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Obituaries - Surname S

 

In order to comply with copyright laws, please submit only obituaries published before 1935.

 

Those names in bold, red lettering were well-known, a soldier, or of importance in Madison County.

 

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SURNAME S

SACKER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1903               Killed by Train

John Sacker of East End Place, aged 40, was struck by the southbound C. and A. Prairie State Express about 5 o'clock Friday evening, and sustained injuries which caused his death at 9 o'clock. He was an employee of the glassworks, and after his day's work in the batch room was done, started to his home in East End Place. Witnesses say he was on the Big Four track and left it to avoid an approaching train. He was not aware of the approaching Prairie State Express as he stepped onto the C. and A. track, and was struck and thrown several feet away almost immediately after leaving the Big Four. An arm, shoulder, and leg were fractured in several places, and he sustained mortal internal injuries. Dr. W. Fisher did all that was possible and had him removed to St. Joseph's hospital where he sank steadily until death came to his relief. Deputy Coroner Streeper will hold an inquest as soon as the men in charge of the train can be brought here to testify. Mr. Sacker leaves a wife and a son.

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SALEY, MIKE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 31, 1923

Seven year old Mike Saley, son of Andrew Saley, died yesterday at St. Joseph's Hospital from the effects of injuries sustained a week ago yesterday when he was struck by an automobile driven by Fred Eckert of East Alton, at Broadway and Bozze streets. The child was believed fatally injured at the time he was struck and he lived just one week after being hurt. The father, who had taken care of two children since his wife died, made it a rule to escort the children across the railroad tracks every day going to and from school, as he feared they would be hurt on the railroads that lay between their East End Place home and their school. Last Friday for the first time the father did not have time to serve as their escort. The lad was standing with a group of boys on Broadway, and he darted out in front of Eckert's car and was struck on the side of the head, fracturing his skull. At no time after the accident did the child show much improvement, as paralysis set in immediately.

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SALLINGER/SELLINGER, NELLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 28, 1907                Woman Commits Suicide by Carbolic Acid Route

Mrs. Nellie Sellinger, aged 32, killed herself by drinking carbolic acid Wednesday morning at 2 o'clock at 420 Piasa street. She died in the same room as was occupied by another woman who did a similar act three months ago. The Sellinger woman's maiden name was O'Hearn. A man claiming to be her husband was attending her. He is employed at the Duncan Machine shops. Deputy Coroner Keiser held one of the quickest inquests on record in Alton. Within a few minutes after the woman was dead he was summoned. He managed to pick up a jury quickly, notwithstanding the hour in the morning, heard all the witnesses and a verdict of suicide was found before 4:30 o'clock in the morning. The father of the woman was notified and came after the body this afternoon to take it to St. Louis. The husband told the coroner that he went with his wife to Overath's garden last night, and that on his return he had a few words with his wife and that she took poison in a room adjoining his.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph,August 29, 1907

Arthur Sallinger probably owes his life to the fact that he was drunk yesterday afternoon and evening and was in jail sobering up. He was the husband of the 31 year old woman who committed suicide by drinking carbolic acid because her husband forced her to lead a life of shame. The father of the suicide lives in St. Louis and his name is O'Hearn. He came to Alton to claim the body of his daughter, and was shocked to learn the circumstances attending her death. He was so indignant that he begged for a chance to see his son-in-law for just a moment. He said he did not want to talk to him, wouldn't say a word to him, but the eyes of the father glistened as he pleaded, and there was a look in them which meant that he would make short work of his daughter's husband....O'Hearn said that he knew his daughter was not just exactly happy in Alton, but he never thought that she had fallen to the depths of degradation which led up to her tragic death. Deputy Coroner Keiser believes the father would have killed his daughter's husband if he had found him.

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SAMPSON, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 28, 1907

Mrs. Martha Sampson, colored, aged about 30 years, died this morning at her home, 1714 Alby street, from dropsy. She leaves a couple of brothers and a sister. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

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SAMUELS, CARRIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 30, 1915               187 Grandchildren Left By Woman - Was Georgia Slave

Mrs. Carrie Samuels, colored, who died at the home of her daughter at 302 Mildred avenue this morning, leaves 187 grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Alton has long held a reputation for being the stork city, but this old woman, who was very well known in Alton, breaks all records so far as is known in this vicinity. She had great-grandchildren all over the country. Mrs. Samuels was born in Georgia in the days of slavery. After the Civil War, she came to Alton and made her home here for the past fifty years. There was no exact way of telling her age. Some claimed that she was very close to one hundred years of age, but her close relatives say that they do not believe she was over eighty. Mrs. Samuels is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Missouri Scott of Pin Oak; and Miss Carrie Eerxsion of Alton; and three sons, Walker Elbert and Arthur Samuels, all of Edwardsville. The funeral will be held on Sunday afternoon from the NOrth Alton church to the Upper Alton cemetery.

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SANDERS, ALBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1903

Albert Sanders, aged 34, son of Mr. and Mrs. "Jack" Sanders, died this morning at his home at the foot of Ridge street after a long illness with lung troubles. He leaves a wife and three small children in destitute circumstances. The funeral will be Wednesday afternoon from the home to Milton Cemetery.

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SANDERS, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 28, 1913

Fred Sanders, who was steward of the Illini Yacht Club house for years, died Sunday morning, aged 34, at his home, 1818 Market street. He is survived by his wife. The funeral will be tomorrow at 2 p.m. from the home.

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SANDERS, HORTENSE [nee CORBETT]/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, February 5, 1916/Submitted by Jane Denny

Death Was Sudden. Mrs. Frank Sanders Died Early Last Evening. Funeral Will be Held on Monday Afternoon.
Mrs. Hortense Corbett Sanders, aged 27 years, wife of Frank B. Sanders, assistant cashier of the Bank of Edwardsville, died suddenly at her home at no. 9 St. Andrew's Place at 7:35 o'clock last night. Her death was caused by heart trouble. Mrs. Sanders had been ill since January 2. On that day a son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Sanders. Her illness was from blood poisoning and for the past two weeks her condition had been very serious.  During the past few days, Mrs. Sanders improved and was able to sit up in a chair at times. Yesterday evening she occupied a chair in the sitting room at her home conversing with members of the family. She suddenly fell over in the chair and become unconscious. Those in the room rushed to her assistance, and two physicians were called. There was only life for a few seconds and then without a murmur she passed away. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon from the residence thence to St. John's M. E. church at 2 o'clock. Rev., Robert Morris, pastor of the church will conduct the services. Interment will be in the Woodlawn cemetery. Mrs. Sanders was born November 2, 1889 and died February 4, 1916. Her birthplace was in Edwardsville and she was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Corbett. Her father has been a dentist here for a number of years. She attended the public schools here and also graduated from the Edwardsville High School. At the time she graduated she was salutatorian of her class. She later attended the Illinois Women's College at Jacksonville, this state, and graduated in 1908, from that institution. She then took up the study of foreign languages in the Ohio Wesleyan College at Delaware, Ohio. After graduating from the college she became instructor in foreign languages in the High School here. She was a teacher in the High School for four years and resigned that position shortly before her marriage to Frank B. Sanders, of Edwardsville, on September 21, 1914. Mrs. Sanders was well liked by all. She was a member of St. John's M.E. church and also a member of the choir of the church. She was an active worker in the Epworth League and at the time of her death was president of the St. Louis Alumni Association of the Illinois Women's College She is survived by her husband, Frank B. Sanders, and one son, Frank Corbett Sanders, Jr., and also by her parents Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Corbett of Edwardsville. There is also a brother, Clifton Corbett, of Edwardsville.
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SANDERS, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 13, 1922           Drowns In Glass Works Slough

Thomas Sanders, colored, of Missouri Avenue, was drowned Monday afternoon while swimming in the slough in the rear of the Illinois Glass Company. He was drowned in the presence of eight or ten men who were also swimming in the slough. The coroner, C. N. Streeper, was notified immediately and at once began to drag, but was unable to locate the body. The dragging continued until late last evening and work was recommenced this morning. The body was not recovered.

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SANFORD, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1907

The funeral of Clarence Sanford was held this afternoon from the home of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Grow, 26 Jefferson avenue, and was attended by a large number of friends of the family. There were many beautiful floral offerings. Services were conducted by Rev. W. H. Bradley and burial was in the City Cemetery.

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SANFORD, ELLA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 23, 1904

About a week ago George W. Sanford, an old soldier living at 110 West Tenth street, died after an illness with pneumonia. Sunday, his wife, who is aged about 65 years, passed away. She was very ill at the time he died and she never rallied from the shock his death gave her. Two children are left now completely orphaned. The funeral will be Tuesday afternoon from the home. [Burial was in City Cemetery]

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SANFORD, GEORGE W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 14, 1904

The funeral of the old soldier, George W. Sanford, took place this afternoon from the home, 110 West Tenth street, where services were conducted by Rev. M. H. Ewers, of the M. E. church. G.A.R. members acted as pall bearers, and interment was in City Cemetery. The pallbearers were James P. Pack, C. B. Brooks, O. S. Lehr, A. J. Osborne, Adam Ruth, and Frank Sikes.

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SARGENT, SUSAN P. (nee PHINNEY)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 17, 1912

Mrs. Susan P. Sargent, widow of B. F. Sargent, died Saturday morning at 9:50 o'clock at her residence, 326 East Twelfth street, after a long illness due to the disability of age. Mrs. Sargent had passed almost her entire life in Alton, had lived in the one place most of the time, and was one of the oldest residents of Alton. A quiet home-loving woman, devoted to her church and her family, she had lived a life filled with many good acts for those who came in contact with her. For some time she had been in a very weak state, due to no particular malady except the advance of years. She was a member of long standing in the First Presbyterian church, and until her health and strength failed, she was regular in her attendance at her church. For several days her death had been expected to occur at any moment. Mrs. Sargent was born at Falmouth, Mass., in the year 1823, and was 89 years of age at the time of her death. She came to Alton with E. L. Dimmock and her brother, Charles Phinney, in the year 1838, and ever since then, with the exception of a brief period she spent in Chicago and St. Paul, Alton was her much beloved home. Mr. Phinney, her brother, preceded her in death a number of years ago. Her husband, B. F. Sargent, to whom she was married sixty-seven years ago, died in 1887. Mrs. Sargent's residence in Alton spanned the years from the earliest days of the city to the present, and her recollections of early days in Alton were interesting. Her mind was bright, and she was a delightful woman to know all through her long life. Four weeks ago she suffered a breakdown which preceded the end. Mrs. Sargent leaves two children, E. L. Sargent of Dallas Tex., and Mrs. J. T. Dodge of Alton. She leaves also two granddaughters, one of whom is Miss Jessie Sargent. Miss Sargent had made her home with her grandmother since she was a little girl, and stood in theplace of a dutiful daughter to her aged grandmother. The other granddaughter is another child of E. L. Sargent of Dallas. In the death of Mrs. Sargent, the First Presbyterian church loses one of its oldest, if not the very oldest member in point of years of connection with that institution. It was about 74 years ago that she united with the church, on first coming to Alton, and except for a brief period following the organization of the Congregational church, she remained there. After uniting with the Congregational church, her heart turned back to the organization in which she had first joined, and she reunited there and remained to the end. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock, from the family home on Twelfth street, and interment in City cemetery will be private.

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SAUERMANN, EDITH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1907

Edith, the eight weeks old child of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sauermann, died this morning at the family home on Ninth street, and the funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock from the home.

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SAUNDERS, RICHARD H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1916      Civil War Veteran, Upper Alton Resident, Dies

Richard H. Saunders, one of Upper Alton's oldest and most respected residents, died Sunday morning at 5:40 o'clock after a long illness at the family home, 1816 Main street. He would have been 76 years old had he lived until the 26th day of next month. Mr. Saunders' serious illness commenced a few weeks ago, but he had been a sufferer from rheumatism many years. Trouble in one of his feet, which commenced several years ago, caused him much suffering, and this finally developed into gangrene and was the direct cause of his death. The wonderful vitality which Mr. Saunders possessed, together with his constitution, which literally seemed to be of iron, were instrumental in prolonging his life weeks after all hope for his recovery had been given up. During the last three days of his life he had entered into a deep sleep, and in this state his end came peaceably Sunday morning. Richard H. Saunders was born in Greenville, Bond county, on March 26, 1840. He was the son of Asa L. Saunders, a pioneer of Bond county. While M. Saunders was quite young his parents moved over to Marine, where they located on a farm where they raised their family. At the age of 22 Mr. Saunders joined the 117th regiment, going into Company G Illinois Volunteers, and went immediately into the Civil War. His war record was interesting. He kept a daily record of all his three years' experience in the Civil War. Later, he entered his memorandums in ink in a book he procured for the purpose, and this book has been one prized highly by the old soldier in his home, and it is indeed interesting. He was in 33 skirmishes and battles altogether, but 19 of them were some of the hardest battles fought in the rebellion. One interesting fact is that during the three years Mr. Saunders served his country in the Civil War and in the battles he participated in, he never received a scratch. His life as a soldier, however, was a hard one, and he always attributed the hardships and exposure during that time to bringing on his physical troubles later. Besides being a sufferer from rheumatism, Mr. Saunders' hearing was affected supposedly from his army experience. As he grew older, his hearing became poorer, and during the last five years of his life he was totally deaf. He was mustered out of the service at Springfield, Ill., in 1864, just one day before his three years' service was completed. Mr. Saunders was married to Miss Eleanor Kinder on September 4, 1866 at Marine, and they came to Upper Alton to live 41 years ago. The couple would have observed the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage next September. Mr. Saunders was a life long Presbyterian. His father was one of the founders of the church in Greenville, and he walked from that town to Boston in an effort to raise money to finance the Greenville church. Soon after coming to Alton, Mr. Saunders became an elder in the Upper Alton Presbyterian church, and in that capacity he was active 31 years, and in all he was a ruling elder of the church 36 years. He is survived by his widow and two daughters, Mrs. W. F. Sherwood and Mrs. R. J. Richardson of Alton. He also leaves two grandchildren, Maarcelia E. and Richard Ross Sherwood. Mr. Saunders was the last of his family. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the family home on Main street. Services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Gibson, pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Alton, and burial will be at Oakwood cemetery.

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SAVIDGE, ADELINE F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 19, 1917

Mrs. Adeline F. Savidge, mother of William Savidge of Alton, died at the home of her son on Central avenue Friday morning at 9 o'clock after a long illness with stomach trouble. She came here from Greenfield, Ill. about seven months ago to make her home with her son. Four months ago she was taken ill. She leaves four children, Mrs. Mary Degerlia and William Savidge of Alton; Mrs. Alice Secor of Greenfield; and George L. Savidge of New York. The body will be taken to Medora for burial. Services will be held in the family home on Central avenue Sunday morning at 9 o'clock by Rev. M. W. Twing of the First Baptist Church. Mrs. Savidge held membership in a Methodist Church at Greenfield for many years.

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SAWYER, ANN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1902       Old Resident of Upper Alton Dies  

Mrs. Ann Sawyer, widow of Hugh Sawyer, died Saturday morning at her home in Upper Alton on Main street near College Avenue, in the 84th year of her age.  For many years she was an invalid, and this, combined with advancing age, caused her death. She was a resident of Upper Alton more than half a century, having settled there when a young woman. She was born in England but came to America with her parents when she was a girl. In the Methodist church she was an almost life-long member, and was always deeply devoted to the church in Upper Alton and to work among the church people. Her husband died six years ago. Mrs. Sawyer leaves one daughter, Mrs. Julia S. Machin, and two grandchildren. The funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon and will be conducted by Rev. G. W. Waggoner and Rev. M. L. Cole.

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SAWYER, BENJAMIN S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 29, 1917              The Man With a Sterling Character Dies

Benjamin S. Sawyer, aged 66, died at 6 o'clock Monday morning at the family home, 828 Alton street, from pneumonia. Mr. Sawyer had been in poor health for some time, beginning with an attack of the grip. Two weeks ago, pneumonia developed, and in his weakened condition he was unable to resist the attack. He had been in a bad way the past week and the end was no surprise. Mr. Sawyer was born in Alton and lived here almost his entire life. He was one of the best known men in Alton. For many years his services had been in great demand as an inspector of public improvements. To illustrate the high reputation of the man, and the general belief of the public that he was a man of sterling honesty, the Telegraph takes the liberty of relating the story of his first appointment as a street paving inspector by Mayor Beall twelve years ago. Mr. Sawyer had been a critic of Mr. Beall and had opposed him strongly in his race for mayor. When Beall was elected he was looking about for a capable, honest man to take the post of inspector in the campaign of street improvements he had a mind to inaugurate. Consulting a friend, the mayor was advised, more in fun than anything else, to appoint Ben Sawyer. Mayor Beall jumped at the suggestion eagerly. "The very man I want," was his reply. "I want a man who doesn't trust me, so that he will see that the work is well done." Mr. Sawyer was conferred with, the situation was explained, and he was asked to take the job, with instructions to keep a close watch on the contractors, and to see that the very best work was done. Mr. Sawyer promised and the result is well known. He became known to the contractors as a man who knew when a good job was done, and made no criticism, but who insisted that a good job be done. His service on a job at first was dreaded, but later contractors began to solicit his appointment as inspector because of his knowledge of the work. Mr. Sawyer was engaged in the work of making collections too, when he was not serving as a city inspector. He was a graduate of Shurtleff College. He is survived by two brothers, Fred A. Sawyer and Charles E. Sawyer; also by a cousin, Miss Henrietta Williams, who was the housekeeper for many years in the Sawyer home. All the members of the family have been suffering from the grip, the malady being of a very serious character.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 30, 1917     Kept Weather Record

The late Ben S. Sawyer kept an accurate weather report for the last forty years or more, and continued his "labor of love" in this respect up to about a week before his death. He started keeping the record many years ago for amusement, and afterwards grew so interested in the markings and changes that he kept it up. It was about the only such record kept in this part of the country for many years, and it ought to be interesting, if not valuable, right now to weather men.

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SAWYER, FRED A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 28, 1918                     Retired Alton Business Man Dies

Fred A. Sawyer, retired Alton business man, died at his home, 828 Alton street, Thursday morning at 8 o'clock, after one week's illness with pneumonia. It was the second attack of pneumonia he had suffered in little more than a year. His brother, Benjamin Sawyer, died about a year ago from pneumonia, which he is supposed to have contracted while taking care of Fred A. Sawyer and a cousin, Miss Henrietta Williams, who made her home with the Sawyer brothers. At that time it was not believed that Fred Sawyer would recover, but he did, and later on he retired from business as he continued in poor health. He had made rapid gains toward good health since giving up his business cares, and at the time he was taken down by the fatal attack of pneumonia, he was apparently better than he had been in many years. His death came as a sad surprise to many friends who did not know that his case was so grave. Mr. Sawyer was 57 years of age. He was born in the place where he died, and he passed his entire life there. He is survived by one brother, Charles E. Sawyer, who has been confined to his home three weeks by a rheumatic attack. He leaves also his cousin, Miss Williams, who had stood in the place of a sister to him and had given devoted attention to the welfare of her cousins. Mr. Sawyer, while not affiliated with any church membership, was a firm believer in a future life, and believed that the practice of the "Golden Rule" would insure a place of happiness and rest for mortals in that life. He was a great reader and earnest student, and while he was not assertive in this respect, he was really one of the best posted men in the city. He studied the Bible as well as other religious works too, and he and his brother, the late B. S. Sawyer, had always a well selected library in which the latest as well as some of the oldest books were to be found. He was demonstrative in no manner at all, but those who knew him well and intimately know that he was a kind hearted, charitable man, and that his right hand frequently performed deeds of good which his left hand knew nothing about. He could judge the deserving needy and the undeserving accurately, almost unfailingly, and he never failed the deserving needy. He did not seek publicity for this; on the contrary he shunned it. But Fred Sawyer had many charitable deeds to his credit on the ledger Over There. He was employed for many years by E. F. Deterding and in the Nisbet store, and after they quit business he engaged in business for himself. This business he conducted successfully in the Madison Hotel block for twenty-three years, and no man ever had a better reputation for square dealing than he.  (Interment was at City Cemetery)

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SAWYER, JOHN Y./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 14, 1912

A number of the old friends of John Y. Sawyer went to Godfrey to attend the funeral of the old resident this morning. Private services were held at the residence in Ravenswood Tuesday afternoon, February 13th, 1912, and the remains were then taken to his old home at Godfrey, where funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. A. Scarritt in the Methodist church, after which he was placed to rest by the side of his wife in the Godfrey Cemetery. Those who accompanied the remains from Chicago were: Mrs. Scribbins, Misses Abbie and Kathryn Sawyer, H. W. Sawyer, Mr. and Mrs. J. Y. Sawyer Jr., G. B. Sawyer, Mr. and Mrs. F. S. Sawyer. The deceased was born at Reading, Windsor county, Vermont, November 2nd, 1824, when as a young man he moved to Madison county, Illinois and purchased a farm at Godfrey. October 21st, 1851, he married Sarah Jane Robbins, daughter of Rev. George W. Robbins, a pioneer minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, and resided in Godfrey forty three years. Here, eight children were born to them, seven of whom are still living. A son, Henry Oscar, dying in childhood. Four of the sons and two nephews, including Ben S. Sawyer of Alton, were the pallbearers.

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SCAKER, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 2, 1916        Youth Dies of Typhoid Fever

The funeral of Caroline Scaker, aged 13, was held this morning from the St. Mary's Church to the St. Joseph's cemetery. The child died at the home, 128 Illinois Avenue, from typhoid fever.

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SCARRITT, HANNAH REBECCA (nee MELDRUM)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 14, 1905            Wife of Rev. J. A. Scarritt Dies in Cairo, Illinois

Mrs. Hannah Rebecca Scarritt, wife of Rev. J. A. Scarritt, died from heart disease at Cairo, Ill., Friday morning at 2 o'clock, after an illness of less than three hours. She had been troubled with heart trouble for many years, but on Thursday afternoon and evening she was apparently in as good a condition of health as she had been for many years. She was down town during the morning and had been busily engaged in packing up the household goods preparing for shipment to Alton, where the couple had planned to make their home after spending the winter in the south, and Rev. Mr. Scarritt and his wife went to the home of a friend to spend the night, which was to have been their last in Cairo. Shortly after midnight Mrs. Scarritt was taken with a violent attack of heart disease, and before 3 o'clock in the morning she had closed her eyes in the last long sleep.  Mrs. Scarritt was a native of Madison county, being born on what was known as Scarritt's Prairies, what is now Godfrey, 73 years ago. She was the mother of two children, both of whom died, the last one, Mrs. George Parsons of Cairo, dying in recent years. A few years before Mr. Scarritt was ordained in the ministry he was married to her. Mrs. Scarritt's maiden name was Meldrum. During the more than half century of their married life, Mrs. Scarritt was a faithful companion and a most efficient helpmate for her husband in his ministerial labors. She was well known in Alton and much loved by the members of the church whom she ministered to while her husband was pastor of the Sixth street Methodist church. Her funeral will be the first from the new First Methodist church, and will follow the day of the dedication. Brief funeral services will be held at Cairo, Sunday morning at 9:30 o'clock. The funeral party will arrive in Alton Sunday evening on the Big Four flyer, and the body will be taken to the Jacoby undertaking chapel. The funeral services at Alton will be held Monday morning at 10 o'clock in the new First Methodist church. Services will be conducted by Rev. M. H. Ewers, the pastor, assisted by Bishop David H. Moore of Portland, Oregon and Rev. C. Nash of Jerseyville. Burial will be in the City Cemetery.

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SCARRITT, JOTHAM A. (REVEREND DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 28, 1916           Aged Clergyman Dies - Founder of Godfrey Methodist Church and Piasa Chautauqua

Rev. Dr. Jotham A. Scarritt, last of the original members of the Southern Illinois Methodist Conference, last of the original readers of the Alton Telegraph, "went home," as he had expressed it. He had forecasted his death to take place in the morning, only it wasn't death that he called it. He approached the close of a busy life with his mind at rest, his heart peaceful, and he was looking forward to the end as the beginning of a new life, a journey to a home that had long been awaiting him. On Sunday night, when still fully conscious, the aged clergyman had told his wife that he would be going home in the morning. He closed his eyes and breathed for the last time at 11:24 a.m. Monday, as he had expected. The closing days of Dr. Scarritt were beautiful. The venerable preacher had spent his life in preparation for just such an experience as he went through. He could not have wished the end to come any happier. He was given opportunity to examplify what might be the end of the man who had kept the faith, and in his closing hours his faith did not fail him. He lay for several weeks at his home, fully conscious of the rapid weakening of his body. He retained his faculties unimpaired to the end. He was able to give counsel, and only last Thursday he asked that the Telegraph, a paper he had read for eighty years, be asked to give to the public his farewell message. The Telegraph printed this message just as he had dictated it to his wife. It was full of cheer and confidence that all would soon be well with him, and he was taking advantage of his last opportunity to give counsel to those in whom he was interested and who might be benefitted by it. He was spared any severe suffering. Only a few hours before he breathed his last he became unconscious. Those around him knew the end was very near. He slipped over to eternity peacefully, quietly, with his wife close by him, holding his hand as she had been since he became ill, and taking from him inspiration as to how a righteous person may die. For over sixty-five years Dr. Scarritt was a Methodist preacher. From the rude desk in the log school house to the finest churches in the state, he has preached. He listened in his boyhood to the preaching by Peter Cartwright, the great circuit rider, and his mind was kindled by that. Dr. Scarritt was born on the edge of the Scarritt prairie, near Godfrey, June 23, 1827. Two years before Jotham A. Scarritt was born, his father, Nathan A. Scarritt, moved to the Godfrey neighborhood and there they lived many years. The Scarritt home being on the main traveled road was the stopping place of many travelers and especially was it the headquarters for traveling preachers, and it was in that old house that the youthful Scarritt listened to many conversations between his father and Peter Cartwright. Dr. Scarritt was educated in Central College in Fayette county, Mo. He entered the ministry in 1851 and had been active until a few years ago, when he retired. He was given the degree of Doctor of Divinity by McKendree College. Twelve years he served as presiding elder and the remainder of the time, until his superannuation, he served the churches of the Southern Illinois conference. He was married a few years ago, after the death of his first wife, and the present Mrs. Scarritt was devoted in her care of him in the declining years of his life. Dr. Scarritt was a highly efficient preacher. He had done much to further the cause of religion. It would be impossible to measure the good that Dr. Scarritt has done. In a religious way he was one of the standbys of his church in Southern Illinois. He was a good business man and in many ways he assisted the church. He was one of the founders of Piasa Chautauqua, originally a "camp meeting" for religious services only. He spent many summers on the Chautauqua grounds. It will be remembered that Dr. Scarritt, after the death of his first wife, decided to found a Methodist Church at Godfrey, which would be a memorial to the Scarritt family. He engineered the work whereby the church was realized, and the church is an active agency for good in the community, and will be forever. Besides his wife, the nearest relative Dr. Scarritt leaves is his granddaughter, Mrs. Blanche Peabody of Cairo, Illinois. Her mother is dead. It is planned by Rev. C. C. Hall, district superintendent of the church, to have the Scarritt funeral made the occasion for a testimonial from the preachers of the conference. The funeral will be held at a time when it will be possible for many of the clergymen to attend it, in tribute to the memory of the last of the original and one of the most effective workers the Methodist Church has had in its membership. The funeral will be held Thursday, March 2, at 1:30 p.m. from the First Methodist Church of Alton. The body will be in state from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. that day. Notice of the death and funeral of Dr. Scarritt is being sent to every clergyman in Southern Illinois conference.  [March 2, 1916 - Burial was in the City Cemetery.]

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SCHAEFER, FANNY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 29, 1905

Mrs. Fanny Schaefer, aged 91, died very unexpectedly Wednesday morning at the home of Mrs. Henry Eckhard near East Alton. Mrs. Schaefer retired last night apparently in the best of health. She ate a hearty supper and seemed in good spirits. She made no sign of feeling unwell during the night, and was well until it was time for her to rise this morning. She was taken with a coughing spell and expired very suddenly. Mrs. Schaefer was a native of Germany but came to America in 1857. She lived most of her life in Madison county in the vicinity of Poag and East Alton. She was married twice, the first time to Henry Hendricks, and she leaves a family of four children, Mrs. Dena Eckhard, Mrs. Fred Penning, Henry Hendricks, Mrs. Hannah Suhre, Mrs. Addie Ull. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 12:30 o'clock from the home of Mrs. Eckhard, and burial will be at Wanda.

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SCHAEFER, HERBERT A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 4, 1918

Herbert A. Schaefer died at his residence at 638 1/2 East Fifth street, Sunday, November 3, at 12 p.m. of pneumonia, having been sick nine days. He was twenty-seven years seven months and two days of age, and leaves his wife, Mrs. Laura Schaefer, and two children, Emma Luella, three years old, and Herbert Arthur, one year old. He also leaves his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Schaefer; three brothers, Louis W. of Hammond, Ind., who with his family are sick with influenza at present; William McKinley, with the American forces somewhere in France; and Charles Emmet of Alton. Three grandparents are also living, Mrs. Charles Schaefer of Alton, and Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Luft of Fosterburg, Ill.; also his father and mother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Winters of Milton Heights. Mr. Schaefer was a member of the First M. E. Church, was corresponding secretary of the Alton Homestead No. 3146, Brotherhood of American Yoeman. Members of this order will act as pallbearers. Herbert was a quiet and kind hearted young man, a kind and loving husband, and an obedient son. The funeral services will be held from his father's residence, 614 East Fifth street, Wednesday, November 6, at 10 a.m. Rev. R. C. Morris, his pastor, will officiate.

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SCHAEFER, RALPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1904

Ralph Schaefer, the 18 year old son of John Schaefer, of 1226 east Third street, was drowned Monday afternoon while swimming in the Mississippi off a sandbar out from the glass works. He was with a party of boys who were powerless to help him when he got beyond his depth. The body has not been recovered.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 19, 1904

The inquest held by Deputy Coroner Streeper Monday evening over the body of Ralph Schaefer developed the fact that the young man, who was 19 years old, was subject to cramps and that he was probably overcome by a cramp while in the water. He, with five other boys, were swimming in the slough at the foot of Plum street Monday afternoon. Two of the boys had made the trip across the slough to an old shanty on the island, and Schaefer was trying to swim after them. When about 125 feet from shore, he suddenly sank. The two boys on the island were so terrified they would not even swim back, but waited until a skiff was sent after them. The two boys on the main land could do nothing on account of the distance. The body was recovered by John Dulen, who dived for it, and two hours after the drowning stepped on the body while making a spring from the bottom of the river to return to the surface for air. The body was taken to the family home, 1226 east Third street. The time of the funeral is not known.

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SCHAEFER, WILHEIMINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 29, 1910

Mrs. Wilhelmina Schaefer died this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Louis Grenzebach, McKinley avenue, after an illness of long duration which ended in dropsy. She was born in Germany and is 75 years, 3 months and 13 days old. Three daughters, viz: Mrs. William Koehne, Mrs. Louis Grenzebach, and Mrs. Walter Marsh, the latter of Arkansas, and two sons, Alton, survive her. The funeral will take place from the home of Mrs. Schaefer at 2 p.m. Friday. Interment in City cemetery. Rev. E. L. Mueller will conduct the services.

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SCHAEFER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1922

The funeral of William Schaefer of East Alton, who died Sunday while an ambulance was on the way to take him to the hospital after Dr. Aery had found him dying in his home at East Alton, will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the Squires house, 238 Church street, where services will be conducted by Rev. McIntosh. It was said today that it had not been decided whether or not a coroner's inquest would have to be held, but it was thought probable that it would not.

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SCHAFER, HERMINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 29, 1913

Mrs. Hermina Schafer, aged 70, a well known resident of Moro, passed away at the home of her son George, Shortly after noon today. The old lady was in the best of health this morning, and ate her dinner in the best of spirits. Shortly after dinner she was taken ill with a spell, and never regained consciousness. Rheumatism is said to be the cause of her sudden death. She leaves three daughters, Mrs. Ernest A. Smith of Alton; and Mrs. Edward Helmkamp; and Mrs. William Georgetown, both of Moro; and one son, George Schafer, also of Moro.

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SCHALLENBERG, AUGUST "GUS"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 27, 1907

The funeral of August Schallenberg, who died Monday in Jacksonville, was held this afternoon from the home of his sister, Mrs. T. Miller on Sandford avenue, North Alton, and was attended by a large number of the friends of the family. Services were conducted in Bethany church, Godfrey township, by Rev. J. A. Scarritt, and burial was in Godfrey cemetery.

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SCHALLENBERG, FRANK W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1921       Man Declared Dead - Disappeared in Colorado 7 Years Ago

The City Court was today engaged in hearing the case of Mrs. Jennie M. Schallenberg, who is seeking to have her husband, Frank W. Schallenberg, declared legally dead so she could collect a policy of insurance for $1,000 carried in the Prudential Life Insurance Co. Schallenberg has been missing eight years. He disappeared in Colorado under circumstances which caused his wife to believe that he had died, as she has neither seen him nor heard from him in the meantime. The last seen of Schallenberg was in Denver eight years ago. He had gone west for the benefit of his health. He called at the home of a relative in Denver, did not find at the house the people he desired to see, left word he would be back in a few hours and left some candy for the children. He was never seen or heard from again by his kinfolks, according to testimony submitted in the court to the jury today. The Prudential was making a nominal fight in order that it might keep its records clear and bar any future claim for the money. The insurance company was represented by E. J. Verlie, who filed an answer to the declaration of W. P. Boynton for Mrs. Schallenberg.  A demurrer to the answer was sustained by Judge Yager, and the case proceeded to trial by jury. Schallenberg had many friends in Alton, none of whom has ever heard from him. Under the law a man who has disappeared and remained unheard from for seven years under circumstances which would justify belief that if living he would have communicated with his family at least, may be presumed dead and may be so declared by a court. Mrs. Schallenberg had kept up the payments on his life insurance policy for the seven year period, then demanded payment. The insurance company demanded proof of her husband's death which obviously she was unable to give, and before she could collect she was obliged to file the suit to have a court order made declaring him dead. With this court procedure, the collecting of the insurance policy for $1,000 will be an easy matter. The insurance company in offering some depositions, offered a suggestion to the jury that perhaps Schallenberg had departed with a woman named Viola Fitzpatrick, whose name was frequently mentioned in some statements made by men who said that the woman departed the same day as Schallenberg, from the Woodmen's sanitarium at Woodman, Colo.

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SCHALLENBERG, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 29, 1931

Funeral services of Fred Schallenberg were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Salem Presbyterian church. The funeral party left the Streeper funeral home, where the body had been since Thursday at 1:30. Services were conducted by the pastor, the Rev. H. C. Cramer, and several selections were sung by a quartet of the church choir. Pallbearers were John Whyers, John Kortkamp, Andrew Von Bergen, George Maneke, Fred Maneke, and Frank Bartlow.

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SCHALLER, ROBERT G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1916     Physician Who Practiced in Alton for 17 Years Dies

Robert G. Schaller, a well known practicing physician of this city, dropped dead Thursday morning about 9 o'clock at his home, 904 East Fifth street. He was 69 years of age, and had practiced medicine in this city the last 17 years. He practiced in Missouri eight or ten years previous to coming here, and was a successful practitioner here as well as in Missouri. He was a kindly man too, and often did deeds of charity with his right hand that his left knew nothing of. A couple of years ago he was very sick for a long time with typhoid pneumonia, and while he recovered enough to resume practice, he was never well since that time. It is supposed after effects of that double sickness caused his sudden death. Mrs. Schaller, a daughter, Miss Dorothy, and a son, were downstairs this morning at their home when they heard a noise as of a fall upstairs. They hastened up to the doctor's room, and found him on the floor unconscious but alive. The son telephoned for medical aid, but the father passed away before the physician got there. He is survived by his wife and eight children, six sons and a daughter. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

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SCHARTH, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1904

George Scharth, aged 60, dropped dead at his home on Stanton street Monday morning from heart disease. He had been in poor health for many months, but was feeling well shortly before his death. He had been assisting members of his family by putting out the clothesline and returned to the house, to die a few minutes later. Scharth sat down in a chair and expired a few minutes afterward without a struggle. He leaves five children. The funeral will be held Wednesday at 2 p.m., and services will be conducted by Rev. D. E. Bushnell at the family home.

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SCHARTE, UNKNOWN SON OF HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1906

The 5 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Scharte died last night at the family home in East Alton from diphtheria. This is the second death to have occurred there since the appearance of the dread disease several days ago, and there are several more cases under the care of physicians. Some of the cases are said to be bad, but in the majority of them the visitation is in light form. The sick ones being practically quarantined in their home, the authorities and parents hope by this course to stop further spread of the disease.

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SCHATE, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1903

Joseph Schatz, aged 18, son of Mrs. Hannah Schatz, died this morning about one o'clock at the family home on East Sixth street after an illness of 11 weeks duration with bone consumption. The funeral will be Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church to St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SCHAUB, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1910         Tragic Death of Edward Schaub - Fell on Icy Pavement

Edward Schaub, aged 28, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schaub, died at St. Joseph's hospital Monday morning, twelve hours after he was accidentally injured by falling at his home in the North Side. He had eaten supper and was starting for his place of business, he being proprietor of the drug store for many years conducted by Dr. George Barth in the North Side [North Alton]. He was carrying under his arm an Alton city directory, and as he stepped up to the sidewalk his foot slipped on some ice, and he fell in the yard at his father's home. When he got up, he noticed he had a severe pain in his back, but as that seemed to be passing away he went on walking to his place of business, about four blocks away. He stayed there awhile and became so ill he decided he must go home, and there doctors were summoned. After an examination, they decided that he had sustained a bad injury to his spleen, and about midnight he was moved from his home to St. Joseph's hospital, where three surgeons operated upon him in the hope of saving his life. The operation could not give the desired relief, as he had sustained a bad rupture of his spleen and he died at 6 o'clock Monday morning, just twelve hours after the accident. The attending surgeons explain the serious nature of the injury by saying that in attempting to save himself from falling, he had all his muscles at tension, and the force of his impact with the ground caused the weaker organ inside to break. Some of the surgeons believe that the book was a contributor cause, and that it caused the rupture, but there was no bruise on his body showing where the book may have struck him. Edward Schaub was for a number of years connected with the Barth drug store of A. F. Barth, his brother-in-law, at Second and Market. He bought the old Barth drug store in the North Side and was among Alton's most prosperous young business men. He was a leading member of the Illini Athletic club, was deeply interested in baseball, and was a promoter of the Alton City league last summer. He was very popular and was highly esteemed by all who knew him, bearing a character that was above reproach. His death was the cause of deep sadness among those who knew him, as well as in his family circle. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schaub, and one sister, Mrs. A. F. Barth.

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SCHAUB, JOSEPH/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, January 18, 1893

Coroner T. W. Kinder held an inquest Thursday on the body of Joseph Schaub, who died on the premises of Christ Beckemeier in Madison. The jury, of which A. H. Blankenship was foreman, brought in a verdict giving the cause of death rheumatism of the heart. Schaub was better known as Cake Joe, having been a confectioner by trade, and has been in and about the [American] Bottom off and on for years. He was 55 years old.

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SCHAUM, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 11, 1921

Mrs. Mary Schaum, wife of Matthew Schaum, died this morning at her home in Fosterburg, aged 81. Mrs. Schaum had been sick only a short time. She woke about 1 o'clock Monday morning and complained of feeling sick at her stomach. Nothing serious was thought of her illness as she had been sick before under similar circumstances and she always responded to home remedies in a few minutes. The same remedies were used, but she failed to rally and the family decided that the services of a doctor would be necessary. Before the doctor could reach her, she had passed away, about three hours after she had first complained of being sick. An odd circumstance in connection with Mrs. Schaum's death is that she never in all her life had the service of a doctor. Her family say that she often told them that she never needed a physician, and when she did need one the doctor could not be brought there in time, thus completing her life without ever having paid a single doctor's bill for herself. Mrs. Schaum was born in Portland, Me., coming of a family of ship builders. She came to Alton when twelve years old and made her home in the family of Dr. Long on the Grafton Road, relatives of hers. She was married in Godfrey township in 1875, and went with her husband to Fosterburg where she spent the remainder of her life. She was the mother of three children, two of whom survive. Frank and Miss Carrie Schaum, both living at home. She is survived by her aged husband, Matthew Schaum. Mrs. Schaum was a member of the Methodist church at Fosterburg and always took great interest in religious work. She was in the best of health, for one of her age, seldom using glasses except to read fine print. She had one affliction, a difficulty in hearing. She was a happy woman, and was a great favorite in her neighborhood. She was a great friend to all children and was generally beloved in the Fosterburg neighborhood, where there is a large number of friends who are shocked at her unexpected death. She was the last of her family, leaving no brothers or sisters. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock, unless there is a change, and services will be held in the Methodist church at Fosterburg. A brother of Mr. Schaum, Rev. John Schaum of Eustis, Neb., is expected to be here to assist in the funeral services.

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SCHEER, DEIDRICH C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1904

Deidrich C. Scheer died Saturday at 10 a.m. at his residence in Liberty Prairie after several years illness. He has been in feeble health for a long time. About a week ago he fell and was so shocked that the effects, it is thought, induced his death. Mr. Scheer has lived near Liberty Prairie for many years. He was one of the most prominent men in the county, and highly respected wherever known. Mr. Scheer's wife died several years ago. Of her children the following survive him: Mrs. John C. Reed of Ashmore, Ill.; Ed C. Scheer of Edwardsville, court reporter; Harry G. Scheer of Edwardsville; and Misses Lulu and Bertha, who reside at the home. Mr. Scheer was born in February 1827.

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SCHEFFEL, HELEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 28, 1921

Miss Helen Scheffel, aged 22, died Thursday evening at 5:25 o'clock at the family home, 420 Carroll Street, after a long illness. For the past few weeks her condition has been very serious and for several days she was unconscious. Miss Scheffel was the older daughter of Mrs. Helen Aswege, and besides her mother she leaves one sister, Miss Gertrude Scheffel. Miss Scheffel was born and raised in Alton. She attended the Cathedral School and was a member of the 1917 graduating class of the Cathedral High School. She was a young girl of charming personality, and her sweet and winning manner made her a friend of all with whom she came in contact. During her long illness she was a very patient sufferer. She was a granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Fingheton of Belle Street, and besides her mother, sister and grandparents, she leaves a large number of relatives. She also leaves her parental grandmother, Mrs. Mary Scheffel of Litchfield. The year following her graduation, Helen Scheffel was taken ill with the influenze, and her fatal illness began at that time. The funeral will be held Saturday morning. Solemn Requiem High Mass to be celebrated at 10:30 o'clock at SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

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SCHEIBE, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 31, 1917          Patient at State Hospital Killed

Henry Schelbe, a patient at the Alton State Hospital, was killed Sunday afternoon while at work at the power house on the hospital grounds. Schiebe was so far advanced in his improvement that he was able to do much work about the place, and was the best worker on the grounds. Sunday he was helping at the power plant where an automatic ash conveyor lifts the ashes out of the boiler room to the outside of the building. Scheibe climbed up on top of the cinder pile just over the ash chute. A frozen crust of cinders on which stood broke under him and let him plunge down into the chute and on top of him fell about 15 feet of ashes. It was a difficult task to get him out. For three hours men worked hard to release Scheibe, and at last they succeeded in getting the ashes out and drew out the dead body of the insane man. He was 38 years of age. Sheibe was horribly burned by being dumped into the ash chute along with a lot of hot coals. To cool off the coals and kill the gas in them, in the hope of saving the life of the man, a great quantity of steam was formed down among the cinders, and this added to the burns which he suffered. At a coroner's inquest it was testified by S. R. Baker, engineer at the power house, that he had left the building to perform an errant and that when he came back he noticed some legs sticking out the top of the ash chute. Another patient there told him that Sheibe had been on top. Closer inspection disclosed the leg of Scheibe sticking out, but it was impossible to dislodge him. The patient had not been ordered to go on top, it was testified, but had gone of his own free will. It was testified there was about a car and a half of ashes in the hopper when the accident occurred, and Scheibe was caught under this when the frozen crust was broken and he tumbled into the chute. The chute through which he passed is about 24 inches square.

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SCHEIER, ELEANOR F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 19, 1910

Mrs. Eleanor F. Scheier, wife of John W. Scheier, aged 42, died at 4 o'clock Thursday morning at her home, 1202 east Third street, after a brief illness from congestion of the brain. Mrs. Scheier was apparently better yesterday and wanted to get up and do some ironing, but this was not allowed. She had been ill for a few days and did not realize the gravity of her condition. Her family were wholly unprepared for the fatal termination of the illness, and did not notify her parents at Muncie, Ind., until after death occurred. She leaves beside her husband seven children, some of them young. She was a quiet, homelike woman, and of an uncomplaining nature, and if she had any troubles that aggravated her illness, they were not known to her family, as she said little of herself. She was beloved by her neighbors and there is much grief among those who knew her well over her death.

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SCHELL, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1904

The funeral of Charles Schell will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of his father in law, Dr. Isaac Moore. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

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SCHELLE, EARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 29, 1920             Boy, 15, Drowns in Hole at Foot of Ridge Street

Earl Schelle, 15 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schelle of 727 East Seventh street, was drowned Monday evening while swimming in a deep hole at the foot of Ridge street. In the party of men and boys swimming were Maurice Schelle, a brother, and Eldred Mans. The hole in which they were swimming is one dug by the dredge which constructed the embankment for the Illinois Terminal railroad at the foot of Ridge street. The hole in which the boy was drowned is the same in which Elmer Bailey was drowned on June 26, 1919, a year ago last Saturday. The body of the Bailey boy has not been recovered. An engineer, employed there was also drowned in the hole a few years ago. When young Schelle swam into deep water last night, he sank below the surface. The Mans boy swam toward him and when Schelle rose to the surface again Mans clutched his hair. His grip was broken and Schelle sank again. When Mans saw he could do nothing, he called to a man close by to help. The man replied, according to the boy: "I'm all in. I can't do anything." Efforts last night to recover the body of young Schelle were unavailing. While dragging the hole, the nets caught on many snags. It is believed the body may be caught by one of these snags. The hole in which the youngster was drowned is a very deep one, and regarded as dangerous for swimming. Efforts to recover the body were resumed today. Blasting last night failed to cause the body to rise to the surface. Young Schelle was one of seven children.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 30, 1920

The body of Earl Schelle, who was drowned Monday night, was recovered at the foot of Central avenue, this noon, where it had been washed ashore by waves. Efforts had been made to raise the body where it had gone down, near the foot of Ridge street. Dynamite was used persistently, and a close watch was being kept. The body passed the watchers without being seen, and but for good fortune might have been carried out in the current and far down the river before being found. The funeral will be tomorrow at 10 a.m., from St. Patrick's church. There was considerable fear that the body of the boy would not be found, as the bodies of two others drowned there have never been found, and some of the bodies lost at the time of the drowning of Mike Reilly and a party of children, many years ago, were never recovered, the sandbars shifting and covering them. Two men, Harry Schaeffer and Philip Reilley, narrowly escaped drowning while diving for the boy's body Monday night. Schaeffer, after diving for the body, was caught in the net used in dragging and only after strenuous efforts was able to extricate himself. Reilly also was caught in the net after diving and had difficulty in getting loose.

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SCHELL, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 3, 1903

William Schell, a resident of Alton for 60 years, died Thursday evening at his home on East Fourth street after a long illness due to general debility. He was a native of Germany and 70 years of age. Mr. Schell had been ill many months and his death was expected. For many years he worked in the Priest lumber yard. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was a member of the German Benevolent Society and Germania Lodge, I. O. O. F., and the funeral will be held under the auspices of those societies. Services will be conducted by Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann  of the German Evangelical church at the family home, Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

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SCHELLENBERG, FRIEDRICH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 28, 1915              Aged Farmer Had Been Sick With Cancer of the Face

Friedrich Schellenberg, aged 78, died Tuesday night at St. Joseph's Hospital, after an illness of more than two years with a cancer of the face. Mr. Schellenberg was taken to the hospital a year ago, and was in such a condition that he required attendance most of the time. He suffered terrible agonies, but during his long period of suffering he bore up with a Christian fortitude that was the fruit of long years of the most devout religious practices. He was one of the founders of the Salem Presbyterian Church and had held membership there for fifty years. He was a prosperous farmer in the country five miles from Upper Alton, and lived many years on the one place. His aged wife died three years ago. He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Frances Root, of Fosterburg, and one son, Fred, who lived on the old home place. He leaves, also, four grandchildren. Mr. Schellenberg's funeral will be held Friday. The body will be at the Jacoby undertaking rooms until Friday morning at 9:30 o'clock and from there will be taken to the Salem Presbyterian Church where the funeral services will be conducted at 11 o'clock by Rev. E. L. Mueller. Burial will be in the Ingersoll Cemetery. Mr. Schellenberg was a native of Germany, but came to America when a very young man and settled in Madison County. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him and had a very large circle of friends, including all of his neighbors.

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SCHENCK, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1905

Henry Schenck, aged 76, a well known and wealthy citizen of Alton, died at his residence on North street near Sixth, Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock after a long illness. Mr. Schenck had been in failing health for a year and his illness developed into dropsy, which continued to grow worse until yesterday when the end came. Mr. Schenck was engaged in business in Alton for many years. He conducted a grocery store and saloon at Sixth and North streets and owned much property in that neighborhood. Until the last year he was in the best of health and was regarded as a remarkably well preserved man for his years. He was possessed of all his faculties until the last. Recently he decided to dispose of all his property before his death, which he realized was impending, and he made out warranty deeds to all his property, making it over to members of his family. He had lived in Alton over fifty years. He is survived by three sons, Joseph, Charles and Frank, and one daughter, Mrs. Rose Klinke. His wife also survives him. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church. [Burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery]

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SCHENCK, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1910

Joseph Schenck, aged 48, died Monday evening at 7:15 o'clock at the family home, 611 Central avenue. He had been ill several months with cancer of the bowels, and had been bedfast four weeks. During the last month his condition was regarded as dangerous almost all of the time, and for several weeks his life was despaired of. Mr. Schenck was born and raised in Alton. He leaves his wife and nine sons, the oldest of the boys being 21 years of age. He leaves also two brothers, Charles and Frank Schenck, and one sister, Mrs. John Klinke. He was a member of St. Boniface branch, Western Catholic Union, and that order will attend the funeral in a body. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church.

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SCHENK, THERESA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 22, 1907

Mrs. Theresa Schenk, widow of Henry Schenk, died Tuesday afternoon at the home on North street after a long illness caused by cancer. She was sixty nine years of age and had lived in Alton most of her life. She is survived by four children, Joseph, Charles and Frank Schenk, and Mrs. John Klinke.  The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church to St. Joseph's cemetery. Mrs. Schenk leaves one sister, Mrs. Dorothy Wolf, and one brother, Joachim Grossheim. She leaves also sixteen grandchildren. She was a consistent member of St. Mary's church for many years and was president of St. Martha' society also. She had lived in Alton since she was 20 years of age, when she came to this country from Germany. She was highly esteemed by her neighbors and all those who knew her best, and her death is deeply regretted, although she had suffered long from the painful malady which proved fatal.

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SCHERER, CARL/KARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 28, 1919        Soldier Dies at Camp Shelby, Mississippi .... Twin in Service Too

Carl Scherer, of the medical department of the 101st infantry, died Saturday evening at Camp Shelby, Miss., after an illness of a few days with cellulitis. The young man was affected in the throat and face by the malady. He had been in this country only a short time and had arrived at Camp Shelby from Camp Dewon last Thursday. He seems to have been taken down immediately with the serious malady because the family learned Friday he was seriously sick and on Sunday morning, before the family fully realized the gravity of the case of the young soldier, they received word that he had died. His father had departed for Camp Shelby to be with his son, and would not know of the fatal outcome of his illness until after he arrived at his destination. The death of Carl Scherer, after he had been assured of early discharge from the army and was eagerly looking forward to being home, is one of the saddest of the war's tragedies in Alton. He had been in the best of health, both overseas and while in this country. From Camp Devon he had written to his family telling them that he was looking forward to being back in Alton not later than May 15th, and expressing the utmost happiness at the prospects of so soon being back home. The whole family had been most patriotic in the war, and the parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Scherer, had with the utmost willingness given up their boys to serve their country. Carl was the last one to be called. He had been employed in the Barth drugstore, and he was a very popular young man in the large circle of friends he had. He was a twin brother of Joseph Scherer, who is now in the Navy, and who landed only yesterday at Newport News. The twins were devoted to each other and they were looking forward with great pleasure to the near approach of the time when they reunited after their first long separation in their lives. Carl Scherer was 24 years of age. He was born in Alton and had lived here all his life. He leaves beside his parents, four brothers, Joseph, Cecil, Philip, and William; and one sister, Miss Alice Scherer. The body will be brought back to Alton for burial, and it is expected to arrive here in time to have the funeral Wednesday. A dispatch was received this morning from the father saying that he would arrive in Alton tomorrow morning.

