Miss Minnie Bull of Alton, and Mrs. H. E. Hart of Chicago. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock and services will be conducted at the family home on Maple street.

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BUND, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 17, 1922

Joseph Bund, former glassblower, at one time connected with the city police department, died at St. Joseph's Hospital yesterday after an illness of four weeks from kidney trouble. He was born December 20, 1849, and was in his seventy-fourth year. Mr. Bund was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital three weeks ago, a week after he had become seriously ill. Up to the time of his illness four weeks ago, he had been in perfect health, considering his age, and had been up and around and came down town occasionally. Mr. Bund came to Alton in 1880. He was a glassblower by trade and came her to take a place in the glassworks at Alton. He continued to work at his trade here all the time until the use of blowers was discontinued there. After that, he took a place on the police force under Mayor Faulstich and during all of his administration, remained at that post. His duties confined him to the office, chiefly, and there he displayed the unfailing courtesy and kindness which characterized all his dealings with men. He was a man of a gentle disposition, kindly and always considerate of the feelings of others. Even when the worst of humanity would pass through his hands, Mr. Bund never changed his demeanor, and used them with the same humanity as he was accustomed to show others of a higher order on the social scale. In the neighborhood where Joe Bund lived, he was easily the most popular man, and there has been a great number of people in that part of the city who have been watching with deep interest his fight with disease, which, they felt could have but one end, and that was the one that did come. Mr. Bund leaves his wife, two sons, Joseph Jr. and William, and five daughters, Mrs. James Moran, Mrs. James Dunn, Misses Sadie, Alice and Nellie Bund. He leaves also three grandchildren. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church.

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BUNSY, JOHN H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1908

John H. Bunsy, aged 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Bunsy of 912 Market streets, died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning after an illness of one week with pneumonia. He contracted the disease while firing the furnace at SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. He became overheated and then went outside without wearing the proper clothing. He was moved to the hospital several days ago. His father is car inspector for the Chicago & Alton at Alton. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock and the body will be taken to Medora, Ill. for burial.

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BUNTON, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 24, 1920

An old man, reduced to peddling safety pins as a means of eking out a living, came to the end of the road this noon in front of the Kinloch telephone exchange. The old man who carried mail indicating that he was James Bunton of Franklin, Ill., was a typical specimen of the wrecks of humanity that remain derelicts, exciting pity of those who see them. The white haired old man evidently had little enough reason for living, and this noon as he was plying his trade, seeking to sell safety pins, he dropped from a paralytic stroke. Some operators leaving the Konloch  exchange at noon noticed the plight of the man and they caught him as he started to fall. They propped him against a step until more help could be procured, and finally they summoned surgical help and the old man was taken to St. Joseph's hospital to remain until the end should come. When put to bed at the hospital, it was found that he had five shirts on his person and a great superfluity of clothing in general. He had no overcoat, however. His appearance indicated an advanced age, and police officers who looked at him said they thought he was an "old rounder," who was about down and out.

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BUNZY, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 30, 1906

Mary, the 14 year old daughter of John Bunzy, died this morning at the family home, 912 Market street, after a long illness from consumption. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning, and the body will be taken to Medora for burial.

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BURCH, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1902

Louis Burch, aged 57, died this morning at 6 o'clock at his home, 1342 Wharf street, after a long illness. He was a laborer and had lived in Alton many years. He leaves only a wife. The funeral of Mr. Burch will take place Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The members of Alton Post G. A. R. will attend the funeral.

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BURG, UNKNOWN WIFE OF OTTO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 31, 1905

The funeral of Mrs. Otto Burg was held this morning from St. Mary's church, where services were conducted by the pastor, Rev. Joseph Meckel, in the presence of a large number of friends and acquaintances of deceased and of the family. There were many beautiful floral offerings. Interment was in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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BURGES, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 15, 1905

Fosterburg News - Mrs. Burges, wife of John Burges who resides one mile northeast of the Burg, died on Monday the 11th, at 4 a.m., after an illness of several weeks with cancer of the liver. Mrs. Burges was 77 years of age. She was a native of Germany, and in January they would have celebrated her 50th wedding anniversary. To them were born six children, three sons and three daughters, August Burges of Dorsey; Edward of Alton; Henry of Fosterburg; Mrs. Gus Ebbler of Godfrey; Mrs. O. H. Hermaan and MNrs. John Heines of Moro. Mrs. Burges has always been a very active lady, an excellent neighbor, and a kind and indulgent mother. Her health is a very great loss to her husband, the extent of which is only known to him. In their loss the family have the sympathy of the entire community.