 

Scherer Funeral Friday Morning

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 30, 1919

According to present arrangements the funeral of Karl Scherer will be held from the family home at 808 Jefferson avenue to the Cathedral on Friday morning. Solemn requiem high mass will be solemnized at 9 o'clock and a large crowd of friends is expected to be in attendance. After working for three days, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Scherer, parents of the dead soldier, last evening succeeded in getting word from Karl's twin brother, Joseph, stating that he was at Newport News, and that he was leaving at once for home and that he expected to come to Alton Thursday morning. The message did not state at what hour Joseph would arrive, so the funeral hour was placed for 9 o'clock on Friday. From the hour that the body was taken to the Scherer home, large crowds have visited the home to view the remains and extend sympathy to the bereaved parents, sister and brother. It was estimated that between 1,000 or more visitors called at the home on Tuesday night. The death of Karl Scherer takes the second member from the Cathedral Choir, the fifth from the ranks of the Knights of Columbus, and the third from the Young Men's Sodality of the Cathedral. Karl Scherer, Edward Kniery and Charles Maguire were all members of the Cathedral. Scherer is the first soldier who fought overseas who died and who will be buried in Alton. A large American flag is draped over the foot of the casket. This evening the Knights of Columbus will visit the home in a body. Members of the local post of the American Army Association will form a guard of honor at the funeral of the young soldier. This association, an organization composed of men who were in the service of the country during the great war, has purchased a floral wreath for the grave of Scherer bearing the word "Comrade." Former soldiers were being notified this morning for the funeral. The military escort will not be confined to members of the A. A. A.  Any soldier or former soldier in the city may take part. Nearly 50 men are expected to form the guard of honor.

 

Dominant Ninth Pays Tribute to Scherer - Choral Society Passes Resolution of Meeting

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 1, 1919

The following resolution was passed by the Dominant Ninth Choral Society at a recent meeting: "The news of the death of Karl Scherer has been received with deep regret, and the officers and members of the Dominant Ninth Choral Society extend their heartiest sympathy to his family in their sorrow. Karl Scherer was a valued member of our society and his loss is keenly felt, his cheerfulness and willingness to help on all occasions made him beloved by all and the memory of his manliness should be a source of consolation to his family and his friends. The call of his country found him ready, and he served until the end with honor, when he was about to return, his duty done, he was summoned suddenly to his Eternal Home."

 

Military Guard at Scherer Funeral

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 2, 1919

About 60 men, recently discharged from the service, formed a guard of honor at the funeral this morning of Karl Scherer, who died last Saturday at Camp Shelby, Miss., just before time for his departure to receive his discharge from the service. Included in the former soldiers were men who were captains, lieutenants, non-commissioned officers and privates. The first squad was made up of former officers. The guard included former soldiers, sailors and marine. The guard, forming company front in front of the Scherer home on Jefferson avenue, stood at the hand salute as the coffin bearing the young man was placed in the hearse, and led the cortage from the home to SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, where Solemn High Requiem Mass was celebrated with Father Spalding acting as celebrant, Father Tarrant as deacon, and Father Costello as subdeacon. Miss Josephine Taphorn and Miss Alice Sharkey, assisted by Cathedral choir, sang the Requiem Mass. School children, standing outside the church, sang as the body of the young man was carried up the steps into the church. The former soldiers, in uniform, were followed by the local Knights of Columbus, and the Young Men's Sodality, of which orders Scherer was a member. Six discharged soldiers who saw service in France acted as pallbearers. They were Dave Long, Dave Cahill, Henry Berger, William Harrington, N. B. Thornton, and Edward Werner. At the church the soldiers formed a guard up the center aisle, beginning at the sidewalk. The Knights of Columbus continued the guard within the church. As the coffin, draped in the American flag, passed each soldier, he came to the hand salute. The soldiers in turn followed the coffin into the church and took their seats. The funeral sermon was delivered by Rev. Fr. M. A. Tarrant, who declared that the goodness of a man is measured by his aims in life, declaring that a God fearing man is more valuable in every line. Next to God is our country. The patriotism of him who loves God is the best patriotism, Father Tarrent declared.  Toward the close of the service Rene Becker, Cathedral organist, played taps. At the conclusion of the service with the soldiers standing at attention, the people in the church sang "The Star Spangled Banner." On leaving the church the soldiers lined up in company front and saluted as the hearse passed. Services at the cemetery were conducted by Fathers Spalding, Tarrent and Costello. A crowd, said this morning to be the largest that ever attended a funeral in Alton, was at the church, a great tribute to the young soldier. Former soldiers of all ranks, people of all creeds, thronged the large church. The crowd became so large that it was necessary to place folding chairs in the aisles of the church. Even this was not sufficient as a large crowd, perhaps a few hundred, stood in the vestibule of the church and on the walk in front, the doors of the church being kept open. The balcony of the church was also taxed to its capacity. As the Cathedral is one of the largest churches in the city, it is estimated that more than 2,000 people attended the services. Before the time set for the arrival of the cortage at the church, a large crowd had gathered. As the soldiers leading the cortège came into the view, the men in the crowd bared their heads. At Greenwood cemetery a crowd had gathered before the arrival of the funeral party. The three priests led the procession from the gate to the grave, chanting prayers.

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SCHERER, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1903

The funeral of Ellen Scherer, eleven months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Scherer, took place this afternoon from the family home, 626 Market street to the City Cemetery. Services were conducted at the home by Rev. H. M. Chittenden.

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SCHERER, REGINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1903

Mrs. Regina Scherer, aged 69, died Tuesday evening at the home of her son, William Scherer, on Division street. Mrs. Scherer was stricken with apoplexy at her son's home Saturday morning, and failed to regain consciousness. She was a resident of Jersey county, near Elsah, 45 years, and had lived in Alton about six years. She leaves five children: Mrs. L. F. Youngblood of Joplin, Mo.; Mrs. J. M. Phillips of Elsah; Mrs. Gildersleeve of Live Oak, Florida; John and William Scherer, of this city [Alton]. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 11 o'clock at Elsah.

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SCHERFF, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 20, 1922         Farmer Shoots Self in Head While Insane

Fred Scherff, a Prairietown farmer, shot part of his head off with a shot gun yesterday while suffering from a recurrence of an attack of insanity. He died soon after the shooting. Scherff was 65 years of age. It was said that he had been a patient in the insane hospital at Jacksonville, and that he had periods when his mind would be clouded. He had been suffering from a return of his mental troubles for several days, and yesterday he ordered his wife to leave the place, after securing possession of a shot gun his family had hidden from him. After the wife left and went to a neighbor's, she telephoned to her son at Worden, and when he arrived home he found his father sitting on the front doorstep with the shotgun, and ordering everyone to stay away. Deputies from the sheriff's office were called on to help take charge of the demented man, and as they drove into the yard Scherff shot himself in the head with the shotgun.

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SCHERFF, MINNA CHRISTINA (nee KAYSER)/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, December 12, 1924/Submitted by Myra Ann

The funeral of Mrs. Henry Scherff [Minna Christina Kayser] of Worden, formerly of this place [Prairietown], was held at Worden on Tuesday. Burial was at the Meyer Cemetery near here. She had attained the age of 48 years, one month, and five days. She leaves to mourn her death her husband, one sister, Mrs. Ernst Siegel of this place; three brothers, Arthur Kayser of Edwardsville, Edward Kayser of Worden, and Alfred Kayser of this place. The family has the heartfelt sympathy of all in their bereavement.

 

Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, December 13, 1924/Submitted by Myra Ann

Mrs. Minnie Scherff, wife of Henry Scherff, died Friday, December 5, at 2 p.m. after a lingering illness. She had attained the age of 48 years, 1 month, and 4 days. She was a member of the Worden Lutheran Church. She is survived by her husband, one sister and three brothers: Mrs. Ernest Siegel, Alfred Kayser and Edward Kayser of Worden, and Arthur Kayser of
Edwardsville
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SCHEURER, ELIZATION/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1910

Mrs. Elizabeth Scheurer, aged 68, died at 7 o'clock Monday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Minnie Christian, 1012 east Sixth street, after an illness that began four months ago. She was taken ill the day of the arrival of the body of her son, Frank Klebolt, from San Antonio, Tex., and could not attend her son's funeral. She never recovered. Mrs. Scheurer was married twice, her first husband's name being Klebolt. Eighteen years ago she married Fred Scheurer, a Brighton farmer. Since her illness she has been staying in Alton with her daughter. She leaves one son, John Klebolt, and four daughters, Mrs. Ed Ohley, Mrs. Minnie Christian, Mrs. John Huber, and Mrs. William Kolb. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at ten o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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SCHIBE, ALBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1916              Young Man Killed by C. B. & Q. Train

Deputy Coroner John Berner was called to Grassy Lake Saturday morning to hold an inquest into the death of Albert Schibe, 19 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Schibe, farmers living within a few hundred yards of where the youth met his death. The evidence was that the youth, who was a deaf mute, was walking along the track about 6:30 Saturday morning when the train came along and struck him. He was hurled some distance and was dead when members of his family and the train crew got to him. The train was stopped immediately after the accident, which happened directly in front of the Schibe home, and not far from it. Besides his parents, Albert is survived by several brothers and sisters. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from the home and burial will be in Wanda Cemetery.

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SCHICK, STELLA (nee MURPHY)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1912     Murdered in St. Louis, Brought to Alton For Burial

The body of Stella Schick, a former Alton girl who was murdered in St. Louis by a man named Harry Ogden, was brought to Alton Tuesday for burial. She is a member of an east end family, and her maiden name was Murphy. She has many relatives living in Alton. Harry Ogden met Mrs. Schick in Belleville, where the woman had parted from her husband, and the pair had gone to St. Louis where they began living together. Ogden was 22 and Stella Schick was 20. A month ago the couple arrived at a rooming house in St. Louis and had been there up to the day of the killing. They told the other boarders they had been married three months. Sunday morning a neighbor was startled by Mrs. Schick running to her room and crying for protection, saying that Ogden intended killing her. The neighbor became panic stricken on seeing Ogden coming with a revolver and she ran for help, and while she was gone Ogden shot Mrs. Schick. Ogden then went back to his own room, and first taking carbolic acid, shot himself to make doubly sure. A four year old child of the neighbor, Mrs. Slinner, witnessed the shooting. W. H. Bauer was summoned to St. Louis to take charge of the body of Mrs. Schick, and he brought it to Alton. Mrs. Schick's friends in Alton were shocked by the news of the terrible tragedy. The dead woman leaves three brothers and two sisters. The funeral will be tomorrow afternoon and will be from the home of her brother, John Murphy, 619 east Sixth street.

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SCHIESS, BALSER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 20, 1906          Founder of Many Alton Businesses Dies

Balser Schiess died at 12:10 o'clock this noon at his residence in North Alton after an illness of four years with a complication of diseases. Mr. Schiess was one of the most prominent promoters of financial and industrial institutions in the city. He had wide business interests in Alton, and was a director in a half dozen large institutions in the city and vicinity. He assisted in organizing the Citizens' National Bank, the Alton Banking and Trust Company, the Alton Packing Company, the North Alton Paving, Building and Fire Brick Company, and had served as a director in all of these institutions. He was president of the packing company, now the Illinois Packing Co., from its organization in 1892 to the time of his death. Mr. Schiess was born at Bargzabern, Germany, and would have been 72 years old next Christmas day. He came to Alton in 1854, and after three years here he started in the meat business. In 1860 he engaged in business under the firm name of Kirsch & Schiess, and continued in that firm thirty years. He was married in Alton in 1862 to Matilda Rodemeyer, who survives him. He leaves four children, Misses Matilda and Marie, Mrs. W. H. Bradley and Fred Schiess. The funeral will be private and the body will be cremated, but the time is not set. Mr. Schiess was a mild-mannered, industrious, and highly esteemed citizen of Alton and North Alton. He was trusted implicitly by all who knew him, his reputation in the business world was among the best. In his fight for life, entailing repeated journeys to more salubrious climes. Mr. Schiess was followed by the earnest hope of his friends that he might stay the disease and live many years longer to enjoy the fruits of his labors. He was retiring in his nature, but in his family he was beloved and his greatest interest centered there. His death is regretted by many in the business world, but especially by those who worked for him, as he was a kind, considerate employer.

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SCHIESS, MATILDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 12, 1908

Miss Matilda Schiess, oldest daughter of Mrs. Balser Schiess, died Sunday morning at Colorado Springs, Colo., at the age of 45. The death of Miss Schiess was not unexpected, but the end came suddenly. She was attended by her mother, her two sisters, Miss Marie Schiess and Mrs. W. H. Bradley, and her brother, Fred Schiess, the latter two having gone west in response to a telegraphic summons. Miss Schiess' illness was the direct result of an injury she received while returning home from Alaska, where she, with her sisters and mother, spent three or four months. During rough weather, while making the voyage from Alaska to Seattle, she fell from her berth on the steamer and injured one of her arms, the injury failing to heal. Blood poisoning set in and the family stopped at Colorado Springs in the hope that a winter's stay there would be beneficial and that she might recover. Her health had been impaired by her constant attention and devotion to her father, the late Balser Schiess, during whose long illness the eldest daughter was constantly with him. She traveled with him wherever he went in search of health, and it was believed that it was the anxiety and the physical strain incident to this devotion that caused her own health to break down. The body will be brought here for burial, arriving tomorrow morning, accompanied by the other members of the family. Miss Shiess was a woman of many good parts. To all her neighbors she was kindly and sympathetic and was always ready to lend a helping hand in time of trouble. By those who lived near her and came in contact most with her, she will be missed. She possessed a fine character and in her family circle she was the mainstay of those around her.

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SCHIESS, MATILDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 12, 1910                   Lifetime Resident of Alton Dies

Mrs. Matilda Schiess, widow of the late Balser Schiess, died Sunday evening at 9:30 o'clock at her home, 240 Elm street, after a few days sickness from heart trouble. She is survived by a son, Fred Schiess, of the Illinois Packing company, and two daughters, Mrs. Caroline S. Bradley and Miss Marie Schiess. A grandson, Walter Bradley, also survives. She was the oldest daughter of the late Charles Todemeyer, Alton's wealthy pioneer carriage manufacturer, and she has three sisters in Alton: Mrs. Dan Miller, Mrs. Charles Raith, and Mrs. Fred G. Roenleke. One brother, Charles Rodemeyer, survives.  To those who knew her best, her death comes as a shock and to many who benefitted by and through her unostentatious charity it comes as a distinct loss. She was a kindly, charitable woman, a devoted wife and mother, and a good neighbor, and the afflicted family has the sincere sympathy of the community. Mrs. Schiess was born in Alton March 20, 1842, and spent all of her life practically here. Funeral services, which will be private, will be held at the residence Wednesday morning, and afterwards the body will be taken to St. Louis for cremation. The urn containing the ashes will be buried Thursday afternoon in Oakwood cemetery in the grave with that of her husband, the late Balser Schiess.

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SCHILLINGER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 5, 1909                  Man Of Many Troubles Never Complained ... Even Unto Death

John Schillinger, a farmer in the American bottoms over fifty years, is dead. His life ended Tuesday morning at 3 o'clock from weakness of old age. His 82 years of life had been filled with troubles such as would have overwhelmed a man of less tranquil, philosophic disposition. Whenever sorrow or loss assailed him, he merely set his teeth, kept still and did not grieve too deeply over what was gone, but rather increased his determination to get along. He did not win the battle with troubles except in so far as he preserved his tranquility and did not give up, and the fight between him and trouble was a draw. Schillinger settled near Oldenburg on a fine farm of 120 acres 55 years ago, and set about making a living for himself and family. The mouth of the Missouri river changed subsequently, and in the course of about twenty years, the farm was utterly wiped out. Today not a vestige of it remains but a little tract of about 16 acres that belongs to another man. Year by year the Missouri kept eating into his rich farmland and carrying it away. During this time he saw three of his wives and five children die, but still Schillinger did not complain, at least such is the testimony of his children who survived. Every time there was high water in the river, another big slice of ground would go away down the river. finally the water encroached on his house and three times he moved it farther away from the water. At last he got it as far as he could take it, and in the flood of 1892 the last of the farm went away, and the driftwood that battered his house finally tore it to pieces and the house too was a wreck. Then Schillinger gave up trying and left the farm to the river which soon must claim the last remnant of his land. When he gave up to the river he put his money, all he had, amounting to $725 in the Edwardsville bank that failed, and with that failure Schillinger lost his all - all but a loyal family. Still, like Job of old, Schillinger could say, "though he slay me, yet will I praise him."  He had very little or no complaint to make. He went to live with his sons and helped them about the farm until about six years ago, when he became too feeble to do any farm work. He died at the home of his son, George Schillinger, and the funeral will be from that place Thursday morning at 10 o'clock.  Mr. Schillinger leaves two sons, John Jr. and George, and two daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth Kuennemann and Mrs. Mary Katzmann.  Burial will be in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Nameoki.

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SCHIRE, UNKNOWN WIFE OF GUY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1907

Mrs. Guy Schire, 25 years old, of Granite City, died at St. Joseph's hospital last night following an operation to relieve appendicitis. The body was taken to Upper Alton today to the home of the mother of the deceased, Mrs. Jane Huddleston, and will be taken tomorrow to Gillespie for burial. A brother, Samuel Huddleston of Upper Alton, and a sister, Mrs. M. Work of Gillespie, with the husband survive.

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SCHLAGETER, ADOLPH/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, January 13, 1892

Adolph Schlageter, aged 83 years, the Vandalia street tailor, died this morning at two o'clock, of quick consumption. He had been sick all fall and winter and has been confined to his bed since the middle of December. The funeral will take place tomorrow morning at eight o'clock from St. Boniface's church. The remains will be interred in the Catholic cemetery. The deceased leaves two little daughters, who will be taken care of by friends.

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SCHLAGETER, BEDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 22, 1911       Founder of German Benevolent Society and Business Man Dies

Beda Schlageter died shortly before midnight Monday at the home of his stepson, John A. Neininger, on Union Street, where he has been given tender care by Mrs. Neininger for several months past. He was unconscious for a day or so before death claimed him, and his end was peaceful. He was born May 28, 1823 in Germany, and came to Alton in the early [eighteen] fifties. He was actively engaged in business all of the time since up to a few months ago, when old age infirmities began their work on his vitality. He conducted a repair shop in East Second street, and it was famous as a gathering place for the older Germans for many years. He was a kindly man and was always trying "to help someone a little." He was not a charter member of the German Benevolent Society, but was a charter trustee of the society. When it was first organized it was a bachelors' club, and he did not belong to it at that time. In 1857 it was chartered as a benevolent society under the laws of the state, and since then he was always most active in its behalf. He was treasurer of it since it was organized as a benevolent society strictly, and has personally paid the benefits to survivors of members. He always marched in the funeral processions of dead members and always took a personal interest in looking after the welfare of widows and orphans left behind by death. Annually he took all surviving widows of deceased members on an outing, 1911 being the first year he failed to do this on his birth anniversary. Besides his stepson, J. A. Neininger, deceased leaves a niece, Mrs. C. Kramer of Chicago, and a nephew, Beda Geiger of Cripple Creek, Colo.  His wife, Mrs. Eugenia Neininger Schlageter, died in 1884. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Neininger residence in Union street, where services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller, pastor of the German Evangelical church. Burial will be in City cemetery, and the German Benevolent society members will have charge at the cemetery.

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SCHLANKER, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 10, 1919

Mrs. Mary Schlanker, wife of William S. Schlanker, died today at her home, 2508 Broad street. She was 28 years old, and was married a month ago to Schlanker. Her first husband, Louis Ohley, died last Fall. She leaves her husband and a daughter, Dorothy Ohley.

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SCHLEGEL, AUGUST (FATHER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 25, 1903

Rev. Father August Schlegel of Highland, who was ordained a priest by Bishop P. J. Baltes in the Alton Cathedral in 1878 and said his first mass here, died at his home in Highland yesterday. The funeral will be Monday and will be attended by many of his Alton friends.

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SCHLERECH, ALICE R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 31, 1916

Mrs. Alice R. Schlerech, aged 53, died this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. A. L. Schwartzbeck, 1009 Phinney avenue, from paralysis. She had been afflicted with the malady that caused her death for a long time. Mrs. Schlerech had lived in Alton about one year. She leaves besides her daughter, Mrs. Schwartzbeck, two other children, Mrs. Leon Buckhead of Wichita, Kan., and William Schlerech of St. Louis.

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SCHLICHER, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1905

Mrs. Catherine Schlicher, wife of Louis Schlicher, died from pneumonia at 11 o'clock Sunday night after a ten day illness from pneumonia.  She had lived in Alton many years and in recent years had made her home in East End place. She is survived by her husband, a son, and a daughter. The funeral will be held at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow from the family home.

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SCHLICHER/SCHLICKER, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 22, 1905

The funeral of Louis Schlicker was held from the family home this afternoon at 2 o'clock and was attended by numerous friends and old neighbors. Services were conducted by Rev. Theo. Oberhellmann of the German Evangelical church, and burial was in City Cemetery.

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SCHLUETER, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1908

Mrs. Elizabeth Schlueter, who came from her home in Westphalia, Germany direct to Alton 30 years ago, died Monday afternoon from old age infirmities at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Julius Veech in Hawley avenue, North Side. Her husband, Henry Schlueter, died sixteen years ago, and she will be laid to rest beside him. She was aged 84 years, 5 months and 13 days, and her passing was painless. She is survived by three children, Charles A. Schlueter and Mrs. Julius Veech of Alton, and Rev. Henry C. Schlueter of Baltimore, Md. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the German Methodist church, of which Mrs. Schlueter was a member. Her son, Rev. Henry Schlueter, will be unable to attend the funeral because of illness and his inability to make the long trip.

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SCHLUETER, HERMAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1904

Herman Schlueter, who was wounded one week ago after a quarrel with John Fechter at the East Alton tile works, died Tuesday morning in St. Joseph's hospital. Schlueter's vitality was remarkable, and the surgeons marveled at the length of time he continued to live. There were ten perforations in one of the small intestines, and these were sewed up by the attending surgeons, Drs. Shaff Bowman and Pence. Schlueter held on in an unchanged condition until Sunday, when he became somewhat worse and died Tuesday morning. The body was moved to the Bauer undertaking establishment, from where the funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon, and Rev. Theodore Oberhellman will officiate. Fechter is being held in the county jail and will now be refused bail, even though he is able to give it. He will be charged with murder, and will be compelled to face the dying statement left by the man he shot, and his own statement when arrested. The inquest over the remains will be held this evening.

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SCHLUETER, OPHELIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 27, 1902

Mrs. Ophelia Schlueter, wife of Charles A. Schlueter, died this afternoon at 2:30, after a lingering illness. Mrs. Schlueter was in her 50th year. Her husband and two daughters survive her. She was a daughter of the late Philip Peters. She was a sister of Mrs. Frank Squires of Godfrey, and John Peters of Albion, Nebraska, Henry Peters of Chicago, and Charles Peters of the U. S. Navy. She was highly esteemed by all who knew her, as a mother, neighbor and friend.

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SCHMAIG, BARBARA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 17, 1911

Mrs. Barbara Schmaig, wife of John Schmaig, died Saturday evening from paralysis just after she had finished her evening meal. She was 75 years old. With her husband she had been living at the [Nazareth] Home, having no children. Hers was the second death within a few days under similar circumstances, a man having died across the river Friday just after eating his breakfast and while still seated at the table. The funeral of Mrs. Schmaig was held this afternoon at 3 o'clock, and burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SCHMERGE, ELSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 5, 1913

Elsie, 17 years old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schmerge, died this morning at the family home on Washington street, after an illness extending over a period of a year and a half, during all of which time she was a patient sufferer. For several months she has been bedfast, and hope was abandoned some time ago by her family. She suffered from some malady that resulted in turning her blood to water and causing a lot of complications. She was a sweet, bright, companionable girl, and her numerous friends are grieving with her parents and other members of the family over her taking off. The funeral will probably be held Saturday afternoon. Miss Schmerge was a very popular member of the junior class of Alton High School.

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SCHMIDT, ANN A./Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, October 1901/Submitted by Sharon Inman

Joseph Schmidt, the Hillsboro avenue grocer, is sadly bereaved.  During the last month and a half he has had in his family an unusual amount of sickness.  One after another the children took down with typhoid, until eight of them were sick.  Mrs. Schmidt nursed them tenderly and had the satisfaction of seeing all on the high road to recovery when she herself was stricken down.  Physicians and nurses united their efforts to save the life of the devoted mother, but without avail, and Wednesday morning at 2:30 o'clock after a struggle of weeks the end came.  The funeral was this morning at 9 o'clock.  Services were held at St. Boniface's Church by Rev. J. D. Metzler and the body was laid to rest in the Catholic Cemetery.  The pall bearers were Mayor N. E. Bosen, Jacob Weber and John Schumacher, August Seiser, Ed Herning, and Henry Harlem. Mrs. Ann A. Schmidt had attained the age of 41 years, 9 months and 2 days.  She was a native of Hamel township, her parents being Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bange.  On May 4, 1881, she was married in St. Boniface's Church in Edwardsville to Mr. Joseph Schmidt, and resided here thereafter.  Mrs. Schmidt was a great lover of flowers and her home was beautified with many rare specimens, which were her special care.  Then, too, she loved birds, and had a number of them as pets.  In this connection her husband recalls a peculiar incident.  They had a fine redbird, whose custom it was to sing every morning early.  During the stages of her highest fever Mrs. Schmidt never failed to ask in the morning after the redbird.  Wednesday morning she died, and yesterday morning when Mr. Schmidt went to the cage to feed it, it lay upon the bottom of the cage, dead, although it had been apparently as well as ever the evening before.  It had followed its mistress, whose love it had shared, and whose departing it seemed to realize.

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SCHMIDT, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1904

Mrs. Anna Schmidt, aged 78, died from congestion of the lungs about 2 o'clock Saturday morning after a brief illness at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Zaugg, 613 east Fourth street. Mrs. Schmidt was taken ill during the night and died after about six hours illness. She leaves beside her one daughter a son, Henry Schmidt. Mrs. Schmidt came to Alton from Sedalia, Mo., a few hours [sic] ago, and had made her home with her children. Her death was very unexpected.

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SCHMIDT, ANNIE MARIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 4, 1918

Mrs. Annie Marie Schmidt, widow of Carl Joseph Schmidt, died Wednesday morning at 5 o'clock at her home, 1621 Walker street, from old age. She was 84 years of age. Mrs. Schmidt was born in Baden, Germany, and came to America when 11 years old, where at the age of 18 years she was married to Carl J. Schmidt, who died 13 years ago. After a few years spent in St. Louis, Mrs. Schmidt's husband entered the Union army, and after the war the couple moved to Upper Alton where they lived for a long time. About fourteen years ago she moved to Walker street where she spent most of her life since then. She leaves to mourn her death three sons, Jacob, Charles and William; also sixteen grandchildren and fourteen great grandchildren. She was possessed of a beautiful character and was loved by all her friends and neighbors. The funeral will be from the home of her son, Charles, 1620 Bozza street, Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery beside the body of her husband.

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SCHMIDT, CHARLES J. (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 26, 1923          Dies From Mental Breakdown

Dr. Charles J. Schmidt, until about ten days ago a well known physician at St. Jacob in Madison county, died yesterday morning at the Alton State hospital, following a sudden breakdown of his mentality. One day about ten days before his death he was examining a patient in his office at St. Jacob, when he suddenly began to act queer and he exclaimed to his patient, "I am going crazy." His diagnosis of his own condition was correct. He became a raving maniac. One week ago yesterday he was removed to the state hospital at Alton. He was not committed to the institution regularly, but was put there for safe keeping as it was believed his mental troubles would pass away. He was received there as a "visitor," Dr. Trovillion, the managing officer said, and it was the intention, if he regained his mental composure, to send him home without the record being made against him that he had been insane. He grew worse steadily. Most of the time he was there it was necessary to keep him in ice packs or under the influence of a narcotic, to control him. Those who were near him say that it was a blessed relief when he passed away. Dr. Schmidt belonged to a well known family. He had practiced for years at St. Jacob. Recently a son of his was hurt in an automobile accident, and this fact worried him greatly. Dr. Trovillion said that Dr. Schmidt was suffering from an acute form of insanity that came on suddenly and there was never the slightest improvement from the time he was afflicted. Dr. Schmidt leaves a wife and nine children. His partner, Dr. A. Meriwetherk said that Dr. Schmidt broke down under the strain of practicing. In connection with the sudden breakdown on his own brain, it is told that Dr. Schmidt had made a specialty of studying growths on the brain which might cause insanity.

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SCHMIDT, CONRAD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 10, 1907

Conrad Schmidt, a well known restaurant keeper on Belle street, died last night at 8 o'clock at his home over his restaurant. Death was said to be due to asthma. He leaves his wife, a son and two daughters. Schmidt's restaurant was for many years in Alton a favorite resort for bon vivants. He had the reputation of being a high class cook, and he continued to hold on to his trade through all kinds of vicissitudes. As Schmidt would drift from one eating house to another as its chef, his customers would follow him and he might have died a wealthy man. Mr. Schmidt was 61 years of age. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

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SCHMIDT, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1921        Man Who Fell From Scaffold at Wood River Refinery Dies

Edward Schmidt died at St. Joseph's hospital at midnight last night from the effects of injuries sustained in a fall at the plant of the Standard Oil Co., at Wood River, last Friday. A fracture of the spinal column in the neck and injury to the spinal cord producing paralysis caused death. There was no hope entertained for the recovery of Schmidt after an X-ray examination had developed that his spinal cord had been incerated by the broken fragments of his vertebrae. Schmidt, in falling from a scaffold, by being overbalanced when he was pulling a wire, had struck on his head on a railroad track 18 to 20 feet below. He was a long time resident of Alton and had been a member of the White Hussars band for many years and he was a member of Piasa lodge No. 27, A. F. & A. M. and Alton Aerie F. O. E.  Mr. Schmidt was born in Bethalto and was 48 years of age. He had lived in Alton thirty years. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Anna Schmidt, one brother, Nicholas, of Alton, and three sisters, Mrs. Kate Miller of Alton and Mrs. Lillie Moore and Mrs. Lena Dent of St. Louis. He had been employed at the Standard Oil plant at Wood River since that plant was started. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home, 638 Brown street, and services will be conducted by Rev. O. W. Heggemeier. Burial services in City cemetery will be under auspices of Piasa lodge, A. F. & A. M.

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SCHMIDT, JACOB/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 5, 1903

North Alton News - The funeral of Jacob Schmidt took place Monday afternoon from the home on the Godfrey road to Godfrey Cemetery. Services were conducted by Rev. Theo. Oberhellmann of the Evangelical church, and were attended by a large number of the friends and neighbors of the deceased. Mr. Schmidt had lived in this vicinity more than 50 years and was an industrious, honest man and good citizen. He leaves two sons, George and Jacob Jr., both of North Alton.

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SCHMIDT, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1904

Mrs. Elizabeth Schmidt, aged 79, died Monday evening at 6 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Joseph Lohr, two and one half miles east of Upper Alton, after a long illness. She leaves three daughters, Mrs. Henry VanBuren, Mrs. Elizabeth Gollmer, Mrs. Joseph Lohr, also thirteen grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock.

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SCHMIDT, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 10, 1918

John Schmidt, who for the last fifteen years or so has worked for the Standard Oil Company, died this morning at the Nazareth home, from pneumonia. He was taken sick at his boarding house and was removed to the Nazareth home only yesterday. He was 59 years of age, was industrious, and made friends, but so far as known has no relatives. The funeral will be held at 4 p.m. Wednesday at the Nazareth home and burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SCHMIDT, JOSEPH/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Monday, December 18, 1922/Submitted by Sharon Inman

'Joe' Schmidt Dies - End Came Sunday After Illness of Over a Year - - Grocer of Edwardsville for Forty Years to be Buried Wednesday

Joseph Schmidt, retired Edwardsville grocer and who followed the business for over forty years, passed away yesterday at 12:30 o'clock, at his home, 136 Buchanan street, death being due to a malignant growth which he had suffered for a year.  He was taken sick about a year ago, undergoing a surgical operation in St. Louis about the time of the Christmas holidays. The operation gave some relief and within the past several months he took special treatments at the Barnes Hospital. With an unusual constitution and a determination to overcome his ailment he began a hard fight to get well and maintained it to the last.  He showed considerable improvement at times and there were hopes for his recovery. Several weeks ago he took a decided turn for the worst.  Within the past week members of the family became reconciled that the inevitable was only a matter of a few days.  During most of last week he hovered at the point of death.  He remained conscious until the last recognizing members of the family a few minutes before the end. A short time ago he made some of the arrangements for the funeral.  He picked five he desired as pallbearers and added the ? to the list later.  Those named are Joseph Hotz, Henry Trares, H. P. Hotz, Jacob Weber, August ?, and Henry Viere, Sr. They will be asked to serve. Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Boniface's Catholic church.  Rev. E. J. Eckhard will officiate.  Burial will be at St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery. Joseph Schmidt was born at Memphis, Tenn., on March 10, 1857 and was 65 years, 9 months, and 7 days old at the time of his death.  Just before the Civil War, his father, a sister and brother died of a disease which claimed many in the south.  He became a prisoner of war when Memphis was taken. Later, the widowed mother married a man by the name of Klock, a soldier of the Sixth Illinois Calvary.  The family moved to Edwardsville where Mr. Schmidt remained until about 19 years of age.  He had a desire to return to Memphis and went there in October 1876.  He arrived during an epidemic of yellow fever and after a short time left, getting away the night before a quarantine was placed on the city. While on the trip he stopped at the Peabody Hotel and when his son, Leo J. Schmidt, was married a short time ago, he spent a part of his honeymoon at the same place. Returning to Edwardsville he secured employment in the Henry Trare's grocery store at Vandalia and Buchanan streets.  That was forty years ago.  After a short time Mr. Schmidt and another employee, Henry Bernins, purchased the store.  The partnership was later dissolved, Mr. Schmidt taking it over.  He later moved to the location now occupied by the Citizen's State and Trust Bank, then on Hillsboro avenue and later moved to the location of his son's, Schmidt Bros. on Vandalia street. To many in Edwardsville he was known as "Joe".  He catered to school children and hundreds of them went to his store to exchange their pennies and nickels for sweets.  Through that business he cultivated the acquaintance of many who have fond recollections of him. He was married to Miss Annie Bange on May 4, 1881, her death occurring on October 9, 1901.  One son, Paul, preceded the father to the grave and his only brother, William Schmidt, died on Feb. 21, 1908. The death of Mrs. Schmidt left the father with seven children.  The children are, Henry Schmidt, Boone, Ia., who returned home recently, Mrs. Lena Langwisch, August Schmidt, Mrs. Eleanor Krieger, Leo J. Schmidt, Miss Rose Schmidt, and Edward Schmidt. Mr. Schmidt was of unusual traits and his jovial disposition was one reason as a successful businessman.  Possibly his dealing with school children helped to some extent in doing things for the children at home after long hours at the store.  He was of a very patriotic disposition during the late war. Before America entered the conflict he became a supporter of the cause for the allies.  His son Leo J. Schmidt joined the Marines a few days before America declared war.  When he returned home, the father retired, turning the business over to two of the sons who formed a partnership and are operating the business.

 

Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, December 20, 1922

Wife Goes to Alton and Husband Remains Here - Joseph Schmidt Is Laid To Rest At St. Mary's Today

 A family was forced to divide this morning to attend the funerals of two relatives. Mrs. Frank Bange went to Alton to attend the funeral of her brother, John Vonnabmen.  Her husband remained in Edwardsville to attend the services of his brother-in-law, Joseph Schmidt, retired Edwardsville grocer. The funeral of Mr. Schmidt was held from St. Boniface's Catholic Church at 9 o'clock this morning, a number of merchants turning aside from the Christmas rush to pay last respects. The church was filled for the occasion. Rev. E. J. Eckhard conducted requiem high mass, followed by burial at St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery. Five of the pallbearers named by Mr. Schmidt a short time ago when he made some of the plans for his funeral served.  The sixth, Henry Viere, Sr. is serving as member of a jury in the circuit court and could not get away. His place was taken by W. F. Wayne, a grocer. Those noted from out of town for the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sido, and Miss Clara Sido, St. Louis; Frank Epping and Miss Angeline Epping, Granite City;  Mr. and Mrs. August Pizzini, Glen Carbon. Henry Schmidt of Boone, IA, a son, has been here the past several days. He will return home as soon as possible on account of the illness of his wife.

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SCHMIDT, LAURA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 24, 1916

Mrs. Laura Schmidt, widow of Carl J. Schmidt, aged 31, died Sunday evening at the home of her mother, Mrs. Minnie Carmella on Bozza street, after an illness of about three months....she leaves three young children. Mrs. Schmidt's husband was killed a little over a year ago at Bozza and Washington avenue. He was struck by a bicycle and thrown in such a way his head struck the curb and his death followed. Mrs. Schmidt was a member of the musicians' union. Her husband conducted a dance hall and she played. After his death she took a job at the cartridge works and there she remained until ill health compelled her to give up.

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SCHMIDT, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1913

Louis Schmidt, aged 77, died at the Nazareth Home Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock, after a two weeks illness following a paralytic stroke. He came here from Litchfield two years ago to stay at the home. He had two children in Alton, Mrs. L. Flori and Louis Schmidt, also a daughter, Mrs. Ida A. Audrey of Hannibal, Mo. The funeral will be Monday morning at 8 o'clock from the Nazareth Home.

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SCHMIDT, LOUISA SCHNEIDER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1910                         Melville Pioneer Dies ... Kept Store 45 Years

Mrs. Louisa Schneider Schmidt, the storekeeper and postmistress at Melville, and known to thousands who have traversed the Grafton road, is dead. She fell in her garden Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock while working with her flowers. She was attacked by apoplexy and lived only fifty minutes after being carried into her home. Only three weeks ago Mrs. Lena Corzine arrived from her home in Survey, Neb., to spend the summer with her mother, and Mrs. Schmidt remarked when her daughter arrived that she hoped she would die before her daughter went back. Mrs. Schmidt was known as a remarkable character by those who knew her best. She was born in Wittenburgen Castle, Wittenburg, Germany, January 29, 1832, and was almost 80 years of age. She came to this country when twelve years of age. Her father was a fine student and educated the daughter to speak and write French, German, and English, all three of which Mrs. Schmidt never forgot. She was a business woman as well, and ran profitably the little Melville store for forty-five years, and acted as postmistress for twenty-three years. When the little post office at Melville was established, Mrs. Schmidt became the postmistress, and there was never any change - she was the only appointee to the position during the entire life of the post office, from its start to the time it was discontinued because of the rural delivery, which was about three years ago.  A peculiar coincidence in the death of Mrs. Schmidt is that her mother, Mrs. Margaret Schneider, died of apoplexy on Monday, when she was 82 years old. Her sister, the late Mrs. Emanuel Stiritz of Melville, died of apoplexy and died on Monday at the age of 55. Mrs. Schmidt's death coming on Monday makes three deaths in the family on this day of the week. Mrs. Schmidt leaves two daughters, Mrs. Corzine who is now with her, and Mrs. Clara Achenbach who resides on a farm nearby. George B. Schmidt, a son, also survives. Julius Schneider, her only brother, died several years ago. Mrs. Schmidt was the encyclopedia of Melville. She had a great ledger she kept a complete diary in all the events of the little place, and as to what time so and so was married and when so and so died and what the crops were in the neighborhood this and that year. You had only to ask Mrs. Schmidt and she would say, "Wait, I will look in the book and see," and the big book generally yielded the desired information. Mrs. Schmidt was married in Melville and lived there for almost 65 years. Twelve years ago her husband died, and she conducted the little store alone. Mrs. Schmidt was a lover of nature and loved her flower garden, growing the old fashioned flowers that had meant so much to her in her girlhood. While working with her flowers she was stricken. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 10 o'clock from the Melville church.

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SCHMIDT, NICHOLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 10, 1904

Nicholas Schmidt, aged 90, died Wednesday morning after a long illness from the weakness of old age at the home of Henry Menken near East Alton, Wednesday. Schmidt has no known relatives. He had been making his home with the Menken family for a number of years, having gone there to work for his living, and after years of faithful service the family took charge of him in his declining years. The funeral was held Thursday morning.

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SCHMIDT, PHILIP/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1902

Philip Schmidt, for many years a well known business man, died Monday night at his home on Ridge street, after a long illness. He was born September 29, 1843 at Oberstein, on the Nahr, Rheinpreusenn, Germany. He came to America when a young man and had lived in Alton many years. He was engaged in the manufacture of soda water in Alton until fifteen years ago, and later became a member of the firm of H. O. Tonsor & Co.  He retired from business a few years ago on account of his health. The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence of Mrs. Max Kuhl on Ridge street, under the auspices of the German Benevolent Society of which he was a member. Rev. Theo Oberhellman will conduct the services.

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SCHMIDT, SOPHIE (nee ANNA SOPIA MARIA BADE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1934                Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

EDWARDSVILLE, Nov. 21 (Special) -- Mrs. Sophie Schmidt, 75, of Wanda, died Tuesday afternoon at the home of her son, William, with whom she has resided 15 years since the death of her husband, John Schmidt. Death was due to complications and old age. She apparently suffered from a heart attack six hours before her death. She is survived by three children, William J. Schmidt, Mrs. Fred [Ida] Senn, and Mrs. Otto [Charlotte] Ursprung, and seven grandchildren. Mrs. Schmidt was born at Peters Station and lived most of her life at Wanda, where her husband farmed.  [Daughter of Johann Toenies Bade and Charlotta Hardekopf, February 15, 1959 - November 20, 1934]

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SCHMITT, CARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 27, 1905

Carl Schmitt, aged 80, died from old age Saturday night at his home on Walker street, aged 80. He leaves his aged wife, four children, seventeen grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, Rev. W. F. Isler officiating, and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

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SCHMOELLER, CARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 1, 1917        Dies Following Scalding in Vat of Hot Water at Standard Oil Co.

The scalding of Schmoeller last Wednesday morning when he fell into a vat of hot water at the plant of the Standard Oil Co. at Wood River proved fatal. On the day that the young husband had planned to move into a pretty little home he had built at Wood River, he will be laid away in the Alton City Cemetery. The death of the young man was caused by the shock and of the burning, and also from the wide area of skin that was burned. It was said that the young man did not rally from the shock. Friday noon he began to show signs of growing worse, and became unconscious in the afternoon. One of the last words he spoke was when he asked his wife whether they would move Monday into their new home, and he smiled when she told him that was still the plan. Last April 25 Carl Schmoeller, the son of Mrs. Bertha Schmoeller of Alton, married Miss Kathleen Crandall, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Crandall of East Alton. The groom was working at the Wood River refinery and soon a pretty little home was in course of construction for them. It was all finished and ready to occupy when the accident occurred, which cost him his life. Carl Schmoeler was a young man of high character. He was the only son of his mother. He leaves beside his wife, his mother and two sisters, Misses Ruth and Augusta Schmoeler. He was a member of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church, and when able to do so was a constant attendant at that church. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon 2:30 o'clock from the 12th street Presbyterian church in Alton, Rev. C. E. Combrink officiating. Burial will be in City cemetery.

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SCHMOELLER, JOHN W. SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 26, 1911            Prominent Business Man Found Dying

John W. Schmoeller Sr., head of a well known shoe house in Alton, and one of Alton's best known business men, died suddenly Wednesday night at his home, Ninth and Langdon streets, from apoplexy. Mr. Schmoeller was 67 years of age. He had gone home from a session of the Maennerchoir Bowling Club, of which he was one of the most interested members. He had spent a very happy evening with the Maennerchoir, enjoying the usual amusements of that organization, and after walking home he had partaken of a light lunch. Afterward he went to the cellar in his home, and when he did not return a son and a daughter went to investigate and found their father lying unconscious. Doctors were summoned, but Mr. Schmoeller died within a few minutes after he was found. The surgeons said that apoplexy was the cause of his death. The death of Mr. Schmoeller was a great surprise to his family and friends alike. He had not been complaining of feeling ill. He was young in appearance, had hardly a gray hair in his head, and was a well preserved man. He had been attending to his daily duties around the shoe store in the Madison hotel building as usual. Mr. Schmoeller was known as an upright citizen, a very reliable business man, and he has a very large circle of friends. He was the father of a large family of children. In the past few years he has suffered several afflictions by death, his wife and several of his children dying. Mr. Schmoeller was a native of Germany, but had lived in Alton since he was a young man. His was the third death in the family in 14 months. He is survived by one daughter, Miss Bertha Schmoeller, and seven sons, William, Charles, Henry, Albert, John, Walter and Emil. Mr. Schmoeller was born in Germany in 1845, and came to Alton forty seven years ago. He worked for other parties a few years, and forty years ago started a boot and shoe store of his own. This he conducted to the hour of his death, of late years his son, J. W. Schmoeller Jr., being associated with him. He was a charter member of the Alton Maennerchoir, and was one of the best singers in that famous musical organization. He was also a member of the Alton Turnverein, and was always active in his support of the society. Mr. Schmoeller made many warm friendships during his residence in Alton, and his death will be regretted by all who knew him. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon from the German Evangelical church.

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SCHMOELLER, UNKNOWN WIFE OF J. W. SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1910

Mrs. J. W. Schmoeller Sr., one of the best known and most respected among Alton's older German-American citizens, died Monday morning at 9:20 o'clock after a illness which developed shortly after the death of her son, Fred, in Virginia, several weeks ago, and which has been severe for the past three weeks. She worred and grieved so much over her son's death that a stomach trouble from which she long had been a sufferer developed malignant features and it has been known for several days that she could not recover. She fell asleep Sunday evening about 7 o'clock at her home in Langdon street, and woke up in eternity this morning. All of the family were present at the home this morning, Charles and Albert having arrived from their homes in Washington, Iowa, in time to see their mother. She was a great hearted charitable woman, and many good deeds of helpfulness to others are to her credit. She was the mother of ten children, eight of whom survive her, with her husband, the well known shoe dealer. The children are: J. W. Jr., Henry, John B., Walter and Emil, and Miss Bertha, of Alton; and Charles and Albert of Iowa. She was 64 years old and had lived in Alton 44 years. Funeral arrangements have not been made, but the funeral will be held probably Wednesday afternoon from the German Evangelical church.

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SCHNEBELE, CHRISTINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 5, 1920

Mrs. Christina Schnebele, wife of Jacob Schnebele, died very unexpectedly last night at her home, 500 East Broadway, from a heart attack, a few minutes after she arrived home from attending a very happy family gathering at the home of her niece, Mrs. Edward Joehl. Mrs. Schnebele had been in the best of spirits all day and had eaten supper heartily. There was no indication of any trouble as she left the Joehl home, but when within a short distance of her own home, she began to complain of a smothering sensation. She was hurried to her home and there an effort was made to get her undressed and put her to bed, but she died at 10:30 o'clock before this could be completed. She was 56 years of age. Mrs. Schnebele leaves, besides her husband, three daughters: Mrs. Fred Abel, Mrs. Harry Stobbs, and Mrs. Leroy Holland; two sons, Philip and Edward. She leaves also two brothers, Chris and Philip Koenig and one sister, Mrs. Jacob Senz. The funeral will be Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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SCHNEEHAGE, UNKNOWN WIFE OF HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 13, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. Henry Schneehage, whose death occurred on Tuesday, will be held Thursday morning at 11 o'clock from the family home at 8 East Fifth street, Rev. O. W. Heggemeier, pastor of the Evangelical church, will officiate. The burial will be in the City cemetery.

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SCHNEIDER, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 22, 1904

Charles Schneider, a packer in the Illinois Glass Works, died Thursday evening at 8:30 o'clock at his home, 1006 North street, after an illness of nine weeks with Bright's disease. Mr. Schneider was one of the officers of the German Lutheran church on North street, and head of the men's society of the church. He was highly esteemed by those who knew him, an honest and upright man. Mr. Schneider was born October 25, 1858 in the American Bottom. He was married at Staunton, Illinois to Miss Louisa C. Adler, and in 1886 came to Alton where he was employed in the glass works as a packer. He leaves two brothers, August Schneider of Maxwell, California and F. W. Schneider of Alton; and a sister, Mrs. Mary Brueggemann. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from the home and will be conducted by Rev. Frederick Brunns, of the Lutheran church.

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SCHNEIDER, HERBERT FREDERICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 4, 1911    Hardin County Refuses Toddler's Body - Died From Scarlet Fever

Herbert Frederick Snider [sic], son of Mr. and Mrs. James Snider, died at seven o'clock this morning at their home, 307 Shields street. It was their only child, aged eight months. The Schneider family did not intend to procure the services of an undertaker, and were planning to put the body in a coffin and take it to Hardin, Calhoun county. Mrs. Demuth, local health officer, learned of it, and she told the family that in the case of such a contagious disease, they must have the body prepared and disinfected, and that they must get a certificate required by law for transporting the body. Word was telephoned to Hardin that the family were coming, and the health officer at Hardin telephoned back not to let them come, as he would not admit the people in the village. His ruling was based on the fact that members of the family might carry the disease with them. Mrs. Demuth thereupon persuaded the family to have the burial in City cemetery at Alton.

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SCHNEIDER, JACOB/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 26, 1910

Jacob Schneider, a farmer, living near Wanda, was instantly killed near Edwardsville Monday evening while driving a team across the Wabash track. His horses were cut in two, his wagon demolished and Schneider's skull crushed. He was 45 years of age.

 

Alton Evening Telegraph, April 27, 1910

The tragic death of Jacob Schneider, who was killed by a Wabash train Monday evening near Edwardsville, completes a series of five violent deaths in the one family. Four brothers-in-law of Schneider were killed, and only one is left, Peter Meier of Bethalto. A few weeks ago Pierre Meier was killed in a coal mine accident, and his brother carried him up out of the pit. Many years ago a brother, Henry Meier, was shot on a street fight at Bethalto, and years before another brother, John, was killed by a train. Another brother-in-law of Peter Meier was killed at East St. Louis, Dorsey Lawrence. A remarkable train of violent deaths, the surviving member of the family thinks. In addition to the list of names given, Mish Meier, another brother, died a few years ago from getting up from a sick bed when he had typhoid fever and went downtown in Bethalto.

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SCHNEIDER, JULIUS F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1907                   Wealthy Land Owner Dies

Julius F. Schneider, one of the wealthiest and best known residents in the vicinity of Alton, died Friday evening at 7 o'clock at his home, 447 Bluff street, in his 77th year. The death of Mr. Schneider was not unexpected. He had been suffering from heart trouble for several weeks and for a week was not able to lie down. The family were expecting the end. In the death of Mr. Schneider a very interesting character passes off the stage of action. Perhaps Mr. Schneider held more real estate mortgages than any other person in this part of the country, and it is an interesting fact that until blindness overtook him recently, he drew up all his legal blanks and seldom if ever was obliged to pay any attorney's bills. He carried on business on a large scale, yet there was no one who would have judged from looking at him that he was the possessor of such immense wealth as he is credited with having, by those who knew him well. He has very extensive farming land possessions and a claim on dozens of fine farms in Jersey county. Until age began to tell on him and render it impossible, Mr. Schneider, who was a great walker, would make the trips on foot from and to his farm at Melville, and even walk to St. Louis at times, rather than take a train. In his early days he had practiced law in St. Louis, but gave up that pursuit for the more interesting and profitable one of loans and real estate. Mr. Schneider's mind was one that could readily grasp the salient points of a business transaction. He was generally recognized as a sharp, shrewd man, but who would give to everyone his just dues. He was a native of Germany, but came to America with his parents when he was 14 years of age. The family went to Melville to live, and except the few years he was away from home attempting the practice of law and laying the foundations of his future business success, he continued to make his home there. At Melville he raised his family of children and there he lived until old age and failing eye-sight made it appear necessary to move into the city where he would have the advantage of more comforts. Although almost blind, Mr. Schneider would make his way about the city and would make trips to St. Louis, attending to his business affairs. Julius Schneider was born July 1, 1830 at Wurtemberg, Germany. He came to America when 14 years of age, and after two years in St. Louis he moved to Melville. Subsequently he studied law in a recorder's office in St. Louis and filled offices of justice of the peace and notary there for twelve years. In 1869 he moved back to the farm at Melville, where he lived until he came to Alton within the past year. He was married to Marie Theresa Kientz of Marine, Illinois, at Highland, June 6, 1858. Mrs. Schneider died March 18, 1892. Mr. Schneider is survived by Mrs. Minnie Wittman and Julius E. Schneider of Pana; Christian, Rene and Walter G. Schneider of St. Louis; Lillie N., Helen A., Theresa M. Schneider, who lived with their father. Mrs. L. F. Stiritz, who died one year ago, was a daughter. He leaves two sisters, Mrs. Theresa Schmidt of Melville and Mrs. Kate Achenbach of St. Louis. The funeral arrangements have not been made, but the funeral will probably be held from Ss. Peter and Paul's Cathedral Monday or Tuesday.

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SCHNEIDER, RENE J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 4, 1911              Son of Late Julius Schneider Dies Near Melville

Rene J. Schneider, aged 42, died at the old family home near Melville at 6:30 o'clock this morning, from asthma and pleurisy. He had been living in St. Louis and working as a cabinet worker almost all his life. With his wife he moved to the old home a few weeks ago because the doctor told him he must get away from the city. His death was very unexpected. Mr. Schneider leaves beside his wife, three brothers: C. F., Walter, and Julius Schneider; Mrs. Minnie P. Wittman of Pana, Misses Lillie, Helen and Teresa Schneider of Alton. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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SCHNEIDER, WILLIAM F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 2, 1916

William F. Schneider, for many years a prominent barber in Alton, a leader in labor circles in Alton and for several terms city treasurer, died at his home, 123 East Eighth street, Sunday night at 10:30 o'clock. He had been confined to his home almost all the time the past eight months. Mr. Schneider's collapse was a great surprise to all of his friends. He was near death for some time after his collapse, then rallied and was able to be out occasionally, driving about the city. He had suffered a relapse some time ago, and hope of his recovery was given up. Mr. Schneider was one time a very popular man with the voters of Alton. He also had the entire confidence of the labor unions and served as treasurer for the Trades and Labor Assembly, and always took a very important part of all Labor Day celebrations held in this city. Mr. Schneider devoted much of his time to the labor movement, and was generally liked by all his friends and associates. He was also treasurer of the city of Alton and for a time a deputy of the city treasurer. He conducted a barber shop in the Spalding building on Belle street for many years, and was one of the best known men in the barber trade in Alton. Mr. Schneider was also a member of the Alton Fishing Club, and always took a very active part in the proceedings of this organization. He was willing at all times to help build up the club membership, and was always a booster for the welfare of the association. Since last March Mr. Schneider had been suffering from kidney trouble. Many times he was very low, but he would rally. Seven weeks ago he suffered a relapse and grew weaker rapidly until Sunday night when his death occurred. Although he was suffering from a very serious illness, he never gave up and bore his illness with patience. He served for two terms as city treasurer of Alton. He was a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Barbers Union. He was a devoted father and husband. He leaves his wife and two daughters, Mrs. Lewis Kopp and Miss Dorothy Schneider, and his little granddaughter, Betty Lee Kopp. He leaves also a brother, Hermann Schneider of St. Louis, and a sister, Mrs. Peter Wells of Miles Station. Mr. Schneider was one of the leading spirits in the Alton Fishing Club for a long time. He had been a devoted follower of the sport of fishing and whenever he had spare time he was sure to be seen with his fishing tackle, on the way to catch some fish. He was a very successful fisherman too. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home at 123 East Eighth street.

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SCHNELLE, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 23, 1908

The funeral of Charles Schnelle was held this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the home on College avenue, Rev. T. B. Frary officiated. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

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SCHOEFFEL, EDWARD F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 10, 1904

Edward F. Schoeffel, after several months' illness, died at 9 o'clock Tuesday night. Two surgical operations were performed during his illness, and after each his condition appeared to improve for a time. He was a well known young man and highly esteemed. He formerly conducted a meat market in this city, but of late years has been in the retail department of the George F. Kirsch company. He was 28 years of age and is survived by a wife and two children. His mother and other relatives live in Brighton.

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SCHOEFFLER, JOHN G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 23, 1918                 Civil War Veteran Dies

John G. Schoeffler, 75, died at his home, 735 East Sixth street, at 6 o'clock on Sunday afternoon, after an illness of one day. His wife died four months ago. Some time ago he suffered from a slight stroke of paralysis. This had been giving him a small amount of trouble but was not considered serious. Sunday morning he was taken to his bed, but it was not believed that his condition was serious until Sunday afternoon. He died at 6 o'clock. Mr. Schoeffler was the father of John W. Schoeffler, president of the Alton Board of Education. Mr. Schoeffler was born February 12, 1843, at Zweibruchen, Rheinish Bavaria. In 1856, he, the oldest of five children, came to the United States with his parents. They settled in Kentucky. Mr. Schoeffler was in the Civil War, fighting with the Union Army. After the war he came to Alton. For many years he was connected with the Quigley, Hopkins & Lee Wholesale Drug Co., and later with Quigley & Co. After this company retired from business he entered the transfer business, which he followed for fifteen years. Several years ago he retired. He was at one time a member of the Alton city council. He was a member of Irwin Lodge, A. F. & A. M., at the time it merged with the Franklin Lodge. He was also a member of the Benevolent Society. Mr. Schoeffler is survived by one brother, William, of Louisville; three sons, John W., August and Edward, all of Alton; two grandsons, Henry and Oscar; and one granddaughter, Miss Olga. Henry Schoeffler is serving in the United States navy. Efforts are being made to have him home for the funeral. The services will be conducted Wednesday afternoon from the home on East Sixth street.

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SCHOEFFLER, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JOHN G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 1, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. John G. Schoeffler was held at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon from the family residence and services were conducted by Rev. O. W. Haggemeier of the Evangelical Church. There was a large attendance at the funeral. The pall bearers were William Beiser, E. E. Zeller, O. T. Marshall, George Dick, Walter Fries, and Charles Gerner. Burial was in City Cemetery.

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SCHOENBERG, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 29, 1908

Peter Schoenberg, a well known glassblower, died at his home in East End Place this morning after a short illness, aged 32. He will be buried Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church. Schoenberg leaves only a wife.

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SCHOENBERGER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 22, 1907

The funeral of the late John Schoenberger was held today from the home, No. 914 east Third street, and was attended by a large number of friends and neighbors. The glassblowers were out in numbers and among the floral offerings was a beautiful design contributed by the glassblowers' union. Services were conducted by Rev. E. Mueller and burial was in City Cemetery.

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SCHOERRS, CONRAD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 18, 1903

Conrad Schoerrs, a well known farmer who lived in the vicinity of Edwardsville Crossing the past 50 years, died at his home Thursday night from the effects of a paralytic stroke sustained by him nearly two months ago. Mr. Schoerr was about was about 75 years of age, and when stricken hovered between life and death for several weeks. He took a change for the better a few weeks ago, and it was thought he would recover, but he suffered a relapse and his enfeebled condition caused the end to come speedily. He was a good man and neighbor, and had many friends throughout the county. He leaves a wife and a niece and nephew in this city. They are Charles and Miss Annie .... [unreadable]

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SCHOFIELD, HANNA L. (nee TEASDALE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 23, 1916             Old Time Resident of Upper Alton and Member of Prominent Family Dies

Mrs. Hannah L. Schofield, widow of Elijah Schofield, died Thursday morning at 7:45 o'clock at her old home at the corner of College and Worden avenues in Upper Alton. While Mrs. Schofield's condition had been serious at intervals since last week, her death this morning came unexpectedly. She had been a sufferer from asthma and last Friday she had an attack from this trouble, which almost caused her death at the time, but as she had done many times before, Mrs. Schofield fought a hard battle for her life and survived. For two or three days her neighbors and friends were gathered about her in the belief that the end was near, but the aged woman improved and was much better during the past few days. Last night Mrs. Schofield conversed with her nurse concerning the social the Baptist ladies had held yesterday at the church, and she was much interested and inquired into all the particulars of the affair. This morning she watched as usual for the arrival of the morning paper, and when it came she requested the nurse to read it to her. Her request that the morning paper be read was among the last words she uttered. Death came at 7:45 o'clock, and instead of Mrs. Schofield passing away in a smothering attack of asthma, as her friends feared she would at any time, she went quietly into a sleep and passed away peacefully. On account of the improved condition Mrs. Schofield had been in during the last two days her St. Louis relatives, who had been called here last week, had returned home for a short stay and none of them was in Alton at the time of her death this morning. Mrs. Schofield came to Upper Alton from New Jersey when she was 18 years old. She was the daughter of Rev. John Teasdale, one of the pioneer Baptist ministers of this section. He was pastor of the Third Baptist Church of St. Louis, an institution that has in latter years become one of the biggest churches of the country. The family located in the house on College avenue where Mrs. Schofield died this morning. There were five sons and two daughters in the family, one daughter, Mrs. Ellen Miller, having died many years ago in Upper Alton at her home across the street from the Teasdale place. One year ago last Thanksgiving one of the brothers, Bordman Teasdale of St. Louis, died. The remaining four brothers are living. Mrs. Schofield's death this morning at the age of almost 82 years was only the second death among the six children of the family. The four brothers surviving are: W. Carey Teasdale of St. Louis; Judson Teasdale of New York City; J. Warren Teasdale of St. Louis; and Salmon Teasdale of Arkansas. The family has been a prominent one, and the brothers are among the foremost business men of St. Louis and New York. W. C. Teasdale arrived from St. Louis at noon today, and the other brothers are on their way to Alton to attend the funeral of their sister. At the age of 30 Mrs. Schofield was married in St. Louis to Elijah Schofield. In her life she experienced tragic deaths in her family, both her husband and father being killed accidentally. Her husband was a half-brother of Major General Schofield, and he secured a position for Mr. Schofield in government business in the South following the close of the Civil War. He, with his wife, went to Richmond, Va., where he was to discharge the duties of his office. A dispute arose in Richmond as to whether the mayor of the city should be a Northerner or a Southerner. Finally the citizens decided to leave it to the court to decide, and when the trial was to be held the citizens of the place flocked to the court house to witness the trial that was attracting vital interest. When the house was filled with people, it collapsed, and many were killed. Mr. Schofield was one of the men fatally hurt. His death occurred just four years after he had been wedded to Miss Hanna Teasdale, and she never married again. Her father, Rev. John Teasdale, was killed when the Gasconade bridge in Missouri broke down with the first train that ever crossed it, and dropped the train into the river. The bridge had just been built, and a party of prominent men were to ride across it in a special train. The bridge timbers were sawed by miscreants, so that when the weight of the train came upon it the timbers broke where they had been partially sawed. Some years after her father's tragic death, Mrs. Schofield's mother died at the old home in Upper Alton. Mrs. Schofield returned to Upper Alton and made her home in the house ever since. She was away a time or two for several years, but this was her home all the time. Thirty-two years ago the wife of W. C. Teasdale of St. Louis died, leaving a family of five small children. Mrs. Schofield left her home and went to St. Louis where she took charge of her brother's family and raised the children. These five children are now scattered over the country. Miss Harriet Teasdale of St. Louis is one of them, and she has been attending her aunt. She returned to her home Sunday for a brief stay and was not here when the end came. She returned to Alton this morning upon hearing of Mrs. Schofield's death. In later years, since the family of W. C. Teasdale grew up, they spent the summer each year in Upper Alton at the home of their aunt. Mrs. Schofield was the oldest member of the Upper Alton Baptist Church. In looking up the records today, it was found that she joined this church in 1852. Her membership was transferred to other churches on two different occasions. In later years her membership was brought back to the Upper Alton church, and she died a member of this organization. She was one of the most interested workers in the church, and she attended the services as usual a week ago last Sunday. She would have been 82 years old in June, had she lived until that time, and in spite of her great age her mind was as clear as that of a child, and her interest in church work and in the general affairs of the public never decreased in the least. She had been a great reader of the daily papers a long number of years, and in this manner she kept in touch with the outside world, in politics, and was always right up to the times in everything. On Sundays if she was physically unable to attend the church services she always sent her contribution by someone who was going. In the neighborhood where she lived so many years she was loved as a mother by her neighbors. The news of Mrs. Schofield's death this morning brought a wave of sorrow over the eastern part of Upper Alton. The funeral arrangements will not be made until the relatives arrive in Alton. Burial will take place at Bellefontaine cemetery, and will probably occur Saturday.

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SCHOLLMEIER, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 10, 1914

Frank Schollmeier, aged 51, died Monday evening at his home, 549 east Ninth street, after an illness of seven weeks. He had been suffering for several years and was finally obliged to give up work. He had became a victim of a dropsical affection of the liver. Mr. Schollmeier was born in Alton and lived here all of his life. He worked at the old Alton box factory, and later he took a position as head carpenter for the Hapgood Plow Co. He was also employed by E. C. Mack and later at the Ginter-Wardein planing mill, until his failing health obliged him to give up active employment. He leaves his wife and five children - Henry, Matilda, Mary, Bertha and Elizabeth Schollmeier. He leaves no brothers or sisters. He was a member of the Modern Woodmen. Mr. Schollmeier's funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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SCHON, JOHN/Source: Troy Weekly Call, December 1, 1906/Submitted by Marsha Ensminger      Prominent Farmer Victim of Accident

John Schon, a prosperous and influential farmer and one of the best known residents in this section of the county, died Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock at his home two and one-half miles northwest of this city near the Edwardsville road. Mr. Schon's death was due to injuries received in an accident the day before while returning home from Edwardsville. He had been to the county seat on business and left there about 3:30 with his team and farm wagon. Just how far he had proceeded is not known exactly, but the supposition is that his team became frightened near Leclaire and ran away, throwing him from the wagon.  H. P. Stullken, who resides just out of Leclaire, but some distance from the road, saw the team going at a gallop but could see no driver. He gave the matter but passing thought until a short time after when the children coming home from school told there was a dead man down on the road. Mr. Stullken hurried to the place indicated and found Mr. Schon lying unconscious in a ditch and apparently in a dying condition. A Suburban electric express car, coming at the time, was stopped and the injured man was carried aboard and taken to the office of Dr. E. W. Fiegenbaum at Edwardsville. Mr. Schon was there restored to semi-consciousness and a thorough examination revealed three fractured ribs with the ends penetrating the lungs. There was also a deep scalp wound, besides minor cuts and bruises about the face, and internal injuries were deemed highly probable. The injured man was temporarily cared for by Dr. Fiegenbaum and the family was apprised of the accident. Fred and John Schon left for Edwardsville immediately and their father's condition at the time was such as not to cause grave alarm or apprehension and the removal of the patient to his home that evening was permitted. The team was afterwards found at the Wagner place, several miles from the scene of the accident. It had wandered from the main road and the wagon and harness were still intact. Dr. F. W. Braner of this city was called to the Schon home Wednesday evening to attend Mr. Schon, and found his injuries then bordering on a serious nature. His condition remained about stationary Thursday until 3 o'clock in the afternoon when death ensued rather suddenly, supposedly from heart failure or from an internal hemorrhage. The patient was conscious to the end but was unable to say just what caused the accident and that particular will probably remain unknown. Mr. Schon was born in Germany but came to this country at an early age and had resided nearly all his life in this immediate vicinity. By thrift and economy he acquired quite a competency, was a large land owner and farmed on an extensive scale. He was fair and square in his dealings, firm in conviction and, altogether possessed qualities which make and kept for him many friends who regret his sudden and tragic end. He is survived by a wife, three daughters, two sons, one grandchild and three brothers. The daughters are Minnie, wife of Fred Gerfen of this city, and Misses Anna and Louisa who reside at home. The sons are Fred and John, also at home. Henry, George and Herman Schon are brothers of the deceased. The funeral took place at 11 o'clock this morning at the Schon home, the service being conducted by Rev. G. Plassmann, formerly pastor of the German Evangelical church of this city, and interment was in Oaklawn cemetery.

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SCHOPPET, PHILIP/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 3, 1918

Philip Schoppet died at his home in Bethalto Sunday night, December 30, 1917. He was born in Germany, September 30, 1845. He grew to early manhood in his native town, and came to Alton in 1869. He moved to Bethalto in 1874. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary Kreig in August 1873. To this union were born four children, one dying in early infancy, and a son, John, who died February 13, 1908, leaving a widow and one small child. The mother died July 5, 1894. He was again married February11, 1896 to Mrs. A. Andrews. He leaves to mourn his death his widow, one daughter, Mrs. N. Schmidt of Alton, one son, Frank, of Bethalto, four grandchildren, one nephew of New Jersey, beside numerous distant relatives and friends. The funeral was held from the family home at 1:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.

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SCHORRS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 21, 1911        Skeleton of William Schorrs Found - Suicide is the Theory

The fleshless skeleton of William Schorrs was found Sunday afternoon in tall grass of what was once the bed of Grassy Lake, by Frank and Berthold Schmid, two of the sons of Berthold Schmid Sr., who were shot at by Schorrs on the afternoon of June 21 from ambush. Gus Schmid, the young man wounded by Schorrs at the time of the shooting, and who is recovering from the wound in his breast where a Springfield army rifle ball pierced his body, was not with the other two brothers when the skeleton was found. It was a strange fate that led the two brothers to the place where their assailant had ended his own life, and that they should find his skeleton and identify it, seems remarkable to all who learned about it. A price on his head, aggregating $700, $500 of which was offered by Berthold Schmid Sr., and the other $200 by a brother, John Schorrs of Sunbury, Iowa, who believed his brother could be vindicated by showing just cause for the shooting, William Schorrs, the fugitive, probably concluded to end his life rather than face trial on a charge of attempted murder and perhaps murder. He was supposed to have taken refuge in the tall grass and thicket that surround the lake, and it was known that if he was there, a desperate man, armed and ready to defend himself, his capture would be difficult. None of the county officers would make the attempt. Cards were sent out broadcast bearing his picture, and his escape would be very difficult. He disappeared completely, although what now appears to have been false information came from Fidelity that Schorrs had been seen there at the home of a relative. The finding of the skeleton Sunday afternoon came as an incident of a hunt for blackbirds on the part of the two Schmid brothers. They went armed everywhere since the shooting, as Schorrs had threatened to exterminate the family because Berthold Schmid Sr. refused to countenance the suit of Schorrs, for Miss Ida Schmid, who was a second cousin of Schorrs. The boys stumbled over the skeleton lying in grass that was man high, where water had formerly been two feet deep. The lake having been drained revealed the body. It is supposed that Schorrs, despairing of escaping, waded into the shallow water shot himself and then lay down in the water to drown if he did not kill himself instantly. His rifle was about five feet distant. All the flesh had disappeared. On the backbone of the body was lying a shell watch charm, which the boys identified as one Schorrs had owned. On the waist was a belt with a large metal buckle they also identified. In the pocket of the garments was a watch which the Schmid brothers did not touch, as they preferred to wait until Coroner Streeper had been called to take charge of the skeleton. However they were satisfied that the skeleton was that of the fugitive. Others who were called to the scene were satisfied of this also. Owing to the difficulty in getting to the place because of the tall grass and brush, the coroner did not go down until today. Ever since the shooting on June 21, the Schmid place has been guarded and members of the family in a state of terror. Someone was on guard against night attacks for a long time after the shooting, and it was feared Schorrs would return to work his vengeance on the family because of his failure to find favor for his courtship of Ida Schmid. Berthold Schmid Sr., the father, never relaxed his efforts to find Schorrs, and refused to converse about the matter with anyone. He heard reports several times of Schorrs being in various places. However the finding of the skeleton seems to set at rest all doubt of what really happened. The skeleton was about fifty yards from the wheat shock where Schorrs hid when he shot Gus Schmid from ambush on the afternoon of June 21. It is believed that Schorrs killed himself soon after he shot at his cousins, the fleshless condition of the bones indicating that death occurred long ago. There are some who think he may have gone away, and afterward returned to the scene of the shooting to fulfill his threatened vengeance, and that he found too strong a guard and that he, failing in his purpose, determined to end his life. coroner Streeper held an inquest Monday morning and a verdict of suicide was found. The body was positively identified further by a memorandum book containing Schorr's name, also that of his father, Jacob Schorr of Sunbury, Iowa, to whom the coroner sent a telegram asking instructions as to the disposition of the skeleton. The jury consisted of J. A. Hend, John Henry, Dr. L. L. Yerkes, Will Yenny, Al Dixon and R. F. Hoeckstra. The place where the body was found was about 100 feet from the old bank of the lake, and 50 feet from the water edge at present. It was lying in a mat of water lilies and willows. A hole in the skull showed where the ball had passed through. In the clothes was found 40 loaded cartridges, and four more were found in the handkerchief. They were forty-five calibre. The rifle lying under Schorr's leg had an empty shell in it. Richard Westerholt and E. F. Hoeckstra said that they heard a report of a gun after the shotting at the Schmid boys, and believed that was the shot that killed Schorrs.

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SCHOTT, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1903

Henry Schott, a well known farmer living between Upper and East Alton, died this afternoon after a long illness. He leaves a wife and three children, besides several brothers and sisters to mourn his death. One of his brothers is the noted Dr. Schott of St. Louis.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 26, 1903

Henry C. Schott, the Wood River farmer who died Wednesday afternoon, was born in St. Louis in May 1860, but he lived in Alton and vicinity nearly all his life, his parents moving here when he was a baby. He leaves a wife and five children; two brothers, Dr. A. H. Schott of St. Louis, and George W. Schott of Upper Alton; and two sisters, Mesdames Eliza Lowe and May Yost of Upper Alton. Mr. Schott was an industrious, charitable man and scrupulously honest. He was a good citizen, a kind husband, tender father and model neighbor, and no one knew him but to esteem and respect him. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home on the Milton road, and will be conducted under the auspices of Keen Kutter Kamp, Modern Woodmen of America. Interment will be in Oakwood Cemetery.

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SCHREIBER, CONRAD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 6, 1914

Conrad Schreiber, aged 53, died Saturday night at his home at 815 East Third street, after a lingering illness with dropsy. He leaves a wife and five children. Mr. Schreiber was a well known stone mason. The funeral was held this morning at 8:30 o'clock at St. Mary's church, and burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SCHREMBACHER, CHRISTOPHER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 21, 1912

Christopher Schrembecker, the 70 year old man who has been suffering at the Patterson hotel in East Alton with uraemic poisoning for the past two weeks, died at 12:30 p.m. today without regaining consciousness so that he could be asked about the sister who was referred to in the letters found in his room. The telegram sent by interested friends to Eliza Schrembecker was returned last night with the notation that there was no telegraphic station at _ilwood, Kas.  Coroner C. N. Streeper was notified to remove the body to his undertaking rooms in Upper Alton, where an effort will be made to locate his sister or any other relatives he may have. Schrembecker was believed to have considerable money saved up, but no one could be found today who knew anything definite about the amount, as Schrembecker was a very reticent man and told few persons about his business affairs.

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SCHROEDER, HERMAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1904

The trial of John Fechter, who was accused of murdering Herman Schroeder at the Alton tile works at East Alton a year ago, was set for Tuesday in the circuit court. Fechter had absolutely no defense to make. He admitted that he shot and killed Schroeder when first arrested. He admitted then the only provocation was a fight between himself and Schroeder, and that he laid in wait for his victim. An eyewitness of the shooting told a damaging story at the coroner's inquest, and as Fechter had no money to assist in making his defense, his attorneys were up against a hard proposition. To assist State's Attorney R. J. Brown, the former prosecutor, E. B. Glass was engaged. J. V. E. Marsh and E. C. Haagen were counsel for the defense. Fester would not plead guilty, and late this afternoon a jury was secured to try him. [Note: According to the Alton Evening Telegraph, Oct. 20, 1904, Fechter's punishment was a year's imprisonment at the penitentiary.]

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SCHROEDER, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 7, 1910

Mrs. Margaret Schroeder, aged 73, died at 2 o'clock this morning at the home of her brother, B. F. Day, 1721 Maupin avenue, after an illness with typhoid fever. The funeral will be held from the Day home on 1 o'clock Thursday afternoon. The body will be shipped to Jerseyville for burial.

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SCHUBERT, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1902

Mr. George Schubert, a prominent business man of Moro, died at 11:30 today. He had lived at Moro 25 years. His wife and one grown daughter survive him. Mr. Schubert was one of the wealthiest men of Moro, and leaves a very large estate. His death was due to blood poisoning resulting from a carbuncle on the back of his neck. He will be buried Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock.

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SCHUELLE, BERNARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 19, 1905

Bernard Schuelle, aged 84, and head of a well known Alton family, died Sunday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Andrew Ursch, on the Milton road, after a long illness. Mr. Schuelle had been sinking steadily for several months and once all the members of his family were summoned to attend him. He manifested a remarkable vitality, however, and would rally repeatedly, but the struggle finally told against him and he died peacefully Sunday afternoon. Mr. Schuelle was born in Germany, August 8, 1821. He came to Alton in 1853 and had lived in the city ever since. He was a carpenter by trade, and for many years was a well known builder of the city. He leaves five children, Mrs. Andrew Ursch, Mrs. Henry Miller, Joseph, Frank, and Henry Schuelle. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church.

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SCHUELLE, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 27, 1915

Mrs. Caroline Schuelle, wife of Contractor Henry Schuelle, died at the family home, 920 East Second street Saturday afternoon at 5 o'clock after an illness of five months with a cancerous trouble. She was 56 years of age. Her case had been very bad for several months, and her end was expected at any time during the past week. Mrs. Schuelle was a native of Alton. Her maiden name was Lampert, and she was married here and spent all of her life in Alton. She leaves beside her husband, Henry Schuelle, two children, Harry and Mamie Schuelle; also two sisters, Mrs. John Spaniel and Miss Mary Lampert; and one brother, John Lampert. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's Church.

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SCHUELLE, FRED (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1902

Capt. Fred Schuelle, the private night watchman and former police officer, died Thursday evening at 8 o'clock at St. Joseph's hospital where he had been since he was run over by the Chicago and Alton switch engine Sunday at midnight. His condition was thought to be somewhat improved yesterday morning, but paralysis had set in and his left side was affected. He sank steadily all day Thursday and breathed his last after 8 o'clock. Capt. Schuelle was well known in Alton. He was a member of the Alton police force many years and was a good officer. Of late years he had filled the position of private night watchman in the business part of the city and was known as a brave, cool-headed man. Mr. Schuelle was born in Hanover, Germany, August 24, 1846. He came to America in 1866, and to Alton in 1869, where he has lived continuously. He leaves a family of six children: Messrs. Conrad, Henry and Fred Schuelle, Mrs. Michael Knowles, Mrs. Peter Fitzgerald and Mrs. William Mohr. Deputy Coroner C. N. Streeper will hold an inquest Saturday morning at 9 o'clock and the funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Services will be conducted at the family home, and burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SCHUELLE, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 18, 1922

Henry Schuelle, well known Alton contractor and builder, died Sunday noon at his home, 433 East Third street, after an illness of six months from a complication of diseases. He had been in bad health for a much longer time. Mr. Schuelle was for years a well known builder in Alton, and had erected many homes for Alton people until he found it necessary to give up contracting. He was a carpenter by trade. He is survived by two children, Harry Schuelle and Mrs. Harry Vermillion, also by two sisters, Mrs. Andrew Ursch and Mrs. Theresa Miller, and two brothers, Joseph and Frank Schuelle. He was a resident of Alton all his life, and was a well known man. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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SCHUELLER, UNKNOWN DAUGHTER OF WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 5, 1903

Scarlet fever has invaded the homes of William and August Schueller in Mack's addition to Alton, and Tuesday night a 2 year old daughter of William Schueller died suddenly from the malady. The child was taken ill Tuesday morning, and Dr. Taphorn pronounced the illness scarlet fever. In the evening the child was taken with convulsions and died unexpectedly. The two families live in adjoining homes on Long avenue, and the fathers are brothers. In each family there is one case of the most virulent form of the disease.

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SCHUETTE, DOROTHY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 12, 1916

Mrs. Dorothy Schuette, wife of Joseph Schuette, died at her home in Euclid Place Friday evening at 11:30 o'clock after an illness of about 36 hours with pneumonia. Mrs. Schuette was taken down on Thursday and her great age made it impossible for her to withstand the ravages of the disease. She had lived in Alton about seven years. Her old home was at Bunker Hill, but she had been living in Alabama when she first came to Alton to live seven years ago. She had a wide acquaintance in the Bunker Hill neighborhood, and the body will be taken there for burial Monday. Mrs. Schuette was twice married. By her first husband she leaves two children, Mrs. Charles Habekost of Pana, and William Wohlert of Dorchester, Ill. She leaves four children by her second marriage. Chris and Ernest Schuette and Mrs. Fred Miller of Alton; August Schuette of Bethalto. Funeral services will be held at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Miller, 711 Linden Avenue, Sunday at 3 p.m., the body being taken to the daughter's home today. Monday morning the funeral party will leave for Bunker Hill, and services will be held in a Lutheran Church at Bunker Hill at 10 a.m.

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SCHUETTE, HENRIETTA/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 6, 1933                Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

Mrs. Henrietta Schuette, 83, resident ot Worden, died this morning at 3.30 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. W. Stoecker. Funeral services will be held Sunday at 1:30 .P. M. at the Stoecker residence followed by services at the Worden Lutheran Church, of which she was a member. Interment will be in the Lutheran Cemetery there. Mrs. Schuette was born Dec. 2, 1849 in Preusen, Germany. Her husband, the late William Schuette, preceded her in death in 1898. Surviving are two sons, Charles and Emil Schuette, Worden; two daughters, Mrs. William Ursprung, Sr, and Mrs. Fred W. Stoecker of Worden, 19 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren.

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SCHUETTER, ANTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 9, 1920

Anton Schuetter, a prominent farmer of Godfrey township, died at the Alton State Hospital this morning. He had suffered a breakdown due to advancing age, and a few days ago it became necessary to remove him from his home to the hospital. He had been a hard working man all his life, and a very successful farmer. He was the father of a large family of children. Mr. Schuetter, who had been a resident of Godfrey for 40 years, was born in France. He was 69 years old. He is survived by five daughters, a son and a brother. The son is Joseph H. of Godfrey, and the daughters are Mrs. Theresa Geiben of Portage De Sioux, Mrs. Mary Geiben of West Alton, and Elizabeth Anna, and Johanna, of Godfrey. The funeral will be at 10 o'clock Friday morning from the home at Godfrey to St. Mary's church, where Requiem Mass will be celebrated. Interment will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SCHUETTER, CHRISTIANA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 8, 1905

Mrs. Christiana Schutter, wife of Anton Schuetter, died at her home near Godfrey, Monday afternoon, in her 49th year. She had been ill three days from pneumonia. She leaves her husband and seven children. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning from St. Mary's church, and burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SCHULENBERG, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1904

Harry Schulenberg, aged 17, who has been an inmate of St. Joseph's hospital twelve years, died Sunday morning after a long illness. The boy was deserted by his parents when five years old, and he was taken to the hospital. He was a deformed child and a dwarf, being a constant sufferer from hip disease. The sisters in the hospital constituted themselves mothers for the abandoned child and gave him every care and attention he needed. They provided him with clothing and food, and tried to make his lot as happy as was possible under the circumstances. Sister Lizzie has had much to do in caring for the boy, and the other sisters did likewise. Sister Lizzie is now in St. Louis attending a retreat and cannot return until tomorrow. The funeral will be delayed until Wednesday morning at 8 o'clock when the poor, deformed body will be laid away in Greenwood cemetery after services in St. Patrick's church.

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SCHULER, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1906

Mrs. Caroline Schuler, aged 34, died last evening at 5 o'clock at her home on Long avenue after a long illness. She leaves her husband and four children. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and services will be conducted by Rev. Theodore Oberheilmann.

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SCHULL, UNKNOWN CHILD OF FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1903

The 7 month old child of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Schull was buried this morning in City Cemetery. Services were conducted at the home by Rev. H. K. Sanborne of the First Presbyterian church.

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SCHULLER, PAUL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 10, 1918

Paul Schuller, aged 21 years, died this morning at the family home, 1112 Long avenue. Schuller is survived by his father, mother, three brothers and three sisters. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

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SCHULTE, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 27, 1917

Mrs. Elizabeth Schulte, aged 48, died just before noon Friday, after a long illness. She was a long time resident of Alton and she leaves a family of five children: Edward and Joseph; Misses Agnes and Frances Schulte of Alton; and Sister Felicia of New Orleans. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock, the body to be taken from the home of her son, Edward Schulte.

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SCHULTE, HANNAH R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 17, 1910

Miss Hannah R. Schulte, aged fifty-three years, died Monday night at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Hull, 949 Union street, after a sickness of four days with erysipelas. The malady attacked her about the face and went to the brain, in spite of all that could be done to stay its progress. Miss Schulte was born here and lived all of her life in Alton and was well known and esteemed. She leaves two sisters, Mrs. E. T. Hull, with whom she made her home, and Mrs. J. P. Vissering of Melville. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 10 o'clock from the home to the City Cemetery, Rev. F. S. Eitelgeorge and Rev. G. L. Clark officiating. She was a member of the German Methodist church for many years.

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SCHULTE, UNKNOWN CHILDREN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 21, 1904

Another child of Mr. and Mrs. John Schulte of North street died this morning from cholera infantum, and this afternoon at 2 o'clock there was a double funeral from St. Mary's church, and the two bodies were buried in one grave at St. Joseph's cemetery. The funeral of the first child was to have been held yesterday, but was deferred because of the dangerous illness of the child which died this morning.

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SCHULZ, ANTOINETTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1904

Mrs. Antoinette Schulz, a member of a prominent Alton family, died Sunday morning at her home, 723 North street, after a long illness from bronchitis and heart disease. Mrs. Schulz was born in Westphalia, Germany in 1853. She came to America twenty-two years ago, and since her coming had lived in Alton. Eight children survive her: Bernard, Henry, John, William, Frederick, Joseph, Mrs. Henry Wardein and Miss Lizzie Schulz. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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SCHULZ, HENRY/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 11, 1895

Henry Schulz, a stone mason residing on North Street (Alton), died Tuesday at the family home from effects of injuries received in a fall the Friday evening previous. He was 37 years of age and leaves a widow and six children. The funeral took place Friday morning from St. Mary's church under the auspices of St. Boniface's branch of the Western Catholic Union, of which deceased was a member.

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SCHULZE, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 29, 1914

Frank Schulze of Wood River died suddenly yesterday afternoon at the County hospital, where he had been but a few days. The coroner's jury returned a verdict of death from alcoholism.

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SCHUSSLER, L. F. (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 14, 1908         

Dr. L. F. Schussler, aged 54, died at New Sharon, Iowa Friday morning at 2 o'clock. The news of the death of Dr. Schussler came in a telegram sent by his son, Dr. Hugh K. Schussler, who was with his father at the time of his death. Word received from Dr. Schussler after his arrival at New Sharon that he had stood the trip well and that he was feeling somewhat easier since he had reached the home of his sister where he was, as he said, "with home folks." His one desire was to be where he could receive the attention of his own blood relatives of which he had known so little for many years. He left Alton just one week before the date of his death, and when he departed he said farewell to all his friends who could see him. He knew well that he would never recover and that the remaining span of his life would be very brief. He was borne up with the greatest fortitude although he was suffering extreme pain. Before his departure he requested a representative of the Telegraph, a friend of his, who was calling upon him to note some facts about his life, as he remarked, "you will probably be wanting to know something about me very soon." Those who were present in the room at first did not realize the meaning of the remark, but gradually the consciousness dawned that the dying physician was dictating the important facts of his own obituary. He did it with all the calm and self-possession that he might have manifested in speaking of the end of some one who was not of his own people. He bore up bravely in the parting from his friends, except just before the train started to leave and he took the last look at the old city he had loved so well and had been his home for so many years. Tears came to his eyes and he could hardly speak, as he knew the parting was the last earthly one. Dr. Schussler was born in Warren county, Illinois May 30, 1850. He graduated from the Pharmacal college as a homeopathic physician in 1874. At the age of 37 years he received the decree of doctor of philosophy in Shurtleff college, and at the age of 41 he received the degree of doctor of laws. He was married in 1874. In 1885 he came to Alton to practice his profession and he remained in the city, holding a very lucrative practice until a few weeks ago when he was compelled to give it up and go to Chicago to have his malady diagnosed as he had feared, a cancer of the stomach and liver. He leaves one son, Dr. H. K. Schussler of Chicago, who was with him when he died. He was a member of the Masonic order and was serving in the position of Eminent Commander of Belvidere Commandery, Knights Templar, when he died. To fill this office was one of his greatest desires and the first meeting he was able to take the full part in the work was his last. He was suffering then and never served again. He had filled various offices in the Masonic bodies with great credit to himself. He was also a 32nd degree Mason and a Mystic Shriner. He was a member of the Baptist church. Dr. Schussler leaves beside his one son, two brothers, John Schussler, Lone Elm, Kansas; George Schussler of Monmouth, Illinois; also two sisters, Mrs. Lelitta Egerton of La Junta, Calif., and Mrs. Loftus Fox of New Sharon, Iowa. Dr. Schussler's death leaves a sad place in the hearts of his many friends and patients in Alton. He was a family friend to those who required his services and was very successful in his practice. Alone most of the time so far as his own people were concerned, he made many friends who were pleased to talk with him, as he was a man of much reading, and his mind was stored with facts which made him a ready talker. To those who knew him his death is no less a sad affliction, although it was expected. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at New Sharon. Burial will be there.

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SCHWAARBURG, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1917

Harry Schwaarberg of Alton died at St. Joseph's hospital Monday night following a surgical operation. The body will be sent to Springfield for burial. He was employed for many years at the Armstrong lime kilns.

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SCHWALLENSTICKER, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 2, 1922        "King Swanny" Dies

The death of Henry Schwallensticker, Sunday afternoon at St. Joseph's Hospital from paralysis, removes an old-time resident of Alton, and a character that was an interesting one. He had been suffering from partial paralysis for some time, and about a week ago he was stricken again and removed from his home on the river front to the hospital for treatment. He was 61 years of age. He was born in Franklin County, Mo., and had been a resident of Alton for 50 years. Schwallensticker was a dominant character, and when he took up his residence many years ago on the river front, he became a leader there, as he would have been anywhere else. He was conceded the title of "King," a title he wore all the time he was living there. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Julia Schwallensticker, and two daughters, Mrs. Cora Carlyle of East St. Louis, and Mrs. Sophia Stormer of 1921 East Fourth street. The funeral will be held from the home of Mrs. Stormer, 1021 [sic]  East Fourth street, tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock, and burial will be in City cemetery. Schwallensticker was a man of gigantic strength of body, as well as possessed of a dominating will.

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SCHWALLENSTICKER, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 31, 1919                Well Known Alton Stone Mason Dies at Paris, Missouri

Louis Schwallensticker, aged 64, was instantly killed at Paris, Mo., yesterday, by the collapse of a scaffold on which he was working, setting up some columns on a Presbyterian church. It was a difficult job he had undertaken, and the contract was awarded to him because of his skill in such work. The family were notified yesterday afternoon of the fatal accident, but no particulars could be obtained. The body was shipped to Alton this afternoon and it is probable that the funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, 1215 Exchange street. Louis Schwallensticker lived in Alton almost his entire life. He came here when a boy and was married here and reared his family. He was known as an expert worker in stone. In addition, he possessed mechanical skill of a remarkable character. He demonstrated this a few years ago when he took the parts of a dozen or more automobiles, amalgamated them into a sort of a composite automobile, and making some wonderful combinations produce a machine that would run and proved serviceable to him. He leaves his wife and five children, Mrs. Emma Kanard of Leesburg, Fla.; Mrs. Mayne Godfrey; and L. A. Alfred and Wintrhop.

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SCHWARTZ, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1914

Charles Schwartz, aged 60, died suddenly Tuesday evening at the home of his sister, Mrs. John Mischell of 518 East Ninth street. While Mr. Schwartz had been ill off and on for some time, not even the intimate members of the family expected his death. He has been ill since the first of March, but was much improved of late and it was thought that he would recover. Tuesday evening he seemed to be in the best of health, and spent the early part of the evening at the home of a neighbor. While he was preparing to retire for the night, he was taken with a spell and died within fifteen minutes. A doctor was summoned and arrived before his death. Mr. Schwartz was born in Alton and has lived here all his life. He died in the house directly across the street from the one in which he was born. He was the owner of a large amount of property in the eastern part of the city, and was very well known. He leaves two brothers, John Schwartz of Alton and Albert Warner of St. Louis; and one sister, Mrs. John Mischell. At present, Mrs. Mischell is visiting with relatives in Iowa. She has been notified of the death and will return home this evening. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

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SCHWARTZ, KATE (REVEREND MOTHER ANGELICA)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 2, 1913     Head of Ursuline Convent Dies From Heart Failure

Rev. Mother Angelica, mother superior of the Ursuline convent in Alton, was stricken with heart failure New Year's morning while dressing to attend the 6 o'clock morning mass, and died soon after being discovered. When she did not go to the mass, a visit was made to her room, and she was found lying on the floor, almost, if not quite, dead, and she was partly attired as if she had been preparing to attend to her morning devotions. Mother Angelica had been a member of the Ursuline sisterhood 33 years and had been mother superior of the convent seventeen months. She was 53 years of age. Her name was Kate Schwartz, and her home was Decatur, Ill., where she leaves four brothers and one sister. For 20 years she was a teacher in the Cathedral school. She was venerated and loved by all who knew her, and had been very prominent in the educational work of her order. she comes of a prominent family. The funeral will be tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from the Convent chapel.

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SCHWARTZ, NIC/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 19, 1918

The funeral of Nic Schwartz was held this morning from St. Mary's Church where a requiem mass was said by Rev. Father Brune in the presence of a gathering of relatives and church members who were his friends. Burial was in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

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SCHWARTZBECK, ANTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 19, 1914             Civil War Veteran Dies

Anton Schwartzbeck, a veteran of the Civil War and a resident of Alton for many years, died at 6:20 o'clock this morning at his home, 915 Harrison street, from pleurisy. Mr. Schwartzbeck was a native of Germany and was born in Baden June 13, 1836. He came to American in 1853, and resided a year at Boston, Mass., then came to Alton and had lived here ever since. He served with credit during the Civil War in the Union army. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Schwartzbeck, two sons, Louis and Henry E. Schwartzbeck, and four daughters, Mrs. Anna Rathmann, Mrs. Elizabeth Schuelle, Mrs. Mary Downing, and Miss Louise Schwartzbeck. He was a member of the Odd Fellows order, and the funeral services Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock will be under the auspices of that order. Rev. F. L Mueller will conduct the funeral services at the home.

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SCHWARTZBECK, BERTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1905

While the funeral ritual of the Court of Honor was being said at the funeral of Mrs. Bertha Schwartzbeck in the City Cemetery yesterday afternoon, Mrs. Thomas McDonald, a daughter of the deceased woman, fainted and remained in an unconscious condition for about three hours after being removed to the home on North street. A physician finally succeeded in restoring her to consciousness, but she is yet in a prostrated condition over the loss of her mother, to whom she was devotedly attached.

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SCHWARTZBECK, ERNEST/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 12, 1905

Mrs. Bertha Schwartzbeck, widow of Ernest Schwartzbeck, is dead at her home at 633 North street. She passed away at 7:30 o'clock Monday night after a long illness from diabetes. The deceased came to Alton about forty years ago and has resided here ever since, having enjoyed a wide acquaintance among residents of the city. She leaves four children, two daughters, Miss Bertha Schwartzbeck and Mrs. Thomas McDonald, and two sons, Anton and Walter Schwartzbeck. Mrs. Schwartzbeck made all funeral arrangements and divided her property before her death. The funeral will take place Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock from the home, and services will be conducted by Rev. S. D. McKinney of the Cherry Street Baptist church.

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SCHWARTZBECK, HENRY E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 7, 1916

Henry E. Schwartzbeck died at 10:45 o'clock Tuesday morning at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schwartzbeck, at 1001 Washington avenue. He would have been 28 years old on the 3rd day of next June. For eight weeks the relatives of the young man had waited for him to die as they were aware that medical science was helpless to do anything for him. He did not know this himself and up to Sunday morning he had maintained every hope that he was on the way toward recovery. The case of Henry Schwartzbeck has attracted general interest in Alton. His case was a most trying one to the relatives and immediate members of his family because he was satisfied he was getting better while all others knew that each day was bringing his death nearer and nearer. He had been an unusually healthy young man all this life and up to last September when his trouble first began he was strong and well. On September 20th he underwent a surgical operation at St. Joseph's hospital for the removal of a small tumor that was giving him trouble. The operation at the time was not considered a serious one and the young man recovered from it steadily, and was soon back to his work. However, the ordeal had been trying on him, and he continued to worry a great deal on account of his condition. It was not long afterward that it became evident another growth of some kind was making its way about his vital organs and after consulting many medical authorities an operation was finally decided upon. Mr. Schwartzbeck went to the hospital and made ready for the operation, which a number of prominent surgeons were to attend and it was performed on Saturday, January 15, almost eight weeks ago. The incision at the operation disclosed the fact to the surgeons that medical science could accomplish nothing that would benefit the young man, and they did not proceed further with the operation. He was sent to the home of his parents soon afterward, but he never knew that the real purpose of the operation was not carried out and he lived during the next seven weeks in the hope that the operation had been beneficial to him and he was recovering gradually. A serum treatment was used as a last resort in an effort to destroy the deadly growth that was rapidly taking the life of the young man, but this treatment failed also. Sunday morning Mr. Schwartzbeck told the nurse that had been attending him all through his sickness that he was going to die. He maintained consciousness up to this morning about 8 o'clock. He talked some after that time but he did not recognize members of the family after that time. Fifteen minutes before eleven o'clock he passed away. Henry Schwartzbeck was one of the best known young men in the city of Alton. During the weeks he lingered telephone calls poured into the Schwartzbeck home every day from people who were deeply interested in him and whose sympathy for the father and mother of the young man, for his wife and two little children, was great. He was born in Upper Alton and had been brought up there. He was a very bright boy and his record at school was always the very best in all his studies. He attended the Upper Alton public school from the first grade up to the junior year in high school, when he left to enter a business college. He completed his business education eight years ago in Alton, just at the time the big plant of the Standard Oil Company was finished at Wood River, and he took a position in the office of the company and remained in that position up to the time his health failed in January. When a little boy Henry Schwartzbeck displayed great talent for music. His parents gave him a musical education and he became one of the best musicians Alton ever produced. He confined his musical talent almost exclusively to the piano and when a very small boy he played the piano at the Upper Alton public school almost every day for the marching of the scholars and his playing at such an age attracted much attention. Later on he became notied in Alton and in the surrounding towns as one of the best piano players in the vicinity, and his services in orchestra work were always in demand. Other musicians liked to play when Henry Schwartzbeck played the piano, because he played his part correctly. He was married on May 25, 1911 to Miss Mae Krinard of Bunker Hill, and she, with two children, survive. He also leaves his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schwartzbeck, and three brothers, Edward, Arthur and Elmer Schwartzbeck. The four brothers composed the Schwartzbeck orchestra, which had become one of the most popular musical organizations in the city, but the death of the oldest brother today leaves a vacancy in this family organization that cannot be filled. Henry was a member of the musicians' union, and was also a member of the Alton Eagles. About two years ago he purchased a home on Phinney avenue, where he and his little family lived until his sickness commenced in January. When leaving the hospital he wanted to be taken back to his parents' home in Upper Alton, and there he spent the closing days of his life. The funeral arrangements had not been made as of this afternoon.  [March 9, 1916 - Burial was in City Cemetery.]

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SCHWARZ, CHARLOTTE S. (nee RINNE)/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, February 1, 1893

Mrs. Charlotte S. Schwarz, wife of Christian M. Schwarz, died Thursday night [Jan. 26] at 11:45 o'clock, at the family residence on Fillmore and Schwarz streets, aged 55 years, 9 months and 18 days. She had been suffering with a chronic disease for several years, but was to appearances getting better, until last week when she was stricken with paralysis, which terminated in her death. Charlotte S. Schwarz was born in Stadthagen, Germany, April 8, 1837. She was the oldest daughter of Capt. Wilhelm F. Rinne. She came to this country with the family in 1845 and resided in or near Edwardsville since. Of the seven children of the family, only three survive her, viz: Mrs. James Whitbread, Mary E. Rinne and Henry W. Rinne. She was married to Christian M. Schwarz, September 30, 1858. They improved and lived up to within a year on the Oak Hill farm, near Edwardsville, when they erected a home and removed to the city to spend the remainder of their days. Of seven children, two died in infancy, five survive, viz: Laura S., William C., George C., Emma L., and Elmer H. The funeral took place Sunday afternoon. The remains rested in a casket in the parlor of her home. Around and above it were the floral tributes of friends, the last mark of respect that could be given her on earth. Among them was a design of gates ajar of roses and lilies of the valley, a cross of roses and harrist lilies, an anchor of roses and hyacinths, a pillow of roses and calla lilies and numerous sprays of roses and hyacinths. But a more eloquent testimonial of esteem in which the deceased was held by the general public was the large number who had assembled to attend the services and follow the remains to the grave. The services were conducted by Rev. J. C. Daw, and were simple. After these the remains were placed in charge of the pallbearers, Messrs. F. W. and A. P. Wolf, T. P. Dooling, R. F. Tunnell, henry J. Springer and Henry Trares. The funeral cortege then wended its way sadly to beautiful Woodlawn cemetery, where all that was mortal was consigned to mother earth. Mrs. Schwarz found her greatest pleasure in performing with fidelity the obligations which family and society impose. With a simplicity in life and manners she had a singleness of purpose to discharge sacredly her duties as wife and mother. Her sympathetic nature endeared her to all with whom she came in close relation. She made friends of old and young and her memory will be cherished long and tenderly.

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SCHWEGEL, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 22, 1916

Clarence, the 2 1/2 years old child of Mr. and Mrs. Nic Schwegel died Sunday morning at 3:30 o'clock at the family home. Burial was this afternoon in St. Joseph's Cemetery, after services at 2 o'clock in St. Mary's Church.

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SCHWEGEL, NICHOLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 20, 1906

Nicholas, the 6 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Schwegel, died at the family home in Yager park yesterday afternoon, after an illness with typhoid fever and rheumatism. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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SCHWEGEL, NICHOLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 7, 1920           Well Known Business Man Dies

Nicholas Schwegel, well known business man, died this morning at 11:30 o'clock after an illness of 18 months at his home, 1403 Main street. He was 45 years of age. Mr. Schwegel was in the butcher business in Alton for twenty-two years. When ill health made it necessary, he gave up active participation in the business he had conducted. He leaves his wife and five children, also a brother, Peter Schwegel, in Alton, and two sisters and a brother in Germany. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church, and burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SCHWEPPE, HENRY RAND/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, May 29, 1899                  Son of Alton merchant

The terrible news was flashed over the wires Sunday afternoon that Rand Schweppe had been killed in a railroad wreck on the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern at Waterloo, Iowa, early Sunday morning. The dispatch received here was from a surgeon and said briefly: "Tell H. M. Schweppe H. R. Schweppe is dead here." The awful truth of the dispatch was beyond realization and found no one who could believe the message true. A message was sent to Waterloo inquiring further particulars, and the reply was that he was one of eight passengers killed in a wreck of a Burlington train at that place, early Sunday morning. He was not instantly killed, the dispatch said, but died at 8 o'clock Sunday morning in a hospital. He lived long enough to ask that a message be sent to his father and also to his friends in Minneapolis whom he was going to visit. Rand left Alton at noon Saturday for Minneapolis to spend a few days with friends there. He told only a few of his most intimate friends that he was going and the news that he had been killed at Waterloo, Iowa, was not at first believed by those who had seen him on the street Saturday morning. Further details of the terrible catastrophe are that the Burlington train was wrecked at Waterloo by a washout, caused by a cloudburst. The railroad crosses Sink creek, near Waterloo, on a massive stone culvert. The cloudburst caused the creek to overflow far out of its banks. The water did not affect the stone culvert but it washed out the ballast at the approach leaving spaces of twenty-five feet where the track was unsupported. The engineer had no means of knowing the condition of the track and the train dashed on to its ruin. The engine crew jumped when the engine lurched and escaped with slight injuries. The whole train was derailed and thrown into the ditch and the cars were piled up in a confused heap. Dispatches from there say: "The mail car tipped over and was telescoped by the baggage car behind, while the rear end of the baggage car telescoped the smoker. The roof of the sleeper plowed its way through the day coach, while the lower half of the latter crushed through the sleeper." Nine people were killed and of this number was Rand Schweppe. He was taken from the wreckage of the sleeper, bleeding and mangled, but still living. His head was frightfully cut and from the first it was evident he could not survive. It was impossible to notify his parents until Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock when the worst had taken place. When he was taken from the wreck his first words showed his thoughtful nature when he asked that his father and friends be notified, but no more. He wanted to keep them from worrying over him until his condition was known. Death came at 8 o'clock Sunday morning and ended his suffering. On Saturday at noon, Henry Rand Schweppe left him home in this city full of life, manly vigor, and beauty, anticipating the pleasure of a visit with friends in Minneapolis for a few days. This afternoon at three o'clock his lifeless body was brought back to his home, the lips that uttered nothing but pleasant words, still; the bright eyes that beamed joyous mirth and pleasure closed in death, and the high hopes of parents, relatives and a host of friends dashed to the ground. Perhaps never before has such a shock come to Alton as came yesterday evening in the announcement that Rand Schweppe had lost his life in a railroad accident near Waterloo, Iowa, early Sunday morning. Everyone who knew Rand admired and loved him. His bright, happy face made him friends everywhere, and his genial and affable manners were always pleasant to see. His magnificent physique - tall, graceful, proportioned like an Apollo - attracted attention always. To know Rand Schweppe was to become a sincere and devoted admirer, and, to count him among your friends. Of excellent habits, high character, and loyal to his friends, it was little wonder that the announcement of his death brought a shock of pain to all hearts and tears to many eyes beside those of his nearest relatives. No family in Alton ever had more sincere sympathy than Mr. and Mrs. Schweppe, and the sister and brother, so rudely bereft of his companionship. We shall see his familiar form no more upon the streets of Alton; no more we shall hear his genial greeting, but his memory and his kind words and deeds and his sincere and warm friendship will be treasured in the long years to come. A sweet, true spirit has gone, just as it had lit its taper for the journey of life, ere it had known the sad awakenings which frequently come in the pathway of human progress. May the parents and family be solaced by the thoughts of the brave young life that has passed away into an immortal day. Henry Rand Schweppe was the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Schweppe. He was born in Alton October 1875, and was in his 24th year at his death. Alton has been his residence during his entire life, except a few months of last year, when he resided in Minneapolis, from which place he returned after the accident he met with there in January. The train bearing the body was met at West Alton by a party of the Black Hawk boys and by L. F. Schussler, Dr. H. K. Schussler and A. J. Howell. The body arrived in Alton today over the "K" at 8:20 p.m., and was immeidately taken to Howell's undertaking establishment, where it was prepared for burial in the presence of Mr. L. F. and H. K. Schussler and Dr. Brown, who accompanied the body from Waterloo. The funeral will take place Wednesday. The hour will be stated tomorrow.