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BURGESS, THOMAS W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1919                Retired Grocer Dies

Thomas W. Burgess, retired business man, died at his home on Twelfth street, Friday evening at 7:40 o'clock, after a long illness from weakness of old age. Mr. Burgess had been in a precarious condition of health for many months. He was born September 22, 1843 at Lisbon, Md., and he spent his young manhood days there. He was twice married, first in 1869, and by that marriage he leaves two daughters, Mrs. John Wheatley of Columbus, Ohio, and Mrs. Emma Sullivan of Baltimore. He was married a second time at Alton, November 15, 1877, to Miss Sallie Dimmock of Alton, who survives him. By that marriage he leaves three children, Miss Marie Burgess, Mrs. c. W. Davis of Peoria, and Charles Burgess of Alton. He leaves also two sisters, Mrs. James Jones of Libertytown, Md., and Mrs. Gaither Henderson of Lisbon, Md. Mr. Burgess had been in declining health for five years. He became very much worse about two weeks ago, and his death was expected at any time. He was a well known Alton man. For years he conducted a grocery store at Sixth and Alby streets. He was a prominent member and for years an officer of the Congregational church at Alton. He was a man of high character and was esteemed by all who knew him as a man of the firmest integrity and strictest conceptions of honor. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock from the family home, and interment will be in City cemetery.

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BURHAM, JANE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 20, 1921          Born a Slave in Virginia, Woman Came to Alton After Emancipation ... Dies At 111 Years of Age

Jane Burham, an aged negro woman whose family claim she had passed her century mark by eleven years, died this morning from old age at her home, 105 West Ninth Street. It was said that she was born in 1810, a slave on a plantation in Virginia, afterward West Virginia. She leaves two daughters, one of them 89 years of age and the other 82. The deceased lived with the 82 year old daughter, Martha Jackson, and the other daughter, Betty Hall, lives at Bloomington. The two daughters appear to be very old. Members of the family say that there were five generations living in the family, and that the death of this aged woman leaves only four. The Telegraph's authority for the age of the woman said that she frequently referred to having seen "the stars fall," an event that happened back early in the thirties, when there was a remarkable display of "shooting stars," and many an aged negro, whose age was not kept accurately and whose knowledge of figures were insufficient to enable them to keep a close track of their ages, give a clue as to how old they are. Those who knew the deceased testify that she had the appearance of great age and many of them readily credit the claim that she had passed the century mark. She came here after she was freed from slavery. All her years as a slave she had lived on one place, the property of one family.

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BURJES, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1917             Former Police Officer Dies at Home

Edward Burjes, aged 56, former policeman, died Saturday morning at 5:55 o'clock at his home, 832 Logan street, after an illness with heart trouble, lasting four months. Mr. Burjes was believed to be much improved in condition, but about 45 minutes before death came he became violently worse and nothing could be done to cause him to rally. Mr. Burjes was a native of Germany. He came to this country at the age of seven, and about thirty years ago he came to Alton. He served for years as a member of the Alton police force, and went out of office at the time of the incoming of the last city administration. Immediately after his retirement from the duties of policeman, he was stricken with heart trouble and he had never been able to be out much since that time. He leaves his wife, four sons, Theodore, Edward, Harvey, and Alfred, and three daughters, Lulu, Florence and Dolores. He leaves also two brothers and three sisters. The time of the funeral was not decided upon until word could be had from relatives at a distance.