 

SCHWEPPE, RAND/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Wednesday, May 31, 1899

Today at 10 o'clock, loving friends tenderly performed the last offices of respect for Rand Schweppe and laid him away in his narrow couch for the last, long rest that is the human lot. It was hard to part with Rand, and the feeling of regret that pervaded every heart was shown at the services in the darkened home. The home was filled with Rand's friends of all ages at the funeral hour, and not one was present but felt that the death of the universal favorite had left a blank in the hearts and affections that nothing but time in its long, long course could fill. There was not a dry eye in the house. Strong men tried hard to repress a show of grief, but the gathering tear-drop in the eye could not be kept back, while hearts ached so for one who had gone forever. Rev. George Gebauer of the Unitarian church conducted the solemn services at the home. His scriptural selections were impressive and the prayer offered at the close was a combined tribute to the memory of the departed and consolation to the family. Rand's life he said, was not lost. Some good must come from it. While it was hard to see in the heavy affliction what good was intended, still the human mind might faintly see some great design in it. Rand's memory would be one for his friends to cherish and would live with them to the end. Miss Lila Haskell, of Monticello Seminary, sang feelingly the beautiful "Good-Bye, Sweet Day," that brought tears from many an eye as the meaning of the words in connection with the occasion was fully realized. The face was not uncovered after 9 o'clock, but up to that time all of Rand's friends could see him. The casket was borne from the house by six members of the Black Hawk Club, who claimed the mournful privilege of bearing their dead companion to the grave, and laying it away in its last sleep. The bearers were Clark McAdams, Edwin Duffield, John McAdams, H. K. Schussler, H. H. Hewitt, and John Pfeiffenberger. At the cemetery the service was by Rev. H. M. Chittenden of St. Paul's Episcopal church. There were evidences of what loving hands had done. The girls of the Black Hawks had claimed the privilege of lining the grave with green and flowers and each wore a rose to cast into the grave. The ritual of the Episcopal church was read. The Arion Quartette sang "In the Sweet Bye and Bye."  It was one of the largest funerals ever known in Alton. Among those who came from out of the city to attend were Mr. and Mrs. Will Schweppe, Will Schweppe Jr., Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Garvin, Frank Garvin, Mrs. George A. Bayle, Miss Hallie Bayle, Miss Mary Wallace, Dr. C. Tuckett of St. Louis, Mrs. William Tindall of Washington, D. C., Mr. and Mrs. Max Sterm of Chicago, Miss Alice Wood of Minneapolis.  Mrs. Crocker, who has been in Washington, was present also.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 1, 1899

Mr. H. M. Schweppe has been notified that part of the property which his son, Rand, has at the time of the railroad wreck, in which he was fatally injured, and which had not been recovered, had been found and will be sent home. After the wreck, ghouls went through the pockets of the dead and badly injured victims and stole all the valuables they could find. The train crew was killed or so severely injured as to be unable to look after the safety of the property of the injured passengers and the thefts were due to this fact. Mr. Clark McAdams has gone to Waterloo to see the people who cared for Rand, and from them learn anything they know of his last moments.

 

[Note: Rand's father, Henry M. Schweppe, owned and operated a clothier shop at 117 W. Third, Alton.]

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SCHWEPPE, WILLIAM E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1923          Dies at Illini Hotel Within Short Distance of Where He Was Born

William E. Schweppe, retired business man, one of the oldest native residents of Alton, died this morning at 2 o'clock at the Illini Hotel where he had been making his home for a long time. His death was due to a general breakdown from old age. He was in his seventy-sixth year. His health had been bad for a long time and for about a year he had not been out of the hotel. His death had been expected for weeks, and members of his family had been here with him. The sons gathered at Alton from opposite sides of the continent. Some came from New York and one came from Los Angeles. Two daughters are in Europe and were advised while there that their father was very low, and they could hardly arrive here in time to be present before his death. Some of the sons, having come to see their father, were forced by business affairs to return to their homes. One of them residing in California has been called home, departing Wednesday night for Los Angeles, and probably will not be here at the funeral. Mr. Schweppe was born in Alton in a house which formerly stood on the site of the Alton Evening Telegraph office, October 13, 1846. He lived here and was in business until he was 26 years of age, when he moved to St. Louis. He organized the Schweppe Grocery Co. in St. Louis, of which he was the head for many years. He retired from business in 1917, and since that time he has traveled about much but he considered Alton his home. He leaves five sons: W. H. Schweppe of New York; Richard J. of Los Angeles; C. H. of Chicago; E. P., Courtney B. of New York; and two daughters, Mrs. George Schneller of New Haven, Conn., and Miss Virginia Schweppe of New York. Mr. Schweppe never lost interest in his native city, and when he no longer was in business his desire was to be back here where he could be close to his brother, H. M. Schweppe, and be with some of his old friends. "I want to be in Alton where I know somebody," he is quoted as having told his brother in writing, that he intended to come back here to stay. It was like coming back home for him, and he picked up many new friends to take the place of the many who had died or moved away, and it was not long after he returned before the kindly, courteous gentleman had again surrounded himself with a group of good friends who were very much younger than he. He was the soul of courtesy and a delightful man to know. He was a man of great talent as a musician. In his younger days he played the pipe organ in some of the Alton churches and he was frequently in demand to help out in giving musical programs. He had an artistic nature which found expression in music chiefly. It was an interesting fact about Mr. Schweppe that he came back to Alton to die as close as he possibly could to the place where he was born, and his death did occur within less than 75 feet of the exact spot that was his birthplace. It was as he had desired it should be, and had doubtless planned.

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SCHWERBERGER, MARY KATHARINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1909

Mrs. Mary Katharine Schwerberger, one of the oldest residents of Madison county, died Sunday afternoon at the home of her son-in-law, Tobias Hahnenkamp, in Ft. Russell township near Moro. She was born in Germany in 1821, and came to Ft. Russell township in 1860 with her husband, William Schwerberger, who died in 1890. One daughter and several grandchildren and great grandchildren survive. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from the Moro Evangelical church, where services were conducted by Rev. William Laatch. Burial was in the cemetery surrounding the church. A very large number of acquaintances, neighbors and friends attended the obsequies.

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SCOLLARD, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 17, 1908             14 Year Old Succumbs to Heart Troubles

Clarence, the 14 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Scollard of East Alton was found dead in bed by his mother at about 8 o'clock this morning, just a few minutes before she had dressed and was ready to come to Alton in company with her guest, Mrs. Mary Grace of Dallas, Texas, to spend the forenoon. Clarence had always suffered with heart trouble, but never at any time seemed to be seriously inconvenienced by the disease. He was in the best of health all day Sunday and stayed up late Sunday night with a company of friends at the Scollard home and played on the piano and sang. At 5 o'clock his father arose and the boy leaned and patted him on the cheek and said, "Goodbye, papa."  Mrs. Scollard and Mrs. Grace, the only other two persons in the house, arose about 7 o'clock, and noticing the boy did not get up remarked how soundly he slept. They concluded to let him sleep and passed back and forth through the room several times during the morning without being aware of any trouble. Both ladies even assisted each other in dressing before a large mirror in the room, and on being ready to depart, Mrs. Scollard noticed that the boy's foot protruded from under the sheet. As she went to move the foot over, the body was stiff. With a hysterical shriek the two women rushed out into the front yard and told the neighbors to order a physician. Drs. Pence and Taphorn responded, but the boy had been dead over an hour. An inquest will have to be held by Coroner Streeper. The funeral arrangements have not been made.  Clarence had regularly attended the St. Patrick's parochial school in Alton and was also a member of St. Patrick's church, from which church the funeral will probably be held. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Scollard, and the parents are grief stricken over his sudden and unexpected death.

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SCOTT, EDNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 28, 1915            Woman Killed at Wood River by Train

Mrs. Edna Scott was instantly killed this afternoon by the Big Four Flyer at the North Wood River crossing. She stepped in front of the train, in her confusion, when she heard the train whistle. Engineer Wright saw her about to step on the Big Four track from the Illinois Terminal track and he sounded a warning blast. Instead of staying where she was and would have been safe, she jumped in front of the Flyer and was ground to death. Her body was picked up and taken to the Big Four depot, where it was held until the coroner's undertaker, John Berner, could take charge of it. The only means of identification that was visible was a card in the pocket book, a receipt given by the American Express Co., for a money order payable to the Roman Oil Portrait Co., and bearing the address 2721 College avenue, indicated that the woman was an Upper Alton woman. However, investigation disclosed that Mrs. Rose Lookeba lived at that address and she said she knew no one by the name of Scott who had lived at that address, as she had lived there for a number of years herself. Beside the address and receipt there was found a ladies' gold watch and fifty cents in money. Inquiry around Wood River failed to reveal what was the business of the woman in the village. Charles Vermillion identified the body as that of Mrs. Edna Scott, wife of Charles F. Scott, former steward of the Loyal Order of Moose Club at Alton. Scott is said to be in East St. Louis now. Mr. Vermillion had lived next door to the Scott family, and knew Mrs. Scott well....He said he thought she was about 31 or 32 years of age, and had no children. Efforts were being made to find her husband. It was said that Mrs. Scott had been trying to earn some money by acting as agent for a portrait house, for which she took orders.....Recently Scott went to St. Louis to take a position with his brother, who has a saloon and meat market at 2771 Caroline avenue, St. Louis. The wife did not go along, it is said, because of her prejudice against her husband's business and she was trying to earn a living for herself. She was slightly deaf.

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SCOTT, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 11, 1919

Mrs. Elizabeth Scott, aged 79 years, died Monday afternoon at 4:20 o'clock at her home in Bethalto, where she has resided for 52 years. The aged woman has been in poor health for several years, but was bedfast for just two weeks prior to her death. She was well known in Alton, having visited here frequently as the guest of her son, Henry E. Scott and his family, who reside on Lawton street. Besides her son, Henry E., Mrs. Scott is survived by another son, Everett J., of Bethalto, and one daughter, Mrs. Lulu Starkey of Monica, California. She also leaves four grandchildren, Harry Scott, Miss Mildred Scott, Mrs. Fay Scott Southard, all of Alton, and Miss Ethel Starkey of California. Mrs. Scott was a member of the Bethalto Presbyterian church, and until her illness prevented her attendance at meetings, she was very active in all church work. Up until a very short time ago, she continued teaching a class in the Presbyterian Sunday School. She was also active in civic improvement work in the village. The funeral will be held at the Bethalto Presbyterian church on Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. Gilchrist of Moro, and pastor of the Bethalto church, will officiate.

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SCOTT, IDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1903

Mrs. Ida Scott, who died on Hamilton street several days ago, was buried yesterday afternoon in Milton cemetery. Rev. W. F. Isler, of the German Methodist church, conducted the services.

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SCOTT, LIZZIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 10, 1905            Well Known Colored Resident of Alton Dies at Great Age

Mrs. Lizzie Scott, widow of Jacob Scott, one of the best known and most respected colored residents of Alton, died at her home, 1708 Piasa street, Thursday afternoon after a long illness. Mrs. Scott was engaged for many years as a nurse, and she served in many of the best homes in Alton. Her services were always in demand whenever any social events of importance were to take place, and she had sincere friends among the people for whom she worked for many years. Her husband, too, was a highly respected resident of Alton, and at the time of his death he was mourned by many friends too. Mrs. Scott was a quiet, unassuming woman who always did her best whatever she was called upon to do. She had lived in Alton more than fifty years. Mrs. Scott was born in Frederick, Maryland, and was over 84 years of age. She came to Alton in the ante-bellum days [before the Civil War], and it is related by old acquaintances that at one time, before the Civil War, when a fugitive slave came to Alton and was captured here, the citizens of Alton made up a purse to buy the freedom of the fugitive, who was a woman. Mrs. Scott, who was then working as a domestic in the family of the late Dr. B. K. Hart, had saved some money and she contributed $100 toward the fund to buy the slave woman's freedom. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1905

The funeral of Mrs. Lizzie Scott was held this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from her late home on Piasa street.  Rev. J. H. Barton assisted by Elder Samuel McCrosky, conducted the funeral services. There was a large attendance at the funeral. Burial was in City Cemetery.

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SCOTT, M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 5, 1916

While Frank Scott, living five miles north of Upper Alton in Fosterburg township, was in Alton Friday attending to some business matters, his aged mother, Mrs. M. Scott, died at their home. Mr. Scott said that his mother had not been feeling very well, but though she was 80 years of age her illness did not seem enough to detain her son at home. The mother was evidently stricken very suddenly and must have died soon after her son left the house, as he found her dead when he arrived home and death had taken place some time before.

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SCOTT, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1907

Miss Minnie Scott, aged 24 years, died this morning at the family home in East Alton from consumption. She leaves her mother, two sisters, and three brothers. The funeral will be Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the home.

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SCOTT, WADE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 16, 1904         Burned to Death in House

Wade Scott, aged about 80, was burned to death, it is supposed, in his dwelling in Upper Alton about 9 o'clock Wednesday morning. The house was destroyed and most of its contents in it. When the discovery of fire was made, Scott had been burned to death, and there is no possibility of determining whether or not the man was first killed and the house then set on fire, or whether he really was burned to death while lying helpless in bed. No one was at home with him at the time the fire broke out, his wife being out according to her custom, earning a living for herself and husband. Mrs. Scott is a white woman. About six or eight years ago Scott was attacked by someone in his house at night and his throat was cut so that he almost died at the time, and although he lived, he never fully recovered from the injury. He was always helpless after his experience with the person who cut his throat, and he would never tell who it was that attacked him, if he really knew. He was partially paralyzed and is said to have seldom left his bed. About ten o'clock fire was discovered in the dwelling, which is situated in the northeast corner of the village in Salu addition, near the C. and A. railroad. The fire seems to have started in Scott's room, as that part of the house was destroyed when help arrived and Scott was dead. There is a deep mystery in Upper Alton over the burning of Scott, and some of his friends and neighbors are inclined to believe that there was foul play, as the old man was unable to help himself. Mr. C. N. Streeper took charge of the body and will prepare it for burial. Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer held an inquest over the body of Scott Wednesday morning. Mrs. Scott testified that she had been away from the house only about five minutes, having gone to get a bucket of water. She says she had cautioned her husband not to get out of bed, as he was unable to walk. Before she returned to the house, neighbors discovered the place in flames. Mrs. Scott testified her husband is 45 years old, but acquaintances of the man say that he was over 80. The wife pleads ignorance of the cause of the fire. The jury found a verdict of death from burning, and found further that the fire was due to unknown causes. The funeral will be held tomorrow.

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SCOTT, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 12, 1912

Coroner J. M. Sims of Collinsville Wednesday came to Alton to hold an inquest over William Scott, who was killed by a fall from the loft of the Lemp brewery barn at Second and Cherry streets, while drunk. Evidence of witnesses at the inquest indicated Scott had been helping to consume two kegs of beer during the afternoon and was in a bad way. He had been sleeping for a month in the loft over the stable, because he did not have the money to pay a board bill. He owed his boarding mistress for ten months board, it was stated at the inquest, and he leave no estate to pay the bill. Scott's long line of credit, when he worked but seldom, caused the coroner's jury to marvel somewhat that one so short of industry should have such a good credit. Witnesses testified that while Scott was unable to walk alone, he did succeed in climbing up a ladder into the loft, and that he must have fallen there from afterward. The jury found a verdict of death from accidental fall. The body will be shipped this evening to Carnegie, Pa., accompanied by Walter Day as the representative of the Glassblowers Union. In connection with this inquest, Coroner Sims notified the undertakers they must refrain from embalming a body until after the coroner was through with it, and he warned that he would hold undertakers to a strict accountability for failing to observe his orders.

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SCOTT, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1915

William Scott, aged 80, was found dead in bed at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Thomas W. Burns, 1301 State street, Sunday morning, and it was supposed that paralysis had caused his death. The aged man had risen in the early hours, about 3 o'clock, dressed himself, and then had lain down on the bed fully clad and was stricken with paralysis. Four years ago he suffered his first stroke on his right side. Two years later his disability was completed by his left side being affected. Then he began to recover some use of his limbs and he was able to get around the house using two canes. He had been almost helpless for a long time. Mr. Scott was for forty years a resident of Chesterfield, and a prosperous farmer. He came to Alton to live with his daughter when his health failed him. He leaves beside the one daughters, Mrs. Burns, three sons - William Scott; T. A. Scott; and Arthur Scott. The coroner's jury found a verdict of death from paralysis. The body will be taken to Chesterfield tomorrow morning for burial after brief services have been held at the daughters' home. Funeral services will be held at Chesterfield.

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SCOVELL, ALLEN T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 18, 1910

Allen T. Scovell, familiarly known to a large circle of friends as "Dad," died this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frank Loehr, after an illness of five months. His death had been looked for a long time, and during the past few weeks was expected to occur at almost any minute. He had been sinking slowly, although it appeared there was very little way for him to go before dissolution would set in. During his long illness his condition has been watched with great interest by his many friends. He was a genial man, possessed of a disposition that made for him hosts of friends, and wherever he was there was always good humor. He was a story teller, and enlivened his stories with a dry wit that made his presence much enjoyed. He was known for his honesty and unswerving fidelity to any trust. He was prominent in Masonic circles and held high positions in Franklin lodge and chapter of the Masonic order. during many years he served as a driver on the old horse cars in Alton, and later held a position as a conductor on the electric cars. He was given a place as track foreman for the street railway company a number of years ago, and he held the place until illness disabled him. Last summer he became very sick and it was thought then he might die. He recovered enough to be able to get out, but late in the fall he had a relapse and he never got well again. His death occurred at his only child's home, where he was given the most faithful attention. He had two other daughters, but both are dead, and his wife also is dead. He leaves two brothers, William of Alton and Alexander of Upper Alton, and a sister, Mrs. Mary Hindle. Mr. Scovell was born in Iowa, and was 65 years of age. He was taken to Upper Alton when he was 2 years old and resided there the remainder of his life. The time of the funeral is not set, but it will probably be Sunday afternoon from the Upper Alton Methodist church, and the services at Oakwood cemetery will be under Masonic auspices.

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SCRAIGGS, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1902

Upper Alton News - George Scraiggs, colored, was buried this afternoon from the Second Baptist Church.

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SCROGGINS, REBECCA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 26, 1914

Mrs. Rebecca Scroggins, aged 68, died this morning at her home, 811 Piasa street, after a long illness. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon.

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SCROGGINS, UNKNOWN WIFE OF SHERMAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 6, 1907

Mrs. Sherman Scroggins died last night at the home, 1231 Wharf street, from consumption. She is survived by her husband and four or five children. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

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SCULL, WILSON H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 14, 1911          Hermit Dead a Week in Log Cabin - Mutilated by Rats

Wilson H. Scull, aged 61, who had lived as a hermit in a log cabin on the Robert Kennedy place near Bethalto, was found dead in his cabin Sunday morning, where he had been dead for a week. He had not been seen for a week, and two young men passed the place looked in his window and saw the disfigured body of the man lying on his cot. Rats and other animals had been at work and his body was also in a high state of decomposition. Coroner Streeper brought the body to Upper Alton and held it at his morgue until today, when it was buried. Scull had done farming in a small way at the Kennedy place, and was known as a recluse. He is said to have wealthy relatives in St. Louis.

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SCULLEN, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1910          Wann Explosion Victim Suicides

Frank Scullen, one of the victims of the Wann Oil explosion of seventeen years ago, killed himself in the county jail some time during Monday night. He was a frightful cripple, having been burned and very badly disfigured on the face, and his hands were so contorted from the burns that he was able to do very little work. Added to this an appetite for strong drink, he finally drifted to the poor house, notwithstanding the fact that at one time he had enough money to have kept him nicely, had he saved it. Scullen was employed by the Big Four when the explosion occurred, and was in the line of duty when injured. His claim was one of the few that was ever settled by the railroad company, most all the other victims, except railroad employees, being thrown out of court on the ground that they were trespassers on railroad property when they were killed or hurt. Scullen got $3,500, and is said to have spent it in ten days in riotous living. He had been staying at the poor farm for some time. Formerly he was given a home at the Ursuline convent, and at one time was at the hospital, where the kindhearted sisters took care of him, and he did a little work around the place. Strong drink was his undoing there. Finally he had to become a county charge. He had been suffering from hallucinations, and thought that an Alton man was after him. Yesterday he left the poor farm and was finally locked up in the county jail. He was searched, but no weapon was found on him. Charles Trabue, superintendent of the poor farm, says he believes that in his shoe Scullen had concealed a piece of a case knife, about 1 1/2 inches long, and with this he cut his throat, making a thorough job of it. He has a sister at East Alton who did not know where he was. Scullen is reported to have carried an insurance policy on his life, and he inquired about this several days ago to see whether it was still being kept up. It is supposed he had meditated suicide for several day. [Note: According to the Alton Evening Telegraph, March 4, 1910, Frank Scullen was buried in Greenwood Cemetery.]

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SCULLY, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 4, 1907

Mrs. Mary Scully, a native of Ireland but who lived in Alton for more than 40 years, died Saturday night at the home of her son, Simon Scully, 733 East Sixth street, from the effects of a paralytic stroke, the second she had sustained in a few months. She was the widow of the late Maurice Scully, and besides her son leaves two daughters, Mrs. Phillip McEvoy of St. Louis and Mrs. W. L. Nason of Boston, Mass. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

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SCULLY, SIMON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 14, 1917         Was Guarding Power House When Struck By Train

Simon Scully, aged 55, of 636 East Fourth street, took the place of a soldier guarding the plant of the Alton power house on the levee just a week ago, and last evening he was killed by an Illinois Terminal switch engine as he was crossing the C. P. & St. L track. Scully had been watching a boat going up the river, and was returning to the plant at the time of the accident. When the engine struck Scully, Raymond Young, brakeman, was struck by the body of Scully, and his lantern broken. For a time it was believed his leg was broken, and he was in danger of being knocked off the train and ground to pieces under the wheels with Scully. When the engine stopped 60 feet from where it run over Mr. Scully, Young fell from the engine to one side of the track. He was improved today and was able to attend the inquest where a verdict of accidental death was returned. Mr. Scully had taken the place of the soldiers on August 4. For some time past he had been employed as a watchman at the Alton State Insane Hospital, but the work became so heavy when the new patients arrived that he resigned and accepted a position guarding the power house on the levee. That was on August 4. Besides his wife he leaves three daughters, Margaret, Rose and Alice; and one son, Maurice, all of whom are grown. The funeral will be held at nine o'clock on Thursday morning from the St. Patrick's church, and burial will be in the Greenwood Cemetery.

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SCURLOCK, AMANDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 24, 1903

Amanda Scurlock, the ten year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Scurlock, colored, died at the home near the lead works this morning after an illness with lung troubles. The body will be shipped this evening to Oakton, Ky., for burial.

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SEAGO, ETHEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 8, 1903

Ethel Seago, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lem Seago, died Wednesday afternoon at the family home in the east end, after an illness from typhoid pneumonia. She was 19 years of age, and a young woman who was known for her personal beauty. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 11 o'clock from the family home, and burial will be in the Bethalto cemetery. Services will be conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenna.

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SEAGRAVES, ARTHUR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 3, 1920              Body of Aviator Who Died in Fall Arrives in Alton

Arthur Seagraves, 17, member of the army aviation section, and a son of Mrs. Lela Seagraves, who is spending the winter at the home of her brother, Ben Bryant, of Mayfield avenue, was killed on New Year's day at Rich Field, Waco, Tex., when his plane crashed to the ground during a flight. The body will arrive here this evening, accompanied by a sister, Miss Esther Seagraves, and will be taken to Elsah, where the funeral will be held tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. Mrs. Seagraves formerly resided in the Elsah neighborhood, and is well known in that neighborhood. Her son entered the aviation section soon after the end of the war, and because of his age secured his mother's consent before enlisting. The tragic death of the young man is the fourth which has occurred in the family on holidays. Two years ago, on Thanksgiving day, the boy's father died. Four years ago on Thanksgiving day, Mrs. Seagrave's mother, Mrs. Anna Bryant, died. Three years ago, on Christmas day, a brother of Mrs. Seagraves, Fred Seagraves [should be Bryant], mysteriously met his death in Texas. It was reported that he was accidentally shot, but it has always been the belief of the family that he was murdered, it was said at the Bryant home today.

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SEAGRAVES, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 15, 1914     East St. Louis Man Killed in Auto Accident Near East Alton

James Seagraves of East St. Louis was instantly killed, and five other men from Granite City were slightly cut and bruised when the seven passenger Stern automobile in which they were riding turned turtle shortly before 10 o'clock Friday evening in front of the home of James Chessen, on the Rock road between East Alton and Wood River. It is the general opinion of the men who arrived shortly after the accident, and those who were in the car, that the accident was over so quickly Seagraves never knew what had happened. The party came into Alton Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from Granite City to post Alton for a barbecue and picnic, which will be given by the Eagles of that place on August 23. After spending several hours in the city, they left Friday evening for home. Among the members of the party were Tom and William Murphy, Charles Koenig, Henry Johnson, William Williams, and James Seagraves. Tom Murphy was driving the car, and according to the story he told of the accident, they were traveling at a good rate of speed over the rock road, when suddenly, after the driver had made a little turn to get in the center of the road, the machine skidded. As the auto skidded one of the front tires blew out, and this caused the machine to turn over on its side. Murphy was caught under the machine at first, but as it rolled a trifle farther, he was released and the 6,000 pound machine caught Seagraves' head, killed him instantly.....None of Murphy's bones were broken, but he was badly bruised and cut about the head and body. The police of East St. Louis informed Mrs. Seagraves of the accident at her home last evening. She arrived in Alton this morning to make arrangements for caring for the body of her husband....Mr. Henry said today that he was one of the first to reach the wreck, and assisted in lifting the heavy wheel from the deceased man's neck. The windshield of the auto had torn his throat open and had completely scalped him, proving that the man was killed instantly. The auto was completely demolished.....The inquest of the man who was killed was set for this afternoon at the Jacoby undertaking rooms. The body was taken in charge by Coroner's undertaker, John Berner....

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SEARLES, FANNIE (nee CHALLACOMBE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 10, 1920

Mrs. Fannie Challacombe Searles, daughter of Mrs. Nancy Glorianna Challacombe, who died a few months ago, died at a hospital in Springfield last night. She was about sixty years of age. Mrs. Searles was taken to Springfield last week, suffering from blood poisoning in her foot, brought on by an infected toe. Her condition was not known to be serious, and her death came as a great shock to the large circle of relatives and friends at Challacombe, Alton and vicinity. Mrs. Searles is survived by her husband. Also by three sisters and three brothers, including Mrs. John Butler, Mrs. Mary Hartwell and W. J. Challacombe, all of Challacombe, Ill., Wesley Challacombe of Carlinville, Mrs. Mabel Pritchard and Nicholas Challacombe of Everett, Wash. Mrs. Searles' death makes the fourth in the Challacombe family within the last year, the others being Mrs. Challacombe, her brother, and her brother-in-law. No definite funeral announcement has been made. The funeral is, however, expected to be held in Challacombe on Friday.

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SEDLACEK, JOSEPH/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, January 6, 1892

Joseph Sedlacek, aged 51 years, died Sunday morning [Jan. 3] at 8:15 o'clock, after a long and painful illness with Bright's disease. The funeral took place from the family residence at Glen Carbon, yesterday morning at 10 o'clock. It was under the auspices of the local post, G.A.R. and the Druids' lodge, of which orders he was a member. The remains were interred in the family burial ground. The pallbearers were: George Bernius, Ben Epping, John Michel, Herman Berlemann, and John Baum.

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SEEGER, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 9, 1931                        Submitted by Marshal Ensminger

Funeral services for Mrs. Elizabeth Seeger were held Tuesday from the home in Hartford and at the Wood River Lutheran Church. The Rev. Norman Wolff officiated. Burial was in Prairietown cemetery. Mrs. Seeger is the wife of Christian Seeger who is watchman at the Wood River National Bank.
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SEELEY, SYRIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 27, 1912

Mrs. Syria Seeley, widow of Austin Seeley, who was one of the old time business men of Alton and founder of a firm that was continued by his son, R. F. Seeley until the latter's death, died Sunday morning in her home in Upper Alton, in her 89th year. Death was due to weakness of old age. Mrs. Seeley was stricken with paralysis about three days before she died. She had been living with her daughter-in-law, the widow of R. F. Seeley. She came to Alton sixty-eight years ago and was among the best known residents of Alton. For many years the family lived in the old home on the site of the present Airdome, and it was there Mrs. Seeley passed the greater part of her life. When her son sold the place and moved to Upper Alton, she went with him. She is survived by one son, Frank, who lives in Fulleston, Neb., and one daughter, Mrs. W. T. Norris of Greenfield, Ill. Mrs. Seeley was born at Philadelphia in 1812, and was married in 1844, living all her married life here. The funeral will be Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the home in Upper Alton.  [note: obit of her son, Robert Seely, states her first name was Sarah]

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SEELY, ROBERT FULTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 22, 1910                "Fult" Seely's Suffering Ended

Robert Fulton Seely, one of the best known business men in Alton, died Friday night at 11 o'clock at his residence in Upper Alton, after a long illness. His death had been expected for several months, as all hope of his recovery was given up some time ago. The fact that "Fult" Seely was in declining health came as a surprise to his many friends in the Altons. As a young man he was known to be a strong athlete. His feats of strength are still talked of among the men who knew him as a boy and young man. He was a devoted lover of outdoors sports of all kinds. A few years ago his health began to fail, but he stayed in his place of business, which he had inherited from its founder, his father, and continued to sell books and stationery. The firm had been in the one place of business since the early days of Alton. Over a year ago, Mr. Seely found it necessary to move, as the owners of the building had leased the store room to another firm. He moved then to the present location of the store on State street. Among the school children who had bought books from Mr. Seely for many years, he was well liked. Among business men who associated with him, he was popular, and his word in a business way was highly regarded. Until failing health made it necessary for him to retire from business, he was constant in his attendance on his duties in his store. Mr. Seely was 53 years of age, being born in Upper Alton September 12, 1857. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Austin Seely, and his mother, Mrs. Sarah Seely, aged 84, survives him. He leaves also a brother, Frank, of Fullerton, Neb., and a sister, Mrs. W. T. Norris of Greenfield, Ill., neither of whom will be able to attend the funeral, owing to illness. Mr. Seely also leaves his wife, to whom he was married October 1, 1896, and two daughters, Adda and Mary Seely. Mr. Seely's final illness made it necessary for him to leave his store the 18th of last June. He was not down town from that time. The doctors at first said his malady was malaria. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home in Upper Alton, Rev. W. H. Bradley officiating, and burial will be in City cemetery at Alton.

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SEEMAN, NETTIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1911

Mrs. Nettie Seeman, wife of Frank Seeman, died from tuberculosis at the age of 21, today at the family home, 1212 east Second street. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

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SEGAN, PETER (also known as MILLER)/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, April 17, 1919

Peter Segan, of Livingston, also known as Peter Miller, is dead today, the result of a gunshot wound inflicted last night by Constable Charles Kovala, who escaped during the excitement as Segan fell to the floor mortally wounded. The shooting occurred at the saloon of George Skimoka, but the cause has not been learned today. The bullet entered Segan's breast and he was dead a few minutes later when Dr. Berry and Dr. Oliver reached the scene. It was said today that Segan, an Austrian, and Kovala, who is Slavish, quarrelled on the street a few minutes before they entered the saloon. Just what the argument was about has not been told officials. Eyewitnesses said the Kovala drew his revolver and struck Segan over the head before firing the fatal shot. Kovala ran from the saloon while others went to the aid of Segan. A policeman visited the Kovala home, believing he would return there. Later in the night Kovala went home, secured additional clothing, told his wife and children goodbye and left. Sheriff George E. Little and Coroner Joseph Krill were notified. The latter gave permission to move the body from the saloon. Arrangements are being made for an inquest. Segan is a coal miner, and about 34 years old. He has a wife and five children. Kovala is about 32 years old. He is described as being a man weighing about 150 pounds, and 5 feet 2 inches tall.

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SEGAR, UNKNOWN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1917

Rev. M. W. Twing went to Mitchell today to conduct the funeral services over Mrs. Segar, who died there several days ago. Mrs. Segar was the mother of Mrs. F. C. Bailey of Alton.

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SEIBERT, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 30, 1905

Charles, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Seibert of east Fourth street, died at 2 o'clock Monday morning after a short illness.

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SEIBERT, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1918

Charles Seibert was buried this afternoon from the family home on East Fourth street, short services being held by Rev. Joseph Meckel and Rev. J. J. Brune. On account of Mr. Seibert having died from influenza, his funeral had to be private. Interment was in St. Joseph's cemetery. A Requiem High Mass will be sung in St. Mary's church Saturday morning for the repose of the soul of the deceased.

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SEIBOLD, CHARLES SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 26, 1905

Charles Seibold, in his eighty-third year, died at his home, 611 east Seventh street, Thursday morning at 6 o'clock after a long illness. Mr. Seibold's death had been expected for several weeks, as his condition had become extremely grave and all hope of his recovery was given up because of his great age. An additional sad feature of the death is that his aged partner in life, Mrs. Magdalena Seibold, is very seriously ill, and the attending physician could hold out but little hope that she would long survive her husband. Mrs. Seibold has been a sufferer from dropsy for many months, and several months ago it was thought that she would die then, but she recovered and was able to be around the house until she sustained injuries by falling at her home a few weeks ago. By a strange coincidence, Mr. Seibold's fatal illness began with a fall from a tree last October, he having never recovered fully from the effects of it. Mr. Seibold was born at Hessen Darmstadt, Germany, July 25, 83 years ago. He came to Alton in 1856, and was married here the year following to Magdalena Jokers, who survives him. He was one of the seventeen founders of the German Benevolent Society in 1857, and is the last charter member of the society. His funeral Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the German Evangelical church will be under the auspices of the society in which he was one of the fathers. Mr. Seibold is survived by a family of four daughters and four sons: Misses Lena, Louise and Caroline Seibold and Mrs. L. J. Hartmann; Messrs. Charles, Nicholas and Samuel Seibold, all of Alton; and Frank Seibold, of St. Louis. He was the last of his family, all the remainder having died before him. Until ten years ago Mr. Seibold had followed the occupation of teamster, when he retired because of advancing age. He was highly respected, was a sober, industrious man and a dutiful husband and father. His death was an easy one, and he passed away as quietly as if falling into a deep sleep after long suffering. It is requested that flowers be omitted.

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SEIBOLD, LAVERNE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 4, 1905

The funeral of Laverne, three years old son of Mr. and Mrs. George Seibold, was held this afternoon from the home on Bozza street, and many friends and neighbors of the family attended the obsequies, and floral offerings were numerous. Services were conducted by Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann, and interment was in City Cemetery.

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SEIBOLD, LENA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 3, 1911

Miss Lena Seibold, a member of a well known Alton family, died Friday morning at her home, 607 East Seventh street, after an illness of about four years' duration. Miss Seibold's death was due to dropsy of the heart. She was a native of Alton, and had lived here all her life. She made her home with her sisters at the place where she died. She leaves three sisters, Misses Caroline and Louise Seibold, Mrs. L. J. Hartmann; and four brothers, Charles, Nicholas and Samuel Seibold, all of Alton, and Frank Seibold of Arizona. Miss Seibold was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Seibold Sr., and was 51 years of age. Her illness began about four years ago, and she had been suffering from occasional attacks, and then would improve apparently. She spent part of last summer in the west with her brother. Up to yesterday, her case was very hopeful, but she took a sudden change for the worse and her death occurred at 7:30 o'clock Friday morning. The funeral will be held Sunday morning at 10 o'clock, and from the family home, and services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller. Friends are requested to omit flowers.

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SEIBOLD, MAGDALINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 4, 1906

Mrs. Magdaline Seibold, widow of Charles Seibold, died this afternoon at the family home on Seventh street after a long illness. She was a sufferer for several years and many times was near to death, but rallied. She was stricken a few days ago with the last attack of her old trouble, and it proved fatal late this afternoon. She had been a resident of Alton almost all her life and leaves a large family of children. Her children are Messrs. Charles, Nicholas, Samuel and Frank Seibold, Mrs. L. J. Hartman, Miss Carrie Seibold, Miss Lena Seibold and Miss Louise M. Seibold. Mrs. Seibold was a native of Baden, Germany, and was 71 years of age. She had lived in Alton over fifty years. She was a member of the German Evangelical church almost all her life.

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SEIBOLD, NICHOLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 12, 1918             Old Time Wagonmaker Dies

Nicholas Seibold, for many years the proprietor of a wagon shop on Belle street, died Monday evneing at 6 o'clock at his home, 521 East Seventh street, a few hours after he suffered a stroke of apoplexy. Mr. Seibold, who was in his 78th year, had been living in retirement since he disposed of his business a few years ago. Monday after dinner he complained of feeling unwell, and was induced to go to bed. He was given some treatment by members of his family. Just before 6 o'clock he passed away peacefully in his sleep, the attending physician diagnosing the malady as cerebral hemorrhage. It was just a few hours before his death that he noticed the great noise that was being made as the Victory parade was passing his neighborhood and inquiring he was told that the coming of peace was being celebrated. He sank back satisfied, and soon afterward it was noticed that he had just died. He was born at Hessen, Darmstadt, Germany, January 10, nearly 78 years ago. He had lived in Alton since boyhood, and was among the best known citizens. He learned the wagon making trade under John Koeline and worked for him until engaging in business for himself, where he remained until a year ago. He was very deeply interested in the Evangelical Church at Eighth and Henry streets, and for years held important offices in that church, includng that of president. He was also a devoted member of the Benevolent Society. He leaves three daughters, Mrs. A. A. Sotier, Mrs. Harry Lenhardt, Miss Lena Seibold, and two sons, George Seibold and Arnold Seibold. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Evangelical Church.

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SEIFERTH, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 31, 1910                 Old Soldier, Octogenarian Dies of Exposure

Louis Seiferth, aged 80, was found in a dying condition Friday afternoon at his home, 1002 Belle street. He was lying on the floor where he had fallen when stricken with paralysis. The last time he was seen about the place was Wednesday night, and it is supposed that he must have been helpless since then. His death was due partially to exposure, as well as to the paralysis, as he lay in the cold with no attention, and he suffered fatal effects from lack of care and protection. Maggie Betts, a 9 year old girl, the daughter of a neighbor, discovered the old man Friday afternoon when she went down to borrow an axe. Dr. George K. Worden was summoned and he said that the old man had been paralyzed on the right side. He had fallen against the kitchen sink and his face was skinned, showing where he had struck in his fall. He had on no shoes, nothing under his head, and was covered with an old comfort. He has a daughter, who lives in St. Louis. She had been up to see him a week ago. Seiferth has a son, Louis Seiferth, whose home is in Alton. The old man drew a pension of $20 a month as an old soldier.

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SEILER, HAROLD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 20, 1912                  Boy Falls Through Ice at Central Avenue

Harold Seiler, aged 8, whose family live at 101 east Third street, was drowned in the Mississippi river at the foot of Central avenue this morning, about 10:30 o'clock, by falling into an air hole. According to stories told by witnesses, the boy was playing with some companions on the ice when the ice broke under three of them. There were five little boys in the party: Harold Seiler, aged 8; Kenneth Seiler, aged 10; Clifford Feathers, aged 9; Vincent Weindel, aged 8; Harry Schaefer, aged 12. Harry Schaeffer was the hero. He had lingered behind while the other boys, led by Feathers, were walking on the ice. The ice broke under three. Feathers being farther away and did not fall in. Schaeffer used a shinny pole to rescue Kenneth Seiler and Vincent Weindel, but Harold Seiler was drowned. No men were near to give assistance. The drowning occurred at 11 o'clock, and the recovery of the body of the drowned boy was at 12 o'clock.

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SEILER, URSULA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 17, 1913

The funeral of Mrs. Ursula Seiler was held Sunday afternoon at the Ingersol school house in Fosterburg. There was a large number of sorrowing friends and relatives at the funeral. Mrs. Seiler died Friday, leaving a family of five daughters and three sons. She had been a resident of Fosterburg township for forty-five years.

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SEILER, URSULA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 8, 1919              

News of the death of Miss Ursula Seiler at Washington, D. C., was received with great sorrow and regret by the large number of friends of the well known Upper Alton woman. From the first her illness was serious, but death was not anticipated by relatives and friends in the city. Miss Seiler passed away Thursday at one o'clock. Ten days ago Miss Seiler was taken ill with typhoid fever, and was removed to the Sibley Hospital in Washington. Her condition grew steadily worse and last Sunday word was received that she was very ill. Her mother, Mrs. A. H. Seiler, departed Sunday for Washington, arriving in the Eastern city on Monday, and was with her daughter when she died. Miss Seiler was employed for some time in the office of Dr. Mather Pfeiffenberger in this city, and later accepted a position with the Western Cartridge Company. About eighteen months ago she took a government examination, and passing, left for Washington. In Washington she had an excellent position in the Ordnance Department. She worked hard and faithfully for the government and was getting great enjoyment from her work when she became ill. The young woman was the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Seiler of 1843 Evergreen avenue, and with her parents has resided in Alton for a number of years. The family came here from Fosterburg. Mr. Seiler is a millwright at the Stanard-Tilton Milling Co. Miss Seiler is survived by her parents, and by two sisters, Mrs. Sidney K. Yeapel of Windom, Minn., and Miss Mildred Seiler of this city. Mrs. Yeapel was before her marriage Miss Edna Seiler. She was a member of the College Avenue Baptist Church, and took a great interest in the affairs of the Young Women's Christian Association. She was a member of the choir of the Baptist Church, and an active worker. She was 26 years of age. According to the message received by friends and relatives, Mrs. Seiler has left Washington with the body, and will arrive in St. Louis Saturday afternoon. No funeral arrangements will be made until after the arrival of the mother.

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SEMICK, EMIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 3, 1919         Painter Falls From Steel Towers of High Tension Line

Emil Semick, a painter employed in painting the steel towers of the high tension line of the East St. Louis Light & Power Co., near Federal, and who fell early this week after touching a wire carrying 13,200 volts, died in St. Joseph's Hospital this noon from injuries. According to Dr. Worden it was not the electric burns or shock that caused his death, but the injuries he sustained in the fall from the tower to the ground, a distance of 50 feet. Semick was so badly hurt it was very difficult to handle him in the hospital. His back was frightfully burned by the electric current, but nevertheless it was necessary for him to lay on his back because his other injuries made it impossible for him to be comfortable any other way. He had been married just two weeks before he was injured, and his bride was in attendance at his bedside in the hospital. The body was turned over to Deputy Coroner Bauer, who will conduct an inquest.

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SERFF, AMELIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 26, 1919           Demented Woman, 59, Hangs Self to Tree

Mrs. Amelia Serff, 59 years old, wife of William Serff, ended her life by hanging herself in Smith's grove near Taylor avenue, Saturday afternoon. Her body was seen hanging from the tree by two negro boys who notified the police. The woman, who was in a demented condition, tied a thin rope to a limb of the tree and around her neck while standing on a tin bucket. She stepped from the bucket and was strangled. When the police were notified Turnkey Henry Cramer and Deputy Coroner William H. Bauer went to the woods and after a search found the body. The woman was dead when the officers reached the spot. According to the police officer she close a spot dense with trees and shrubbery in which to end her life. Unless passing close to the spot, it would have been impossible to see the body, Cramer said. Mrs. Serff has been in a demented state for some time. Statements to Deputy Coroner Bauer by two physicians showed her the victim of a nervous trouble resulting from an interior goiter. Recently she came to the police station asking that a warrant be issued for a relative whom she accused of a crime she weirdly described. The verdict of the coroner's jury at the inquest Saturday night was that death was due to "suicide by hanging while in an unbalanced state of mind." Mrs. Serff was born in Germany and had been a resident of Alton for 22 years. She is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Gertrude Redfield, Beaverton, Oregon; Mrs. Marie Clyne; and Mrs. Joseph Monks, Alton. She leaves one son, William Serff, who is in England with the Canadian army. He was living in Detroit when war broke out and enlisted with the Canadians. For a long time he had not been heard from and recently a letter stated he was then at Winchester, England. Mrs. Serff leaves also a sister in Germany, and several grandchildren. The funeral will be tomorrow morning at nine o'clock from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Joseph Monks, 813 East Sixth street. Requiem mass will be celebrated at St. Mary's church by Rev. Fr. Joseph Meckel, and interment will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SERING, TITUS PAUL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 30, 1905

Titus Paul, the 14 month's old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Sering, died at the family home Sunday evening, after a brief illness. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the family home, Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann officiating, and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

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SERYIER, ARMONDE "FRENCHIE"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 1, 1907

Armonde Seryier, known as "Frenchie," who lived between Upper Alton and East Alton, died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning from the effects of alcoholism. He lived alone and followed making gardens as a means of livelihood. He claimed to belong to a good family in St. Louis, but became an outcast. He was not married. The body will be buried tomorrow.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1907

The funeral of Armande Seryier "Frenchie," the East Alton gardener, derelict, was held this afternoon from the Streeper undertaking rooms in Upper Alton. A son from Centaur, Mo. was present and made the funeral arrangements. Until the young man made his appearance a few days ago, it was not known that "Frenchie" ever was married or had a family. He was buried in Milton cemetery close to the land upon which he raised garden stuff for many years. "Frenchie" was good hearted and charitable and helped many a poor person over rough places in life's road.

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SHADE, ROSE MOULTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 6, 1902

Mrs. Rose Shade, wife of Isaac Shade, a glassblower, was fatally burned Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock by the accidental ignition of her clothing which had become saturated with coal oil while she was filling lamps. Going to the kitchen stove to stir the fire, her dress caught fire and in an instant she was wrapped in flames. Mrs. Shade was alone in her home on Fourth street between Cherry and Apple streets, and she ran out in the yard to call for help. Before neighbors could extinguish the flames in her clothing, the woman was burned on every square inch of the surface of her body, and all her skin was burned off. Dr. L. M. Bowman, who attended her, said that he never before saw such a severe case and pronounced the burns fatal at once. Death ensued at 10 o'clock, eight hours after the burning. Louis Honsbehn, who was passing, ran into the yard and tried to throw Mrs. Shade down and to extinguish the flames, but failed and was burned about the hands. The body was taken to St. Louis this afternoon for burial. Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest and a verdict of death from burning was found.

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SHAEFER OR SHAFER, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1920

Frank Shafer, who died Saturday noon from influenza, was buried today. Shafer, who conducted a lunch room at the Gerner saloon and lived at the Lincoln hotel, leaves no relatives whose whereabouts are known. He had been in perfect health a week before his death, and he was taken into the order of Eagles. His illness with double pneumonia was very short.

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SHAKE, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1914

Annie, the 14 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shake, of Dye street, died this morning. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the Cherry street Baptist church at 2 o'clock.

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SHAKE, ELIZA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1911

Mrs. Eliza Shake died at the hospital for the insane at Jacksonville, and her body will arrive here this evening, consigned to her son, William Shake. Mrs. Shake lost her mind because of her old age, and recently it became necessary to take her away from home. She did not survive the change long.

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SHAKE, RALPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 17, 1915

The funeral of Ralph, eighteen months old son of Mr. and Mrs. William Shake, took place this afternoon at two o'clock from the home with Rev. F. H. Austermann of the Evangelical Church officiating. Burial was in the City Cemetery, the mound being covered with handsome floral pieces, carried to the grave by four little boys and four little girls.

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SHARON, RALPH W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1909

Ralph W. Sharon, aged 35, died Friday morning at his home, 510 Pine street, Upper Alton, after an illness of only a short time. He was employed at the Joesting clothing store on Third street, and Friday was able to be about his usual work, but during the day appeared to be unwell and was advised to go home and get a doctor. He declined to do so, saying he believed he would be all right in a short time, and that a night's sleep would put him in good condition again. He went home and said little of feeling sick until he became so ill his condition was serious. The young man was a believer in Christian Science and had been active in the work of that cult in the Altons, it was said at his home today that his death was doubtless due to heart disease, as he showed symptoms of heart trouble and his father died from the same malady. His death was a very sad chock to his wife, also to his only brother, Ned Sharon, and his mother, Mrs. Martha Sharon of St. Louis. The body will be taken to Carrollton, Ill., for burial, probably Sunday morning. He was born in Carrolton and came to Alton about five years ago. He leaves only his wife, having no children.

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SHARPE, SURREY B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 15, 1909            Colored Politician Dies ... In Five Years Gave Wife Five Dollars

Surrey B. Sharpe, a negro politician, died Monday afternoon at his home on Alton street, between Seventh and Eighth streets, aged 47 years, 3 months. In the last five years, Surrey is said to have given his wife exactly $5, and most of the time she was obliged to support him and friends he very hospitably invited to the house. He frequently chased his wife out of the house, threatening to do her bodily violence, and she was often defended by white people for whom she worked. The wife bought and is paying for a home where the family lived, and Sharpe's only contribution toward the house was his efforts to get the city to fill up Alton street, through political influence, at an estimated cost of several thousand dollars, which was twice what the house was worth. When he applied for the filing of the street, it was suggested that the city buy him a flying machine and let him get into the house that way, if all other avenues were closed, as it might be cheaper than filling in the street. Surrey, it will be remembered, served a penitentiary term for killing a man named Crow at the glassworks about fifteen years ago. He was released after serving his term of imprisonment, and thereafter posed as a political worker with great influence. Candidates in the future will miss Surrey, but may be ahead financially.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 16, 1909

The funeral of Surrey B. Sharp was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Union Baptist church, and burial was in City Cemetery.

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SHASCHEK, JOSEPH/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 25, 1893

Joseph Shaschek, who lives on the C. F. Cook farm, in the southern part of Edwardsville township, committed suicide Friday morning [Jan. 20] at about 8 o'clock by shooting himself with a pistol. Coronor T. W. Kinder was in the city when the information reached here and proceeded to the scene accompanied by Judge C. L. Cook. A jury was empanelled consisting of C. L. Cook, foreman, William J. Baird, Henry Ostendorf, Herman Gerling and John Ernst. His wife testified that deceased had been worrying about some debts, having recently purchased a farm. He did not sleep Wednesday night. Thursday night he visited at Frank Rabbit's and returned home about midnight, and slept until 5 o'clock next evening. He went out after breakfast to render lard, as he had been butchering. After being out a few minutes, a neighbor, Henry Detienne came to the house and told her that Shasheck had shot himself. He borrowed a pistol from Detienne, saying he was going to kill a mink in a pile of rails. He had gone but a few minutes when the shot was fired. The bullet entered the forehead and lodged in the head. The funeral took place Sunday, under auspices of the C.S.P.S. lodge. The remains were interred in the Bohemian cemetery. The pallbearers were: Henry Ostendorf, Samuel Jedlicka, Mike Krejci, John Schlemmer, Frank Schlemmer and John Ernst. Deceased was born in Bohemia, Austria, in 1845, was married there and came to this country with his wife. She died some twelve years ago, leaving seven children. He was married a second time. To this union three children were born, one of whom is dead. He leaves a wife, nine children, father, two brothers and two sisters. Mrs. Shaschek is in a precarious condition as a result of the death of her husband.

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SHATTUCK, EMMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 16, 1917

Mrs. Emma Shattuck, wife of James Shattuck, the contractor and builder of Upper Alton, died this afternoon at 1 o'clock at the family home on Elizabeth street. The death of Mrs. Shattuck was very unexpected. She had been in ill health a month, but had not been confined to her bed. Her death came while she was sitting in a chair. Members of the family were scattered at the time and they were hurriedly summoned to the home by the news of Mrs. Shattuck's death. Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Harlan, her parents, were with her at the time of her death. Besides her husband, she is survived by her parents and four children. The children are: Warren, Ethel, Grace and Marion. No funeral arrangements have as yet been made.

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SHATTUCK, HELEN STRONG/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Dec. 2, 1918

Mrs. Helen Strong Shattuck, wife of Warren Shattuck, died Saturday morning at 9:30 o'clock at the home of her uncle, James Strong, in Delmar avenue, after an illness which began Monday with the influenza and developed into pneumonia. Mrs. Shattuck's husband, to whom she was married in July 1917, left in July of this year for camp, and has been serving in the camp post office, where he was located. His wife, determined to do her part toward winning the war by going to work when there was a call for workers. She was employed until Monday, when she found it necessary to go home, and the illness proved fatal. She was the daughter of Richard Strong, and was 19 years old the 27th of last August. Beside her father and husband, she leaves one brother, Robert Strong, of Camp Taylor, and a sister, Miss Ethel Strong of Alton. The funeral time will not be announced until the husband is heard from. He is at Camp Holobird, Baltimore, but no message had reached him apparently up to Monday morning.

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SHATTUCK, MYRON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 22, 1914        Child Dies From Infantile Paralysis

Myron Shattuck, the 11 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. James Shattuck, died Saturday morning at 2 o'clock at the family home in Upper Alton on Elizabeth street, near the Rock Spring Country Club. Death was due to infantile paralysis. The child had been suffering just one week. In connection with the sickness of the child it may be said that the cause of the illness was at first supposed by the family to be due to two wasp stings the child had suffered on the day he was prostrated a week ago Friday. However, when physicians were called and made an examination and were convinced that the child was a victim of infantile paralysis, the parents were informed that the wasp stings probably had nothing to do with the case. The wasp stings, however, have a close analogy to the real cause of the disease, at least that which is now blamed, the bite of the blue bottle fly. The victim of infantile paralysis was one of a pair of twins, who were their parents youngest children. His twin sister is Marion Shattuck. He leaves besides his parents three sisters and one brother. According to medical men, there is no human help for infantile paralysis, and had the child resisted the attack and had not died immediately, all the remainder of his life he would have been a physical wreck. James Shattuck, the father, is inclined to believe that his child died from the effects of wasp stings. The father told a Telegraph reporter today that one of the stings was on the face and the other right over the spine. He said that he told the doctors of the stings and that the St. Louis specialist thought that the stings might have had something to do with the child's condition, but that it was a case to be diagnosed properly as infantile paralysis, and that was the final diagnosis. The father cannot be persuaded, however, that the sting of the wasp over his son's spine was not the cause of the child's death. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

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SHAW, ARTHUR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1920          Killed by Switch Engine ... Died on Crossing

Arthur Shaw, aged 27, was instant-up killed Tuesday afternoon at the foot of Central avenue when a switch engine struck him as he was driving his team across the track. Shaw's wagon was wrecked and one horse killed. There were no witnesses to the tragedy, except the trainmen. Shaw had been employed nights at the Duncan shops. He was a hard working man who by keeping a team, managed to augment his daily earnings by doing job of hauling. He had not been feeling well and did not work Monday night, so Tuesday he went out with his team in the afternoon to earn money hauling ashes. He was crossing the railroad tracks at the foot of Central avenue and evidently did not see the approaching switch engine. He was instantly killed. The body was taken in charge by Deputy Coroner Bauer and an inquest held this morning. Shaw was highly thought of in the neighborhood where he lived. He was devoted to his family consisting of his wife and four little children. The death of the husband and father was a cruel blow to the family. He was a man of good habits, very industrious, and was paying for a little home at 1830 Alby street. A brother of Shaw was on his way home from work at the oil refinery, and noticing the commotion at the foot of Central avenue his attention was attracted to the wrecked wagon, and he recognized it as the property of his brother. Then he discovered that his brother had been killed.

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SHAW, DAVID A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 15, 1918

The funeral of David A. Shaw was held Friday, interment being in Oakwood Cemetery. Shaw, who was 31 years of age, died last Sunday and the body was held until the arrival of a brother, C. E. Shaw, of Kansas City.

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SHAW, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1911

Harry, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shaw, died at their home, 1117 Belle street, yesterday morning at 9 o'clock; age 5 months. Burial was in City cemetery, Rev. A. Good officiating. The child was adopted.

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SHEA, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1906

The funeral of William Shea, who died Sunday at his farm home in Wood River township, was held this afternoon and was attended by many friends and neighbors. Services were conducted at St. Patrick's church by Rev. P. J. O'Reilley, and burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

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SHEARBURN, ROSE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 20, 1918

Rose Shearburn, aged 21 years, died yesterday afternoon at St. Joseph's Hospital where she had been taken for treatment. Mrs. Shearburn was the wife of Owen Shearburn, and resided at 612 Belle street. The body will be shipped to C_______ville Thursday _________ at 9 o'clock for burial.

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SHEEHAN, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 14, 1916

Mrs. Mary Sheehan, widow of John Sheehan, died last evening at her home at 215 East Broadway after a short illness of two weeks duration. Mrs. Sheehan was 70 years of age and was an old time resident of the city, and highly respected by all who knew her. The deceased is survived by two daughters, Miss Katherine, who lived with her mother, and Mrs. Otto Boercker. She also leaves one son, Thomas Sheehan. The body of Mrs. Sheehan will be taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Boercker, 218 West Seventh street, and the funeral will be Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

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SHEFF, KATHERINE B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 1, 1916

Mrs. Katharine B. Sheff, wife of F. H. Sheff, died very suddenly yesterday morning. She had been great afflicted with rheumatism for the past three years, but a few minutes before her death was sitting out in the yard laughing and joking with friends and neighbors. A stroke of apoplexy was the cause of her death, and she passed away without any suffering. The funeral service was held this morning at 11 o'clock at the family residence, 910 Union street, by Rev. J. Thompson Baker. The remains were taken to Cairo, the old home, this afternoon, where interment will be made tomorrow in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds. The father, mother, husband and two brothers and three sisters survive her.

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SHEFF, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 20, 1917

The funeral of William Sheff was held at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon from the home on Hamilton street to the Oakwood Cemetery. The services were conducted at the home by Rev. M. W. Twing.

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SHELBY, ALBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 6, 1912                       Joke or Suicide .... Man Drowns in Lake

Albert Shelby, aged about 35, a fisherman who had been working as a thresher hand in Wood River township, was drowned in Smith's lake yesterday afternoon. It is believed that he only intended to startle his comrades by making them believe he was trying to commit suicide, but the scare he sought to give the men in the boat with him proved a reality. Shelby, with Frank Foy and Charles Floyd, all of Alton, was crossing Smith's lake in a flatboat, going from one farm to another to do a job of threshing. Shelby was sitting in the back of the boat, and had been drinking. Throwing up both arms he shouted, "Whoopee, here I go," and with that he tumbled over backward into the lake. The water was there about 7 feet deep, and it was about 200 feet from shore. The lake at that point is full of water lilies, which form a perfect mat. It was about 50 feet away from this place that the body of Guy Shores, who killed himself after trying to exterminate the family of Barthel Schmid a year ago, was found months after he disappeared. Later when Coroner C. N. Streeper arrived and grabbed for the body with hooks, the cause of the man staying below was discovered. His body was enmeshed with lily stalks which formed a perfect trap and held him down. Otherwise he would have floated to the surface again as he was a good swimmer. When Shelby disappeared his companions tied a red handkerchief to some brush to mark the place where search was to be made. Shelby has a father at Muscatine, Iowa. coroner Streeper disagreed in opinion with the verdict of his jurymen, whom he selected near Smith's lake yesterday afternoon to hold an inquest on the body of Mr. Shelby. The verdict was "death from drowning with suicidal intent." Mr. Streeper said today that he hardly thought that the man intended to commit suicide, but that he thought he merely tried to show off by jumping into the water, and was afterwards caught in the water lilies and could not get out. He left the verdict as it was because there was no positive proof either way since it would be impossible to know the intent of the man at the time he made the leap into the water. He will hold the body, which is unclaimed, and said he would make an investigation this afternoon to locate the man's relatives, if there were any, who would take charge of the body.

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SHELTON, CARRIE S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 19, 1920                 State Manager for Corset Firm and Prominent in Fraternal Societies

Mrs. Carrie S. Shelton, wife of E. T. Shelton, died at 1:25 p.m. today at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. C. Mullins, 500 East Thirteenth street, after a long illness. The last four days she had lingered very near death. Seven weeks ago she was taken to Mayfield, Ky., in the hope that a visit there might benefit her. She had been suffering from a nervous collapse due to a goitre. The change did not prove beneficial, and she was brought home three weeks ago in a very bad condition, unable to sit up, and it was believed then that the remainder of her life would be a matter of but a few weeks. Mrs. Shelton was born in Staunton, Ill., and would have been 59 years of age the 26th of June. About thirty five years ago she came to Alton with the other members of her family, and she passed the remainder of her life here. She leaves three children, Edgar, Miss Carrie Shelton and Mrs. H. S. Mullins. She leaves also two brothers, Douglas and Hosea S. Sparks, and four sisters, Mrs. Ida Toole, Mrs. John Strickland, Mrs. E. F. Strickland and Miss Nettie Sparks. Mrs. Shelton was a woman who had a marked talent in a business way. She had been connected with a corset firm for many years, and for a long time had very effectively discharged the duties of state manager for that company. She traveled much about the state and devoted all her time and energy to the business. She had great success in her work and at the time she was prostrated by illness, she was vested with much authority and was very highly esteemed by her employers. She had been prominent in the Royal Neighbors too, for years, serving the organization in official capacity. Mrs. Shelton was a woman of a kindly disposition and she was generally loved by those who knew her. The announcement of her serious illness caused a profound shock in a large circle of friends. Her death had been expected. The time of funeral was not decided this afternoon.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 21, 1920

The funeral of Mrs. Carrie Shelton, wife of Edgar T. Shelton, was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. C. Mullins, at Thirteenth and Langdon streets. There was a large attendance of relatives and friends at the funeral services, which were conducted by Rev. C. Combrink, of the 12th street Presbyterian church. Among those at the funeral were many of the Royal Neighbors, in which fraternal society she had been prominent for a long time. In addition to the active pallbearers, six women, members of the organization, served as honorary pallbearers..... [could not the rest of article]

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SHELTON, EVERETT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1904

Everett Shelton, aged 29 years, died this morning at his home in East Alton after long suffering from consumption. He leaves a wife and also his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Shelton of East Alton. The body will be shipped tomorrow morning to Shandole, Marion county, Illinois for burial.

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SHELTON, HORACE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 26, 1904

Horace, the 7 years old son of Mr. and Mrs. George S. Shelton, died at the family home last night after a long illness. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, 316 East Second street.

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SHELTON, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1904

The funeral of Mrs. John Shelton, who died Tuesday evening at her home in Godfrey township, took place this afternoon and was attended by a very large number of neighbors and friends. Ray Alworth of Godfrey conducted the services, and interment was in Melville cemetery.

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SHEPHERD, NELLIE [nee HILDEBRAND]/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1917             Missionary Was Small Pox Victim in China

The sad news was received in Alton this morning of the death of Mrs. Charles R. Shepherd at Canton, China, on February 15th. As Miss Nellie Hildebrand, she was one of the best known and most highly esteemed of Alton's young people. After her graduation from the High School, she taught for a number of years in the public schools in Iowa and in Alton. After taking a course at the Moody Bible Institute, she was married to Rev. Charles R. Shepherd, also a graduate of the same school, October 9th, 1907. After spending several years in the south engaged in church work and in study at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd went as missionaries to Canton, China, in the fall of 1913, where they have been very happy and eminently successful in their work. Possessed of a bright, happy disposition, an attractive personality, an exceptionally unselfish and deeply religious spirit, she won the undying affection of her pupils and especially of her co-workers in the First Baptist Church of Alton, of which she was a member from childhood. Her death was caused by smallpox, notwithstanding the fact that she had twice been vaccinated. Ten thousand cases were reported in the city of Canton at the time of her death. Mrs. Shepherd is survived by her husband, her daughter, Dorothy, aged 8, her brother, George Hildebrand, and her sister, Mrs. Lydia Cronin of Assumption, Ill.

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SHERFY, HAROLD ROBINSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1921

Harold Robinson, the two months old son of Mr. and Mrs. William Sherfy, died this afternoon at 1:30 at the family home at 2508 East Broadway, the infant having suffered from stomach trouble since his birth. He is survived by his parents, and two sisters, Sarah Jane and Irene Eva. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home.

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SHERFEY, ISAAC/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 15, 1907 (Fosterburg News)

The death of Isaac Sherfey, which occurred on the 6th, removed from our midst one of our most prominent citizens. Mr. Sherfey was 71 years of age. On April 17, 1868 he was united in matrimony to Miss Louisa Isch, who survives him. Two daughters, Mrs. Ida Kreig and Mrs. Mollie Medden, one brother, Abraham Sherfey of Bunker Hill; two sisters, Mrs. Hitchak and Mrs. Pollie Jinkenson of Bethalto, mourn his departure. Funeral services took place at the Mt. Olive church on Sunday, conducted by Rev. S. D. McKinney. As an evidence of respect, the attendance was quite large. Floral offerings were numerous and beautiful. The Grand Army post of which he was a member had charge of the services at the grave, assisted by the band. Interment took place at the Short cemetery. The family in their bereavement have the sympathy of their many friends.

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SHERFEY, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 30, 1920

The funeral of Mrs. Minnie Sherfey will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Herman Kohle, on Main street. Theodore Cates, pastor of the Wesley Methodist Church, will have charge of the services. Burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery.

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SHERIDAN, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1916

Frank Sheridan, aged about 40, was found dead in bed in his room this morning at the Stoneware Pipe works hotel by John De Silvey, proprietor of the hotel. Sheridan's death is supposed to be from heart disease probably induced by the excessive heat. Sheridan was in an unusually happy frame of mind yesterday. He was in town in the evening and spent the evening joking with friends as usual, and no one had any idea that he was ill. He did not complain to anyone. He retired as usual. When it came time for him to get up his door was still locked. After DeSilvey tried it several times, he broke the door down and found Sheridan lying across the bed dead. He had been dead for many hours and probably died shortly after entering his room. He was fully dressed when found. Coroner's Undertaker John Berner went down and brought the body to Alton. Sheridan worked a year for Mr. DeSilvey doing choring and teaming. For five years before he worked on the Frank Smith farm near East Alton. He is said to have a wife living in Calhoun county from whom he is parted.

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SHERMAN, MAGGIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1907

Mrs. Maggie Sherman, aged 66, died this morning at 11 o'clock from paralysis. She was stricken Friday evening in her home about 5 o'clock and did not regain consciousness. The funeral arrangements have not been made. Mrs. Sherman lived at Washington and Bozza streets over Tomlinson's blacksmith shop.

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SHERWOOD, EDWIN M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 18, 1903 

Edwin M. Sherwood, for many years a well known transfer man and one of the most highly respected residents of Alton, died Sunday morning at his home, 210 East Sixth street, after an illness dating back more than eight years. Since the beginning of his illness he was unable to attend to his usual duties, and he gave up the transfer business to his son, W. F. Sherwood. Mr. Sherwood was taken ill with whooping cough when he was 62 years of age, and from that time his health was seriously impaired. He did not regain his strength and many times during the period of his illness his death was expected, but he would revive and be able to be around his home again. Heart failure brought on by kidney trouble was the direct cause of his death Sunday. He had been feeling unwell for a few days before, but Sunday morning was stronger than he had been. Without any further warning he was stricken by death shortly after eating a hearty breakfast. After many months of suffering he slipped away peacefully and found relief, which he had been unable to find in many years. Mr. Sherwood was an industrious, upright man and had many friends. He was known as being strictly honest in everything he did and was highly esteemed as a good citizen. He leaves his wife and a family of nine children: Mrs. H. N. Smalley of Concord, Michigan; Elward Sherwood of Kansas City; Lynn of El Paso, Texas; Miss Helen of Independence, Iowa; Misses Louisa and Eunice, William and Thomas Sherwood and Mrs. George H. Paul, of Alton.  Mr. Sherwood was born in Lockport, N. Y., and was 71 years of age. He had lived in Alton 47 years. The hour of the funeral has not been set, but it may be held Wednesday, if his children arrive in time.

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SHERWOOD, ELSIE S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 23, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. Elsie S. Sherwood will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home at Sixth and Easton streets. Services will be conducted by Rev. W. T. Cline of the First Methodist church, and Rev. G. L. Clark of the Twelfth street Presbyterian church. The funeral will be private. Mrs. Sherwood had been a member of the Presbyterian church on Twelfth street since girlhood. She was born in Bellaire, Ohio in 1844, and came to Alton with her parents when she was seven years of age. She lived here ever since. Her son, Edward Sherwood of Kansas City, arrived this morning with another son, Thomas A. Sherwood of Memphis, Tenn. Mrs. George H. Paul of San Antonio, Tex. will be unable to come, and it is not expected that Mrs. H. Smalley of Concord, Mich., another member of the family, will be able to make the trip.

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SHERWOOD, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 4, 1902

Frank Sherwood, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Sherwood, died last evening at 8 o'clock at the home of the family, Sixth and Easton streets, after a long illness. He was 20 years of age and had lived in Alton nearly all his life. A few weeks ago he was taken ill and went to St. Joseph's hospital. When it became apparent that he could not recover, he was moved to his father's home one week ago, and his condition has been very bad since then. He was well known in Alton. Many years ago he was permanently injured by falling from the face of the bluffs a distance of nearly 40 feet, and he was slightly lame during the remainder of his life from the effects of the fall. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock and services will be conducted at the family home.

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SHERWOOD, HARRIET A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 20, 1906

Mrs. Harriet A. Sherwood, widow of William K. Sherwood, died this afternoon at 2:45 o'clock at her home in Upper Alton after an illness of more than two years duration. Her death was due to a general breaking down of her health. she was in her 66th year. Mrs. Sherwood lived in St. Louis for thirty years prior to the death of her husband, after which she moved to Upper Alton to make her home. She leaves one daughter, Mrs. Clara Stevens, who is now in Paris, France, and two sons, Charles and Abbot W. Sherwood, both of Upper Alton. She leaves also one brother, Nathaniel Wilson of Washington, D. C., and his arrival is being awaited before the funeral hour is fixed. The funeral will probably be held Thursday, and burial will be in St. Louis.

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SHERWOOD, LYNN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 10, 1904

The funeral of Lynn Sherwood was held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, Sixth and Easton streets, and services were conducted in private by Rev. Dr. D. E. Bushnell of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. There was a large attendance at the cemetery, but at the home only the members of the family and a few very intimate friends attended. The pallbearers were Will Neerman, Will Miller, Samuel Wade, Louis Berner, John Whalen and John J. Bray. The honorary pallbearers representing the Order of Railway Conductors of Bluff City council, No. 481, were William Atchison, A. C. Swain, Ed Motherway, William Fleming, J. Searles, A. Bennett. The body arrived from El Paso, Texas Sunday morning, accompanied by a friend of the deceased, L. L. Lyon of El Paso.

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SHERWOOD, MARY A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 4, 1913

Miss Mary A. Sherwood, aged 25, daughter of Mrs. Elsie S. Sherwood, died Tuesday morning at 4 o'clock at the home of her mother, 201 East Sixth street. She had been ill for more than a year. Miss Sherwood had been a patient sufferer during her long illness. Since she went south in the hope of benefiting her health, but she desired to be at home with her family and came back. During her long illness she was given the most devoted attention by her mother, and by her sister, Miss Helen Sherwood, who gave up all her other work of nursing and devoted her full time to looking after the invalid in her own home. The death of Miss Sherwood, while expected by her most intimate friends, is nevertheless a sad shock. She possessed a sweet disposition and made many friends. She was long a commuter making daily trips to St. Louis, where she worked as a stenographer until ill health forced her to give up her work. Miss Sherwood leaves her mother, five sisters, and three brothers: Mrs. H. N. Smalley of Concord, Mich.; Mrs. George Paul of Beaumont, Tex.; Mrs. Edgar Hoefert and Mrs. C. L. Head of St. Louis; Miss Helen Sherwood of Alton; and Messrs. Edward Sherwood of Kansas City, Mo.; W. F. Sherwood and Thomas A. Sherwood of Alton. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home and will be private.

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SHEWMAKE, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 6, 1916

George Shewmake, aged about 55, was fatally injured this afternoon when he was struck by the bridge engine on the Missouri side of the river. Shortly after the accident word was sent to Alton and the police were notified of the accident. The city ambulance was waiting at the foot of Henry street for him, and he was taken at once to the St. Joseph's Hospital. It is believed that his skull was fractured and his arm broken as the result of the accident. Those who saw him shortly after the accident held out little hope for his recovery. Shewmake died shortly after being taken to the hospital this afternoon.

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SHEWMAKE, ROY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 26, 1919        Two Year Old Fatally Burned

Roy Shewmake, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Shewmake, was fatally burned Wednesday afternoon at the home of his aunt, Mrs. Ben Coffler, who was also seriously burned while trying to extinguish the flames which were burning the child's clothes from his body. Mrs. Coffler had gone to a neighbor's for a short time and returned to find that during her absence the 2 year old nephew had been playing with fire and had ignited his clothing. When she entered the house she found the child's garments all ablaze. She seized other garments and wrapped them about the boy, finally succeeding in putting the fire out, but in so doing her own left hand was badly burned. The little boy sustained burns on his body and face and two surgeons called pronounced the burns of a very serious character, and there appeared to be no chance of his recovery. He died Thursday afternoon. The aunt of the boy had gone out to complete preparations for bringing the youngster downtown to see Santa Claus. When she returned to the house she saw the youngster standing at a window, in flames. She tried to save him and in doing so sustained burns to her hand. The funeral of the boy will be at 9 a.m. tomorrow from the Coffler home, where services will be conducted by the Rev. M. W. Twing, pastor of the First Baptist church. Interment will be in Oakwood cemetery. The pall bearers, uncles of the youngster, will be Ben Coffler, and Harvey, Fred and Oscar Shewmake.

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SHIELDS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1906             Death of an Old Soldier

John Shields, an old soldier who formerly lived in Alton and on the coal branch neighborhood of Godfrey township, died this afternoon at St. Joseph's Hospital after a short illness. He has spent most of his time in recent years at the Soldiers' Home in Quincy, and came from there several weeks to visit friends. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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SHIELDS, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 5, 1920

Mrs. Minnie Shields, died Sunday morning just before 10 o'clock at her home, Central and Grove streets, after an illness of one week with an acute attack of diabetes. She was the widow of Joseph Shields. She leaves one child, Jean. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church.

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SHIFFLETT, KIZZIE HUSKINSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1923             Author, Painter ... Woman of Prominent Family Dies

Mrs. Kizzie Huskinson Shifflett, member of an old and prominent Alton family, died last night at 11 o'clock at St. Luke's Hospital in St. Louis from a cancerous trouble in her kidneys. Her death had been expected at any time since her return from a trip to California, about a month ago. She had gone west for the purpose of settling up the estate of her daughter, Mrs. Gladys Blalack, who was killed in an automobile accident at Los Angeles on New Year's day. Mrs. Blalack was joint heir with her mother in the estate of John B. Shifflett, father and husband of daughter and mother, and his estate had not yet been settled when the death of the daughter occurred. This caused complications, and Mrs. Shifflett went west to do what she could toward getting the estates adjusted. She was accompanied by her sister, Mrs. Anna Lane, widow of the deceased postmaster, G. H. Lane, and the two remained there until Mrs. Shifflett's health began to be such as to cause anxiety. They returned to Alton and immediately Mrs. Shifflett consulted specialists who warned her that she had but a short time to live. She went to St. Louis to St. Luke's Hospital to pass the remainder of her days. The past ten days her condition was such as to justify the belief that she was very near death. Members of her family were in constant attendance upon her. Mrs. Shifflett was born in Alton and was 61 years of age. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Huskinson, and a member of a large family of children. She was educated in the Alton public schools and was married here. Most of her married life she had spent in other cities, but for several years had counted Alton her home. She had lived at the Illini hotel. When she returned from the west a month ago, she was planning to build a little home in Alton and settle down here for the remainder of her life, but about the same time she reached that conclusion she was told of the short time she had to live. Her passing completes the wiping out of her family within one year's time. Mrs. Shifflett was a woman of artistic talent. She was a painter of ability and had fine literary tastes. In the last few years she worked hard on a book which she issued, covering the story of Elijah P. Lovejoy, and she had taken much interest in getting the book introduced to the public. Always she was interested in literary work, and she took a prominent place in women's clubs wherever she lived. She was a good talker and for interesting talks her services were in demand at gatherings. Members of her family said that she had been in bad health for several years, but that she did not know the nature of her malady and it was not until a month ago that she became informed of what it was that was causing her ill health and what condition she was in. She leaves three sisters, Miss Jennie Huskinson, Mrs. Anna Lane of Alton, Mrs. J. W. Hopkins of Grand Junction, Colo., and three brothers, George Huskinson of Springfield, Charles and R. G. Huskinson of Alton. Mrs. Shifflett was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and she was also a member of the Eastern Star. She belonged to the St. Louis Historical Society, the Parliamentary club of St. Louis and she organized the St. Louis Women's Shakespeare club. She was a widely travelled woman and was a charming conversationalist, well informed on all subjects. The funeral will be held Sunday at 3:30 o'clock from St. Paul's Episcopal church, with interment in City cemetery. The body was brought to Alton this morning and taken to the Huskinson homestead at Twelfth and Easton streets.

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SHIPLEY, RICHARD A./Source: Alton Telegraph, January 23, 1839

Died - At the residence of Charles Howard, Esq., Mayor of this city [Alton], on Sunday the 29th inst., after a long and painful illness, Mr. Richard A. Shipley, in the 68th year of his age; leaving many friends and relatives to deplore his loss. He died as he had lived, in the faith of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

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SHOELLMEIER, INFANT CHILD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, March 6, 1899

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Shoellmeier, who live at 515 East Tenth street, died at 8 o'clock Monday morning at the family home, after a short illness with bronchitis. The funeral will take place Tuesday afternoon and services will be in St. Mary's church.

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SHOEMAKE, DAVID/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 7, 1906

David Shoemake, aged 60, died this morning at 2 o'clock from dropsy and malaria, after a long illness, at his home, Fifth and Belle streets. The body will be taken to West Alton, Mo., for burial tomorrow noon.

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SHOEMAKE, HERBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 23, 1907

Herbert, the 9 months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Shoemake, died from spinal meningitis last night at the family home on Jefferson street.

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SHOEMAKER, WALTER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1912

Walter Schoemaker, aged 30, a former glassblower, was drowned in the river this afternoon by falling from the fleet of the Mississippi Sand Co., where he ahs been working. The body was recovered at 3:20 p.m., about a half hour after the drowning occurred. Shoemaker, who was about 30, had recently returned from California. He was engaged this afternoon in handling a rope on the bow end of a barge, when the rope missed an upright and slipped into the water, causing Shoemaker to lose his balance. He was carried under the barge. Nets were used to recover the body. The young man was a son of Francis Shoemaker, an old soldier. Beside his parents he leaves three brothers and three sisters.

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SHOOLER, ELIZABETH H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 11, 1904

The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth H. Shooler, widow of Richard Shooler, was held Thursday morning at 10 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Services were conducted by Rev. Fr. E. L. Spalding, who celebrated a Requiem High Mass. Burial was in City Cemetery, where Father Spalding, assisted by Father Parrent and a number of alcolytes, performed the burial services of the Catholic church. The body was accompanied from St. Louis by a funeral party consisting of the relatives of Mrs. Shooler.

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SHORT, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 4, 1911

Mrs. Annie Short, aged 72, died yesterday noon at her home in Bethalto. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at seven o'clock from the Bethalto church to the Short Cemetery.

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SHOW, THOMAS J. (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 14, 1923

Capt. Thomas J. Show, retired school teacher and river man, died Friday evening at 9:30 o'clock at the home of his son, I. M. Show, 1004 Alby street, from paralysis. He was stricken last Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock while seated at his writing desk in his home and he never fully regained consciousness. He was paralyzed completely on the left side. His wife, who has been bedfast for eight years from rheumatism and a constant sufferer, was in the room with him when he died, but was sleeping and was not informed that her husband had died so close to her until after the body had been removed from the room. She was then awakened and told that her husband had passed away quietly. She had been expecting the end and had requested that he be kept near her in his last hours, when members of the family suggested moving him to another room. Her wish was respected as she wished to be with him when the end came. Capt. Show was born in Jefferson county, Iowa, October 1, 1854, and when ten years old he went to Jersey county. Most of the time he lived at Rosedale where he was near his beloved Illinois river on which he spent much of his time. He was married in 1877, on Christmas day, to Charity E. Ritcher, of De Soto, Mo., and until twelve years ago he had made his home at Rosedale, moving to Alton then to be nearer his sons. Ever since coming here, Capt. Show and his wife had made their home with their son, Ivy M. Show. After teaching district schools in Jersey county seventeen years, Capt. Show took up river work. He possessed a master and pilot's license on the Mississippi from St. Louis to Keokuk and on the Illinois river. In his early days he had followed wood boating, as he liked to be on the water. On coming here he took a position with the Mississippi Sand Co. and worked there for a long time. He gave up river work because of his age about three years ago, being persuaded by his children to do so. Since then he has done carpenter work. The last work he did before his death was to build a double garage for his son, Clark Show. He was a member of the Methodist church from boyhood. He led a life that was consistent with the religious profession he had made. He was known as a man of quiet, even temperament, was highly esteemed by all who knew him and was held in the affectionate regarded by the members of his family. He was always ready with a cheery greeting for those he knew and he had a large number of good friends who loved the genial kindly gentleman. His face bore wrinkles where smiles had been, not grouches. During his last illness, all his children but one, Mrs. Calame, were with him constantly, and she will be here tomorrow from Denver. He is survived by four children, Ivy and Clark Show of Alton, Mrs. Charles F. Calame of Denver, and Mrs. Albert Oppenhoff of Granite City, and his wife. He leaves also three brothers and one sister, Mrs. Savilia Hayes and Noah Show of Wills Point, Texas, John Show of Alton and George Show of Rosedale. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home and services will be conducted by Rev. Charles Shumard of the First Methodist church. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

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SHUBERT, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1918            Moro's Oldest Resident Dies Today - Nearly 98 Years Old

Moro's oldest and richest woman died this morning. She was Mrs. Catherine Shubert. She would have observed her 98th birthday anniversary on December 24. Mrs. Shubert was the widow of the late George Shubert, whose death occurred ten years ago. Shubert was a self-made man, and by industry had accumulated a considerable fortune. He willed his fortune to his wife for her use during her lifetime, and at her death to become the inheritance of their only daughter, Barbara Shubert. For many years Mrs. Shubert has been reputed to be the wealthiest woman in Moro township, and one of its largest individual tax payers. Her fortune, aside from the family homestead in Moro, is said to consist entirely of personal property. Mrs. Shubert has been an invalid the latter part of her life. Six years ago she was in a brick building at Moro, which suddenly collapsed. The roof parted and came down over Mrs. Shubert. It was said to be the protection of a portion of the roof that saved her from instant death. As it was, she sustained injuries which left her an invalid. During all the years of her invalidism, Mrs. Shubert has been tenderly cared for by her daughter, Barbara. Barbara is blind and 70 years of age, but notwithstanding her physical infirmities, the daughter has attended to the ordinary household duties, and looked after the wants of her aged mother with great fidelity and tenderness. The funeral services for Mrs. Shubert had not been arranged this afternoon, but it was said they will likely be held Saturday.

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SHULTZ, ALBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 4, 1914           Stranger Liked Employees So Well He Believed He Would Live and Die With Them ... And He Did ... Commits Suicide

A stranger, thought to be Albert Shultz of Litchfield, was found dead in bed at the Bray rooming house, 810 East Second street, at noon today by William A. Bray, who was cleaning the rooms. The stranger had evidently taken carbolic acid last evening as he had been dead a number of hours before he was found. Mr. Bray said that the man came to his boarding house last Saturday and asked to be given a room with board. He said he was employed at the Luer Packing Co., and paid for the room and board in advance. He was well dressed and brought three large suitcases with him. Bray says that the man was one of the most quiet he ever met, telling nothing about himself, and not even giving his name. During the time he remained in Alton he was inclined to drink more than was good for him. Yesterday Bray told the stranger that if he kept drinking he would have to leave the rooms. Shortly after that the stranger met Miss Tina Miller who works at the Bray restaurant and said to her, "You know I've gotten so I like you people, and I think I'll live and die with you." He made good on his promise. At eight-thirty this morning Bray went to the rooms and saw Shultz in bed, but he thought Shultz was probably asleep. When he returned three hours later and found the man in the same position, he tried to arouse him but found the body stiff and cold. A number of neighbors were called in and the coroner was called. The man was in his night clothes and it is thought that he took the carbolic acid from a tin cup on the dresser and then retired to his bed. A bottle bearing carbolic acid label and the name of the S. H. Wyss Drug Co. was found, but at the drug store none of the clerks remembered making a sale to such a man within the past few days, so that it is probable he had the acid a number of days. The man was apparently forty years of age.

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SHUMMELL, M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1904

Mrs. M. Shummell, aged 69 years, died this morning after three days illness with congestion of the lungs, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William Feldwisch. She leaves three daughers, Mrs. Feldwisch of Alton, Mrs. C. A. Maxeiner of Shipman, and Mrs. C. A. Vaughn of Sapulpa, I. Territory. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 7:30 o'clock from the home of William Feldwisch to the 8:30 C. and A. train, by which the body will be conveyed to Brighton and taken from the depot there to German Evangelical church, where services will be held.

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SICKELMEIER, SUSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1916

A very sad case is that of the death of Mrs. Susie Sickelmeier of 507 Market street, who died at 9 o'clock last evening after an illness of but a few days with pneumonia. Besides her husband, Mrs. Sickelmeier leaves two small children. The wife and mother was but twenty-nine years of age and was a very devoted mother to her children. The body will be shipped to Carlinville tomorrow morning and the funeral will be held at Carlinville.

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SIDWAY, LOUISE B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1923

Mrs. Louise B. Sidway, widow of Leverett B. Sidway, died this noon at her home in Godfrey after an illness of about three weeks. Death was due to a general decline due in part to her great age and partly to a prevailing malady. She had been in a bad way for several days and her death was not unexpected. Mrs. Sidway was a woman of strong character who made a powerful impression on all with whom she came in contact. She was a highly educated and much travelled woman and a person whom it was a pleasure to know intimately because of her large fund of knowledge. She was born in Alton, the daughter of Judge Martin, head of one of the prominent early day families here. She was married here in 1850 to Leverett B. Sidway. Part of their married life she spent in Chicago. About twenty-five years ago she came back from Chicago and resumed her residence here, going to the farm where she spent the remainder of her life. Her husband died in 1914. She was a member of the Episcopal Church. Mrs. Sidway leaves two sons, Harry and George. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the home and burial will be at Alton City Cemetery.

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SIDWAY, LOUISE MILNOR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1922

Mrs. Louise Milnor Sidway, wife of Henry T. Sidway of Godfrey, died yesterday afternoon at the family home after an illness of ten days. Her death was due to heart trouble. Members of her family knew that she was in a serious condition, and her two daughters, Mrs. Will. Curtis of Tampa, Fla., and Mrs. Frank Houghton of Springfield were summoned to attend her. Mrs. Curtis was on her way here when her mother died, but the other daughter was present. Mrs. Sidway spent most of her life in Chicago, and was married there to Mr. Sidway. They came to Godfrey where Mr. Sidway took up the management of the fine farm which he owns there, and ever since her coming from Chicago Mrs. Sidway has been one of the best known of Godfrey residents. She was known for her gracious hospitality and her many fine qualities of mind and character and her death was the cause of great sorrow in the community where she had lived. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home. Interment will be in the Godfrey cemetery. Rev. F. D. Butler of the St. Paul Episcopal church will officiate.

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SIEBEN, JAMES H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 30, 1908          Man Who Painted Beautiful Business Signs Dies

James H. Sieben, known as the man who painted beautiful and artistic business signs for Alton business houses, died Thursday afternoon at 5 o'clock at his home, 801 east Second street, from paralysis. He never rallied after the first prostration, which occurred Monday evening while he was playing with his children in his home. The stroke of paralysis came just about the time of day that his death occurred. Mr. Sieben was a first class sign painter and an artist of considerable ability. Many of the prettiest and most artistic signs displayed by Alton business houses were made by him, and he was kept busy filling the demands made on him for his services. He had been in ill health for some time and had frequently told his friends that he was a broken down man, although only 43 years of age. He had been working hard and it was perhaps too close attention to his work that caused his trouble. He was devoted to his family and he also had many very good friends. In business circles he was highly esteemed. Mr. Sieben leaves his wife and three children.

 

SIEBEN, JAMES H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 2, 1908

The funeral of James H. Sieben was held Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the home on Second street to St. Mary's church. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Fr. Joseph Meckel at the church and at the grave. The funeral was attended by a large number of men who marched in a column from the church to St. Joseph's cemetery. In the column were the White Hussars band, the German Benevolent society, the Owls, Western Catholic Union and the Painters Union. It was the third funeral on as many successive Sundays attended by the German Benevolent society.

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SIEBEN, UNKNOWN INFANT SON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1907

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Sieben on Sunday morning at 2:25 o'clock. The child died last night from convulsions.

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SIEBN, HARRY A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, March 6, 1899

The little son of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Siebn, Harry A., aged two months, died Sunday afternoon after a short illness with bronchitis. The funeral will be Tuesday afternoon from the family home at Second and Spring streets, and services will be held at St. Mary's church, at 2:30 o'clock.

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SIEGEL, MIKE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1918               Old Time City Employee Succumbs to Diabetes

Mike Siegel, aged 67, died at St. Joseph's Hospital at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon. He had been there a week, having been taken to the hospital when an illness with diabetes assumed an acute stage. Siegel was well known about town. He had worked for the city many years and was always an efficient worker, though he did work in a humble capacity. Mike was a philosopher and the bits of wisdom that fell from his lips as he would sit during his spare time talking to friends were quite interesting, always. Mike was always in good spirits, and though he was 67, his society was not scorned by the younger men. He leaves a brother, David Siegel, the merchant tailor on Belle street. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock, and burial will be in Godfrey cemetery. The funeral of Seigel will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from the Siegel home at 209 West Seventh street.

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SIEGEL, UNKNOWN CHILD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1907

The two years old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Siegel died last night at the home, 1124 Pearl street, from intermittent fever. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock and burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 31, 1907

The funeral of the three years old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Siegel was held this afternoon from the home in Pearl street. Many neighbors and friends of the family attended the funeral, and burial which was in City cemetery.    [Note:  I believe this child is the same as above, but I do not know whether it was a son or daughter.]

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SIGLOCK, LAURENCE J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1917

Lawrence J. Siglock, aged 48, died at his home on Hayden avenue on Saturday evening after an illness of three months. Mr. Siglock up until the time of his illness had been employed as a foreman at the Western Cartridge Co. He was born in Alton and lived here all his life. Mr. Siglock is survived by his wife, Anna E., and eight children, all of whom live in Alton. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral to the Greenwood Cemetery.

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SIGLOCK, M. J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 8, 1907

M. J. Siglock, aged 60 years, died this morning at 7 o'clock at St. Joseph's hospital, where he was taken a few days ago to be treated for kidney troubles. The body was removed to the home of his son, Lawrence J. Siglock, 205 Madison street, and the funeral will be held from there tomorrow afternoon. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery. The son is the only survivor of the family.

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SIMMENS, PETER/Source: Troy Call, January 18, 1918

Death had a sudden and tragic summons for Peter Simmens in the cold still hours of last Saturday morning when, while doing duty for the Pennsylvania railroad, he was struck by a train and killed a short distance east of the St. Jacob depot. No one witnessed the accident, and it first became known about six o'clock when the dead and frozen body was found near the mill switch by the crew of a freight train. The skull was fractured and there were numerous other cuts and bruises about the body. Simmens was employed as a section hand and with William Weidner was detailed Friday night to keep the switches free from snow. A fierce blizzard was raging and the night was one of the worst ever experienced by section men. Simmens was stationed at the west end of the switch and Weidner at the east end. The accident is known to have occurred after midnight, but it is not known definitely what train struck Simmens. Two trains went east, one at 2:25 and the other at 2:38, and it was one of these which struck him but the engine crew did not know it at the time. Following the finding of the body it was taken to the W. P. Baer undertaking establishment and later removed to the home. Coroner Lowe was notified and sent Deputy Coroner H. C. Kueker of Troy to hold the inquest. The inquest was not completed Sunday on account of being unable to get the testimony of the engine crew, but was finished Monday. The verdict of the jury was that Simmens came to his death by being struck by a train under circumstances unknown. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the home of FMrs. Regina Meyer and were conducted by Rev. C. A. Hildebrand, pastor of the German Evangelical church, after which interment was made in Keystone cemetery. The pallbearers were: Oscar Witschie, John Wyatt, William Widner, Harry Sapp, Dan Liebler Jr., and Ed Pflugbeil. Deceased was a son of Mrs. Regina Meyer and was born in St. Jacob on February 20, 1876, being at the time of his death 41 years, 10 months and 23 days of age. He was never married and had worked as a section hand at St. Jacob for a number of years. Besides his mother, he is survived by one half-brother and two half-sisters who are Ollie Meyer of St. Louis and Mrs. Fred Goss and Miss Emma Meyer of St. Jacob. Mrs. Emil Blumer of St. Jacob is an aunt and John Simmens of St. Louis an uncle.

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[Simms ... see also Sims]

 

SIMMS, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1908

Edward Simms of Upper Alton died last night from old age at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Edward Kennedy, near Bethalto. He was taken ill several weeks ago, and was moved to his daughter's home, where he soon after suffered a severe paralytic stroke, resulting last night in his death. Edward Simms was one of the old residents of Upper Alton, and well known and highly respected in the village. He was 83 years of age, and was up to a year ago active physically, following the occupation of market gardening on the village. The daughter and five sons survive, Mrs. Edward Kennedy of Bethalto, Mrs. Herman Knapp, and Messrs. Theodore, Gustave, and Humbert Simms of Upper Alton, and William and George Simms who reside in the west. Mr. Sims had a stroke of paralysis a few years ago while at his home in Upper Alton, and he never recovered entirely from it. He had been making his home the last few years with his children, staying with one awhile and then another. Recently he went out to the farm of his daughter and had been making his home there when he was seized with a stroke of apoplexy, which resulted in his death Monday evening. Edward Sims was one of the oldest and best known gardeners in Madison county. He was born in England but came to Alton when a boy and has lived here ever since. He belonged to the Alton Horticultural society ever since that organization was formed, and always attended the meetings no matter where they were held. He was well known as a gardener and horticulturist. Will and George Simms went west some time ago, and they have not been located so as to inform them of their father's death. The funeral will be held Thursday morning from the Kennedy home, and burial will be in Upper Alton. Mr. Simms was a member of the Baptist church a long number of years.

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SIMMS, J. MORGAN (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 17, 1917        Former Coroner Takes His Own Life at Alton State Hospital

Shortly before 7 o'clock last evening, Dr. J. Morgan Simms, aged 49, formerly coroner of Madison County, ended his life at the Alton State Hospital by jumping from the top of the sun parlor. He died four hours later as the result of the injuries he received in his dive from the building to the ground. Dr. Simms was not responsible for his action, as his condition has been such for the past few months that he was unaccountable for his deeds. From the time he was defeated in the race for coroner of Madison county, he became despondent and his mind failed him. This condition became so bad that he was adjudged insane in Edwardsville and ordered sent to the Alton State Hospital for treatment there. When he was brought to the Alton State Hospital, his condition was so serious that it was believed he could live but a short time. He knew no one and could not even talk. His condition was so serious that a special nurse had been assigned to look after him. While caring for him her duties called her out of the room, and while she was gone he jumped from his bed and rushed down the hall. Breaking through a screen, he went out on the roof over the sun parlor where he either fell or jumped to the ground, a distance of twelve or fourteen feet. In the meantime, the nurse had returned to the room and discovered him missing and started a search. She arrived on the top of the sun parlor just in time to see him go off. The doctors say that the injuries he received in the fall would not have killed a normal man, but on account of his weakened condition they caused his death. Dr. Simms lived in Collinsville for a number of years and was well known there. He was a candidate for the office of coroner at the time of the Bull Moose defection, and went into office with the Democratic wave. When the Bull Moose returned to the Republican fold last November, he, as was the case with a number of other Democrats, was defeated. He is survived by a wife and two daughters, who live in Collinsville. The body will be shipped there for burial. The inquest was held this morning.

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SIMON, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 17, 1911

Charles Simon, aged 63, died Sunday noon at his home, 804 Washington avenue, after an illness from cancer of the liver. Mr. Simon had been a resident of Alton 31 years. He followed the trade of glassblowing until twelve years ago when he retired. He leaves besides his wife, five children: Charles Jr., John and Harry Simon; and Mrs. George Bennes and Mrs. Harry Halton. He was 63 years old last Thursday. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon, and burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SIMON, KATE (nee WEBSTER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 27, 1906

Mrs. Kate Simon, wife of John Simon, died at the St. Joseph's Hospital at 3:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon. She has been suffering from a complication of diseases for some time, and was taken to the hospital for treatment. Her condition grew so much worse Thursday that her family was summoned, and were with her when the end came. Mrs. Simon was Miss Kate Webster, and resided all her life in Alton. She was 36 years of age, and leaves a family of four girls and four boys. The burial will be Saturday, service being held in the St. Patrick's church at 9 o'clock Saturday morning.

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SIMONS, EUNICE AMANDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 1, 1913

Mrs. Eunice Amanda Simons died Sunday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Albert M. Jackson, Western Military Academy, Upper Alton, from the debility of old age. Mrs. Eunice Amanda Simons, daughter of Horace Miner and Elizabeth Brown, was born at Grafton, Vermont, November 16, 1837. She was one of a family of eight children, and at an early age she moved with her family to Ashtabula County, Ohio. She attended the public schools of Ohio and Olivet College, Mich.  In 1860 she was married to John Frederick Simons. They had two children, a son, DeForest, who died in Upper Alton in 1893, and a daughter, Mrs. A. M. Jackson. Mr. Simons died in 1879. Since 1888 Mrs. Simons has made her home in Upper Alton with her daughter. In early youth she united with the Presbyterian Church and took an active part in religious work. She has had her membership in the Upper Alton Presbyterian Church for about twenty years. She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Jackson, and two brothers, Mr. Dwight Miner of Chicago, and Mr. Francis Miner of West Union. Ia. Though of a modest and retiring disposition, she was highly esteemed by a large circle of friends in Upper Alton, and was recognized as a most devoted Christian mother. Funeral services at the Western Military Academy at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday. Burial at Oakwood Cemetery.

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SIMPSON, JOHN C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 13, 1904

John C. Simpson, aged 75 years, died in St. Louis Saturday afternoon after a long illness. The body was brought to Alton Monday noon for burial in City Cemetery, and Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann conducted the services at the grave. Many years ago Mr. Simpson conducted a livery stable in Alton under the firm name of Gardner & Simpson, in the building on Fourth street occupied by Schmidt & Hellrung as a liquor store. He was city marshal of Alton at one time and was well known in the city many years ago. He is survived by only one son.

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SIMPSON, MARIETTA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1923      Aged Woman Dies - Was One of Long Lived Sisters - Unusual Record in her Family

Mrs. Marietta Simpson, widow of F. B. Simpson, died last evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. E. Walton, in Upper Alton, from old age. She was nearly 94 years of age. Her life closed quietly and peacefully. It was just like a fading out. She had been growing slightly weaker in the last two years and was in bed most of the time because she could not walk about. However, she was not sick all through the winter and until Wednesday, when she had a chill, she showed no signs of any disposition except the weakness and inability to move around. Mrs. Simpson came of a long lived family. She was one of eight children, two of whom survive her. The youngest of the family to die was 78. All the others passed the eighties. The last one to die preceding Mrs. Simpson lived a little longer than Mrs. Simpson, having passed her ninety-fourth birthday, and was the longest lived of the whole family. The mother of this remarkable generation lived beyond ninety. The two sisters who survive her are Mrs. Lavinia Forwood and Mrs. H. W. Denny of Medora. Mrs. Forwood is 83 and Mrs. Denny is 78. Mrs. Simpson was born in Hardin County, near Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1829. When she was ten years old she went to Medora neighborhood with her parents and there she grew up, was married and spent all her life until three years ago when she came to Alton to live with Mrs. Walton. She had with her another daughter, Miss Julia Simpson, who was at the Walton home too. Beside these two daughters, she leaves four other children, S. E. Simpson of Carrollton, Ill., French B. Simpson of Medora, Mrs. A. C. Steed of San Diego, Calif., and Mrs. John Robbins of Albany, N. Y. She leaves also fourteen grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Her husband was for many years known as one of the largest landowners in the Medora neighborhood, in Macoupin and Greene counties. In all her long career in Medora, Mrs. Simpson was a devoted member of the Medora Baptist Church. The body has been taken to Medora for burial. Services will be held there Sunday afternoon at the Medora Baptist Church and will be conducted by Rev. L. H. Williams, assisted by Rev. Henry Dixon. Prior to the departure of the funeral party for Medora this afternoon, brief services were conducted at the Walton home by Rev. Dr. Magill of the College Avenue Baptist Church.

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SIMS, ANNIE (nee HARVELL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1923                   Upper Alton Business Woman

Mrs. Annie Sims, wife of Theodore Sims, died Saturday night at 9:20 o'clock at the family home, at the Sims store building at the north end of the Broadway car line. She had been almost an invalid for four years but she never gave up until just a week before she died. On the Sunday preceding her death she went to bed and did not get up again. During her long illness Mrs. Sims had borne up bravely and she continued to devote all her attention to the business of the Sims store which she and her husband had conducted on that corner for 35 years and to her family. She did not intend to allow her physical debility to interfere with her attention to her family and to the business and she continued to fight against her ailment during the four years' time up to just a week before her death. Many of her friends had noted with much regret her failing conditions and they were convinced that she could not keep up very long. The Sims store had been referred to for many years as the store at the end of the line, although Mrs. Simms and her husband had conducted the business there many years before the car line was ever extended north of College avenue on Washington. Mrs. Sims was the daughter of an old time store keeper, Louis Harvell, who was the original business man at the corner of Sixth and Alby streets, a corner that has continued to be an important business location. She was born in Alton and had her first business experience in her father's store. She was married to Theodore Sims about 45 years ago and soon after their marriage they started a grocery store in the North End of Upper Alton. A few years later they located in their present corner at Washington avenue and Salu street, where they continued up to the present time in business. Mrs. Sims was a most efficient business woman and, living in the same building with their business, she and her husband have given their undivided attention to the business through the long number of years they have enjoyed life together. Early hours in the morning and late hours at night has been their method of doing business and such a thing as closing the store for anything was almost unknown to them. The store was their home - or a very important part of it - and the only time the business was not open was during the hours of the night when everybody sleeps. Mrs. Sims was most highly esteemed by everyone who knew her and she had come in contact with many people during her long career as a business woman. Mrs. Sims leaves besides her devoted husband two sons, Fay and Harry Sims, and two daughters, Mrs. John W. Hackett Jr., and Mrs. George Hinderband, all of Alton. She also leaves three sisters, Mrs. Ruth Embly and Mrs. Mattie Le Masters, who reside at the Enos Apartments and Mrs. Zene Baired of Indianapolis. During the last few days of Mrs. Sims' life, her decline was very rapid. Her physician had been summoned late Saturday afternoon and in the evening when she was sinking an effort was made to get the physician again. Her husband and son went up town in search of a doctor, but the end came before they reached the home. Mrs. Sims passed her 65th birthday anniversary on the 15th of this month. The funeral had not been arranged for this morning.

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SIMS, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 17, 1903

The funeral of the late Frank Sims took place this afternoon from the family home in Salu. The services were conducted at the home by Rev. W. H. Ganneway, and there was a large attendance of friends of the family. There was a beautiful floral offering, and the grave was covered with a bank of flowers.

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SIMS, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 17, 1913

The funeral of Harry Sims, colored, was held this afternoon at the home in Upper Alton. Burial was in Oakwood Cemetery.

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SIMS, UNKNOWN INFANT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 1, 1904

The infant child of Mrs. Della Sims, colored, died at the home in Salu Sunday. The funeral was held this afternoon at 3 o'clock, and burial took place in Oakwood cemetery.

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SINCLAIR, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 27, 1916

Mrs. Margaret Sinclair, wife of Alexander Sinclair, died at her residence on West Brown street in Upper Alton, shortly after midnight Saturday morning. She was 77 years of age. Mrs. Sinclair had lived in Upper Alton about fifteen years. She was twice married, first to Col. Sam Hughes of Wanda, and she lived there many years, afterward going to Edwardsville, then moving to Upper Alton. She was the mother of Mrs. O. T. Kendall of Wanda, her only child. Mrs. Sinclair was taken ill about the first of the year with grippe and pneumonia, and never fully recovered. She was taken down again two weeks ago and her death resulted. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon from the home, Rev. Mumford officiating.

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SKAETS, EROD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1904

The funeral of ERod, the 10 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Skaets, took place this morning from the home in East End Place, and was attended by many sympathizing friends of the family. Interment was in City Cemetery.

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SKAGGS, LEROY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 29, 1910

Coroner C. N. Streeper has been a busy man for a few days holding inquests in cases of accidental deaths. Yesterday he held an inquest over Leroy Skaggs, who was run over by a coal wagon on which he was driving. Skaggs was seated on the load of coal, and as the wagon passed over a railroad crossing the front end gate collapsed and allowed Skaggs to fall down in front of the wagon, the wheels passing over him. He died yesterday and a verdict of accidental death was found.

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SKATES/SPENCER, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 2, 1919      Victim of Shooting Dies - Murderer Unknown

Mystery shrouds the death of Harry Spencer, 30, who died Sunday morning at St. Joseph's hospital from a bullet wound just above the heart. He was found lying near the railroad tracks at East Alton Saturday night by a C. B. and Q. train crew, who were attracted by his moans. He was taken to the hospital in the ambulance. Spencer told George Cleveland, ambulance chauffeur, that he was climbing into a box car when he was shot. He crawled for some distance from the car, he told Cleveland. The bullet entered the left side and went out at the hip, indicating that Spencer was shot by someone standing above him. Spencer's coat was found later with a bullet hole in the left lapel, just at the point where the bullet entered the man's body. A tramp, sleeping in a box car near by, said he had heard no shots, and a man and woman on a porch in the neighborhood also declared that they had heard no report. Spencer told the ambulance driver that he had a sister in St. Louis. His sister, Mrs. Minnie Michellis, 709 East 5th street, St. Louis, said her brother had been a wanderer, and that often she had not heard from him for months at a time. She declared his name was Harry Skates. The chief detective of the C. B. and Q. said the man's name was Spencer, and identified him as a car thief. The body is being held by Deputy Coroner Bauer, who will conduct an inquest. The date for the inquest has not been definitely set, the coroner being anxious to have the railroad detective testify, and will probably be held when the detective can attend. Efforts to find the slayer of the man have proved futile. The fact that the coat of the dead man was found some distance from the car leads to the belief that he was not shot while trying to climb into a box car. He was in a serious condition when picked up, and it is thought that he did not remember full particulars of the shooting. Skates was buried this afternoon, from the Bauer undertaking parlor on Market street. Interment was in the City cemetery.