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BURJES, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 30, 1912

John Burjes, aged 81, died Friday evening at the home of his son, John Burjes, at Dorsey, after a long illness. Mr. Burjes was a resident of Alton and vicinity for a number of years. He engaged in farming for a long time, and retired a number of years ago. His wife died seven years ago. He leaves three sons and three daughters. They are John of Dorsey, Edward of Alton, Henry of Hilland, S. D., Mrs. Gus Ebbler, Mrs. Otto Herman of Alton, and Mrs. Anna Heintz of Abilene, Kansas. The funeral will be tomorrow morning from the son's home at Dorsey at 10 o'clock, and burial will be in the Fosterburg Cemetery, near which Mr. Burjes lived for many years.

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BURKE, BRIDGET/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Friday, February 12, 1897

Mrs. Bridget Burke, wife of James Burke, for nearly a half century a resident of Edwardsville, died Wednesday afternoon [Feb. 10] at half-past three o'clock, the result of heart failure. She was nearing her 75th year. For nearly a year she has been in failing health, and during the past several months at times complained of pain in the region of her heart. Nothing of a serious nature had been considered. Tuesday morning her husband noticed her sitting in an arm chair as if sleeping, but breathing unusually hard. Efforts to arouse her were unavailing and neighbors were called in and medical aid summoned. She remained in a semi-unconscious condition until death relieved her. Death came unexpectedly and as a surprise to her numerous friends. The funeral took place from the family residence to St. Mary's church this morning at ten o'clock. Services were conducted by Rev. Fr. C. A. O'Reilly. The body was laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery. The pallbearers were: James Kairns, Thomas Kane, M. Grainey, James McNeilly, Patrick Manion and Thomas Knisel. Bridget Burke was born in county Mayo, Ireland, and came to America and direct to Edwardsville in 1849. Shortly afterward, she married James McNeilly, who died several years later. In August, 1855, she was united in marriage to James Burke. This union was blessed with one child, Mary Jane, wife of S. J. Stubbs, who with her father survives. Mrs. Winifred Lyons, a sister, resides in St. Louis. Mrs. Burke was a typical representative of the hardy and industrious people from whom she descended. She was a Christian in all that the word implies, a dutiful wife and mother and beloved by all who knew her.

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BURKE, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1904

The funeral of John Burke took place this morning from the home to St. Patrick's church where a requiem mass was said by Rev. Fr. O'Reilley. The services were attended by many neighbors and friends and by members of the Glassblowers Union and the C. K. and L. of A., of which he had been a member. The body was taken to St. Louis for burial.

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BURLEY, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 8, 1909

William Burley, stepson of Howard Hays, died this morning at 11 o'clock at the family home, Sixteenth and Market streets, after an illness from pneumonia. The time of the funeral has not been set.

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BURNETT, ADDIE D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 27, 1904

Mrs. Addie D. Burnett, wife of William Burnett, died at 2 p.m. Wednesday at the family home, 221 Hamilton street, after a long illness from lung trouble. She was 37 years, 2 months of age, and beside her husband leaves two daughters, Misses Alice and Mollie Young.

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BURNETT, DANIEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1910            Kills Himself by Drinking Carbolic Acid

Daniel Burnett, aged 31, killed himself Saturday night by drinking carbolic acid. He took the burning drink after a desperate struggle with Owen Voyles and Harry Flake in Sunderland Bros. saloon on Union street. Voyles and Burnett stepped into the saloon to get a drink of beer late Saturday afternoon and Burnett produced the bottle of carbolic acid, and with Voyles watching, made as if to drink it. Voyles knew that Burnett had once before tried to kill himself the same way, and he attempted to take the bottle from him. Harry Flake, who was present, assisted Voyles. The two men seized Burnett, one by each hand, and tried to hold him, and the three men struggled around the saloon. Finally Burnett jerked his left hand from one of his captors, and getting hold of the bottle of acid he held in his other hand, he swallowed enough to kill him about three hours later. He leaves his wife and several children. The funeral was held this afternoon from the home of his sister, Mrs. Dwyer, on Green street.

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BURNETT, JOHN R. "JACK"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 8, 1903

John R. Burnett (better known as "Jack") died in the hospital this morning, aged 82 years. He has lived in Alton 61 years. The funeral took place this afternoon.

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BURNS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 29, 1903

Early Sunday morning parts of the body of John Burns, said to be a resident of Alton, were found along the Wabash track between Edwardsville and Carpenter. Burns had been employed in the construction camp of D. J. Griffith, working on the Big Four cut-off. On Saturday night he drew his wages and went to Carpenter. It is presumed that he was run down by a fast mail train while intoxicated. The body was torn into small fragments and strung along the right of way for three quarters of a mile. It required half an hour for Deputy Coroner C. E. Hoskins and his assistants to collect the remains. The inquest resulted in a verdict of "death while on the track in an intoxicated condition."

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BURNS, LUCY (nee SCOTT)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 22, 1919              27 Years an Invalid, Dies - Model Housekeeper - Wife of Thomas Burns

In the death of Mrs. Lucy Burns, this morning, one of the most remarkable persons in Alton passed away. An invalid for twenty-seven years in a state of would have been helplessness in others, Mrs. Burns surmounted every handicap and maintained her usefulness up to the time two weeks ago she was taken to her bed for the last time, with a bad case of blood poisoning. She was 56. Only once, she would say, did she ever walk to church with her husband. That was the Sunday after they were married, when as a happy bride she accompanied him to St. Paul's Episcopal church. A few days later she was stricken with a baffling malady that showed rheumatic symptoms, but which had the effect of hardening and twisting and stiffening her joints. Mrs. Burns gradually became able to help herself, but it was in a way that would have completely discouraged others with less stout hearts. With her hands twisted out of shape, her arms hardly moveable, her legs and feet in such condition that she could never again walk, she would get around her home. She did not go to bed for years because it was too hard for her to get out of her bed. She would sit up all night, and had done so for years. In a little chair that enabled her to move about her home, she did all her household work. She made the bed, she swept the floor, washed, ironed, sewed, cooked and in fact did more work than the averaged  person who has full use of their limbs and body. Her home was a marvel of cleanliness. She would not allow others to do things for she loved to do them for herself, and her chief joy in life seemed her ability to take care of her own home. Five weeks ago she became bedfast, but got somewhat better and again was up and around her home as usual. Two weeks ago she was stricken a second time and she never rose again. She developed a very bad case of blood poisoning, which proved fatal. Mrs. Burns was born at Chesterfield and her maiden name was Scott. She leaves beside her husband, three brothers, Arthur of Loring, Kan., Thomas of Chesterfield, and John William Scott of Alton. The funeral will be Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, 1301 State street.

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BURNS, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1910

Mrs. Minnie Burns, who was taken from across the river to St. Joseph's hospital for treatment and died there Saturday morning, will be buried Thursday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Mary's church. Mrs. Burns has one daughter at Brighton, Mrs. Lawrence Hubner, and another daughter at Cherryvale, Kas., Mrs. Joseph Klinke. The children were not with her when she died. She was 55 years of age.

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BURNS, PATRICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 6, 1915            Old Soldier and Long Time Resident of Alton Dies

Patrick Burns, in his 88th year, died Wednesday morning at his home, 2210 Virginia avenue, after a long illness from the weakness of old age. His death had been expected for a week. Mr. Burns had been a resident of Alton for over sixty years, and almost all of the time he had lived in the one neighborhood. He was engaged for many years as foreman for James Bannon in his quarry, but had been in retirement for many years, living at his old home with the children he had raised and who gave him the truest filial care and affection. He was born February 22, 1828 in Donegal, Ireland, and came to America in 1849. He was married in Alton ten years later to Katherine Crotty, who had come from Ireland. He was the father of nine children, four of whom survive him - Misses Jennie and Mollie Burns; and Patrick H. Burns of Alton; and Mrs. John W. Brady of Dallas, Tex. He leaves also two grandchildren. Mr. Burns was a consistent member of the SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral and a regular attendant there until old age disabled him and forced him to remain at home. He was a soldier in the Union army during the entire Civil War, enlisting in the 49th Illinois Volunteers, Co. G. His regiment gave distinguished service during the war, and Mr. Burns was discharged honorably at the close of the war. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