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SKELLY, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 10, 1918

Mrs. Anna Skelly, aged 71, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. G. R. Butler, 922 Washington avenue, at 2:30 o'clock this morning after an illness of about six months. Her death was due to a general breakdown from old age. Mrs. Skelly was born in Liverpool, England, October 9, 1847. She had been living in Janesville, Wis., up to the time of the death of her husband, Henry Skelley, March 20, 1904, after which she came to Alton to be with her daughter. Mrs. Skelly leaves her daughter, Mrs. Butler, and six grandchildren, Lawrence, Phyllis, Harriet and George Butler of Alton; Harwood and Willis Skelly of Janesville, Wis. The body will be taken to Janesville for burial. Mr. and Mrs. Butler will leave Thursday evening with the body for the old home.

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SKELLY, WALTER B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1905

Walter B. Skelly, steward at the Elks club, was probably fatally injured Saturday night by falling while attempting to alight from an electric car at Fourth and State streets. Skelly, it is said by passengers, attempted to get off while the car was still moving rapidly and was thrown on the back of his head and shoulders. He was picked up badly injured and was taken to No. 1 Hose House, where Dr. Fisher attended him. The members of the lodge of Elks took charge of him and had him removed to his home on State street. He lost consciousness a short time after being taken home, and his condition became hopeless. He suffered from a hemorrhage of the brain. Death resulted from Skelly's injuries at 11 o'clock. He was 58 years of age and leaves his widow and one child. Deputy Coroner Keiser impaneled a jury and will hold an inquest Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock.

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SKINNER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 6, 1916

John Skinner, aged 96, colored, died at his home on the Coal Branch at 9 o'clock this morning after a long illness. Mr. Skinner was well known in the northern part of the city where he has lived for many years. He is survived by a wife and a number of children. The funeral will be held on Saturday afternoon. For many years Mr. Skinner has conducted a truck farm near North Alton and has supplied his neighbors with vegetables. He was an old soldier.

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SKINNER, NATHAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 3, 1907

Nathan Skinner, aged 73, died Tuesday evening at his home in Moro after an illness of six weeks from stomach troubles. His wife, to whom he was married 52 years ago, survives him. He leaves an adopted daughter, Mrs. Samuel Foreman.

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SKIPPER, LUCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1918

Mrs. Lucy Skipper, wife of Ivor V. Skipper of 446 West Bluff street, died this morning after a lingering illness. She leaves her husband and two small children. She has resided in Alton for some time and is well known. Her husband, Ivor V. Skipper, is an engineer at the power house. The present plans are to ship the body on Friday to Columbus, Ohio, for interment. Mrs. Skipper formerly resided in Columbus.

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SLATEN, EMMA J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 10, 1919

Mrs. Emma J. Slaten, 68 years old, wife of George W. Slaten, died yesterday at noon at her home, 1919 Central avenue. She has resided in Alton since Jan. 1, before which she lived in Grafton. She is survived by her husband, a daughter, Mrs. Clara Belle Crull, a grandson, Pierce Heffington, and a sister, Mrs. E. S. Pierce of St. Louis. She was born in St. Louis, Nov. 29, 1850. The funeral will be Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. at Grafton, from the Methodist church. Interment will be at Grafton.

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SLATER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 14, 1923

William Slater, aged 42, died this morning at 12:45 a.m. at his home on Wood River avenue. Death was caused by a complication of diseases. The body was taken to the Streeper Undertaking parlors, where the funeral will be held Sunday morning at 10 o'clock. The body will be taken to Vandalia, Ill. for burial, which will be in South Hill cemetery. He leaves his wife, Amy, two daughters, Mabel and Virginia, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Slater Sr., of Wood River, three brothers and two sisters.

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SLAUGHTER, LAWRENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1906                  Slayer of Dan Wright Was Hoodoo Victim - Claim He Was Haunted by Wright's Ghost

With his mind almost wrecked with worry over having been compelled to kill Dan Wright, a notorious negro character who died with his boots on in Upper Alton several years ago, Lawrence Slaughter, a negro resident of Upper Alton, died last night. He claimed that he was a victim of a hoodoo and that he was being haunted by Dan Wright's ghost. At times during his illness, he would become wildly excited and would start fighting an imaginary foe with terrific vigor. Physicians said that Slaughter died from dropsy, but people who knew him well say that his bad health was the result of a physical breakdown from worry. It will be remembered that Dan Wright, a notorious and dangerous negro character, was slain by Slaughter in Upper Alton while Wright was trying to force entrance to Slaughter's house to kill him. The career of the bad man, suddenly ended by Slaughter, was so bad that Slaughter was hardly even taken into custody. He was held at police headquarters in Alton after surrendering himself, but was fully exonerated the next morning and the police and other Alton people who knew Wright well were disposed to raise a fund for his health. Indeed, a cash bonus was started and a number of people voluntarily walked into the police headquarters and gave him money, ostensibly to aid in his defense, but really as a thank offering for killing Wright. Slaughter never did recover his peace of mind, although fully justified and he imagined that the ghost of Wright was haunting him and only waiting for vengeance.
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SLICK, T. H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 8, 1919            Brakeman Killed in Bluff Line Yards - Caught in Guard Rail

T. H. Slick, a brakeman on the Bluff Line, was instantly killed this morning in the Bluff Line new yards near the Mississippi Sand Co. property. His foot became fast in a guard rail, it is supposed, as it was necessary to pry him out of the guard rail after the accident. Slick was engaged in uncoupling a car that was to be set out of the train. It is said by men working with him that Slick was in the act of lifting the pin that would admit of the release of the car from the train, and just at that moment the freight train was backed up. Slick was knocked down and dragged a short distance in the guard rail. His body was horribly mutilated. The watch he carried was found afterward, crushed down between the guard and the rail, the stem broken off and the case badly mashed, yet the watch was still running. F. A. McMurry, the conductor, said that Slick was his cousin. His age was 41, and he leaves a wife and a child in Springfield, Ill. The body was turned over to Deputy Coroner Bauer, who prepared it for shipment to Springfield. Testimony of men in the crew, none of whom saw Slick killed, was taken by the deputy coroner and will be submitted to the coroner's jury.

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SLOAN, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 13, 1908

Louis Sloan, father of Agent W. L. Sloan of the C. & A. at Godfrey, and of Mrs. Minnie Dimmock, died Saturday evening at his home in Godfrey after an illness with kidney trouble. He came to Godfrey last November to make his home with his son in his declining years. He went on his son's little farm to take care of it and was enjoying his new life very much when he was taken ill. He was 70 years of age. The funeral was held this afternoon from the Bethany church, and burial was in the Bethany cemetery, Rev. C. Nash officiating.

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SLOCUM, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1909           Old Railroad Man Dies From Pneumonia

John Slocum, aged 62, died at St. Joseph's hospital Sunday morning from pneumonia after a brief illness. He was taken to the hospital Friday, and was not thought to be very dangerously ill. His death was very unexpected. The death of Slocum was the first break in the family circle in fifty years, when the father died. The aged mother is still living at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In addition, there are three brothers living, T. D. Slocum of Upper Alton; William T. Slocum and M. C. Slocum and Mrs. Allan Peddycord of Cedar Rapids, Iowa.  William T. Slocum and Mrs. Peddycord arrived this morning to attend the funeral, which will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of T. D. Slocum. The deceased was engaged as a brakeman on the C. & A. for many years, and was on one of the first trains run between Alton and St. Louis. For five years he had been employed in the glass works.

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SLOCUM, THOMAS D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 17, 1910

Thomas D. Slocum, an old resident of Upper Alton, died Tuesday morning at his home on Edwards street. Mr. Slocum was suffering from cancer. Last winter he underwent an operation for the removal of a cancer on his upper lip, which he believed was caused from smoking. Shortly afterward another one made its appearance on the side of his face. He was being treated at Carlinville for the trouble a few weeks ago when his condition became serious. He was brought back home and he continued to sink rapidly until the end came this morning at 8:30 o'clock. Mr. Slocum was a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows orders, and he was prominent in both lodges. He came to Upper Alton in 1881, at the time the C. & A. cutoff was built through Upper Alton. Many men came here that year to help with the construction of the new railroad, and most of them located here permanently, Mr. Slocum being in that class. He raised a family of children in Upper Alton, and all of them survive him. Mrs. Slocum preceded her husband to the grave. Her death was very sudden, occurring nine years ago. She was on a Middletown car returning home from Alton, and as the car crossed Washington avenue Mrs. Slocum was stricken with apoplexy and died within a few minutes after being removed from the car. The children who survive are Mrs. J. J. Mullen of Alton; Mrs. William Elwell; Warren, William and Elmer Slocum, all of Upper Alton. Mr. Slocum was engaged in the teaming business principally during his career in Upper Alton, and he owned a small farm near town for many years, which he recently sold. He served a term of three years as highway commission in Wood River township. He also held other public offices in Upper Alton and in Wood River township at various times. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home of Warren Slocum to the Upper Alton Presbyterian church.

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SLOCUM, UNKNOWN CHILD OF WARREN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 27, 1906

The funeral of the little child of Mr. and Mrs. Warren Slocum will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from St. Patrick's church. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

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SLOMAN, ADALINE BARRY [nee FLAGG]/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 28, 1930
A brief illness following a period of failing health culminated in the death of Mrs. Adaline Flagg Sloman, wife of Mark Sloman, early today at the residence at Ninth and Alton streets. She was 78 years old. Born in this city, Dec. 5, 1851, Adaline Barry Sloman was the daughter of Richard and Sarah Barry Flagg. She was married to Mark Sloman who had come from Devonshire, England, Jan. 5, 1875, and their golden wedding was observed on the anniversary date in 1925, the event being a particularly happy one for them because of the presence of their ten children. Mrs. Sloman spent her girlhood and the first five years of her married life in Alton. With her husband and their three small children, she then moved to a farm near Pawnee, Ill., where the next 35 years were spent. Since 1914, the family home has been in Alton. 9 Children Survive. Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Sloman, of whom nine survive, three sons and six daughters. The sons, are Charles H., of Taylorville, the Rev. W. Richard of Salt Lake City, and George S. Sloman of Pawnee, Ill. The daughters are Mrs. Florence F. Overbey of Wichita, Kas., Mrs. Maude E. Hoppin of Pawnee, Mrs. Susie B. Overbey of Greenfield, Mrs. Esther A. Lawrence of Davenport, Ia., Mrs. Rebecca A. Snyder, and Mrs. M. Ruth Dipetro of Chicago. Twenty-one grandchildren also survive. Children whose death preceded that of Mrs. Sloman were two sons, John H., who died in January, 1901, at age of nine, and Ralph A. Sloman, whose death at the age of 51 years, occurred a year ago last April. Deacons as Pallbearers.  Mrs. Sloman was affiliated with the First Baptist church both in her early years and since her return to Alton. This was the church in which her father, an early day prominent business man in Alton was active for a period of 50 years, and to those interests she, in turn, had been devoted. The funeral services have been set for Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence, 902 Alton street, to City Cemetery. The Rev. J. M. Warner, pastor of the First Baptist Church, will officiate. Members of the Board of Deacons of the church will serve as pallbearers.

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SLOMAN, MARK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 7, 1931
Mark Sloman, prominent churchman, retired farmer, and earlier in life connected with the dry goods business in Alton, died at his home, 902 Alton street, Friday evening at 8:45 o'clock. He was in his seventy-eighth year. The death of Mr. Sloman had been expected. Two weeks ago last Wednesday he was stricken with a form of paralysis which rapidly progressed until the end came.The death of Mr. Sloman removes one of the most devoted members of the First Baptist Church. He was a deacon and a constant worker in that church. One of the most conspicuous works he did was to help launch what was a little mission school on west Ninth street, and by his constant attention to its interests saw it grow into a work of great importance in connection with the First Baptist Church. In all the business of the First church in which he had held membership, he had a leading part. His counsel was much sought and, his judgment regarded as sound, his importance in the church could not be overestimated. Mr. Sloman was born in Devonshire, England, April 17, 1855, and came to the United States when he was 30 years of age. He came direct to Alton and for several years after that was connected with the dry goods store of Richard Flagg, in those days a prominent business institution on Third street. Two years after he came to Alton he married the daughter of his employer, Miss Adaline Flagg, in Alton. They lived here until 1879 when they went to a farm new Pawnee, Ill., where they lived for 35 years. Mr. Sloman was a successful farmer, and when he retired from the farm he turned the property over to his son to manage it for him. Since that time he had lived in the old Flagg place at Ninth and Alton streets. Mrs. Sloman died one year ago this coming Feb. 28. The couple were the parents of 11 children, nine of whom survive them, three sons and six daughters. The children are Charles Sloman of Taylorville, Ill., Rev. W. Richard Sloman of Salt Lake City, Utah, George Sloman, of Pawnee, Ill., Mrs. Florence Overbey, of Wichita, Kan., Mrs. Maud Hoppin of Pawnee, Ill., Mrs. Susan Overbey, of Greenfield, Ill., Mrs. Esther Lawrence of Davenport, Ia., Mrs. Rebecca Snyder and Mrs. Ruth Di Pietro of Chicago. All of the children either have arrived, or will be here to attend the funeral of their father. Mr. Sloman was a kindly, friendly man, and after his return to Alton, following his 35-year absence from the city, he made new friends to replace those he had known in his earlier days in Alton, and who were no longer here. He possessed a large circle of friendships in Alton, largely the fruit of his contacts here since he resumed making this city his home. He was devoted to his family and nothing made him so happy as a family reunion at which he would be glad to welcome back to the home the children who had become widely scattered. He was intensely proud of his big family and took particular satisfaction in the fact that he had one son who had entered the ministry. He himself was as capable in handling religious work as many a clergyman, and in his religious work he found plenty to keep him busy in the days since he retired from farming. Mr. Sloman was not affiliated with any fraternal organizations but for 57 years was an active member of the Baptist Church. The funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the residence, 902 Alton street and will be conducted by the Rev. J. M. Warner, one of whose most valuable helpers Mr. Sloman had been in the First Baptist church. Burial will be in City cemetery.

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SLOSS, GRACE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 13, 1910

The funeral of Miss Grace Sloss was held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from her late home, 431 east Ninth street. Services were conducted by Rev. A. G. Lane of the First Presbyterian church. A large number of friends of Miss Sloss, and relatives, attended the funeral. She had a large circle of acquaintances and many good friends who were grieved at her death, although it followed a long period of suffering. The pallbearers were cousins of Miss Sloss. There were many touching testimonials of esteem in which the young woman was held, by the children who had attended her school, their parents, and by those who had been associated with her in her school life and work. During the morning many of her little pupils called to take a last look at their departed teacher, and they took with them little bouquets of flowers. The floral offerings were numerous and beautiful, but not the last beautiful was the flowers the little children took for the teacher they had all loved. It was a striking testimonial of the effectiveness of the work of the teacher, and showed that the children had enjoyed their school work under her. Mrs. George A McKinney and Mrs. Lewis M. Carr sang several numbers at the home and one at the cemetery.

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SLOVER, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 2, 1921

Charles Slover, aged 56, was found dead this morning in a little house he occupied in the rear of the home of his only brother, Peter Slover, 1228 Rodemeyer avenue. Death is supposed to have been due to paralysis, as he had suffered several attacks of paralysis in the past. Last Friday, as he was getting off a street car at Cliff and State street, he fell and he complained of having been slightly injured. Sunday he said he felt much better. About 5 o'clock this morning the discovery was made that Slover had died sometime during the night, and Deputy Coroner Streeper was notified. Mr. Slover came here from East Newbern about 15 years ago. He was not very strong and had not been employed, except at light work. His death leaves his brother, Peter, as the only survivor of the family. The body will be taken to East Newbern for burial, Wednesday morning.

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SLOVER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1923

William Slover passed away Tuesday, January 9, 1923 at 2:30 p.m., at the home of his daughter, Mrs. H. C. Chaffer of Roxana. Mr. Slover's death was due to the infirmities of old age. He was 88 years old Thursday Jan. 4.  Mr. Slover was well known in Jersey County where he settled when a very young man, coming from Munice, Ind., where he was born, January 4, 1935. He was married December 25, 1862 to Miss Mary Caffe who preceded him to the grave 23 years ago next month. Mr. Slover is survived by 3 daughters and 2 sons, Mrs. H. C. Chaffer of Roxana, Mrs. H. V. Keyser of Elsah, Mrs. Ella Hansell of Alton, Joseph Slover of Jerseyville and Calvin Slover of St. Louis. There are 11 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren besides a host of relatives and friends. The body will be taken to Old Newbern Thursday morning at 8:50 on the C. P. and St. L. The funeral will be held from the Cumberland Presbyterian church of which Mr. Slover and Mrs. Elizabeth Herrin, an old lady in the 90's, who lives in Jerseyville, were the only Charter members left. Mr. Slover's death followed soon after that of his old friend, William Dennison. The two had been almost inseparable companions, were taken very ill about the same time and died within a few days of each other.

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SMALLEY, MARY EMMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 8, 1918

Mrs. Mary Emma Smalley, who died at her home, 2329 Central avenue early this week, was born in East St. Louis in 1861, being at the time  of her death 58 years of age. When young the family of the young girl moved to Bunker Hill. From Bunker Hill she moved to Alton. Mrs. Smalley was taken ill in December 1917, but her condition did not become serious until three months ago. It was only a few hours before her death, however, that the sick woman realized that the end was coming, but seemed very willing to die. She was the mother of eleven children, two of whom died in infancy. The children are: Sallie, Andrew J., Grover C., Oscar D., Maud B., Linnia, Ben F., Mary Julia and Lawrence A.

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SMART, ANNA (nee RANDLE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 7, 1904

Mrs. Anna Smart, wife of the late Edgar M. Smart, died Wednesday morning at 5 o'clock at the family home on Liberty street after a long illness. She had been ill for six months and had endured long suffering. Her illness was brought on by rheumatism, which lasted for several months and later developed into stomach and bowel trouble. Mrs. Smart leaves one son, Edgar Smart, also her mother, Mrs. Susan Randle, and one sister and two brothers - Mrs. Nellie Drum and Harry and Isaac Randle of Upper Alton. Her husband, Edgar M. Smart, who was a member of the Upper Alton village board, died two years ago last June. Mrs. Smart's death is a sad blow to all her relatives who have watched at her bedside during her long period of suffering. She was a member of the Methodist church and was a sincere worker in the church and was loved by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Mrs. Smart would have been 37 years old the 20th of this month. She was born in Upper Alton where she lived all her life. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the family home.

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SMILEY, RUSSELL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Wednesday, April 19, 1899

The funeral of Russell Smiley was held at two o'clock this afternoon. The family home was filled at the sad hour with an assemblage of friends of the bereaved parents and the boy friends of the lad whom death has so untimely removed. Sad as funerals always are, the funeral of Russell Smiley was an unusually sad one. The large parlor where the body lay in a handsome casket was almost filled with flowers, testimonials of the esteem of his friends and of the sorrow of his schoolmates at the parting. Because of the funeral, the High school classes, of which Russell was a member, were dismissed and very many of his schoolmates attended the services. Rev. H. K. Sanborne of the Presbyterian church conducted the services at the house and at the cemetery. A quartet from the Alton High School sang. The pallbearers were John Kerr, Jamie Logan, Charles Rich, Roy Maxwell, Ralph Davis, Walter Allen.

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SMILEY, SARAH W./Source: Alton Telegraph, September 12, 1912

Mrs. Sarah W. Smiley, widow of David R. Smiley, died at 3:10 a.m. Monday at the home of her son, George H. Smiley, 1011 State street, after being paralyzed on the right side for eleven years. Mrs. Smiley was 96 years of age August 13. She came to Alton eleven years ago, a few years after the death of her husband, to spend the winter with her son here, and intended to go back to her old home in Springfield, Vt., to spend the summer. She did not realize her hopes of returning to Springfield, as she was stricken with paralysis during the winter and ever since then her whole right side was helpless and Mrs. Smiley required the constant attention of a nurse. Many times during the eleven years it was thought that the end was near, but each time she would rally and it was not until about six weeks ago that the decline set in which resulted in her passing away. When Mrs. Smiley came to Alton at the age of 85, she made the trip from Springfield, Vt. alone, and was apparently in the best of physical and mental health. It was a great surprise when the collapse came then. She had lived the greater part of her life in Springfield, Vt., but for thirty years lived at Washington, D. C. until the death of her husband, who had been connected with a department in the government service and retained his position until he had passed his 82nd year. Mrs. Smiley was a deeply religious woman and had been a member of the Congregational Church since she was a young woman. She never affiliated with the Alton church of that denomination, owing to her disability. She is survived by two sons, G. H. Smiley of Alton and W. E. Smiley of Maniton, Colo. The funeral of Mrs. Sarah W. Smiley was held Tuesday afternoon at home of her son, G. H. Smiley, on State street. Services were in private and were conducted by Rev. D. R. Martin of the Congregational church Tuesday evening. Mr. and Mrs. Smiley departed with the body for Springfield, Vt., where interment will take place.

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SMITH, ALBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1920

Albert, the 8 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Smith, died last night from diphtheria at the family home, 731 East Sixth street, after a short illness. The trouble was not realized to be grave until a short time before the child died. The mother had been sick and in her sickness the child was given remedier for a throat trouble.

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SMITH, ALFRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 11, 1916

Alfred Smith, aged 30, died last night at 16 Indiana avenue of tuberculosis. His wife died some time ago. He leaves his mother, two brothers, and three sisters. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home, and the burial will be in the Alton City Cemetery.

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SMITH, ALICE E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, June 29, 1931

In deference to the memory of Mrs. Alice E. Smith, whose death occurred early Sunday, exercises in dedication of the Johnson playground near the Smith home Sunday afternoon were curtailed and through action of Mayor Brenholt, the concert of the Municipal Band Sunday evening was transferred from Rock Spring park to Riverview park. It was not possible to defer the dedication of the Johnson street play space, but a tribute to Mrs. Smith, whose interest in playground matters has been well known was carried out when Mayor Brenholt just prior to his dedicatory remarks called on the assemblage to stand in a silent token of respect to her memory as the playground flag was lowered to half-staff. Much of the area of Rock Spring park was a gift to the city by the late William Eliot Smith. The land donated was originally a part of the beautiful Smith estate, Elmridge. And in further token of respect to the memory of Mrs. Smith, Mayor Brenholt, after the playground dedication, ordered that the band concert be transferred from Rock Spring pavilion to Riverview park. Officers were stationed in Rock Spring park to direct those coming there for the concert to the park on the bluffs.

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SMITH, AMY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 4, 1915               Church Bell Rung to Announce Death of Old Wanda Resident

The funeral of Mrs. Amy Smith, widow of Upton Smith, well known old time resident of the country below East Alton near Wanda, was held this afternoon in the Methodist Church at Wanda, and the services were conducted by Rev. Roy Fahnestock, a young man who grew up a neighbor to Mrs. Smith. Recently a new bell was given to his church by Mrs. John Poag, mother of Mrs. Frank Smith, and the bell had just been placed on the church and had never been rung. The death of Mrs. Smith occurred at 8 o'clock Monday evening, and when the news was spread the following morning, the new bell was tolled to announce Mrs. Smith's passing away to the neighboring country. It was the first time the bell was sounded after being given to the church by the mother-in-law of one of Mrs. Smith's sons. This afternoon at the funeral the bell announced the services and it was the first service the bell was used for. The attendance was very large in spite of the bad weather. Deceased was known all over the American Bottom as Grandma Smith. She had lived upon the farm where she died sixty years, and was one of the old time residents of the American Bottom. She was 74 years old last Christmas Day. Her husband died 23 years ago, and the following children survive: Mrs. Frank K. Lowe of Upper Alton; Mrs. Frank Smith; Mrs. Ralph Douglas; Henry Smith; and Mrs. John Van Preter of East Alton.

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SMITH, AMY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 15, 1913

Mrs. Amy J. Smith, wife of James Smith, died Tuesday morning at her home, 1246 State street, after an illness from which she had been suffering since last fall and which had kept her bedfast for eight weeks. Nephritis was given as the cause of her death. Mrs. Smith was a native of Alton, and all of her life she had lived in the same neighborhood, in the same block, and practically on the same place. She was born in Alton, July 7, 1851, and was just past her 62nd birthday. Her maiden name was Pile. She leaves beside her husband, James Smith, the former mail carrier, one daughter, Mrs. Frank Page; and two brothers, Samuel B. and George Pile, both of Alton. Mrs. Smith was a consistent member of St. Paul's Episcopal church, and the funeral service Thursday will be conducted by the rector of St. Paul's church, Rev. Arthur Goodger.

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SMITH, ARTHUR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 9, 1905

Arthur Smith, colored, who was once held without bond on a charge of murdering Sylvester Love at the foot of Ridge street, died at his home yesterday noon after a long illness dating from the time he was held in prison awaiting trial. Smith was acquitted of the charge of murder in the city court. His death resulted from consumption, which developed after a long illness with other troubles, and a surgical operation was performed upon him which resulted in no benefit to the man. His son died a few weeks ago. He was buried this afternoon from his late home at the foot of Ridge street.

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SMITH/BENJAMIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph Mon April 22, 1907            Submitted by Colleen Stutz
Benjamin Smith, a well known Godfrey farmer who suffered a paralytic stroke several days ago at his home near Godfrey, died Saturday from the effects. He was 60 years old and is survived by his two daughters, his wife dying several years ago. A brother James Smith is sexton of the Godfrey cemetery and another brother, Samuel, lives in Elm street here. The funeral was held this afternoon and was attended by a large number of friends and neighbors. Internment was in Godfrey cemetery.

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SMITH, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 6, 1905                    Old Woman Commits Suicide

Coroner Streeper and a few friends of the late Mrs. Caroline Smith, the woman who committed suicide a week ago by jumping into a cistern in Upper Alton because she was 86 years old, weak and helpless, will see that she is given a Christian burial tomorrow. Coroner Streeper said today that he had despaired of the daughter near Sedalia, Missouri doing anything for her mother, and that he did not believe she would pay any part of the funeral expenses. Some of the friends of the old woman, moved to pity by the sad tragedy of the last days of her life, have made up a purse and will pay for a decent burial for her. It is planned to hold the funeral tomorrow afternoon from the Streeper undertaking establishment in Upper Alton, and Rev. C. C. Hall will officiate. Friends of Mrs. Smith believe that her daughter's conduct since the mother's sad death has fully justified the mother reaching the conclusion it was useless to look to her for help.

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SMITH, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1908

Mrs. Caroline Smith, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Louis Haagen, died last evening at 5 o'clock at the Haagen homestead on State street, after an illness of four months. She was 40 years of age. Mrs. Smith's illness began with a nervous breakdown. She had suffered for a number of years with a nervous trouble, which was aggravated by shocks due to the deaths of members of the family. The death of her niece, Mrs. Helen Hyland, who died in Chicago about one year ago, coupled with the death of her mother, were the immediate cause of Mrs. Smith's breakdown. She grieved so deeply over the loss of these two favorites of hers that it affected her physical health. Paralysis of the spine set in, and in the past three weeks her condition became so serious that there was no hope held out to members of the family that she would recover. She had been in a dying condition for several days. Her husband, Earl C. Smith, who was also a member of a prominent former Alton family, is a victim of paralysis in Chicago, where he has been confined to his bed for over three years. Mrs. Smith was a woman of remarkably sweet disposition. In her girlhood days she was a famous beauty of Alton and a great favorite in society, and until her last illness she was one of the most beautiful women in Alton. She had many good friends who sincerely regret her untimely end, and her friends are reconciled to  her going only by the knowledge that she had been a great sufferer, and that her sufferings are ended. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

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SMITH, CHARLES W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 29, 1915

The funeral of Charles W. Smith, who, with George Link died from injuries received when struck by an interurban car at Mitchell on Christmas Day, will be held from the Smith family residence at Mitchell Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. After services at the house, the funeral cortege will proceed over the Allen line to Woodlawn cemetery, where the interment is to be. It is planned to arrive at the cemetery about 3 o'clock. Pallbearers selected are as follows: Former Mayor Joseph Faulstich, Alton; Postmaster J. F. Stillman, Edwardsville; James Haggart, Venice; Louis Hess, Mitchell; George Hoehn, Mitchell; and Louis Ahrens, Wanda. Charles E. Smith, a son, and his family arrived from their home at Darlington, Okla. at 10 o'clock Monday. It was pending their arrival that the completion of plans for the funeral were delayed. Thomas Smith, a brother, also of Darlington, arrived with the son.

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SMITH, DELIA [nee TROUT]/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1910

Mrs. Delia Smith, wife of Lloyd Smith, died at St. Joseph's hospital Thursday afternoon following a surgical operation performed to relieve a very grave condition of health. Her infant child which was born died also. Mrs. Smith was 19 years of age and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Trout. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, 1816 Central avenue, Rev. A. G. Lane officiating.

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SMITH, EDNA JEWETT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 27, 1907                       Wife of Edward A. Smith Dies

Mrs. Edna Jewett Smith, wife of E. A. Smith, died Tuesday evening at 5:20 o'clock at the family residence, 520 Mechanic street. She was ill eight weeks with a malignant tumor. The trouble was not diagnosed until recently, it being supposed she was suffering from some persistent malady of a minor character. The doctors decided two weeks ago that she could not recover, and all her children were sent for. All of them were at home at the time of her death. She suffered very little and the end was peaceful. Two slight operations had been performed to give her relief. When the end came it was sudden and very unexpected to her family. A half hour before death came she was smiling and cheerful, although she knew the end was rapidly approaching. A brief period of pain was followed a half hour later by death. Her family had been given much encouragement by her frequent rallying from the effects of the disease. Last Wednesday she was very low, but on Sunday she was able to sit up a short time. Mrs. Smith's maiden name was Edna Cushing Jewett. She was born at Boston, Mass., October 10, 1847. After the death of her father, when she was seven years old, she came to Alton to live with her aunt, Mrs. William R. Payson on Twelfth street. After living in Alton seven years she returned to Boston, and she was a teacher in the Boston public schools for seven years. She was married to Edward A. Smith at Boston in 1869, and afterward she returned to Alton as a bride to make her home the remainder of her life. She is survived by her husband and seven children: Miss Lucie Smith, Mrs. A. L. Kaiser, E. H. Smith, Jewett Smith, all of Alton; Mrs. Fred J. Worden of Muskogee, L. T., Walter M. Smith of Boston, Mass.; and Herbert C. Smith, who is attending school at the University of Illinois. She leaves also two brothers, Francis R. Jewett of Boston and E. H. Jewett of Colorado City, Colo., and a former sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Homans of Cleveland, Ohio.  Mrs. Smith was county president of the W. C. T. U. and had been secretary of the local union over twelve years. She was serving her third term as county president. She was selected as a state delegate to the national W. C. T. U. convention at Hartford, Conn., and the World's convention at Boston, Mass., last fall, and it was her intention to deliver an address in the Congregational church, telling of the two conventions, but illness prevented her carrying out her plan. Mrs. Smith was a woman of more than ordinary mental endowments, a mother whose love and affection knew no tiring - a queen whose sway was that of love, a wife whose loyalty and devotion was ever the controlling spring in her life; a splendid neighbor whose hand was always ready to extend whatever aid she could and whose sympathy in the hour of distress was cherished by all within the sphere of her influence. She was constant in service in every good cause, and her loss in all such circles will be greatly felt. Her devotion to her church was one of the cardinal principles in her life. In the cause of temperance she was a faithful worker and was honored on many occasions by her fellow workers in the gift of offices in the society. Her place in all these matters will be most difficult to fill. Upon her family the deep sorrow will fall most heavily. Her death is also a sad blow to her many friends in Alton who loved and respected her as a good woman and a conscientious, devoted Christian. The funeral will be held at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon from the family home.

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SMITH, EDWARD A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, September 10, 1928          Former Editor of Alton Democrat

Edward A. Smith, former Alton newspaper publisher, and for many years one of the best known residents of his home city, died this morning at his residence, 520 Seminary Square, from arterial hardening. He had passed his 82nd birthday last May 19. When he was 5 years old he came to Alton with his parents and spent all the remainder of his life here, a period of 77 years. The death of Mr. Smith was expected, but the end came suddenly after a period of ill health due to his age. He had been confined to his home and there was a belief that death was not far off, though he was up and around the house. When the final collapse came, it was but a short time until the end came. E. A. Smith was a familiar figure on the streets of Alton, and a man who had taken a prominent part in the civil and religious life of his community. He had an opportunity when he was a member of the firm of Perrine & Smith, then publishers of the Alton Democrat, to have an important influence in the city of Alton. The firm started a job printing shop in St. Louis where they prospered. Mr. Perrin gave most of his time to the newspaper in Alton while Mr. Smith for years was in St. Louis. Later both the partners devoted the greater part of their time to the St. Louis business as they had taken into their newspaper organization J. J. McInerney, who later became the chief owner of the newspaper which had become the Sentinel Democrat, and gave the paper all his time. Mr. Smith was a charter member of the Congregational church and remained deeply interested in its work and welfare up to the end. He was a regular attendant at church services, and for years held various offices in the church organization. In the Y.M.C.A. he took great interest and in years gone by gave much time to it. He retired from active duty in the Y.M.C.A. a few years ago but the directors created the office of director emeritus, and he was an honored member of the directors' circle any time he desired to be present. Mr. Smith, after the death of is partner of many years standing, disposed of his business in St. Louis, but he soon found there he had made a great mistake in thinking he could retire. He was not capable of being idle. A man who had been as busy all his life as he found it necessary to have something to do, so he took a position representing another firm and he made regular calls on a trade he built up in Alton. Many who saw him going about those duties did not realize that it was an absolute necessity for Mr. Smith to maintain his interest and make life happy for him. He could not be idle under any circumstances. He is survived by seven children, Harris Smith of St. Louis, Herbert Smith of Detroit, Mrs. F. J. Worden of Granite City, Mrs. Allen Keiser, Jewett and Walter and Miss Lucia Smith of Alton. He leaves also 11 grandchildren. Mr. Smith learned the trade of printer in the Telegraph office, away back in the early days. He worked with some of the men who were to be prominent in Alton. Among his early days associates were the late Edmond Beall, the late John A. Cousley, the late Samuel Malcolm. He is the very last of the old time printers who had to do with the Telegraph, when this newspaper was in its experimental stages, for whom the symbol of completion "30" is written. It was from the Telegraph he went to become proprietor of the Democrat, a newspaper which was then for sale. The funeral of Mr. Smith will be held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the Congregational church.

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SMITH, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 3, 1899

Elizabeth Smith died January 2, 1899 at the residence of Charles Holden. She was 87 years of age, and was the wife of Thomas Smith. She was born in Bedford, England, and came to American and Alton in 1853. She leaves five children, Mrs. Charles Holden, Boston W. Smith, George Emery Smith, E. A. Smith, and J. J. Smith. Interment will be in the Alton City Cemetery.

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SMITH, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 14, 1904

The funeral of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Smith was held this afternoon at 1 o'clock from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Joseph Lohr. There was a large attendance of friends at the home, and there were also many beautiful floral offerings. A long funeral cortege followed the remains to Alton, where burial took place in the City Cemetery.

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SMITH, ETHEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1908

The funeral of Mrs. Ethel Smith, wife of Arthur Smith, will take place Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home on Alby street, Rev. R. P. Hammons officiating.

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SMITH, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 28, 1912         Man Commits Suicide by Leaping Into River

A man who had given the name George Smith, apparently about 45 years of age and claiming to be a barber, leaped into the river from the W. D. Fluent dock Friday night about 8:30 o'clock, when being pursued by Officer George Mayford. While searching for the man in the water, Mayford himself tumbled in, and but for assistance rendered by Capt. Fluent and Denver McCoy, he too might have lost his life, though Mayford is a strong swimmer. The water was cold, deep, filled with ice and the current was swift. The man had been hanging around the river and the railroad depots several days and nights. Those who believe he committed suicide think he was meditating as to a choice between two methods, drowning or killing himself under the wheels of a train. By day he would hang around the depot, and by night the river. Thursday and Wednesday nights he spent at police headquarters part of the night. Christmas morning, about 2 o'clock, E. Trenchery saw the man wandering about the Fluent dock, at the outer side of the system of docks, and captured him. Capt. Fluent and others were summoned. It was believed that the man was trying to steal a boat, and he could give no good reason for being where he was. Instead of turning him over to the police, Capt. Fluent liberated him. The man then went to police headquarters and stayed the remainder of the night. Friday evening, Geo. Winger, C. & A. baggage man, directed the attention of Officer Mayford to the man. He had been acting suspiciously and Mayford followed him. The man was the one who had given the name George Smith to Fluent, and had also given that name at police headquarters when he lodged there. Mayford ordered the man to halt, and the man said he was going to the Fluent dock, as he belonged there. Mayford went after him, and the man ran fast. He crossed the docks and plunged into the river. It was very dark, all lilghts being shut off. Mayford called Capt. Fluent to bring a light and search was made along the docks for the man, but he had disappeared. At the lower end of the dock, while Mayford was searching for the man, the officer fell in the river inside of a boathouse, and though a strong swimmer, was in a bad way. Fluent and McCoy drew him out. The search for the man was kept up for a while, and then abandoned. Capt. Fluent believes now that the man planned suicide Christmas morning when caught on the dock.

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SMITH, J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 17, 1907

An inquest was held last evening by Deputy Coroner Allen Keiser into the death of J. Smith, the man killed Wednesday at the Standard oil refinery site, and the jury returned a verdict that Smith had come to his death by being accidentally struck over the head with a steel rail, the accident being unavoidable.

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SMITH, JACOB/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 16, 1922         Judge Smith, Old Farmer, Dies in Daughter's Home

"Judge" Jacob Smith, for many years a prosperous farmer on Missouri Point, died Sunday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Edward Pilgrim, 511 East Tenth street, from old age. He had been in poor health for some time, but there was no indication of a general breakdown. On Thursday night he was stricken with the fatal attack, and he passed peacefully away in his sleep, Sunday morning. The death of Judge Smith removes one of the best known of the old time residents of Missouri Point. He had a farm which he operated for many years which skirted Brickhouse Slough. His residence was on the St. Charles road. Many an Alton man who would go fishing at Brickhouse Slough knew the courteous old gentleman, and often enjoyed his hospitality. He was recognized as one of the very best residents of Missouri Point. Fifteen years ago he retired from farming because of his advancing years. Had he lived until November 28, he would have been 85 years of age, but his appearance did not indicate such a great age. He was a well preserved man and looked healthy and well, even up to the time of his last attack of illness. Four years ago he came to Alton to be with his daughter and for about four years preceding that he had lived in Florida. He had settled on Missouri Point when he was forty years of age. He was married three times, all his wives having died before him. He leaves four sons, Frank and Joseph of Missouri Point, George of Wood River, Jacob of Federal, and Mrs. Pilgrim of Alton. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock from the home of Mrs. Pilgrim, and services will be conducted by Rev. C. W. Heggemeier, pastor of the Evangelical church in which Judge Smith held membership. Burial will be in Ebenezer cemetery on Missouri Point.

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SMITH, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 14, 1904

James Smith, aged 20, died Sunday at the family home in East End place. His father died one week ago Saturday from the same disease. The son's body will be taken to Greenville tomorrow to be buried beside his father.

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SMITH, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1913                Dies From Fall Down Elevator Shaft at Madison Hotel in Alton

James Smith, aged 35, was fatally injured by falling down the elevator shaft at the Madison Hotel Friday evening. He was taken to the hospital about 7 o'clock, where he died at 3 o'clock Saturday morning. The man was a stranger. A few days ago he applied to Rev. S. D. McKenny for assistance, and as Rev. McKenny makes a practice of securing places where people may work it they need assistance, he found this man a place at the Madison Hotel where he could work for his board. The man was sick and unable to do very much. According to the story told at the Madison, the man came in drunk Friday evening, and in attempting to find the exit at the main floor of the hotel on the east side of the lobby, he found the elevator door and walked in. He fell from the main floor to the cellar and his skull was fractured. Smith was ordered taken to the hospital by Rev. McKenny.

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SMITH, JAMES R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 8, 1912                     Former Sexton of Godfrey Cemetery Dies on Birthday

James R. Smith died Friday morning at 8:45 o'clock at his home in Godfrey after an illness commencing more than six months ago, when he suffered a paralytic stroke. He has been confined to his bed since, and until a few days ago no change was apparent in his condition. The paralysis, which had been only partial, began spreading to other parts of the body until the end came peacefully. Mr. Smith was one of the best known residents of Godfrey township, and for 35 or 40 years was sexton of Godfrey Cemetery. He was born in New Bedford, Pa., 72 years ago today, but came to Madison county when very young and most of his life was spent in Godfrey. He was a kindly man and made many friends who will regret to hear of his death and whose sympathies will go out to the widow and daughter left behind. Mrs. R. R. Mather, the daughter, and her husband, left their own home six months ago when Mr. Smith was paralyzed, and have been helping Mrs. Smith since then to care for him. He has a brother, George, living in Estelline, S. D.  The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home in Godfrey, Rev. J. F. Bacon officiating.

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SMITH, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 20, 1914    Flag Floats Half Mast In Honor of Union Veteran Who Passed Away

for the second time in the history of the country, the American flag is floating at half mast in honor of an old soldier for whom "Taps" has sounded. The former veteran was John Smith, and the flag was unfurled by Miss Lottie Coleman, proprietor of the Myrtle House, for the Daughters of Veterans of which she is one of the most energetic. The Alton Daughters of Veterans took the initiative in the matter of paying respect to the memory of old soldiers and to unfurl at half mast the stars and stripes as a token of esteem and respect and regret upon the death of a former soldier, but it is expected that the custom will be adopted all over the country. The Telegraph published the fact when the flag was unfurled for the first time on record on such an occasion, and the fact was telegraphed all over the country. The idea pleased others, and the indications are that it will very soon become a general custom. The old soldiers are becoming fewer in number rapidly, and the custom cannot be of long duration at best, but it is a pretty one to adopt and continued as long as possible. [Editor's note: Flying at flag at half-mast allows for the "invisible flag of death" to fly at the top of the mast, which signified death's presence, power, and prominence.]

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SMITH, JOHN GILBERT/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 11, 1893                        Carpenter at Monticello Seminary

John Gilbert Smith, who died April 16, 1893 at his home in Godfrey, Ill., after a painful illness patiently borne, was born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania April 7, 1836, and had therefore completed his 57th year at death, fully fifty of which had been given to Godfrey, he having moved to this place with his parents at the early age of 7 years. There were five brothers, Samuel, James, William, George and Benjamin, of whom John was the eldest. Only one sister, Mrs. Maggie Rowan, being older. In 1861 Mr. Smith entered the army, but the exposure and change of diet incident to army life proved too much for the body that held his courageous spirit. He lay five months of his first year in a hospital at St. Louis, a very great sufferer. In 1862 he returned to Godfrey, honorably discharged. Soon after this he enlisted under Christ, the captain of his salvation, uniting with the Church of Christ in Godfrey. January 28, 1871, at the home of Hon. J. G. Irwin, Edwardsville, Ill., John G. Smith wedded Miss Maria Sparr. Perhaps more than any other, this single event controlled and favorably affected all the remaining years of Mr. Smith's life. The happy couple came at once to live in the house just completed in which so many pleasant quiet years of domestic life were given them, and in which he died, and where also resides his sorrowing companion - if in sorrow, yet surely in comfort. With Mrs. George Smith, of Brighton, Maria Sparr Smith early and long and to this day has enjoyed the relation of a close and special friendship. For many years Monticello Seminary gave employment to Carpenter Smith, and so uniformly thoughtful and kind was the management, Miss H. N. Haskell in particular, through all these years, and the last sad rites that closed them, Mrs. Smith recalls them gratefully. Mr. Smith's contribution in labor given to the new Seminary building was deemed large for his means, and testified in the best possible manner his own appreciation.  Signed O. C. D.

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SMITH, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1912              Killed in Quarry Landslide

Two men, foreman Joseph Smith and George Means, head washer and shooter in the Alton Builder Supply Co. quarries, were buried under a landslide Monday afternoon at 5:15 o'clock, on a ledge 60 feet from the level. Smith was fatally injured and died at the hospital soon after midnight. Means was not so badly hurt and ought to be back at his work in about ten days, according to the doctor. The man who was the worst buried of the two escaped with the slightest consequences. Means was buried forty-five minutes, and was covered completely. Smith's head was projecting from the mass of earth, and he was dug out first, but was so badly mangled by the heavy weight of earth that it was seen he could not live. One arm and one leg were broken in two places each. His head was crushed and his ribs broken. The landslide dropped about forty feet from the top of the bluff to the twelve foot wide ledge where the men were at work. Robert Roady and James Kirk, two other men, managed to escape, but the two men who were hurt could not. Means was in a stooping position at the time and was covered under many tons of earth. When the accident happened, the whistles were blown and distress calls given, summoning all the men working in all the quarries along the bluffs. They hurried down. The two head men being under the pile of earth, the laborers had to take charge of the rescue until neighbors arrived. As a large part of the dirt fell over the ledge to the ground 60 feet below, it was not known whether Means, who was covered deep, was buried on the ledge or had tumbled down to the lowest level. This delayed the rescue work. Finally the rescue gangs got to work on the upper edge and got both men out and lowered them to the ground, where they were put in an ambulance and hauled to the hospital. According to the men, a gang of negroes who were close by refused to lend any aid in the rescue work. Smith, who died, was about 47 years old and leaves a wife. The family lived near the water works. Means lives on Coppinger road. Both men were old, experienced quarrymen. The funeral of Mr. Smith will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

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SMITH, LEAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1906

The funeral of Leah, 8 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Smith, was held this morning from the home near Melville, and because of the nature of the disease from which the child died - diphtheria - was private.

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SMITH, LEAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 15, 1907

Leah Smith, aged 4 years and five months, died this morning at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Smith, 1202 Rodemeyer avenue, from summer complaint. The body will be sent to Henderson, Ky., tonight or in the morning for burial.

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SMITH, LELIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1917

Mrs. Lelia Smith, wife of Randolph Smith, aged 35, died at her home in Upper Alton this afternoon after an illness of five days. Her husband, who has been working in California, was not at her bedside. He had been informed of her illness but her condition did not become serious until yesterday. He was notified today, and the funeral arrangements will not be completed until word has been received from him. Mrs. Smith leaves besides her husband, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Martin Reed; three brothers, Herbert, Robert and Harry; and one sister, Mrs. Nina Treble, all of Alton. She was taken ill last Friday. From that time her condition continued to grow worse until yesterday when she developed pneumonia. The end came at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

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SMITH, LESTER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 17, 1905

Lester Smith, who was brought to St. Joseph's hospital last week suffering from injuries he sustained by falling headlong from a grain tank in course of construction at Edwardsville, striking on a granitoid platform, died Sunday morning at 4 o'clock from the effects of concussion of the brain. He was 23 years of age. The body was turned over to Coroner C. N. Streeper, and the employers of the young man, the R. C. Stone Steel Storage Co. of Springfield, Mo., were notified of his death. Smith's family lived at Edwardsville, and the body will be taken there for burial.

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SMITH, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 24, 1911

The funeral of Mrs. Mary Smith, widow of the late Adam Smith of Godfrey, will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Godfrey Congregational church. Services will be conducted by Rev. J. A. Scarritt by request.

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SMITH, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1918

Mrs. Mary Smith, for more than fifty years a resident of Godfrey, died at the home of Mrs. Leota Bushnell in Godfrey Monday at 8:30 a.m. She was 80 years old. Death was due to paralysis. Mrs. Smith was the widow of John Smith, and she and her ________ were well known residents of Godfrey. For a number of years Mrs. Smith had made her home with her friend, Mrs. Bushnell, who has been her nurse. A niece, Mrs. Moore, resides in St. Louis. The funeral will be from the residence of Mrs. Bushnell Wednesday at 10 a.m., and the burial will be in the Godfrey Cemetery.

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SMITH, MARY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 8, 1910

Mrs. Mary J. Smith, widow of the late Albert G. Smith, died today shortly after noon at her home, 1824 Belle street. She was very old, and had lived in Alton almost all her life. Her son, Arthur Smith, took care of his mother for several years. There are other children, but they are not living in Alton, it is said. The Smiths were once quite well-to-do, and Albert Smith owned all of that tract of land in State street, now known as the Lockyer addition. He owned other property also. After his death a division was made among the heirs. Funeral arrangements have not been made. Smith had not been well for some time it is said, but her death was rather sudden.

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SMITH, RACHEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 25, 1914    Colored Woman Wandered Outdoors in Freezing Weather - Found Frozen

Mrs. Rachel Smith, colored, mother of Mrs. Margaret Fox, was found dead this morning where she had fallen at the foot of a flight of stairs leading from the street to the premises of her daughter's home, 518 Easton street, at 7 o'clock this morning. It is supposed that the aged woman had risen from her bed in the night and wandering from the house in response to some vagary of her mind, and becoming benumbed, had fallen and froze to death. It was not known she was out of the house. The aged woman's mind had failed and she had gone back to her childhood again. Last summer, responding to what she believed was her childhood playmates call, she had gone down into a playground at the intersection of Seventh and Easton streets, rising from her bed to make the trip in the night. It was a rainy night, and the tall weeds in the hollow nearly suffocated her before she was found. She was rescued with considerable difficulty at that time. When she rose from her bed last night, she was clad only in her nightgown and was barefooted. The near zero temperature was too much for her and she was frozen. Mrs. Smith was a very old woman, her exact age being uncertain. She came to Alton from Virginia shortly after the close of the Civil War, and lived here ever since. Members of the family say that she escaped from the house by a ____ door without arousing anyone, and that they did not know she was gone until morning came when her body was found. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Fox home.

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SMITH, ROBERT/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, Monday, January 5, 1880                Submitted by Colleen Stutz
Died - Mr. Robert Smith, of Godfrey, one of the oldest and most prominent citizens of the place, died last night, very suddenly, about 12 o’clock. He was in his usual health in the afternoon, took a walk to the residence of one of his sons and, on his return was seized with an attack of paralysis of the heart which carried him off at the hour mentioned, in spite of the best medical attention. Deceased was a native of Pennsylvania, died at the age of 72 years, and leave a large circle of friends and relatives to mourn his sudden death.

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SMITH, SAMUEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Thursday Aug 13, 1908        Submitted by Colleen Stutz
Samuel Smith, who was stricken with paralysis several days ago, died this morning at his home in Elm Street. He was 70 years of age and leaves a wife and several children. James Smith, sexton of Godfrey cemetery was a brother and deceased was a well known and respected citizen of this county for many years. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon from the home and burial will be in Godfrey cemetery.

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SMITH, SARAH ANN (nee SCROGGINS)/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, June 17, 1935          Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

Staunton, June 17:—Mrs. Sarah Ann Smith; 79, died unexpectedly on Sunday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. A. W. Sawyer. Funeral services will be Tuesday at 2 p. m. at the Huntman Funeral Home with burial in the City Cemetery. The body will be at the residence until 11 a. m. Tuesday. Mrs. Smith was born Oct. 29, 1865 in Bunker Hill township and came to Staunton at the age of five years with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Scroggins. In 1875 she married Milton A. Smith, who died 13 years ago. Surviving besides Mrs; Sawyer are one son George Smith, Hamel, a sister, Mrs. Mary C. Bird, Staunton and one grandson.

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SMITH, STELLA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 21, 1903

Stella Smith, aged 20, daughter of Mrs. Susan Smith, colored, of 1115 Green street, died Saturday night from internal injuries she sustained three weeks ago last Friday while she was trying to alight from a moving Chicago and Alton train at Union depot. She was on the morning train to St. Louis, and attempted to alight after the train had started. In doing so, she stumbled as she struck the platform and rolled over several times, but did not fall under the train wheels. She suffered internal injuries, although it was not thought she was hurt at the time as she rose and walked off unaided.

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SMITH, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 2, 1920

Pneumonia claimed Thomas Smith, night at the Nazareth Home, where he had been staying for a year. He had been a feeble health for a long time and being unmarried and being unable to take care of himself, he was taken to the home where he passed the closing year of his life. He had resided for many years at Eighth and Alton streets. Mr. Smith was 77 years of age. He was born in Sutton, England, and came to Alton when he was nine years old. For sixty-eight years he resided here and until about twenty years ago was engaged in draying. He was a well known man and a confirmed optimist. No matter how discouraging the weather, he always would observe to a friend he might meet "its a fine day." Everything with Tommy Smith was viewed in the same way. He was uncomplaining no matter what misfortunes came, and his characteristic good cheer stayed with him to the end. Physical weakness and disability did not change him and he bore his suffering at the end with the same good cheer he had always manifested and his friends are confident that as this cheerful being closed his eyes, he opened them on a "fine day" in the other world. He leaves one brother, E. A. Smith, and a sister, Mrs. Matilda Holden, widow of Charles Holden. The funeral was from the home of E. A. Smith at 2:30 o'clock Friday afternoon and was private. Rev. M. W. Twing conducted the services. Burial was in the City Cemetery.