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BURNS, SARAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 26, 1904

After many months of illness during which she suffered intensely, Miss Sarah Burns, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Burns, died at the family home in Middletown, Saturday afternoon. She had borne patiently her long period of invalidism, but when the end came it was a relief to her relatives and her friends to see that her suffering was over. Miss Burns had lived in Alton all her life and belonged to a well known family. At the time of her death all the members of her family were with her, as her death had been expected for several days. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

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BURRIS, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 31, 1923

The double funeral of Charles Pickering and Charles Burris, two neighbors and friends, who were killed in a crossing accident by a C. & A. train last week, was held yesterday afternoon from the College Avenue Baptist church, Rev. D. T. Magill officiating. There was a very large attendance. Interment of both was in Oakwood cemetery.

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BURRIS, CHARLES HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1922

Charles Henry Burris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Burris of 428 Myrtle street, Upper Alton, died Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital, following an operation which he underwent Saturday for the relief of appendicitis. He was taken ill on Wednesday. He was born in Alton on January 27, 1901. The young man was employed as furnace helper at the Laclede Steel Company. He is survived by his parents, one brother, Seth, and six sisters, Ethel, Clara, Helen, Blanche, Irene and May. He was a very well liked young man and possessed a host of friends, who will be grieved to learn of his death. The funeral will be held Tuesday at 2 o'clock from the home on Myrtle street, and burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery. The Rev. D. G. Magill, pastor of the Upper Alton Baptist Church, will officiate.

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BURROWS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 17, 1915          Fell off Steamer "Spread Eagle" and Drowns

When a man fell off the Spread Eagle on the 13th of June last, and sank beneath the water, the whole matter remained a mystery except the fact that some strange man was drowned. Later, it was proven that the drowned man was William Burrows of Alton, and now E. L. Thompson of the Metropolitan Insurance Co. is trying to prove up the death that he might obtain the $500 insurance Burrows carried for Burrows' two little children....Burrows' wife had died about six months before he was drowned, and left two children, William, a boy of 9 years, and Vernie, a girl of 7. Mr. Thompson is now trying to get the insurance for the two children. Walter Schmoeller, the tailor, is the only person known to have seen Burrows go off the boat, and he declares that the man stumbled and fell off, and that he did not stand with hands folded and say his prayers and then jump off, as was reported by someone at the time.

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BURSON, JAMES S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1914

James L. Burson [sic], aged 45, master teaser at the glassworks, died Saturday evneing at his home, 1509 Jersey street, in Upper Alton, from tuberculosis of the throat. He was born in Mt. Blanchard, Ohio. He is survived by his widow, his father and two brothers. He was a member of the Pentecostal church. The funeral was this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock from the home, and burial was in Oakwood cemetery. A brother, A. G. Burson, came here from Findlay, Ohio to attend the funeral, and left this afternoon for his home.

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BURTON, DELIGHT M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1915           Widow of Nursery Man Dies - Was Old Resident

Mrs. Delight M. Burton, widow of John Perkins Burton, died Saturday evening at 5 o'clock at the family homestead on Burton avenue. Her death was expected as she had been in a serious condition the past two weeks. Mrs. Burton was one of the old time residents of Upper Alton, and she had lived 51 years in the house where her death occurred Saturday evening. She was born in NOrwich, Vermont on March 4th, 1837, and was 78 years old. She was married to the late John Burton in Norwich in the year of 1856. They came to Alton in 1864 and settled upon the place on Burton avenue, where they both spent the remainder of their lives. The street was named some years later after the family. Mr. Burton was the founder of the Burton & Son nursery, which did business a long number of years at the Burton place. The passing of Mrs. Burton removes one of the pioneer citizens of that part of Upper Alton which she saw develop from farmland to a city. Mrs. Burton was a life long member of the Baptist church, was a church worker and in her home she was a good mother and always maintained the highest standard of Christianity in her daily life. She leaves four children, Joseph E. Burton, Mrs. Charlotte Kinsman, Harry M. Burton, and Delia M. Matthews, the latter from Glen Ellyn, Ill. The funeral was held this afternoon at the family home on Burton avenue, and the services were conducted by Rev. R. L. A. Abbott, a life long friend of deceased and her family. There was a large attendance at the funeral service, especially of the older citizens of Alton and vicinity whom Mrs. Burton had known in her long life in Upper Alton. Many beautiful flowers were sent by sympathetic friends. Following the service at the home the body was taken to Oakwood cemetery, where it was laid to rest beside that of her husband who preceded her to the grave nine years.

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BURTON, JESSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1912

Mrs. Jessie Burton, wife of Charles Burton, died this morning at St. Joseph's hospital where she was taken several days ago to be treated for a malady from which she had long been a sufferer. It was decided a few days ago that a surgical operation was the only chance for her, and this was performed yesterday. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Will Rummerfield, and was 23 years old. She leaves her husband and one child. The body was taken to the Rummerfield home in the North Side this afternoon. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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BURTON, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1908              Nonagenarian Passes Away at Home in Upper Alton

Joseph Burton, the oldest man in Upper Alton, died Sunday night at 10 o'clock at the home of his nephew, W. W. Elwell, on College ave.  He was 93 years old on the 25th day of last November. Mr. Burton had been totally blind for the last seven years. His sight failed him about fifteen years ago, and since that time he could do no writing, but was able to get about town by himself until about seven years ago when he became totally blind. He was born at Norwich, Vermont, November 25, 1814. He came to Upper Alton for the first time on November 25th, 1834, when he was just at the age of 20 years. In 1838 he was married to Elizabeth Elwell, and moved immediately to Bunker Hill where he remained until 1847, when he went to St. Louis to live. In 1857 he returned to Upper Alton, and had lived there ever since. He leaves a large number of nieces and nephews, but the only direct relative he leaves is one sister, Mrs. Eliza Gilette, aged 100 years, at Port Huron, Michigan. Mr. Burton was one of Upper Alton's best known residents in years gone by, and he spent many years in that village. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Elwell home, and Rev. A. M. Scott of Alton will officiate. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

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BURTON, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 28, 1903

Mrs. Margaret Burton, widow of John Burton, died Monday night after an illness of nearly a year. Mrs. Burton suffered from dropsy for many months and a few months ago she became paralyzed. Her condition has been hopeless from that time till her death resulted. She was 80 years of age and had been in America since young girlhood. She came from Yorkshire, England with her parents, and most of her life she spent in Alton and vicinity. She was twice married, her name being Stevenson by her first marriage. She leaves four children: Mrs. W. G. Lytle of Alton, with whom she made her home; Mrs. Anne Crosson of Hagerman; Joseph Stevenson of Chesterfield; and William Stevenson of Garner, Kansas. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home on Belle street.

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BURTON, MARY LEVERETT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 23, 1914

Mary Leverett Burton, the two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Burton, and a granddaughter of Mrs. J. Burton and Mrs. W. H. Stifler, died Thursday evening after several weeks illness with whooping cough. The funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at the home on College avenue, and will be private. Burial was at Oakwood Cemetery [Jan. 26, 1914].

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BUSHELL, ROBERT J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1916

Robert J. Bushell, a well known resident of Alton, died late Monday afternoon while he was at work for the John Armstrong Quarry Co. in the old Lockyer quarry, which the former company is operating. Mr. Bushell had made no complaint of feeling in poor health and without any warning that was apparent to those who were near him, he fell unconscious, and in a very short time life was extinct. Surgeons summoned pronounced the cause of death apoplexy. The body was turned over to the deputy coroner, John Berner, and Coroner Sims was notified to hold an inquest. Mr. Bushell had lived in Alton since he was 18 years of age. He came here from Rochester, N. Y. where he was born nearly fifty-seven years ago. He was married in Alton and raised a family of children here. Mr. Bushell was known as an industrious man, a good citizen, and he was a good neighbor and a kind man in his family. He had not been feeling in the best of health, but was not sick enough to stay home from his work yesterday morning. He had not been complaining of feeling bad, and his death was a great surprise to his family and to his friends. Beside his wife, he leaves one son, Thomas Bushell, and four daughters, Mrs. Rosa Farle, Mrs. Gertrude ___, Mrs. Fred Sweetenham, and Miss Hazel Bushell. The funeral will be held on Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. It will be conducted from the home.