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SMITH, UNKNOWN CHILD .... SISTER OF ALICE SMITH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 29, 1912                        

Grabbing a bowl of burning gasoline that had become fired from a hot iron she was using, Miss Alice Smith of 1115 Harrison street threw the bowl of burning gas through the rear door of her home. Her little one and one half year old sister was toddling across the yard and just passing the door, and the burning gasoline covered the little girl from head to foot, and she was fatally burned before aid could reach her. The accident happened Saturday night, and Miss Alice Smith was preparing a skirt to be worn by her Sunday. She had cleaned the skirt with gasoline, and started to press it with the hot iron, when the skirt was fired. The flames immediately fired the bowl of gasoline sitting on the end of the ironing board, and the young woman, without looking to see whether anyone was in the way, threw the burning gas outside the house. The screams of both young woman and the burning child attracted the mother, who threw something over the child and smothered the flames. A physician was secured and everything possible done for the little girl, but she died after much suffering about 9 o'clock Sunday morning. The elder sister, who threw the burning gasoline, is badly burned about the hands and arms. She is heartbroken over the accident to her little sister and blames herself, although the matter was purely accidental. The young woman was doing all she could to save the house from burning and did not know her little sister was in the back yard, anyway near the open door.

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SMITH, UNKNOWN WIFE OF HOMER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 14, 1918

Mrs. Homer Smith died this morning at her home on Seventh street. She had been sick for four months, but the immediate cause of her death was given as influenza. Mrs. Smith was 28 years old. She leaves a husband, besides her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Newton Keene of Missouri Point. The funeral will be held Monday morning at the Keene home on Missouri Point, and the burial will be there also.

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SMITH, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JAMES R/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Friday, March 10, 1916                   Submitted by Colleen Stutz
Mrs. James R. Smith died at 8:30 o’clock Thursday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. R. R. Mather, on the Godfrey road. She was born July 12, 1842, at West Middlesex, Penn., and was married to J.R. Smith in April 15, 1873, and came to Godfrey where she lived until four years ago yesterday, when her husband died; then came to the North Side and lived with her daughter. She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of West Middlesex, where she still held her membership. She leaves one daughter, Mrs. R. R. Mather, and two brothers, Thomas Wasson, of Orange, Texas, and Wm. Wasson, of Sharon, Penn., and one grandson, Roy Mather. The funeral will be held Sunday at 2 p.m., from the residence, Rev. E.L. Gibson officiating. Burial will be in the Godfrey Cemetery. She was 73 years 7 months and 26 days old.

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SMITH, UNKNOWN WIFE OF ROBERT/Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, Thursday,  November 4, 1875                Submitted by Colleen Stutz
Died - Smith - At Monticello, on the 31st ult., Mrs. Robt. Smith in the 65th year of her age.

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SMITH, WILHELMINA/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, April 18, 1919

Mrs. Wilhelmina Smith, wife of Henry W. Smith of 808 Troy Road, died this morning at 11 o'clock with pneumonia, with which she had been ill the past ten days. Her daughter in law, Mrs. George Smith, is just recovering from the same ailment after a severe attack, and is able to sit up today. During the few hours before her death, there was a decided change for the worse. A weakened heart contributed to her death. During the early part of April, Mrs. Smith contracted a heavy cold, which settled on her lungs and pneumonia resulted. Mrs. Smith was a daughter of the late Ernst Schomberg. The date of her birth was May 5, 1877, and in a few days would have observed her 42nd birthday anniversary. She spent all her life in Edwardsville and vicinity. On August 1, 1893, she was married to Mr. Smith, and the husband and one son, who returned from military service several weeks ago, survive. Besides the mother, two sisters, Mrs. Emma Smith, wife of William Smith, and brother of Henry W. Smith, Miss Augusta Schomberg, and a brother, George Schomberg, survive. Funeral arrangements will be made late this afternoon. Services will probably be Monday.

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SMITH, WILLIAM ELIOT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 20, 1909                                Co-Founder of Illinois Glass Company Dies in Rome

A cablegram came this noon from Rome, Italy, announcing the death there of William Eliot Smith of Alton, who was touring southern Europe and northern Africa with his family. The cablegram was received at St. Louis by George J. Kendall of the Illinois Glass Co., and by him was transmitted to the Alton office. The message said that Mr. Smith died from pneumonia, and gave no further information. The plans for the funeral are not known, but it is supposed the body will be brought back to America for interment, as the Smith family has a burial lot in the City cemetery at Alton. William Eliot Smith was 64 years of age and was a native of St. Louis. He came to Alton when a young man and settled here permanently. He became interested in the glass business at Alton with Edward Levis many years ago, and starting on a small scale and working hard, by the application of strict business principles, he was a very strong factor in building up the small institution to being the biggest of its kind in the world. The Illinois Glass Company plant at Alton will be a monument to his memory. He was the son of one of the benefactors of Smith Academy of St. Louis, and Mr. Smith, a graduate of Washington University, was also deeply interested in that institution. He always was loyal to his own home city and it grew the cherished hope of his later years that Alton would become a beautiful place to live in and would pay more attention to civic improvement. He it was who first suggested in Alton the work of making Alton more beautiful. He contributed a small sum as a starter to illustrate what could be done by making beauty spots here and there, and he interested other men in the idea. Finally he gave to the city of Alton a good-sized tract of ground which he intended should be used for park purposes, and this is in process of being transformed into a beautiful park for the citizens of Alton. Careful economy was the rule of his life, notwithstanding his immense wealth, and he never lost an opportunity to illustrate by example to others around him not so well situated, the folly of reckless extravagance and the benefit of careful saving of property. Mr. Smith leaves his wife and two daughters, Misses Eunice and Ellen Smith. At the time that the father broached the subject of making the trip to Europe and Africa, members of the family seemed to have a premonition that there would be an unfortunate ending of the tour. At the time that the reports came of the earthquake in Italy and it was feared the Smiths were in the wreck, the friends of the Smith family feared that the premonitions had been well grounded. The friends in Alton waited with deep interest news from the family, and there was much rejoicing when the message came announcing their safety. The family afterward went to Northern Africa, and some of them were ill while there, but recovered. The last heard from the Smiths was about a week ago, when a letter came saying they were in Rome and were well. It is believed the illness of Mr. Smith was of short duration, as pneumonia was given as the cause of death. Of Mr. Smith's business ability there are many instances that could be related, showing he was a man of big affairs, and those who knew him best can see how it was that he was so successful in the glass business. Even when he was on pleasure trips he carried his business on his mind, and he was always looking for opportunity to help his business and make it grow still more. He alone prevented the forming of a glass bottle trust many years ago, by holding out and refusing to sell his plant, being impossible to organize a trust without the big plant at Alton. The news of the death of Mr. Smith caused a profound shock among his business associates. The sons of the late Edward Levis have been associated with him since boyhood in the glass business, and he depended upon them absolutely to represent him in looking after his financial affairs, when he was not here to give them his personal attention. What effect the death of Mr. Smith will have on Alton is a matter that can not be decided at the present. He leaves his business well organized in the hands of competent representatives, as he had settled all his affairs before he went away.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 29, 1909                             Body on Way Home

The steamship on which Mrs. William Eliot Smith and the Misses Smith sailed with the body of Mr. Smith is expected in New York June 9, and it is believed the body will arrive in Alton two days later. In absence of explicit instructions from the members of the family, no preparations for the funeral are being made, but a letter is expected in a few days which was written a few days after Mr. Smith died. The party sailed a week after Mr. Smith's death, the letter should get here in advance of them. The Smiths will be met at New York by several Alton friends and relatives from elsewhere. No definite plans for the funeral will be made at Alton until word comes from the family, all the messages which have come so far being very brief. Letters received in Alton from other people who were in Florence at the time Mr. Smith was taken ill said that the weather there was so cold it was uncomfortable and enough to make anyone ill. Touring Cathedrals and other buildings in Italy under such circumstances was very dangerous to anyone's health.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 11, 1909                         Body to Arrive This Evening

The body of William Eliot Smith, accompanied by Mrs. Smith and two daughters, will arrive home this evening. The exact hour is not known, but it is supposed that it will be about 8 or 9 o'clock. A party of Alton friends of the family will go to Edwardsville to meet the Smith party and escort them to their home in Alton, where the body will be kept until the funeral is held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. Preparations have been made for the funeral, which will be subject to the approval of the family when they arrive. A list of eighteen honorary pall-bearers has been selected, also eight active pall-bearers. Large delegations will arrive from Chicago, St. Louis and other places to attend the funeral. Owing to the fact that the number of carriages in the city is not adequate to supply the demand for the funeral tomorrow, the street car company is endeavoring to supply the deficiency by running extra cars, but it is not believed that there will be enough cars available. It is said that there will be practically a full delegation of the 650 glassblowers in the Alton union, beside hundreds of unorganized laboring men and boys, and men who were associated with Mr. Smith in business and other lines. Street cars will be run for the public from the home to the cemetery after the services at Elm Ridge. There will be no work after tonight until next Monday at the Illinois glass factory or other concerns affiliated with that institution in respect to William Eliot Smith.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 12, 1909                          Immense Throng Honors William Eliot Smith

An immense throng of Alton people, swelled by a large number of friends from other cities, united today to honor the memory of Alton's departed captain of industry, Wm. Eliot Smith. The funeral services were held on the lawn under the grand old forest trees that Mr. Smith loved so well, and in whose preservation he took so much pride. The body arrived in Alton last evening at 8:20 p.m. over the Wabash. An immense crowd of Alton people met the body at the train and waited in silence as the casket was removed from the box and was placed in the hearse. There were hundreds of men, women and children at the little Wabash depot when the train pulled in. The body was taken direct to the home. It was necessary to hold the services outside, as the number of people who were present could not have been accommodated in the house. Long before the hour for the funeral, friends and employees of Mr. Smith had begun arriving on street cars. Every vehicle in the city that could be procured was had, and the street railway company found its carrying ability tested to its limit during the hour before the time set for the services to begin. Never in the history of Alton was there such a testimonial to the memory of any citizen at a funeral. Business was suspended in the city for two hours between 2 and 4 o'clock, even though it was Saturday and the business houses were supposed to be at their busiest. Manufacturing institutions were idle for the half day and workingmen rubbed elbows with employers in the throng that gathered at Elm Ridge. It was a universal testimonial to a man who had done more for the city of Alton than any other living person to develop it was a manufacturing place, to increase its natural beauty and to give Alton the commercial importance it has. As it was impossible for all who attended the funeral to ride, many walked and members of the various unions employed by the Illinois Glass Company marched in the funeral procession. In one body over five hundred glassblowers marched. They met at the head of Common street, and marched from there to the Smith home. The pallbearers were Thomas Morfoot, William Hope, Gottlieb Warner, Andrew Schnorr, Louis E. Walter, Charles Goudie, Gus Sneeringer, Robert Robertson. The honorary pallbearers were George M. Levis, H. Gibson, Robert Forbes, Charles Levis, George R. Allen, L. A. Schlafly, C. A. Caldwell, Lucas Pfeiffenberger, A. E. Bassett, John M. Levis, E. M. Bowman, E. P. Wade, Dr. C. B. Rohland, H. M. Schweppe, Nelson Levis, George H. Smiley, F. W. Olin, W. T. Norton, and George E. Hopkins. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. George R. Gebauer, former pastor of the Alton Unitarian church, now of Duluth, Minn. The Lean Gale quartet from St. Louis rendered several musical selections at the home and in the City cemetery, where the body was laid to rest. The funeral ceremony was simple and according to Unitarian ritual. The quartet sang "Nearer My God to Thee" and "Lead Kindly Light." The floral offerings probably exceeded anything of the kind ever given in Alton. There were massive and costly pieces from the different departments of the glass works, from various institutions with which Mr. Smith was connected, and from friends at home and from a distance. All the unions represented at the glass works contributed their floral offerings. Officers of institutions in which Mr. Smith held membership attended in bodies. The cortege moved out Stanton street to Common street, down Common to North and on North to Union, where it was joined by the street cars carrying those who were riding that way, and from there the street cars and carriages moved to the City cemetery.

 

Dominant Ninth Choral Society - Resolutions of Respect

At the annual meeting of the Dominant Ninth Choral Society, the announcement of the recent death of Mr. Wm. Eliot Smith, who had for so many years been such a generous friend to the society, occasioned many expressions of sorrow and regret, and a committee was appointed to express the sentiments of the society in a suitable and more formal manner. The following was adopted and will be spread upon the minutes:

 

In Memoriam:

The Dominant Ninth Choral Society, at the close of its activities for the season 1908-09, desires to put on record a merited tribute of respect to the memory of one of its oldest, most consistent and valued friends, Mr. Wm. Eliot Smith, who died May 20, 1909, in Florence, Italy of pneumonia, after an illness of but a few days. Mr. Smith's constant interest and substantial benefactions, extending back for so many years are so closely interwoven with the history of the society and its growth achievements and past triumphs have been so largely due to his continuous active support that his untimely taking off brings with it a deep sense of personal loss, and a pang of profound regret. Of a retiring disposition with the inclinations of a scholar and a gentleman, he rarely spoke of himself and his doings, so that even his nearest friends had but a faint idea of the many deserving objects that received his active and liberal support. Always in hearty sympathy with the aims and purposes of this society, one of his last acts before leaving on his last journey was to vitalize with his kind approval and encouragement the idea of the recent "Thomas Orchestra Festival," which at first was only tentatively considered by the management, and his substantial assistance did much toward bringing that enterprise to so successful an issue. That he could not be present to enjoy with the society the triumph to which he had so largely contributed is a matter of genuine regret to every individual member. The Dominant Ninth Choral Society hereby extends to his family and friends it most profound sympathy. It grieves with them in that it has lost one of its most faithful and loyal friends, whose sympathy and liberality helped to make possible so many of its aspirations. His name will ever be held in most grateful remembrance.  C. B. Rohland, Emma M. Harris, B. C. Richardson, Committee.

 

Memorial and Resolution On the Life and Character of William Eliot Smith, Unanimously adopted by Branch No. 2, G. B. B. A., June 10th, 1909:

Standing within the saddening shadows which have fallen upon this community from the broad wings of the Angel of Death, amid the silent sorrows which crowd in upon us on occasions like this, it is with great hesitation, yet with a sense of obligation that cannot be stilled, prompted by sympathy for the family, and love and affection for the deceased, that we essay a discharge of the solemn duty which in common with us all, we owe to the memory of the late William Eliot Smith.  He was a typical Illinoisian. It was here in this magnificent commonwealth of ours, amidst the lowly grandeur of our prairies, horizon-fenced on every side; here amid boundless oceans of billowy corn, that defy the poet's pen or artist's brush to half depict their glory, where the summer sun rains down gold, the summer stars drip light, and the summer day combines the tenderness of twilight with the freshness of unsullied dawn, that he became imbued with these principles of honesty and truth that have ever marked his career and rendered his life a perpetual memory to those he left behind. It was here in Illinois that he was reared and schooled; here in Illinois that his life work began; here that his ambitions were centered and fed; here that he laid the foundation of a happy home; here that he always lived; and fitting indeed it is that his resting place will be with us, amid the ceaseless vigils of wife and kin, and the _________ [unreadable] of neighbors and friends and the meadow scented air that in life he loved so well. His sun went down at noon; cut down in the prime of his existence, in the flush of propitious manhood and at the very beginning of his usefulness, his name was stricken from the roll by the hand of death and transferred to the parliament of the skies. Always modest and retiring, never in an unseemly or untimely manner pressing his views, slow to engage the attention of others, except as duty demanded; he was of a frank, courteous and kindly disposition, whose character stood forth like a granite solemn, imposing in its solidity, beautiful in its absence of outward ornament, and immaculate in the material of which it was carved. But it was perhaps in the domestic circle amid the sweet endearments of home that the most lovable traits of his character found their fullest development. He was a great home man, a fond and affectionate husband and father, and acutely appreciative of home joys and family pleasures. In that home there is now an "aching void that the world can never fill." To time, the comforter, they can look for the healing of their wounds, assured that when that time shall come, they will forever cherish as their dearest heritage the memory of his life. But a short time ago, he was with his friends and kindred. Today, he is deaf to the words of encouragement, heedless of fair renown and insensible to praise or blame. No more for him the song of birds, the whisper of the winds or the murmur of the waters as they break upon the shore. No more for him the beauty of spring, the grandeur of summer, the glory of autumn or the uncrowned majesty of winter. Between that yesterday and today is an abyss no line has sounded. In that brief space the wave of life has come and gone. We stand on the shore of time and seek in vain the refluent whalers, for they will return no more. We can but repeat the dirge which has ever been chanted since time began, and which will be carried on in melancholy cadence until time itself shall end.   

 

In conclusion - Resolved by Branch No. 2 of the Glass Bottle Blowers Association of the United States and Canada, that we as members of said organization, realize that in the death of the late Wm. Eliot Smith we have lost a true and valuable friend; our Branch, an honorable and worthy employer. Resolved further, that as citizens of this community, proud of our city, proud of its beauty and achievements, proud of its growth and prosperity, we mourn the loss of Alton's most distinguished citizen. We further realize that when the history of Alton, Illinois is accurately written, the name of William Eliot Smith emblazoned in letters of gold will lead all the rest. Resolved further, that our Branch extend to the bereaved family of deceased, our heartfelt sympathy, in this hour of sorrow and sadness, that a copy of this memorial be tendered them, and that the same be spread upon our minutes upon a page especially set aside for such purpose.  Branch No. 2, of the Glass Bottle Blowers Association of the U. S. and Canady.   William E. Kelly, Secretary.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 14, 1909

It required two hours time, Saturday afternoon, for all who were at City cemetery to file past the grave of William Eliot Smith and view the place. The grass around the Smith lot was trodden until all life was pressed out of it, and even then all who attended the funeral did not have a chance to see the flowers. Yesterday there was another large crowd at the cemetery to see the grave. Most of the flowers, except the large designs, were sent to the hospital on Saturday afternoon.

 

At the funeral of William Eliot Smith Saturday afternoon, Rev. George R. Gebauer, former pastor of the Alton Unitarian church, paid a fitting tribute to the memory of his friend, Mr. Smith, whom he had known intimately. Owing to the largeness of the audience, it was impossible for all to hear it, and the Telegraph prints the address in full, which was as follows:

 

Friends: - If I were to carry out the wishes of our dear departed, I should add nothing to this simple service, which he loved. He believed in that simplicity of burial service which makes no distinction between the rich and the poor, the wise and the foolish, the saint and the sinner. I well remember when he spoke to me about this matter, and I remember too that I fully agreed with him. Nothing indeed is so out of place on an occasion like this as trite and fulsome praise, as pomp and show. If saint or sinner, rich or poor, wise or foolish, we all alike fall short of the glory of God as the apostle says. This all is true, very true, as you well known. And if I stood here simply as the representative of the church, I might be silent now. But I came here from my northern home not so much as a clergyman - there are others nearer who might have performed the simple service of our church better than I - I came here primarily as a friend, and as a friend I must say a few words about the friend, though, by the help of God, in simplicity of spirit. If I were not to speak some one among you would raise his voice, yes, these very trees would speak.

 

Men are drawn to each other for various reasons. What drew me to our departed brother was that very quality of mind for which he believed in the simple service. His was the simplicity of that divine grace, which neither wealth nor learning can spoil, he was one of God's gentlemen. His was a gentle nature which despised anything like sham, that abhorred ostentation that loved the simple life. And this simplicity of heart and mind was joined to an unusual reservation of soul.  It was not the reservation of pride or of indifference. No, it was a sincere modesty, a deep regard and appreciation of others, that unconsciously kept away all intimacy. The souls of others were to him holy ground, and holy ground naturally became his soul to those who felt nearest to him. I think that on the whole, the intimacies we prize, cheapen us. In truest friendship there are indeed no artificial barriers, but love itself plants flowers of mutual regard, which mark the line between mine and thine. But across that living hedge of kindly consideration one could get insights into a rich garden of true rare manhood. Yes, he was a "rare" man, eager for all that is good and true, and noble. Behind that tender modesty of a young girl were the riches of manifold experience.

 

His was a mind broad in the truest sense, cosmopolitan in its range. There was in him no vestige of false pride and vanity; he was ever ready to learn and would take truth from the lips of a child; consideration of others and appreciative almost to a fault. What a rare instance of a man of affairs, of a keen business man, keenly interested in art, in literature, languages. He wanted to know, he wished to widen his mind, and it was no little this craving for new experiences which drew him away from home. And as his attitude toward man was that of true modesty and regard, so he had openness of soul, which is prerequisite to religion. His was not freedom from religion, but freedom in religion. Never fell, I believe, from his lips a frivolous word concerning any religion or the work of any church. True to his own convictions, he never pressed them upon others. He had that truer liberality, which with kindly eye even upon what seems superstitious and sympathizes with every soul that struggles and aspires. He would attend at times service at the Jewish Temple; he would go to the Baptist church; he would listen to the preaching in the German Lutheran church; he would enter too the Catholic church; and in every place he would worship the Father in spirit and truth, though he naturally best loved his own church. He was not bound by faith, but made free by it. And as he was true to his God, so he was true to man, to his friends, his associates in business.

 

I would not speak of his family relations. It seems to me like an intrusion which he would not permit. No, I would not stop across the line marked by the flowers of mutual regard. But blessed the world, if there were more such sons, more such husbands, more such fathers in the world. What he has been to Alton, Alton will begin to realize now, ever will realize more and more. If any man ever was a benefactor to his town, he certainly was such. Not merely by what he gave, though he would give liberally to every good cause he believed in, but by what he was, by what he did.  In our day of multi-millionaires, there are many great givers, but their gifts are tainted with a curse. Here was one who enabled the money by his personality; his personality was the greater gift. By making the best of himself, he made the best for others. By building up a great industry, he helped thousands to bread and homes and happiness. By making the best of his own opportunities, he created opportunities for others.

 

His simple manhood, his ambition, his integrity, have left their mark for good. Friends, we have met here to lay down a simple wreath of love and of sympathy, of mutual consolation for we all have lost individually a true friend; as a church the generous supporter, as a community the best of citizens. It is hard to say, "Thy will be done," and yet through this cloud of sorrow there comes the golden ray of faith that all is for the best. Blessed indeed are those who in mourning find their comfort in this conviction. Blessed are those who have the assurance that the eternal night of death will open into an eternal day. Blessed are those who believe that we shall meet face to face when we have crossed the bar. Friend, the love which brought your body over the deep from a far country, the love that waited here thy coming, that love goes with you into the Italy of your soul, that love binds us together beyond time and place. Toward the same Italy we journey on the sands of life; soon for us the darkness will gather and soon for us the morning shall dawn on the farther shore as we put out to sea. Lovingly, a trusted guide will steer the bark of our life, "For tho' from out our borne of time and place, The flood may bear us far, We hope to see our pilot face to face, When we have crossed the bar."

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SMITH, ZENA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 21, 1909

Mrs. Zena Smith, wife of Samuel C. Smith, aged 77, died at Moro this morning from heart failure after an illness of several days. She had been married to her husband thirty years. The funeral will be held Sunday morning from the Moro Presbyterian church.

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SMITHSINGER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1916            Horribly Killed Trying to Catch a Ride on Freight Train

William Smithsinger, aged 24, a bricklayer, was ground to death under the wheels of a C. and A. freight train in front of the depot at Wood River yesterday afternoon. A number of persons at the depot witnessed the accident which cost the young man his life. He met his death in an attempt to beat his way on the freight train. Smithsinger was the second trespasser of the C. and A. railroad to be killed in a little over two days, and he was the third man to meet his death on the railroad in the past sixty hours. Smithsinger had been making his home in Wood River for some time. He had been working at his trade off and on, but was planning to leave the place last evening. He made a run for the moving freight, lost his grip, slipped under the wheels where his body was ground to pieces. Friends in Wood River say that his home is in St. Louis and an effort was made today to have his relatives there notified....Smithsinger, according to those who were acquainted with him in Wood River, was in the habit of making frequent visits at the place conducted by John Brady in Benbow City. He was there yesterday and had left to go home, it was said, at the Brady place. He was in a saloon near the railroad track and rushed out of the saloon and attempted to catch the southbound fast C. and A. freight train, when he slipped and fell under the wheels. His body was horribly mutilated, those who witnessed the accident say. The head was severed from the body and his legs were torn off.

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SMITT, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 29, 1907

Deputy Coroner Keiser says that he has decided to bury the body of John Smitt, the man killed May 15 by being struck on the head by a steel rail at the Standard Oil refinery. He was authorized by Supt. Evans of the Standard Oil Co. to make a search for the family of the dead man, and if they could be found to send the body to them or give it a decent burial as they might direct. All clues which were obtained have been run down and no one knows where the man came from or where his people may live. The conduct of the Standard Oil officials in trying to find the family of the man, when they might be held peculiarly responsible for his death if relatives are found, is certainly a radical departure from the usual custom of corporations and would seem to indicate that not all of the policies of Standard Oil are as hard and flinty as the critics of Standard Oil would indicate. At any rate, there is a heart and a big, sympathetic one in the bosom of the chief engineer, Mr. Evans, who is directing the work of building the refinery and who gave the orders for the search to be made for the relatives of the dead man.

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SNIDER, HAROLD EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 7, 1923

Harold Edward, the fourteen months old child of Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Snider, of 2071 Alby street, died Thursday morning at 7:30 o'clock at the family home. He was sick three weeks with brain fever. The infant's funeral will be held Saturday at 2 o'clock. Interment will be in Oakwood cemetery. Rev. A. W. Kortkamp of the Pentecostal church will officiate.

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SNIDER, VALARIA (nee CHAPPEE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1923

Mrs. Valaria Chappee Snider died at midnight Tuesday after an illness of two days with congestion of the stomach. She died at the home of Joe and Elmer Camp on the Grafton road, where she has been housekeeper for nearly eight years. The seriousness of her illness was not known to friends and the news of her death was a shock when received this morning. Early last summer, with her sister, Mrs. J. E. Seagraves, and Joe and Elmer Camp, Mrs. Snider enjoyed a six weeks automobile trip to Kansas. Mrs. Snider was born at Newbern, where the Chappee family settled over ninety years ago. She is survived by her aged parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Chappee of Elkhart, Kan., and by three brothers and seven sisters. Her death is the first break in the family of eleven children. For many years members of the Chappee family have lived in Alton. Harry, Frank and Warren Chappee of Alton are brothers of Mrs. Snider. The seven sisters are Mrs. Mary L. Besterfeldt of Elkhart, Kansas. Mrs. S. L. Mallett of Oakland, Calif., Mrs. Etta Carson of Berkley, Calif., Mrs. Katherine Cutler of Long Beach, Calif., Mrs. J. E. Seagraves and Mrs. H. E. Wood of Alton and Mrs. Effie McClellan of Coolridge, Kansas. Funeral arrangements have not been completed awaiting word from relatives residing at distant points.

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SNODGRASS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 4, 1915

William Snodgrass, who missed death in one form Monday night when a mule he was driving was slain by a fallen live wire that came perilously close to winding Snodgrass in its coils, was killed 24 hours later by a train on the C. P. & St. L. railway at the foot of Cherry street. The accident occurred as the train, due to leave Alton for St. Louis at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, was speeding past the Cherry street crossing. Snodgrass, who was employed by Fred Gerdes, had been feeding hogs for Gerdes and was on his way home when he met the accident. When the engine hit him he was hurled about twenty feet and falling between the rails with his right leg and arm across one rail, those members were cut off by the car wheels. The accident was witnessed by Snodgrass' son, Walter, and his grandson. The injured man was taken to St. Joseph's hospital where he was given surgical attention but he died about two hours later. Snodgrass lived at 1029 east Second street. On Monday evening he was on his way home from work, driving a team of mules belonging to Fred Gerdes, when on Central avenue, a live wire fell and caught one of the mules and killed it. Snodgrass himself escaped without being touched, though he had a close call. He was sixty years of age and leaves his wife and five children, all of them grown. One of his sons, Joseph Snodgrass, was among those who hurried to the scene of the injury of Snodgrass, and when he saw how his father had been mutilated by the car wheels, he fainted.....

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SNOOK, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1904

Mrs. Annie Snook, wife of J. E. Snook, died last night at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Fairbanks, 1113 Bloomfield street, after an illness with consumption. She was 24 years of age and leaves a husband and three children. Her parents and three brothers also survive. The funeral will be Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 from the home. Services will be conducted by Rev. Dr. Bushnell.

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SNYDER, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 10, 1909

Michael Snyder, son of the late Michael Snyder whose death occurred last summer, died this morning at 7:15 o'clock at his home, 1119 Vandalia road, after two years of intense suffering from a complication of diseases, aged 41. Mr. Snyder had not been in good health for many years. At one time he was engaged in business for himself on east Second street, but in recent years had been working in the store of his brother, John Snyder, at Third and Piasa streets. His case was pronounced hopeless many weeks ago and he was given up to die. He was given the constant attention of members of his family and relatives through his long sickness. His death occurred as he was sitting in his chair, which he had occupied nearly all the night as he felt easier in the chair. He was a devoted member of St. Mary's church, a kindhearted, conscientious man, good to his family and his death is a sad loss to his wife and his six children, the oldest of the children being 16 and the youngest is 21 months. The children are Robert, Leo, Margaret, Charles, Frank and Paul. He leaves also four brothers and one sister, William, John, Henry and Joseph Snyder, and Mrs. Mary Lang, all of Alton. Mr. Snyder was born in the house where he died and had lived there all his life. The funeral will probably be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.  [Burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery]

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SNYDER, WILLIAM SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1915

William Snyder Sr., 52, was fatally injured and three others painfully hurt when Mr. Snyder's Ford auto turned turtle Sunday on College avenue at the intersection of Jersey street, and pinned its four passengers underneath. The injured are: William Snyder Jr., who was driving the car; E. A. Henney of Alton; and John Schnably of St. Louis, all of whom suffered scalp wounds. The boy was the least hurt of the whole party and it was he, who crawling from the wreck, made his way to a telephone and called doctors and an ambulance and got help in releasing the injured men from under the overturned car. The accident occurred about 5 o'clock Sunday afternoon as the auto was running down the steep grade on the paved street leading from Upper Alton to Rock Spring Park. The car was running at high speed when the accident happened. William Snyder Sr. sustained a facture of the skull near the base of the brain and never recovered consciousness, dying in St. Joseph's Hospital at 11 o'clock, six hours after he was hurt. Henney was stunned, but revived quickly, and Schnably, Mr. Henney's guest, did not recover fully for some hours after he was taken to the Henney home and given a surgeon's attention. Schnably, an engineer on the M. K. & T. railroad, is known as a man of pure nerve. He was the engineer whose train was stopped by bandits near St. Charles less than a year ago, and he conducted himself in faultless manner then, but Sunday, after the auto wreck, he went from one nervous chill to another. He was put to bed at the Henney home. The story of the accident indicates that it was due entirely to a human attempt to avoid hitting a big dog which ran across the road. William Snyder Jr., aged 18, employed at the Citizens National Bank, was steering the car when he saw the dog coming across his path. The boy turned the car to avoid it and at the same instant the car skidded against the curbing, knocking a chunk of rock out of the stone, and then jammed into a high clay bank, careening and then turning over.....Mr. Snyder was born and spent all of his life in Alton. He was in business here for many years. Several times he was in partnership with his brother, John Snyder, and for a long time was senior partner in the firm of Snyder and Budde on Third street. He was at one time interested in the ferryboat Altonian. He was a member of St. Mary's Church and of several of the men's societies there....The funeral of Mr. Snyder will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Mary's Church.

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SOEREAGE, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 25, 1919                Laborer Drowned in Tannery Sewer

William Soereage, a laborer employed at the International Tannery east of Wood River, was found today floating out of the mouth of the tannery sewer that leads to the river. He had been drowned in the sewer. The inquest conducted by Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer developed that fact that Soreage had been sent to inspect the sewer, which is about 4 feet in diameter and carries a great volume of water. He did not return, and his foreman, Theo Oglesgy (Oglesby?), went to hunt for him. He learned that the man's dead body had been discharged from the sewer. It is supposed that Soreage became overcome by gas and fainting, had fallen into the water and quickly lost his life.

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SOHLER, FRED/Source: Troy Weekly Call, July 14, 1906/Submitted by Marsha Ensminger                  St. Jacob Prominent Citizen Dies

The news of the death of Fred Sohler, one of the most prominent and well known citizens of St. Jacob and president of the State Bank of that place, was received as a great surprise to the citizens of that place Monday. Mr. Sohler's death occurred at 10:40 Monday morning at the home of his sister, Mrs. Margaret Peterson, residing at 3940 Russell avenue, St. Louis, where he had gone for a brief visit. Death was due to uraemia of a sudden and severe nature. The remains were brought to St. Jacob Wednesday and funeral services were held at his late home after which interment was made in the Keystone cemetery. Deceased who was in his 67th year, was born in the state of Louisiana and came to Illinois when a boy with his parents who located on a farm near St. Jacob. The father passed away when the son was twelve years of age and to the latter fell the management of the farm which he conducted successfully until 1874 when he and his mother took up residence in St. Jacob. Later he embarked in the general merchandising business and in 1889 went into the coal and grain business. He was never married and is survived only by one sister. When the State Bank was organized at St. Jacob some years ago, Mr. Sohler was made its president and he has aided materially in the success of that institution. Aside from serving several terms on the village board he held no other public positions and took no active part in politics, but was considered one of the most conservative, influential and enterprising citizens of St. Jacob. His death in the prime of his usefulness is one that is regretted generally by St. Jacob citizens and his other friends throughout the county.

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SOLOMON, JOHN/Source: Alton Telegraph, July 12, 1877           Death in a Coal Mine

Last Friday, while John Solomon, David White, and John Davis were on a scaffold near the top of a coal shaft belonging to the first named, in North Alton, arranging cages for raising coal in accordance with the new law, Mr. Solomon made a mis-step backward and fell to the bottom of the pit, a sheer descent of 90 feet, and was instantly killed. The deceased was over sixty years of age, a native of England, but came to this country in 1840. He first located at the Gravois mines in Missouri, afterwards ______[unreadable] in Wisconsin about three months, from whence he moved to the Coal Branch where he has ever since resided, engaged in coal mining. He leaves a widow and five children, three sons and two daughters, and many attached friends, to mourn his sudden death.

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SOLTER, CLARENCE/Source: Troy Star, July 19, 1894

Clarence, the 7 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Solter, died Sunday afternoon at three o'clock. The little one had been sick but a few days. The funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon at the family residence, the Rev. Hansen of the Evangelical church officiating. The bereaved family extend heartfelt thanks to those who so kindly assisted them in their sad affliction.

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SOMERS, ANDREW/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 13, 1910

Andrew Somers, a Benbow City young man who was hit by a C. & A. train at Wood River crossing Sunday noon, and was brought to the hospital in Alton, died there this morning from the effects of his injuries. It was not supposed he was so badly hurt, as his injuries appeared to be slight.

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SOMERS, CHARLES P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 5, 1918    

The death of Charles P. Somers occurred this morning at an early hour at the home of his only daughter, Mrs. Charles Flachenecker on East Eighth street, after an illness with pneumonia, following an attack of grippe which he suffered ten weeks ago. Somers was 55 years of age. Besides his daughter he is survived by his wife. Mr. and Mrs. Somers came to Alton from Urbana, Ill., twelve years ago, and have been residing here since that time, the former being employed at the box factory. Somers was the son of the late Judge Somers of Champaign county, who practiced with Lincoln in Springfield. Among the relatives surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Ella Sutton and Mrs. Pearl Parker of Urbana; also two nieces, Mrs. McCann, wife of Dr. McCann of Danville; and Mrs. Mark Curtis of Peoria. The funeral will be held on Tuesday, the body to be taken to the old home at Urbana for burial.

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SONNTAG, EDWIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1909

Edwin J. Sonntag, the 13 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. William Sonntag of Henry street, died Friday morning at St. Joseph's hospital after a brief illness with appendicitis. The boy had been in good health, was strong of constitution and had seldom been ill in his life. His illness became serious very unexpectedly, and Thursday he was removed from his home to the hospital to undergo a surgical operation to relieve appendicitis. He was very ill all night and Friday morning members of the family were summoned to his bedside, as he had gone into a state of callapse. He was the youngest son of his parents. The young man was a pupil at Lincoln school. He was born July 19, 1895. He was taken ill March 4. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the German Evangelical church.

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SONNTAG, FRANZ LUDWIG/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 19, 1916            Old Time Weaver, Who Had Sailed to America On a Three Month Journey, Dies

Franz Ludwig Sonntag, in his 88th year, died from old age at St. Joseph's Hospital Tuesday afternoon at 5 o'clock from old age. Mr. Sonntag was taken to the hospital Tuesday morning from his home on Belle street. He had lived in the one house for more than fifty years. He was born in Merrana, Saxony, Germany, and would have been 88 years of age in July. He came to America in a sailing ship, requiring three months to make the voyage. He was an expert weaver, and for years he worked in the old woolen mill on Belle street, where he served as foreman. Subsequently, he set up a carpet weaving establishment on Belle street at his home, and there he followed the trade of weaver. He was a well known resident of Alton. One of his chief characteristics was his love for little children, and they loved him. He is survived by his aged wife, to whom he had been married sixty years. He leaves also his daughters, Mrs. Sophia Nickols of East St. Louis; Mrs. William Groether of St. Louis; Mrs. O. G. Wilson of Dewey, Okla.; Mrs. Alfred Schroeder of Alton; and one son, Franz Sonntag of Texarkana, Ark. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the residence on Belle street.

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SONNTAG, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 9, 1911      Came to Alton as a Poor Boy in 1866 - Became Wealthiest Businessman in Alton

William Sonntag, aged 63, died Wednesday afternoon at his residence, 518 Henry streets, at 5 o'clock, after an illness from cancer of the stomach. Mr. Sonntag was not known to be in poor health until after he returned from a trip to Germany. He went there with his wife and daughter to spend a few months, and his condition became so bad he was obliged to return, and after arriving home he was able to leave the house but a few times. He took a change for the worse on Tuesday, and the end came about 36 hours later. Mr. Sonntag died one of the wealthiest business men in Alton. He owns large realty interests in Alton and elsewhere, and leaves a very valuable estate. His prosperity was due to hard work, close attention to business, and strict economy. He was known as a very good business man, and his business affairs were of a wide scope. He came to Alton as a poor young man in 1866, and worked at his trade of weaver. He was employed in the old woolen mill and rose to be foreman of his shop. In 1879 he started in the real estate and insurance business as a member of the firm of Rudershausen and Sonntag. By saving all he could he began to accumulate property, and added to it from time to time until his holdings became large. He was a native of Meereane, in Saxony, Germany, and was born July 28, 1848. He leaves in Alton his wife, two sons, William and Arthur, and one daughter, Miss Flora. His son, William, was his business partner and had charge of the business at the time of the father's death. Beside his wife and children, he leaves one brother, Frank L. Sonntag, of Alton. Mr. Sonntag was a member of the Odd Fellows and the Masonic fraternities for many years. The funeral will be Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to the German Evangelical church.

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SONS, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 7, 1921      Killed In Explosion at Equitable Powder Co.

A blowup of blasting powder in the corning mill department at the plant of the Equitable Powder Co. at East Alton this morning resulted in the death of one man and the serious injury of another. The building was badly damaged by the blowup. Frank Sons, assistant superintendent, was instantly killed, Earl Irby, who was with him, was badly burned and otherwise injured and was taken to St. Joseph's hospital for treatment. The accident occurred about 11 o'clock. The corning department is where the blasting powder that has been thoroughly mixed on the wheel houses and pressed in the press house to form cakes, is taken to be ground up preparatory to being glazed. The explosion did not shake Alton very much, but it was heard and felt far to the east of Alton. Frank Sons, who was killed in the explosion, was 30 years of age. He leaves besides his wife, two children, also his mother, two brothers and two sisters. The brothers are Wesley and Ernest, and the sister is Mrs. Fred Young. The other sister is unmarried and resides with the mother at Sims, Ill. Earl Irby was 30 years of age and he has a wife and several small children. Both men have been highly esteemed in East Alton where they lived. Sons came to East Alton a number of years ago and was married to an East Alton girl. Irby has not lived at East Alton very long. Sons was a member of the Junior Order of American Mechanics and the funeral will be under the auspices of that organization. It was given out this afternoon at the office of the Equitable plant by J. P. Thomas, that the death of Mr. Sons was due to his being hit on the head by a piece of flying timber. He was also somewhat burned by the flash. Both Sons and Irby were outside the group of buildings constituting the corning mill. No one enters the corning mill while it is in operation. The cause of the explosion will never be known. The corning mill consists of a main, large building and three smaller ones, and these were all wrecked by the explosion. It was said this afternoon that Irby's injuries will probably not prove fatal as the doctors said that there were first and second degree burns, but none of the gravest kind, and that they were hopeful that all would be well with Irby.

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SOTIER, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 14, 1914

Mrs. Caroline Sotier, widow of C. Sotier, died at 1:45 o'clock Thursday morning at her home, 209 Ridge street, after a long illness. She was born in Urach, Wittenberg, Germany, September 27, 1843, and came to this country when she was six years of age. With her parents she came to Alton in 1856, and was married here to Christopher Sotier in 1860. She leaves to mourn her death four sons, Alfred, Arthur, Oscar and Charles Sotier, and three daughters, Misses Bertha, Emilie and Carrie; also one brother, Charles Gollmer of Quincy, and three grandchildren. Mrs. Sotier was one of the first members of the Lady Rebekah lodge in Alton. She was highly esteemed by her neighbors who valued her as one who was always sympathetic and kindly with them. In her family she was loved and respected, and during her last illness her children were in constant attendance upon her, even at the greatest of inconvenience to themselves. The funeral will be from the family home Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and burial will be in City Cemetery. Rev. E. L. Mueller, pastor of the German Evangelical Church in which Mrs. Sotier held membership, will conduct the funeral service.

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SOULE, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1911      Lived 72 Years in One House

[Editor's note: Although this is not her obit, as she was not dead at the writing of the article, I thought it may be of interest to her descendants]

Mrs. Elizabeth Soule, aged 72, is in a dying condition at her home, 1244 west Ninth street (formerly Main street). She has been dying for several days, and it was not expected she would survive over Sunday, but Monday morning her pulse was still strong. Her condition was due to a general breakdown. Mrs. Soule probably had a unique record in Alton, in that she had lived 72 years in one house. The place was erected by her father, George Armstrong, and she was born there, married there, and insisted upon staying there to die, although she was urgently invited to go to her daughter's home in Chicago, or to the home of her niece, Mrs. O. G. Norris. Mrs. Soule is the last of her family. She was a sister of William and John Armstrong, Mrs. Harry Johnson, and she had another brother, Thomas Armstrong, who died many years ago. Last winter when she was ill she was taken to the hospital, but this winter she would not leave the home to which she had become strongly attached in the 72 years of her life, and there she stayed with a woman who kept house for her and gave her faithful attention. Mrs. Soule's daughter, Mrs. George S. Haskell of Chicago, has been attending her, and Mr. Haskell also is here. It is believed that no other person in Alton has lived so long in one house, and that no other house in the city of Alton has been so long tenanted by one family. The house was built about 80 years ago [this would be 1831], and has never had in it a tenant outside of the Armstrong family, of which Mrs. Soule was a member.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 21, 1911

Mrs. Elizabeth Soule, widow of C. Soule, died this afternoon at her birthplace, 1244 west Ninth street, after an illness that had lasted over a year. Mrs. Soule's end had been expected for a week, and she was given the constant attention of her daughter, Mrs. George S. Haskell of Chicago, during the last few weeks of her life. Mrs. Soule's death in the house where she was born, married, and had lived for seventy-two years, was as she had wished it. She did not desire to leave her beloved old home, although she might have done so. Beside her daughter, she leaves one sister, Miss Katherine Armstrong, formerly of Monticello Seminary, who is here for the winter and was with her sister during her last week. Mrs. Soule's husband died many years ago. He was a prominent business man in Alton many years ago, and conducted a sawmill. The funeral of Mrs. Soule will be held at 1 o'clock Saturday afternoon from St. Paul's Episcopal church, in which Mrs. Soule had held membership from girlhood.

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SOULNEY, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 22, 1918

Henry Soulney, aged 47 years, died this morning at 10:30 o'clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. J. Ennis, at 698 East Seventh street. Soulney was sick twelve weeks with dropsy. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

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SOUTHARD, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 17, 1903

Upper Alton News - Died, this morning at 6 o'clock, Mrs. James Southard, at her home on Locust avenue, after several months illness. Mrs. Southard was not quite thirty years of age. Besides her husband, she leaves four children, one daughter and three little boys. The body will be taken to Wanda tomorrow for burial, where two of her children are buried.

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SPACEK, ELIZABETH M. (nee WERNER)/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, February 15, 1893

Mrs. Elizabeth M. Spacek, wife of Joseph Spacek, died Wednesday at 10:40 o'clock a.m. at her home, in the southern part of Edwardsville township, of blood poisoning. The funeral took place Friday at the family residence. Rev. Father J. C. Daw conducted services. The remains were interred in the Bohemian cemetery. The pallbearers were John Kriger, Joseph Wacek, Paul Smola, Frank Pekes, Joseph Kovarieck and Frank Yanda. Deceased was a daughter of Nicholas and Anna Werner, and was 25 years, 3 months and 20 days old. She was one of nine children, eight of whom are living. She was married to Joseph Spacek February 8, 1887, and they moved into the husband's residence two days later. She died February 8, 1893, just six years after her marriage, and her remains were laid to rest on the 10th inst., just six years after she took up her abode in her husband's residence. She leaves to mourn her demise a husband, three children, Anna, Joseph and Nicholaus, a father, mother, four brothers and four sisters, William, Nicholaus, John and Joseph, Anna, Mary, Barbara and Julia, besides many relatives and friends.

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SPAET, CHRISTINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 17, 1908

The funeral of Mrs. Christina Spaet was held this morning from St. Mary's church where she had been a daily attendant at services for almost half a century, and was attended by a very large number of people. Services were conducted by Rev. Joseph Meckel and assistants, and burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery beneath a heavy coverlet of flowers - the offerings of friends.

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SPAET, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1911

Henry Spaet, aged 48, died Monday evening in St. Mary's infirmary in St. Louis, after undergoing a surgical operation there. He had been sick for two years with jaundice, and his case became so bad recently that he went to St. Louis a week ago to be operated. The surgical operation was performed Wednesday, and on Saturday he became much worse. His brother, Charles, was summoned from Alton to attend him. During his illness Mrs. Spaet was with her husband. The body was brought to Alton this afternoon and was taken to the home of his father-in-law, Henry Timmermeier, Seventeenth and Piasa streets. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church. The death of Henry Spaet will be learned with sadness by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. He had lived all his life in Alton, and since he was a boy he was a hunter of ability. He took great pride in his hunting outfit, and always had the best of hunting dogs, and he always brought back home plenty of game. Although very ill and weak the last of August, he insisted upon taking a trip up the river, but was forced to return because the trip was too much for him. His favorite hunting companion was H. O. Tonsor, and they had kept company on hunts since boyhood. Henry Spaet served on the police force several years and was a valuable, brave and efficient officer. For several years he had been in the saloon business at Brighton, Ill.  He leaves his wife and child.

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SPAIN, BRIDGET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1910

The funeral of Mrs. Bridget Spain was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Patrick's church, Rev. Fr. Kehoe officiating. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

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SPANGENBERG, ELIZABETH (nee TAMBLIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 22, 1919

Mrs. Elizabeth Tamblin Spangenberg, wife of Julius Spangenberg, died Saturday night at St. Joseph's hospital where she had been taken in the afternoon after becoming suddenly ill. She had apparently been in the best of health Saturday morning when her husband left home. The day before she had been very active about the house, getting ready for the Christmas holidays. Saturday afternoon, shortly after 2 o'clock, she managed to attract the attention of her sister, Mrs. Harry Gissal, by rapping on the window and conveyed the information that she needed assistance and to send for Mr. Spangenberg. The alarm was given, medical aid was summoned and it was found that she was suffering from an acute attack of diabetes. It was decided to move her to the hospital Saturday evening where she could get better care than was possible at home, where she remained unconscious almost to the end. Mrs. Spangenberg was a woman of delightful personality, and possessed many friends who loved her for her friendly disposition and her many acts of friendship and kindness. She was married sixteen years ago last July 9 to Julius Spangenberg. Her maiden name was Tamblin. She was born at Mitchell, 47 years ago last March 27. She is survived by her husband, aged mother and three sisters, and five brothers: Mrs. Margaret Scully of Texas; Mrs. Harry Gissal; Miss May Hoehn of Alton; George Hoehn of Granite City; Leonora Hoehn of Oldenburg; Harry Hoehn of East Alton; John Hoehn of California. She was popular socially and her company was much in demand. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Evangelical Church, 8th and Henry, entombment will be in the Grandview mausoleum. Rev. P. W. Heggemeier officiating.

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SPANGENBERG, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 20, 1909

The funeral of Frank Spangenberg was held this morning from St. Mary's church immediately following the arrival of the body from St. Louis. Services at the church were conducted by Rev. Fr. Meckel and at the graveside in St. Joseph's cemetery by Rev. Fr. Hochmueller. Many friends and former neighbors of deceased and of the family attended the obsequies and floral offerings were numerous. These gentlemen acted as pallbearers: V. Goeken, F. L. Meyer, J. Braunagel, Ed Joehl, J. Eckhardt and William Gschwend Jr.

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SPANGLE, LOTTIE PEARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 23, 1918

Mrs. Lottie Pearl Spangle, the 18 year old wife of Iran Spangle of Wood River, died this morning at her home. Mrs. Spangle was ill ten days with the influenza, which turned into pneumonia. The body will be taken to Jerseyville tomorrow and will be interred in the Lax Cemetery.

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SPANGLER, JONAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 6, 1917

Jonas Spangler, aged 45, was instantly killed by the Limited on the interurban line leaving Alton Monday evening at 7 o'clock. Spangler, who was on his way to work, was waiting at the interurban station for a car to take him to Wood River from East Alton. Noticing the Limited coming, he mistook it for the local car and stepping across the track toward the local he was struck by the onrushing Limited and killed. The only witness to the tragedy was a Mrs. Miller, who was near Spangler when he was struck. The body was taken on to Granite City with Mrs. Miller escorting it, and turned over to an undertaker there. An inquest will be held tonight and the body will be sent to Olney, Ill., for burial tomorrow. Spangler came here from Olney last May, and first worked for the Western Cartridge Co. Finally, getting himself settled permanently, he sent for his family who recently joined him at East Alton, where they made their home. Deceased leaves his wife and five children. His oldest son is in the army. His youngest child is 9 years of age. A daughter of the dead man said she believed her father was blinded by the light from the interurban and becoming confused did not get off the track in time to avoid being hit. Members of the family of Spangler, who were in East Alton, did not know of the death of the head of the family until three hours later. The family were informed about 10 o'clock by Mrs. Miller, who arrived at their home, broke the news to them, and gave them the card of the Granite City undertaking firm which had charge of the body. It is said that the traction officials did not know where to find the family of Spangler, as they had only recently moved to East Alton, but that Mrs. Miller knew and agreed to take back the word to the family..

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SPANGLER, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1918                Daughter's Death Soon Follows Father - Blood Poison Cause

Miss Mary Spangler, aged 24, died last night at 10 o'clock after an illness from tonsillitis and blood poisoning with which she has been suffering for the past week. She boarded in Altwood at East Alton with another sister at the Harry Newman home, after the death of her father, which occurred about three months ago. The father, Henry Spangler, and his two daughters, Mary and Julia Spangler, had come from Olney, Ill. to work at the Western Cartridge Co. plant. Two months and ten days before the death of his daughter, the father, by mistake, stepped in front of a limited car at East Alton, believing that it was going to stop, and he was instantly killed. The remains were taken back to Olney, and since that time the two daughters remained in East Alton continuing to work at the Western Cartridge Co. plant. Previous to coming to East Alton Miss Mary Spangler was for eight years a telephone operator at Olney, where she was well known and generally admired. Her illness began with tonsillitis, but before that she hurt her foot by catching it in one of the machines at the cartridge plant. The foot did not get entirely well, and after her illness with tonsillitis the foot began to swell, and in some unexplainable manner, blood poisoning set in. The foot kept swelling causing excruciating torture until she was relieved by death last night. The mother and two children, a son Pearl and daughter Evelyn, came down from Olney this morning and will stay until after the funeral and will accompany the body home this afternoon where funeral services will be held at 7 o'clock. The body will be taken to Olney tomorrow morning on the 6 o'clock train and funeral services will also be held at Olney.