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BUSSE, DICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1919          Member of the White Hussar's Dies

The members of the White Hussar band will play tomorrow for the funeral of one of their members, Dick Busse, whose death occurred early Tuesday morning. Mr. Busse was the only man who ever died while a member of the band, which has been organized almost thirty years. The funeral service will be held at the Evangelical church on Eighth and Henry streets, of which deceased was a member, and besides the band the members of the Plumbers' Union, the Eagle, and musicians association will attend. Before the body is taken from the church the band will escort the lodges and organizations from the church to the cemetery, and the band will play a funeral dirge.

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BUSSE, DIEDRICH H. W. 'DICK'/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1916              Businessman and Former Member of Board of Supervisors Dies

Diedrich H. W. Busse, for about 23 years a member of the Madison County Board of Supervisors, died at his home in Tenth and Easton streets at 5 o'clock Tuesday morning, after an illness of three months. During the winter he suffered an attack of the grippe and complications developed which proved fatal. His family had known for over a month that his case was a hopeless one. Mr. Busse was born in Zelbert-Amt Spickhausen, Ostfriesland, Germany. He came to Alton when he was fourteen years of age and lived the remainder of his life in Alton. He was born sixty-three years ago last December 22. His marriage took place in Alton forty-one years ago, and he is survived by his wife and six children, William, Henry, Dick, John and Frederick, and Miss Arnoldona Busse. He leaves also a sister and a brother, Mrs. Mary Folkerts and Ernst Busse, both of Gillespie. Mr. Busse had been engaged in business in Alton for many years. He conducted the Empire House on Third street for a long time. For a number of years he had been in the wholesale liquor business, conducting a place in the eastern part of the city. He retired from the county board of supervisors over a year ago. His health had not been the best for some time, and the attack of grippe found him an easy victim. Mr. Busse was devoted to his family and was known as a good friend and neighbor. His death is a sad blow to his wife and his children. During his long illness of three months, Mr. Busse had never been in bed. It was necessary for him to remain in his chair almost constantly, as he had great difficulty in breathing and he died in his easy chair. Mr. Busse held membership in the Masonic fraternity, the Odd Fellows, Harugaris and the Turnverein. The funeral service will be under the auspices of the Odd Fellows. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and the body will be taken to the German Evangelical Church in which he had been an officer and a member for many years.

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BUSSE, VELMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 13, 1902

Mrs. Velma Busse, wife of John Busse, died at 8:30 Monday morning after an illness of one week. Mrs. Busse was taken with congestive chill at 2 o'clock Monday morning. One week ago she became a mother, and was progressing favorably until taken with a chill Monday morning. Ten months ago she became a bride and her brief matrimonial life, although extremely happy, has ended in sorrow for her young husband and infant, who will have the sympathy of their many friends. Mrs. Busse was 22 years of age. The funeral will take place from the family home, 503 Market street, on Wednesday at 2 p.m.

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BUSSE, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 16, 1903             Well Known Saloon Keeper Falls Down Stairs and Breaks Neck

William Busse, a well known citizen who has been conducting a saloon business at 207 West Third street, fell down the stairway at his residence some time after midnight and broke his neck. Mr. Busse was a very large man and probably his death was instantaneous. Mrs. Busse and one of her daughters heard the fall and rushed down as quickly as possible to find the husband and father dead. Mr. Busse was 53 years of age last November, and besides his wife and seven children leaves two brothers, "Dick" Busse Sr. of this city, and Ernst of South Dakota, and one sister, Mrs. J. Fulkerts of Mt. Olive. The Coroner's jury found a verdict of accidental death caused by a fall which fractured his skull and broke his neck. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence.

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BUTORAC, MARTIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 22, 1919       Stabbed to Death in Struggle

Martin Butorac, 36, a Ukranian, was stabbed to death, and Mike Ruogski, 28, was shot, in a fight in Wood River last night. Ruogski is at St. Joseph's Hospital, and is expected to recover. The body of Butorac was taken in charge by Deputy Coroner Bauer who will conduct an inquest. According to the story obtained by Deputy Coroner Bauer, Butorac went to the house in which Ruogski made his home. According to the story, he opened hostilities by firing. This shot is believed to have missed its mark. Ruogski ran to Butoric and a struggle ensued. According to the story told to the deputy coroner, the men traveled a block during the fight. Eventually Butorac was cut, a deep gash being inflicted in the left side of his neck. It is believed that it was after he was cut that Butorac shot Ruogski, as the latter was shot in the back at the base of the spine. Ruogski was brought to St. Joseph's Hospital, where he gave his name first as John Ruogski, and later as Mike Ruogski. At Wood River it was said his name was Matt Moller. Butorac was married and leaves three children. The cause of the fight could not be determined by the authorities. It was said last night by Wood River police officials that the fight followed a drinking party at the home of Paul Francek. In a statement made to Deputy Coroner Bauer this morning, Ruogski declared he struck Butorac with a piece of wood. He declares the fight resulted from an attempt made by the dead man to cheat at a game of cards. He gave the name of "Matt Arozna" this morning: The statement follows: "On December 21, 1919, I and the deceased were playing cards in Mike Bahen's house. We got into a fight about the money. He tried to cheat me and I would not let him. When we started to fight Dahen threw us out of his house. After the fight we went back into the house a few minutes, and then both of us went home. I went to my boarding house and was there about three minutes when Martin came to my house. Martin met me at the gate and said: 'Here you ain't going any further.'  He took a shot at me. I hit him with a piece of wood."

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BUTTS, HELEN MAR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1922

Mrs. Helen Mar Butts, aged 73 years, wife of Frederick Butts, died last night at 10:50 o'clock at the family home at 412 Chamberlain street, after a prolonged illness, suffering from bronchial trouble. She had been in poor health for the past year, but was able to be up until Christmas, at which time she was confined to her bed where she remained until she died. Had she lived until February 8, she would have celebrated her seventy-fourth birthday anniversary. Mr. and Mrs. Butts resided in Litchfield until eight years ago when they moved to Alton to make their home. The deceased is survived by her aged husband, Frederick Butts Sr., three daughters, Mrs. Albert Fanning, Mrs. Alice Rowe, Mrs. Peter Fuchs, one son, Richard Butts, all of Alton; three brothers, Albert Gilpin of Litchfield, Ill., John Gilpin of Leo Summit, Ill., and Polk Gilpin of Neoga, Ill., and nine grandchildren and three great grandchildren. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Peter Fuchs. Interment in the City Cemetery.

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BUTTS, THOMAS D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 31, 1916             Quarrels With Woman, Kills Himself With Carbolic Acid

Thomas D. Butts, aged 34, died from carbolic acid poisoning Wednesday night at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Butts, 631 East Third street. Butts told his family before he died that he had taken poison because he felt he could not live any longer, as he had quarreled with a woman, Ella Scott, and had been unable to effect a reconciliation. The family said that the woman lives on Market street, and that she had been housekeeping for Butts. His own wife had parted from him three years ago. Besides his wife, he leaves a 12 year old daughter, Irene. Wednesday evening Butts came staggering to the home of his parents, his lips burned with acid. He told the family he had taken poison and intended to die. He told of his troubles with the woman and said that was the reason he wanted to die. His brother, Richard, prevented the dying man leaping headlong from a window, and later Butts broke away and ran into the kitchen and fell dead on the floor there. Butts leaves his parents, three sisters, Mrs. Bert Fanning, Alice Roe, and Mrs. Peter Fuchs; and one brother, Richard Butts.

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BYERS, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 29, 1908

Henry Byers, aged 19 years, died last evening at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Byers, 1041 Union street, from pneumonia. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon.

 

 

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