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SPANIOL, VIRGINIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 19, 1915

Mrs. Virginia Spaniol, wife of John H. Spaniol, died this morning at 2:45 o'clock at the family home at 409 Ridge street, from heart trouble. Mrs. Spaniol was 62 years of age, having been born on the 28th of December 1853. The deceased is survived by her husband, John H. Spaniol, and two sons, John and Harry. Also a sister, Mary Lambert, and a brother, John Lambert. Mr. and Mrs. Spaniol were married on July 10th in 1883. The death of Mrs. John Spaniol of Ridge street came so sudden at 3 o'clock this morning that members of her own family who were sleeping in the next room were not at the bedside when she died. Her husband was awakened just a few seconds before her death by her calling him. She had suffered with heart trouble a number of times before, and his first impulse was to place several pillows under her head. While he was lifting her head to the pillows, she died in his arms. Her son, Harry, who was sleeping in the next room, did not see his mother die. Mrs. Spaniol had been ill for some time, but it is believed that the death of her sister, Mrs. Carrie Schuelle, two months ago, hurried her death. Since the death of her sister, Mrs. Spaniol had grieved much. She was taken badly ill about a week ago, but had improved and was working about the house yesterday. She did not retire until 9:30 o'clock last evening, and then seemed to be in excellent spirits. On Wednesday evening she was able to visit the home of her son, John Spaniol, and see her only grandchild, a boy four days old. The funeral will take place from the home to St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock on next Monday morning. Burial will take place in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

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SPARKS, DAVID R. (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 11, 1907          Alton's "Grand Old Man" Passes Away

 

Captain David R. SparksOur city and our state of a citizen of foremost rank, one who had won fame and honor in the field, in the forum and in the business world. Many men win renown in some particular avocation. Some are great as warriors, some as statesmen and some as captains of industry, but few combine the talents which command success in varied avenues of service. Captain David R. Sparks, whose death yesterday cast a shadow over our city, was one of the few, who in the course of a long and eventful career, attained distinction in diverse fields of action. He was a soldier, a statesman, and orator and a business man - distinguished in each calling. He was also a pathfinder, who in early manhood had helped blaze a way through the wilderness from the Mississippi to the Pacific - for a nation yet to be. But, above all, he was a noble, upright, fearless man who loved his home, his friends, his country and his fellow men. Perhaps this is not the place to dwell at length on the beauty and strength of his character, but its most prominent features may be summarized in his open hearted generosity in material things, his unselfishness and his abounding charity. His was the charity which St. Paul glorifies; the charity that "envieth not," "thinketh no evil," "is not easily provoked," and that "suffereth long and is kind." Such men are a tower of strength in a community. They give it tone and vigor. They direct public sentiment, exalt patriotism and raise citizenship to a higher plane where it breathes the free air of a purer-toned ambition. Capt. Sparks was a natural leader, not that he sought to be, but he was a man to whom the public instinctively turned in any crisis or in any public enterprise that demanded wisdom and clear vision for its successful outcome. In all the nearly half century of his residence in Alton, his talents and experience were ever at the command of the public, with no selfish or self-seeking end in view. His civic service in every relation of citizenship was ever freely given, and in every good work he was ever in the forefront. He lived to a good old age, active and vigorous to the end of his 84 years, with intellect undimmed and his native strength unabated. Passing years did not dull his interest in public affairs, in his business, or in any movement that affected the hopes of his fellow men - Alton's grand old man! It may be long before we look upon his like again, and it will be long before we fully realized how much his life and example meant to us all as a patriot, a citizen and a friend.  David R. Sparks was born at New Albany, Indiana, October 15, 1823. He was one of a family of eight children. The family was of pioneer stock and of Virginia lineage. His parents were in moderate circumstances and the children had their own way to make in the world. Of three of them who gained distinction in public life, the eldest became Judge of the Federal court of Washington Territory by appointment of President Lincoln; the youngest, Hon. W. A. J. Sparks, served six terms in congress from Illinois, while the subject of this sketch was a member of the 30th General Assembly, elected in 1888, and was elected to the 40th Assembly in 1896 as State Senator, serving two years. In 1895 he was the choice of Madison, Bond and Montgomery counties for Congress, to fill a vacancy, the selection falling upon the Congressional committee, but the members from Shelby, Moulton and Fayette objected on the score of age, and the choice fell upon another, although the committeemen who voted for him represented the great bulk of the Republican voters of the district. While this discrimination was felt to be a rank injustice, Capt. Sparks, with his usual nobility, acquiesced and gave his successful competitor his warm support.  Capt. Sparks' parents moved to Illinois in 1836 and settled in the vicinity of Staunton. He grew to manhood on a farm, receiving such education as was afforded by the common schools of the period. In 1847 he enlisted as a volunteer in the Mexican War, and marched with his regiment across the plains, encountering great hardships, to Albuquerque, New Mexico, then in Mexican territory, where he served until the close of the war, returning home the following year. In 1850 his adventurous spirit prompted him to join the argonauts on the far Pacific coast, and in company with friends from Staunton he crossed the plains to California, the expedition being five months en route. He remained in the Golden State one year, meeting with moderate success in the mines, and returned home by sea, via Panama and New Orleans. In 1860 he crossed the plains a third time in response to the "call of blood," and again became a gold seeker in the Rocky Mountains. He set up the first steam quartz mill in Colorado at Central City. But after a brief experience in the mining regions, returned to Illinois. The closing and most important event in his career of hazard and adventure was his second enlistment in his country's service, this time as a soldier in the war for the Union [Civil War]. His experience in the Mexican war and in two other expeditions across the plains peculiarly fitted him for active service in the great and bloody drama of the century. His love of country was a burning flame and it was with the ardor and enthusiasm of his whole nature that he dedicated himself to the cause of the Union. In response to the call to arms, he went to the front in 1861 as Captain of Company L, Third Illinois Cavalry. It was in the spirit of the old cavalier, "I could not love thee dear so much, Love I not honor more" that he bade his young wife farewell and buckled on his sword. His regiment was commanded by Col. E. A Carr, afterwards a general of division. The Captain saw active and arduous service from the first in Missouri, Arkansas, Tennessee and Mississippi, and participated in many battles, including Pea Ridge, Haines Bluff, Arkansas Post, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, Siege of Vicksburg, and many minor engagements, and was once severely wounded. His service was ever daring and brilliant. As an incident of this, it is recorded of him that "on the 4th of June, 1862, Capt. Sparks and 66 men were surrounded by 300 of the enemy's cavalry, but instead of surrendering, cut their way out with the loss of eight men." He returned from the war with the same rank he went out. He merited high promotion and it was offered him, but he declined other than brevet rank.  The reason was characteristic. His company was made up of his friends and neighbors. When they went to the war he promised the wives and mothers of his soldiers that he would "stay with and care for the boys," and he did, refusing any promotion that would separate him from his command. On returning home from the army, he resumed his interrupted civil pursuits. His first independent business enterprise had been the erection and operation of a saw mill, which turned out the first ties for the west end of the old Alton & Terre Haute Railroad. Subsequently he sold his saw mill and erected a flour mill in Staunton in 1864. This mill had a capacity of 25 barrels of flour per day, which was then considered a large output. In 1864, in connection with Mr. W. Best, he built a larger mill at Litchfield, and in 1868 he removed to Alton, and in connection with his former partner and the late L. J. Clawson, purchased the National Mills, the firm name being Clawson, Sparks, & Co.  The firm subsequently became D. R. Sparks & Co., and was incorporated in 1887 as the Sparks Milling Co., under which name it is still doing business, the mill having a capacity of 2,400 barrels per day, being one of the largest in the state, and surpassed by none in completeness of modern equipment. From 24 barrels per day to 2,400 per day is an increased in output that indicates the ability that guided the growth of this great industry. In addition to his main business enterprise, Capt. Sparks was one of the founders of the Miller's Mutual Insurance Co., and has been its president for thirty years of constantly increasing success. He was also, for some years, president of the Illinois Millers' Association, In 1892 he made the tour of Europe in company with members of the association. He found much of interest in the old world, but returned a more pronounced and devoted American than ever. There was but one country in the world for him, and that was the one for which he had risked his life and shed his blood.  Of Capt. Sparks political career much might be said.  Before the war he was a Douglas Democrat. From that to Republicanism was but a short step, and after the war he affiliated with the party of Lincoln. In its service he never faltered, and his best energies were devoted to its upbuilding. He was a natural orator and a convincing speaker, with ready command of language, and his intense earnestness mounted often to lofty flights of eloquence. Every political campaign found him ready to take the rostrum and advocate the principles of his party. Probably no man in the organization, since the war, not a professional politician, has made more speeches than he. No political gathering in Alton was complete without his presence. He could hold and entertain a crowd under any circumstances. He was decided in conviction and emphatic in statement, yet ever kindly and considerate of the feelings of his opponents. There was no malice or rancor in his composition. We have said that his early educational advantages were limited, but he had been a reader and student all his life, and his memory was phenomenal. The political and economic history of the country from colonial times up to the present was as familiar in him as an open book, and the situation and conditions in other countries as well, so that he could entertain and instruct as well as convince his hearers. As a legislator at the state capital, he was wise and judicious, and always conscientious. He represented not only his district, but the best interests of the whole state. He was trusted and honored in the halls of legislation as he was at home. He was the friend and associate of our leading statesmen, and had their fullest confidence and support. But there was another side to the life of this brave, gentle, kindly man, whose career was so full of stirring incident and varied experience. Another side, also, in addition even to that of the gentle friend, the generous neighbor and the considerate helper of the needy, and that was the ideal home life that underlaid and sustained his public service. He was happy in his family life, though affliction came in time to him as to us all, and the idol of his wife and children, while his devotion to them was unbounded. He was married at Staunton in 1849 to Anna Davenport Chapman. She was born at Staunton in 1830, of North Carolina parentage. Six children grew up around them to repay the love and devotion of their parents. The wife and mother, a lady of rare endowments of mind and heart, who had been her husband's support and counselor throughout his eventful life, passed away in 1896, leaving a desolate home behind her, but one rich in tender memories. The last illness of our friend, which opened the portals of reunion to husband and wife, was borne with the patient fortitude characteristic of the man.  Surrounded by his children, who had watched over him with tenderest solicitude for weary weeks, he passed into the peaceful palace of rest. Even in the hour of parting there are some times compensations to those left behind in the circumstance of transition - the silent messenger who never forgets did not call for him amid the ghastly horrors of the battlefield nor on the desert plain amid the war whoops of the savage, nor in the dreary mining camp in the mountains, nor on the stormy sea, nor among strangers in a strange land, but waited many years and then called to him in his pleasant home while the faces of loved ones looked into his, and the Sabbath bells without chimed a requiem.  Capt. Sparks' denominational connection was with the Unitarian church, of whose board of trustees he was the president, and whose pastor will conduct the last service for the friend and parishioner he loved so well. Capt. Sparks leaves one daughter and five sons:  Mrs. Mary, wife of Hon. F. R. Milnor of Litchfield; Messrs. W. D., H. B. and C. F. Sparks of Alton, and W. L. and E. W. Sparks of Montclair, N. J.  Also eleven grandchildren.

 

The following appreciative sketch appeared in the Northwestern Miller on the occasion of the celebration of the 80th birthday anniversary of Capt. Sparks, four years ago:

"The expression 'grand old man' is a trite one, yet it seems so fitting as to be inevitable when applied to those rare gentlemen who, surviving four score years, still preserve their faculties and enjoy life, surrounded by their friends and are of use and influence in every relation thereof. Such is David R. Sparks, the veteran miller of Alton, Illinois, founder, in 1855 of Sparks Milling Company, and still its President. This good and just man, after a life of strictest integrity and great activity, is passing the hours when the shadows lengthen in a serene, well-balanced, and sane fashion, not in idleness or more waiting but in occupations congenial to his sunny temperament and optimistic spirit. Hale and hearty, he passed the 80th milestone on life's road last Thursday. The occasion was celebrated at his home by a birthday party, to which came his children and grandchildren and many other relatives. It was a family meeting, and as such would have been no place for an outsider, however close or long his friendship might have been, yet if they could have been present on this occasion, many hundreds of Mr. Sparks' friends in the milling and flour trade, friends made in the course of nearly a half century of exemplary business life, would have rejoiced at the privilege afforded them to grasp his honest hand and congratulate him on the happy day. They would have listened to his reminiscences of experiences in the Mexican War, in the great Civil War, in political life, and in the quest of gold among the "49ers" with keenest enjoyment, and looking upon him would have carried away into their busy lives inspiration and encouragement from his example. Since this was not to be, these old friends go forth to him in spirit if not in the body. An army of witnesses testifying to his loyalty, usefulness and honor among men, many of them remembering and treasuring as such remembrances, kindly words spoken by him in season's of trial; encouragement in dark days; generous acts which counted because they came at the opportune time and many and many a helpful hand extended to aid them upward and onward. As the good man presses on toward, the end which all must at last reach, cheerfully, manfully and without repining, may these thoughts follow and surround him and fall upon him gently as a benediction and may he be preserved in hale old age, his faculties undimmed and his usefulness unabated, for many years to come; an honor, a glory and a blessing to those around him, until the coming of the great and beautiful peace which shall mark the end of a good life well lived."

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 12, 1907

The funeral of Capt. David R. Sparks was held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from his residence on Prospect street. There was a large assemblage of friends and relatives to pay the last tribute to the memory of the aged soldier, statesman, business man, and citizen. A notable feature of the funeral was the number of his former employees who were present. In all his long years of activity in the business world, during which Capt. Sparks employed many hundreds of men constantly, there was not one but would have gone any length to serve him, knowing full well that what he would direct them to do would be only for the best, and there was not one but respected and honored him, and held him in affectionate regard. Of those who knew him, irrespective of political or religious differences, there was not one in the hour of death of the aged gentleman that did not have good words to say of him. The funeral services were very simple, according to an expressed wish of Capt. Sparks. He belonged to the Masonic order and to the G. A. R., but neither of those organizations attended in a body, although many individual members were present at the funeral. The services at the home were conducted by Rev. George R. Gebauer of the Unitarian church.  There were many beautiful and costly floral offerings sent by friends and organizations, but none was more expressive of appreciation than one which came from the children in the Cathedral Orphanage. Capt. Sparks had been a good friend to the children ever since the orphanage was started in what was the first home Capt. Sparks had when he moved to Alton. He never lost an opportunity to make the children happy, and in every way he could he showed his sympathy with the work of the institution and helped it often. He was known to them as Santa Claus, for his beneficences. The little orphans, collecting their pennies and nickels, which would be scarce enough with little folks in such an institution, gave their all to buy a big floral piece, which was delivered with the deepest sympathy of the children and the sisters in charge. The men employed in the mill sent a large broken wheel, and the Millers' Mutual Fire Insurance Co., of which Capt. Sparks was president, sent a floral pillow. The mill men attended the funeral in a body, and took a last look at their departed employer they had worked for so many years. The full force of mill men, 120 strong, carried the flowers from the house to the cemetery, riding in two special cars. Underneath the casket as it was in the home was a spray of pink roses, which made a bed on which lay the sword which Capt. Sparks had twice drawn in defending his country's flag. The casket was borne by six employees in the Sparks mill, James Aldous, Edward Shelton, Joseph Toole, George Burton, Guy Huskinson and Will Watkins, representing all departments of the institution. The honorary pallbearers were T. Koenigsmark of Waterloo, George Poestel of Mascoutah, A. R. McKinney, three members of the Millers' Mutual executive committee, and five personal friends of Capt. Sparks, J. H. Yager, E. P. Wade, W. T. Norton of Alton, Dr. R. F. Zennett and Mr. Southworth of Litchfield. A long cortege followed Capt. Sparks to City Cemetery, where the body was laid away in the family lot beside his wife, and the final service of consigning him to his last long rest was attended by a large throng of relatives, old friends and neighbors, many of the friends and relatives coming from distant places to be present. Among those who attended Capt. Sparks' funeral from Edwardsville were Mrs. W. H. Nall, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Leverett, C. H. Spillman; E. L. Pegram of Decatur; W. J. Pegram of Lincoln; Charles Summers of Springfield; Tipton Blish of Seymour, Ind.; T. C. Chapman of Jerseyville; Congressman W. A. Rodenberg of East St. Louis; Dr. and Mrs. R. F. Bennett, E. Southworth, Mrs. Beach, Mrs. David Davis, W. Jageman, H. G. Tuttle, Mr. and Mrs. Al Palmer, B. J. Chapman and Luther Settlemeyer of Litchfield; Mr. and Mrs. George Palmer of Springfield; Fletcher Chapman of Joliet; Judge Hillskotter and County Recorder Kunneman of Edwardsville.

 

[Editor's Notes:  David R. Sparks was born in Harrison County, Indiana, October 15, 1823, to Baxter and Elizabeth (Gwin) Sparks, natives of Virginia. His paternal grandfather, Thomas Sparks, was a descendant of English ancestry, while the Gwins were of Scotch-Irish origin. In 1830, the family came to Illinois and settled on a farm near Staunton. He purchased the Alton National Mill, which had been erected in 1857 by S. and A. P. Wise. In 1881 Mr. Sparks purchased his partner's interest. The mill was situated on Second Street, on the banks of the Mississippi in Alton. The building was four stories high.]

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SPARKS, CHARLES F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 15, 1923            Boy Crushed to Death When Cave Collapses

Four little boys discovered an old cave, dug perhaps years ago by boys now grown men, and abandoned by them, and the four little boys decided to go back to the caveman idea, which has possessed almost every boy at some time in his life. As a result, one of the little boys is dead, and another was badly bruised all over his body when the roof of the old cave tumbled in and buried the two. The accident occurred yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock. The dead boy was Charles F. Sparks, son of E. M. Sparks and Mrs. Dorothy Sparks. The injured boy is Elmer Osborn, aged 10, son of Mrs. Grace Osborn, whose home is on Semple street, just across the street from where the boys had started on their cave digging. The two other boys are Walter Barton, aged 15, and Leroy Sheff, aged 10. It was due to their presence of mind that there were not two, instead of one fatality, resulting from the collapse of the bank of earth in which they were enlarging the cave. According to the two boys who were standing outside the cave when the fatal accident occurred, the four boys had recently discovered a tunnel-like cavity in the bank of earth on Semple street, about 150 feet north of Seventh street. They planned to enlarge the cavity and make of it a home for a club they intended to form. Yesterday afternoon, two of the boys had crawled inside the cavity in the bank and were at work in there digging to make the hole bigger. The cave was not big enough for the boys to stand upright in it, and they were obliged to crouch, or to sit up in it as they worked. The Sparks boy and the Osborn boy were inside the cave digging away when suddenly the bank above them, about eight feet high, slid down on them. The Osborn boy was nearest the mouth of the cave and when the bank settled down one of his hands was protruding from the mass of earth. The Sparks boy was just behind him, but completely buried. Realizing the gravity of what had occurred, the two boys who were outside got busy and first pulled enough dirt away from around the face of the Osborn boy to keep him from smothering. Then one of the two ran for help while the other stayed to continue digging. Men came with spades and they dug furiously. First they released the Osborn boy, who seemed badly hurt, but revived when taken to his mother's home across the street. "Flettie" Sparks, his companion, being deeper buried, could not be reached so soon and he was dead when taken out about a half hour after the bank slid down on them. Evidently his neck had been broken, as he was apparently seated on the floor of the cave and his head was pressed forward and down on his breast by the weight on tons of earth above him. It is supposed that his death was instant. The other boy, too, supported the weight of the earth on his head but by some chance was not fatally injured. By the time the Osborn boy was taken out, his mother had arrived. She was not home at first but came home in time to see them about to remove her son from beneath the fallen earth. E. M. Sparks arrived on the scene after the boy's body had been taken out and carried it to a neighboring home. Hoping there might still be chance to revive him, the boy was started for the hospital but it was evident he was beyond any help by the time he reached there. The mother of the victim of the accident received her news of the fatal accident from two little girls who volunteered to be the messengers to the mother. Mrs. Sparks said that her son had come home from school and had asked to go to play, and she had told him he could go. It was not long after that when she was given the tidings that the little boy had been killed. She knew nothing of the cave. The two boys who were standing outside the cave at the time it collapsed, Walter Barton and Leroy Sheff, said that they did not know how long ago the cave they had discovered was dug. It had two entrances and was like a winding passage way through a jutting prominence in the clay bank. The digging the boys were doing inside evidently weakened what support the bank had. Blasting in the neighborhood had also done much to weaken it, they believed, but they had not thought of that when they started their excavating operations. The bank was about 10 feet in height. They said that they thought they heard the Sparks boy call for help once, and they say the Osborn boy did call as he was being crushed under the weight of the collapsing bank. The two boys were only a short distance inside the excavation, but happened to be where they caught the full weight of the earth as it slipped down. The funeral of Charles Sparks was held this afternoon from the home of his mother, Mrs. Dorothy Sparks, at 3 o'clock, and services were conducted by Rev. Frederick D. Butler of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. The time of the funeral was set early because of the impending departure of the Episcopal rector from Alton. Burial was in City Cemetery. The victim of the accident was a bright child of a high order of intelligence. He was a pupil at Irving School. Beside his mother and his father, he leaves one sister, Mary Elizabeth Sparks. He was a grandson and namesake of C. F. Sparks.

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SPARKS, MARY NOBLE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 20, 1914

Mrs. Mary Noble Sparks, wife of Charles F. Sparks, died at 3:45 o'clock Friday morning at her residence, 404 Prospect street, from apoplexy. Mrs. Sparks was stricken Thursday noon while eating her noonday meal, and in a few minutes after the trouble manifested itself became unconscious. She never regained consciousness. She had been spending the winter in the south, cruising in southern waters with her husband and her daughter, Miss Katherine Sparks. She was a partial invalid for eight years. While she recovered, after a long period of disability and was able to be around, she never had the fullest use of herself thereafter, and she had spent much of her time in traveling.....Her husband remained in the south, as he had been hoping for permanent relief there from a trouble in his eyes and he had been improving steadily. When she was stricken for the last time Thursday, her husband was notified and he responded that he would be home at once. He was being expected late this afternoon. Mrs. Sparks was a daughter of Capt. and Mrs. W. P. Noble, who formerly resided on what is now Central avenue. She was born in Indianapolis, but came to live in Alton in her girlhood and was married when quite young. Beside her husband, she leaves five children, Mrs. P. B. Cousley, E. M. Sparks, Dick Sparks, Miss Katherine Sparks and David Sparks. She leaves also three sisters, Mrs. Harry Whalley of New York; Mrs. Esther Carter; and Miss Katherine Noble of Indianapolis.....The funeral will be Sunday afternoon from the home.

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SPARKS, WESLEY, D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 20, 1909                   Former Manager of the Sparks Milling Co. Will Be Buried at Alton

Wesley D. Sparks, former manager of the Sparks Milling Co. at Alton, and for many years one of the best known young men in the city, died Monday evening at a sanitarium at Waukesha, Wisconsin. His brother, H. B. Sparks, and his sister, Mrs. Frank R. Milnor of Litchfield, had been attending him for several days, being summoned to the sanitarium when he was stricken with a paralytic stroke. He had been in ill health for several years. He was a son of the late Capt. D. R. Sparks, and had lived in Alton all his life until his health broke down. He had many friends in Alton who will remember him with great kindness, as he was a man whose charitable impulses were strong, and he would give with a free hand wherever he knew there was need of help. His heart was as tender as a woman's, and he was quick to relieve suffering wherever he found it. He had the ability of making friends and holding them, was frank and very honest in the expression of his opinions. His wife died three years ago, and his body will be buried in City Cemetery beside hers. It is expected that the funeral part will arrive from Waukesha tomorrow, and the funeral will be in private from the home of H. B. Sparks on Prospect street, Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock. Mr. Sparks leaves one sister, Mrs. Frank R. Milnor, and four brothers, H. B. Sparks, C. F. Sparks, of Alton, W. L. Sparks and E. W. Sparks of Montclair, N. J.  Wesley D. Sparks was born near Staunton, Ill., May 4, 1854. He came to Alton when a young boy with his parents. He was married September 8, 1876, to Miss Emma Fisher. In his long period of connection with the milling business at Alton he met many farmers from whom he bought wheat, and among them, as among others who had business dealings with him, there will be genuine sorrow that "Wes" Sparks is dead. He had the reputation of being always fair and honest in his business dealings, and the men who sold him their wheat had the utmost confidence in his purpose to do right by them all the time.

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SPEAR, LURENE STOWE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 27, 1906    Old Resident of Alton to be Buried Beside Husband

Mrs. Lurene Stowe Spear, widow of Louis Perry Spear, a former resident of Alton and Madison county, will be brought to Alton for burial Friday morning. She died in Springfield, Ill., Tuesday evening at 9 o'clock from old age. Mrs. Spear was in her 87th year, and was a native of Alabama. When three years of age she came to Madison county with her parents to make her home, and during most of the time until 1857 she lived in the county continuously. She was a devoted member of the Methodist church, and was a member of the Alton church until her departure from the city in 1857. She was married at Chester, Ill., in 1840, and from there she came to Alton. She leaves five sons and one daughter, and lost two sons and one daughter by death. The body will be taken direct to City Cemetery, from the 9 o'clock train tomorrow morning, and Rev. M. H. Ewers will conduct the funeral services at the grave.

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SPECKART, JOSEPH/Source: Highland Journal, Thursday, May 11, 1905

Joseph Speckart died Sunday evening [May 7]. He was born 26 May 1830 in Langenbrucken, Bruchsal, Baden, Germany, and upon attaining majority he left his native country landing in New Orleans and making his way to St. Louis. In 1853 he came to Highland and opened a butcher shop which he operated until he retired on 1886. He married two times, first to Miss Caroline Bellm in Jun 1853. She died in 1885. Eight children were born. Second he married Miss Josephine Brensinger while on visit to where he was born. Surviving is a son Joseph, other living children are Charles of St. Louis, Philip and Frank of Provo, UT, Mrs. Peter Grimmer of Highland, Mrs. Xaver Voegele of St. Morgan, Mrs. Rosa Rhyn of Plattamouth, NB. and a sister Mrs. Katharine Zolk of Laugenbrucken, Baden, Germany.

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SPEECE, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1913

Mrs. Elizabeth Speece died Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. E. Johnson, wife of Alderman Johnson, at the family home, 1500 Sparks avenue. Her death was the result of old age. She was born in Urbana, O., August 30, 1836. She was married to I. T. Speece, Jan. 1, 1860. Of this union nine children were born, of whom five are living: Mrs. F. E. Johnson, Mrs. W. M. Worden, Mrs. F. H. Lawton, all of Alton; and Henry T. Speece of Lawton, Okla., and George T. Speece of Morrisonville, Ill. The body will be shipped from Alton to Morrisonville this evening or tomorrow morning, and the funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon in the Methodist church at Morrisonville, where the remains will be buried.

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SPEEL, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 23, 1916

Clarence Speel, four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Speel of Upper Alton, died last evening after a short illness with diphtheria. The funeral was held this morning.

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SPELLMAN, ALICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 27, 1917

The funeral of little Alice Spellman was held this morning at 9 o'clock from St. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Requiem mass being celebrated by Rev. M. A. Tarrant. The church was filled with the many sympathizing friends and relatives of the family. After Mass, Rev. Tarrant spoke very beautifully on the life of the little girl who through all her long illness was never complaining. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery under a heavy blanket of beautiful flowers. The pallbearers were John Gorman, Leo Sharkey, James Kirwin and Harry Spellman.

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SPELLMAN, CECILIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 15, 1906

The funeral of Cecilia, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spellman, was held this afternoon, and services were conducted by Rev. Fr. Tarrent. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

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SPELLMAN, MATTHEW/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1909

Matthew Spellman, aged 46, died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning after an illness of several years with consumption. He was formerly a well known railroad man and one of the most expert yardmen in Alton. He had been unable to do much work for over a year. He was taken to St. Joseph's hospital a few days ago, and at that time was able to walk from the ambulance to the place where he was to stay.

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SPELLMAN, ROSE ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1910

Rose Elizabeth Spellman, daughter of Mrs. Mary Spellman, died this morning at 6:30 o'clock at the home, 1607 Belle street, after a few months illness from stomach troubles. She was 15 years old and is survived by her mother and four little sisters, Nellie, Margaret, Alice and Lucille. Her father died a few years ago. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

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SPENCER/SKATES, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 2, 1919      Victim of Shooting Dies - Murderer Unknown

Mystery shrouds the death of Harry Spencer, 30, who died Sunday morning at St. Joseph's hospital from a bullet wound just above the heart. He was found lying near the railroad tracks at East Alton Saturday night by a C. B. and Q. train crew, who were attracted by his moans. He was taken to the hospital in the ambulance. Spencer told George Cleveland, ambulance chauffeur, that he was climbing into a box car when he was shot. He crawled for some distance from the car, he told Cleveland. The bullet entered the left side and went out at the hip, indicating that Spencer was shot by someone standing above him. Spencer's coat was found later with a bullet hole in the left lapel, just at the point where the bullet entered the man's body. A tramp, sleeping in a box car near by, said he had heard no shots, and a man and woman on a porch in the neighborhood also declared that they had heard no report. Spencer told the ambulance driver that he had a sister in St. Louis. His sister, Mrs. Minnie Michellis, 709 East 5th street, St. Louis, said her brother had been a wanderer, and that often she had not heard from him for months at a time. She declared his name was Harry Skates. The chief detective of the C. B. and Q. said the man's name was Spencer, and identified him as a car thief. The body is being held by Deputy Coroner Bauer, who will conduct an inquest. The date for the inquest has not been definitely set, the coroner being anxious to have the railroad detective testify, and will probably be held when the detective can attend. Efforts to find the slayer of the man have proved futile. The fact that the coat of the dead man was found some distance from the car leads to the belief that he was not shot while trying to climb into a box car. He was in a serious condition when picked up, and it is thought that he did not remember full particulars of the shooting. Skates was buried this afternoon, from the Bauer undertaking parlor on Market street. Interment was in the City cemetery.

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SPENCER, JAMES T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1923

James T. Spencer, for twenty years a watchman for the Illinois Glass Company at the Plum street gate, died yesterday afternoon at his home 718 Belle street, from a complete breakdown, following an attack of uraemia. Mr. Spencer had been in apparently good health until December 29. That was his day off from duty and he was spending it at the home of his son, Frank Spencer, on Broadway. He became suddenly ill, soon was unconscious and he never regained consciousness. He lingered four weeks in a sleep-like condition and during that time never showed any sign of recognizing any of his family who were with him. Mr. Spencer was born in St. Charles county, Mo., and was 68 years of age. He was a farmer near West Alton until he came to Alton twenty five years ago. He took a position with the Illinois Glass Co., as watchman, remained there a long time, gave up the place and went with the Alton Gas & Electric Co., for three years, then back to the Illinois Glass Co., where he remained up to the time he was prostrated. He made a good watchman during the long time he was so engaged. He leaves six children, Mrs. Clarence Fecht, Mrs. George Vogelpohl, Mrs. Robert Lee, John, Frank and Herbert Spencer. There will be no funeral services at the home. The body will be taken across the river tomorrow and will be buried at 2 o'clock in Ebenezer cemetery, Rev. M. W. Twing officiating.

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SPENCER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 2, 1910

Two of Madison county's old residents died last night. John Spencer of Bethalto, one of the pioneer farmers of that district, died Thursday evening after a short illness. He was 83 years of age and had resided in Madison county in the Bethalto vicinity for over sixty years. He was a successful farmer and coal miner, and was well known in the county. His aged wife and a daughter, Miss Grace Spencer, and a sister, Mrs. Elisa Fields, all of Bethalto, survive. The funeral will be held from the home Sunday afternoon, and burial will be in the Moro cemetery. Mr. Spencer died of the infirmities of old age. The deceased settled at Fosterburg on his arrival in this country, and for some time operated a coal mine in that vicinity, making much money in the enterprise. Later he moved to Moro and took up farming. For the last few years he has owned a coal mine near Bethalto.

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SPIESS, ANTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 20, 1914

The funeral of Anton Spiess, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Jacob Kieg of Oldenburg, Saturday, was held this morning from St. Elizabeth's church at Mitchell. He was 63 (? could be 83) years old and his death was due to pneumonia.

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SPIESS, MINROD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 31, 1912                        Civil War Soldier Dies

Minrod Spiess, aged 80, died this morning at his home, 2346 State street, after a long illness from the weakness of old age. His death had been expected for several days. He was an old soldier, having served in the army for over a year during the Civil War. Mr. Spiess was born in Hunderssingen, Wurttenburg, Germany, September 16, 1832. He landed in New York, May 12, 1853. He enlisted in the army in January 1864, and was discharged November 22, 1865. He was married in 1866 to Miss Johnisee, who survives him. Beside his widow, he leaves five children, Mrs. L. C. Nichol of Madison, Illinois; Mrs. William Richards of Mitchell, Nebraska; Miss LIzzie Spiess and Messrs. George and Louis Spiess of Alton; and five grandchildren.

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SPILMAN, CHARLES H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 20, 1904

Charles H. Spilman, a well known civil engineer and architect, who has lived in Edwardsville since 1844, was buried in that city Monday. He was a kindly man, enterprising and public spirited, and his death is a public loss to Edwardsville and Madison county. His wife and one child, Charles H. Spilman Jr., a well known newspaper man, survive, and they have the sincere sympathy of all who knew them.

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SPINNER, BERNHARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 26, 1916

Bernard Spinner, aged 70, died at St. Joseph's Hospital this morning at 8:30 o'clock. He was taken to the hospital last week when neighbors informed the police that the aged man was in a bad way and had no one to give him constant attention. He had a bad case of pneumonia. He lived alone in his house, which was in a very dilapidated condition, and he had no fire and no food except such as the neighbors would provide. The neighbors did not feel able to continue doing this, and they wanted the man to be taken away from his home where he was living in filth and suffering from intense cold and lack of food, as well as sickness. Spinner had a stormy life and near his end he was not all different from what he had always been. He threatened to shoot Joseph Hermann, overseer of the poor, when he went to remove him from the home. Hermann then reported to Gus Haller, supervisor of Wood River township, and Haller went out with an assistant and he disarmed Spinner and took him to the hospital. Spinner was very unwilling to go and was never satisfied with the change from his squalid home to the clean ward of the hospital. Spinner was for many years a gardener and formerly peddled vegetables about the city. He was supposed to be well to do, but it is doubtful that his estate will be very valuable. His relatives had little communication with him, and he probably desired to be alone, and preferred the life he led to any other. The Telegraph last evening told of the colts which Spinner kept on the place the last 25 or 30 years, and had never worked them. The horses were very old and had never been broke. He always referred to them as his "colts." They romped over the pastures until they have become too stiff to romp. The animals would be worthless as they are too old to break in and compel to do work.  [January 28, 1916 - Burial was in St. Joseph's Cemetery]

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SPINNER, UNKNOWN WIFE OF BERNARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 7, 1914        Upper Alton Woman Dies At Poor House - Was Blind 35 Years

Mrs. B. Spinner, wife of Bernard Spinner, an old time resident of Upper Alton, died Friday afternoon at the county farm. Mrs. Spinner was about 75 years old. The case of Mrs. Spinner is a peculiar and interesting one. She went blind, old residents say, thirty-five years ago, following an occurrence in which her eyes were filled with red pepper. Whether it was an accident or not cannot be stated. Soon afterward she lost her sight and then she became a county dependent. She was taken to the poor farm in her blind condition, where she spent the last half of her life. She leaves two sons, Otto and Reinhart Spinner of San Francisco, well to do men. They were notified of their mother's death and Otto Spinner wired he had started for Alton. The body of Mrs. Spinner was taken in charge by the Lowe undertaking firm in Edwardsville, and they have the body at their place awaiting the arrival of the sons. They will probably arrive here about Tuesday and the funeral will be held after that time. Mrs. Spinner was the owner of a valuable piece of land lying just east of the city limits on College avenue, where her husband has lived many years. Two or three years ago some discussion arose as to the title, and it is said to have been changed at that time to her husband's name. It is hinted that the county will investigate the matter with a view toward collecting her board bill for 30 years at the poor house.

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SPRIGGS, WALTER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 12, 1903              Boy Drowns in Mississippi

Several boys were swimming in the river this afternoon near the water works pumping station. Walter Spriggs, about 13 years of age, in some way became exhausted and was drowned before assistance reached him. The drowned boy's younger brother was one of the boys in the river with him. The boy was a son of William Spriggs, inspector of Belle telephones, who lives in Mack's addition on the bluffs. It is supposed that, as the water is very deep, its coldness probably chilled him. A colored man saw the boys and he thought they were playing, when suddenly he saw the little fellow go out of sight. His body was not recovered.

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SPRAGUE, BESSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 1, 1921

Miss Bessie Sprague, aged 17 years, died this morning at the home of her grandmother, Mrs. Douglas White, on east Elm street. Her death was caused from heart trouble. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Sprague of east Seventh street.

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SPREEN, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1913      Resident of Alton Since 1848 Found Dead

William Spreen, aged 90, was found dead on the floor of his bed chamber Sunday morning at his home, 1128 Alby street. Mr. Spreen had retired at his usual time Saturday evening after eating a hearty supper, and was apparently as well as usual, with no signs of an early dissolution. He did not appear at his usual time Sunday morning, and when an investigation was made he was discovered on the floor near his bed, and was dead. He had not been dead very long, and it is supposed had attempted to rise for breakfast and fell over to the floor, as he was getting out of bed in response to the summons of death. Mr. Spreen was a native of Germany. His wife, who died ten years ago, came to this country with him on their honeymoon trip, and they remained in Alton. Mr. Spreen followed the occupation of patternmaker until he was so old that he could no longer follow the trade. He was known as one of Alton's best citizens, was an honest, upright man, and in every way a worthy and respected citizen. He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Emma Bell; and three sons, William of Los Angeles, Cal.; Edward and George of Alton. For many years he was a member of the First Baptist of Alton. His funeral will be Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home on Alby street.

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SPRINGER, ADDA J. (nee BARBER)/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Monday, February 1, 1897

Adda J. Springer, wife of Levi C. Springer, for many years a resident of Edwardsville and Madison county, died at Pasadena, California Friday morning at half past eight o'clock. The body will be placed in a vault until April, when it will be brought here for burial. Adda J. Springer was the youngest daughter of Rev. John Barber,, a pioneer preacher of the Presbyterian faith, in this county. She was born March 17, 1837, and had been almost a lifelong resident of the county. On October 15, 1878, she married Mr. Springer, and several years ago they moved to Edwardsville from Godfrey.  They remained here until two years ago, when on account of her failing health, the family decided to move to the delightful climate of California. Early in life Mrs. Springer united with the Congregational church at Lincoln, this state. Soon after her arrival here she joined the Presbyterian church, and was a consistent member. She also was an earnest worker in the ranks of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Besides her husband and daughter, Maude Irwin Springer, she leaves her mother, Mrs. Eliza Knight, who is now nearing her 90th year, and who resides here, and two sisters, Mrs. William M. T. Springer of Edwardsville, and Mary Hedges, of Logan, Iowa.

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SPRINGER, ALFRED K./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 12, 1905

Alfred K. Springer died at his home, 302 Court street, Monday night, from a complication of diseases, his illness beginning two years ago with an attack of malaria. He was born in Ohio 63 years ago last April, and came to Alton about 30 years ago. He was generally known as "Jerry" Springer, and had a wide acquaintance. He leaves a wife, two daughters, Mrs. George McCollom and Mrs. Charles Meyers; and two sons, Jerry and William, all of Alton. He has a brother, H. C. Springer, in Alton, and a sister living in St. Louis. The funeral will probably be tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home.

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SPRINGER, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 6, 1908

Mrs. Anna Springer, mother of Contractor Samuel Springer, died at the home of her son at 1305 Alby street, this morning of old age. She was 74 years old. She was the widow of John Springer, who died in Alton twenty years ago. She was born and raised in Ireland and came to America twenty-seven years ago. She first went to St. Louis and after residing there a year, moved to Alton. Although her health has been gradually failing for the last ten months, she was not seriously ill until a week ago. The funeral will be held at 3 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the home, and the burial will be in the City cemetery.

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SPRINGER, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1909                 Mrs. Springer Burned To Death

Mrs. Catherine Springer, aged 73 years, of 702 Court street, was burned to death Saturday night when her clothing caught fire from a match she struck to light a lamp. Mrs. Springer had just filled a coal oil lamp and struck a match to light it when her sleeve, which must have gotten coal oil on it, became fired. She threw her arm against her skirts to extinguish the flames and fired her apron below her waist. She then rushed to a bedroom and throwing back the covers on a bed jumped into the bed hoping to smother the flames. Being quite old she did not act quickly enough and immediately the entire bed was in flames, and by the time aid reached Mrs. Springer she was burned from her head to her feet. Henry Flach, who was passing, heard the screams of Mrs. Springer and rushed into the house and extinguished the flames on Mrs. Springer's clothing, carried the burning bedding from the house. The burned woman was then hurried to the hospital where physicians attended her. She was burned so badly that she suffered little pain, and sank rapidly, dying at 12:30 o'clock, just six hours after the accident. To Mrs. George M. McCollum, her stepdaughter, Mrs. Springer told the story recited above. She was conscious for about thirty minutes after reaching the hospital when she lapsed into unconsciousness. Mrs. Springer lived with her son, William Anthis, on Court street, and kept house for him. She was in very poor health at the time of the accident, and for this reason was able to do little for herself. She was 73 years of age last July and leaves beside her son, William Anthis, one daughter, Mrs. Charles Meyers, of Mt. Olive, and two stepchildren, Mrs. George M. McCollum of East Second street and J. B. Springer, who had just gone to Salem, Missouri. The funeral will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday from the home of George McCollum on Bozza street.

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SPRINGER, HAMILTON C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 28, 1908             Native Son of Pioneer Dies At Age 79

Hamilton C. Springer, who for 50 years lived in Alton, died Friday morning at his home, 914 State street, after six months intense suffering from cancer of the mouth and throat. For several days he had not tasted food of any kind and his vitality in withstanding the ravages of the disease and the lack of sustenance of any kind was considered most remarkable by all acquainted with the case. For 30 years Mr. Springer was engaged in the sewing machine business and was well known. He was married twice and is survived by a wife and seven children, all of whom live in other cities or states but two, a son, Rutherford F., who conducts a cigar store on State street, and a daughter who lives at home. Mr. Springer was born in Madison county on a farm near where Venice now is, his father being a pioneer settler of the territory, and most of his long life was spent in this county. When he was a boy, houses were few and far between Alton and "Illinois Town" (now East St. Louis), and he was an interesting talk when it came to speaking of early days and incidents. The funeral will be held Sunday morning at 9 o'clock from the home, and burial will be in the City cemetery.

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SPRINGMAN, HELEN E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 23, 1921

Miss Helen E. Springman, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Springman of Douglas Street, died at ten o'clock last night at Denver, Colo., following an illness of eight months. Miss Springman was 19 years old. Six months ago Miss Springman went to Denver when it was thought that a change of climate would lead to improvement in her health. The expected improvement did not come, however, and recently her condition became worse. Miss Springman was a member of the Cathedral parish, and was prominent in young persons' organizations of that church. Her untimely death comes as a shock to Alton, where she has many friends. She was a young woman loved and respected to all who knew her, because of her kindly nature and her strength of character. Her sister, Miss Susan Springman, was with her when she died. The body is expected to arrive at St. Louis at 6:50 p.m. tomorrow, and will be brought to Alton tomorrow night. The date for the funeral has not been set. Miss Springman was cashier of the Springman Lumber Co., founded by her father. She was born on Aug. 3, 1902 at Brownstown, Ill. She is survived by her parents and a sister, Susan, who was with her in Denver, and nine brothers: Charles of Alton, Frank of Brownstown, William of Jerseyville, Frederick of Alton, Lawrence of Alton, Joseph of Alton, Anthony P. of Alton, George B. of Alton, and John J. of Alton. She leaves also 4 aunts and 7 uncles.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 24, 1921

The body of Miss Helen Springman will arrive in Alton tonight and will be taken to the family home on Douglas street. Mr. and Mrs. George Springman, George Springman Jr., and Miss Susan Springman are accompanying the remains. According to present arrangements, the funeral will take place at 10 o'clock Monday morning from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery. After Vespera on Christmas night, the members of the Young Ladies' Sodality of the Cathedral will go to the Springman home to recite the Rostry. A request has also been made that the Sodality attend the funeral in a body Monday morning. Miss Springman was a member of the Sodality.

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SPRINGMAN, LILLIAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 14, 1919

Lillian Springman, the 3 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Springman, died this morning at the family home near Brighton. Besides the parents, a brother, Raymond Springman, survives. The body will be brought to Alton this afternoon and taken to the home of the uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Gormley, at 1808 Myrtle street, where the funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

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SPROTT, SAMUEL W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 26, 1917            Suffers Horrible Death - Caught in Cog Wheel on Dredge Boat 'Dubuque'

Samuel W. Sprott, aged 57, of Rock Island, was fatally hurt Thursday afternoon by being caught between a heavy shaft and a cog wheel on the government dredge boat Dubuque, which is engaged in dredging out a dam at Portage des Sioux. Sprott was caught in the wheel at about 2:15 p.m., and it was three hours before he could be released. During that time he was conscious, although suffering terribly and tried to direct his fellow-workmen on the boat how to extricate him from his horrible position. There were only three men on the boat at the time. They were working with the hoisting machine, and when one of the belts began to slip, the engineer was ordered to shut off the steam to repair it. When the steam was turned off, Sprott climbed about ten feet from the deck on top of a large two ton shaft, which engages an eight-foot high cog wheel. While he was tightening a bolt on the shaft, the engine wheels turned and Sprott was drawn astraddle of the shaft down into the cog wheel between the cog wheel and the shaft. He called for assistance, but the two men on the boat were unable to do anything to relieve him. The more they tried to pry him out of the position the farther he dropped into the cog wheel where his left leg was caught and was being terribly crushed. The men could not blow the large whistle to signal the men on the steamer 'Emily' nearby, because there was no steam. Finally they signaled the Emily with the small whistle, and it was decided to remove the two ton shaft with a derrick, which is on the boat. The entire process of removing Sprott took three hours. He kept up his courage until after he was released, when he fell to the floor and collapsed. He was rushed to Alton on a boat, but died on the way. Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer held an inquest Thursday evneing, and a verdict of death from accident was rendered. It was shown by the evidence of the two workmen on the boat that everything possible was done to relieve Sprott. His left leg was crushed and mangled, there being many fractures from the hip to the knee. Sprott's wife is said to have divorced him last winter. He has two sisters at Montrose, Iowa. He was an experienced riverman, having worked on the river for twenty-four years. Deputy Coroner William Bauer received a telegram today from Thomas Sprott, a brother of Samuel Sprott, from Montrose, Iowa, in which Sprott stated that he was coming to make arrangements for his brother's funeral. The body will probably be shipped to Montrose. Three witnesses testified at the inquest. They were Henry Kraus and Glenn Parker, the two other men on the boat at the time of the accident, and Dr. C. A. Barnard of Portage des Sioux, who was called to attend Sprott at the time of the accident.

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SPROW, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 24, 1913

The funeral of Edward Sprow (colored) was held this afternoon from the A. M. E. Church, and was attended by many of his friends and relatives. Burial was in City Cemetery.

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SPURGEON, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1914

Henry Spurgeon, aged 49, died this morning at 2:15 o'clock at his home on Edwards street after a long illness with kidney and lung trouble. He was a native of Foster township, and had farmed all his life in the country north of Upper Alton, up to four year ago when he moved to town and quit farm work. He teamed a while in Alton, but his health finally became such that he had to quit work and for the past two years he has been sick. His death was expected many months ago, but his vitality was so great that he got better after each spell of sickness and was able to walk uptown after physicians thought he could not live but a few hours. Henry Spurgeon was a son of the late Isaiah Spurgeon, an old time resident of Foster township who was killed seven years ago when he was struck by a C. B. & Q. train near his home. He leaves a wife and seven children, six girls and one boy, all under age. He was married to Rose Klinke, a member of an old well known Foster township family, twenty-three years ago, and she survives him. He also leaves one sister, Mrs. William Megowen, and four brothers, Charley and Joseph of Upper Alton, and Jesse and Millard Spurgeon of Worden. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at St. Mary's Church and burial will be at St. Joseph's Cemetery.

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SPURGEON, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 18, 1920

Henry Spurgeon died this morning at 1:10 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital where he underwent a surgical operation on Tuesday of last week. In the last few days his condition had been very bad, and last evening all hope for his recovery was given up, and the relatives were called to the hospital. On Tuesday the relatives were called to the hospital after the sick man had been in an unconscious condition some hours, and it was believed he could not recover. That night he rallied and showed signs of improvement, but the decline started again yesterday and he became unconscious and remained in that state until the end, which came early this morning. Henry Spurgeon was a well known young man, and for ten years he had been operating threshing machines. A good part of that time he owned two different machines and he did all the threshing every year for the farmers in the American Bottoms from East Alton south to the Canal. He was very popular as a thresher among the farmers down there, and all with whom he had business dealings were his friends. He was a son of the late Joseph Spurgeon and a member of a well known family. The family reside at 409 Pearl street, and the young man was 31 years old. He leaves his mother, Mrs. Emma Spurgeon, and two brothers and two sisters, Miss Anna Spurgeon of the McKee Brothers' store, and John Spurgeon of the Henry garage, are sister and brother of the deceased young man. The funeral arrangements have not been made, but burial will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

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SPURGEON, ISAIAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 20, 1906          Aged Man Killed by C. B. & Q. Train at Upper Alton

Isaiah Spurgeon, in his 69th year, was struck and instantly killed by a C. B. & Q. freight train near Upper Alton, Wednesday afternoon while walking along the track. Mr. Spurgeon is said to have been hard of hearing. He was accustomed to walk to and from his home in going to town, taking the railroad tracks, and it was while returning home laden with articles he had bought in Upper Alton that the freight train, northbound, struck him about 4:10 p.m.  The train crew picked up the mangled remains and the train was backed to Upper Alton station where the body was identified. It was then taken back to East Alton because the Upper Alton station is closed and there was no one to leave in charge of the body. Mr. Spurgeon was a prominent farmer living near Upper Alton. He leaves five sons and one daughter, Charles and Joseph Spurgeon and Mrs. William Megowen of Upper Alton; Henry, Jesse and Millard Spurgeon of Worden station.  The funeral of Mr. Spurgeon will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Mt. Olive Baptist Church, and burial will be at Mt. Olive. Services will be conducted by Rev. Simeon Hussey.

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SPURGEON, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 8, 1918

The funeral of Robert Spurgeon was held this morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's Church on Henry street. The pastor, the Rev. Father Joseph Meckel, officiated. The burial was in St. Joseph's Cemetery. On account of quarantine regulations, only the immediate members of the family and close friends attended. Young Spurgeon died as the result of injuries received Sunday while hunting north of Upper Alton, by the accidental discharge of his gun.

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SPURRIER, UNKNOWN WIFE OF DAVID E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1918

Mrs. David E. Spurrier died yesterday afternoon at 4:45 at the family home, 401 Lampert street, Yager Park addition, at the age of 32 years. She leaves, beside her husband, three small children, a boy and two girls. The death was from pneumonia. Mrs. Spurrier was born in Persons, Tenn., where her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Cruse still reside. That section of the state is known as the Jackson purchase, where her fore-parents were early settlers. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2 p.m., Rev. Theodore Cates, pastor of the Wesley M. E. Church, officiating. The burial will be in the City Cemetery.

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SQUIER, JANE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 19, 1922

Mrs. Jane Squier, aged 91, died this noon at ten minutes after twelve o'clock at the home of her son in law, R. V. Smith, on College avenue. Mrs. Squier was taken ill one week ago, and on account of her great age she was unable to throw off her illness. She was a well known resident of Upper Alton, and her illness has been closely watched by members of her family and by friends. She is survived by four daughters, Miss Cora Squier, Mrs. R. V. Smith, wife of Prof. Smith, agricultural teacher at the High School, Mrs. H. C. Turner, and Mrs. Denham of Kansas City. With the exception of Mrs. Denham, the children reside in Alton. The funeral will be held Saturday at 2 o'clock with interment in City Cemetery.

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SQUIRE, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 30, 1908           Old Soldier Answers Last Roll Call

Death summoned Frank Squire at his home in Godfrey township shortly after noon Tuesday. The end came suddenly and unexpectedly, although it was known to his family that he was very ill. He had been in poor health all spring and summer, and suffered several bad attacks which were alarming at the time, so it was expected that the present one would prove no worse than the others. He had been suffering from heart trouble and the treacherous disease snapped the thread of life and the old soldier answered his last roll call. In the death of Frank Squire the career of one of the best known men in Madison county is closed. He was born in Godfrey almost 65 years ago and had lived there all his life. He held various positions of public character during his long career in politics. He was supervisor for twenty years, and gave up the office when advancing years and ill health made it necessary. He filled various other positions in the township organization, and for many years was elected term after term to office, and was considered invincible at the polls. During the many years that he lived in Godfrey he was the keeper of a store that was the center of activity in the village. It was the political headquarters of Godfrey and the usual meeting place for Godfrey people, next in importance to the post office. At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted in the army and fought gallantly throughout the war. He made an excellent record, and at the close of hostilities he was discharged with honor. He was an exceedingly popular man in his own township, and he had hosts of friends in Alton and throughout Madison County. Beside his wife he leaves two sons and three daughters.

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SQUIRE, LYDIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 24, 1904

Mrs. Lydia Squire of Godfrey, widow of William Squire and mother of Dr. James Squire of Carrollton, W. F., and H. M. Squire of Godfrey, died Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at her home from senile debility, aged 88. Mrs. Squire was the last of the pioneer settlers of Godfrey township. She was born in Pennsylvania, and came to Godfrey in 1840, where she lived nearly 64 years. She was married March 1, 1843 to William Squire, who died March 12, 1865. Mrs. Squire was left a widow with nine children, and she raised them to manhood and womanhood with all the care of a good mother. She was loved by all for her Christian and benevolent character, and especially by her children. Mrs. Squire was a member of the Godfrey Methodist church more than fifty years. The funeral will be from her late residence in Godfrey, Friday morning, at 11 o'clock, and services will be conducted by Rev. Nash.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1904

The funeral of Mrs. Lydia Squire, of Godfrey, was held this morning at 10 o'clock from the family home. Rev. C. Nash of the Godfrey Methodist church conducted the services. There was a large attendance of friends and relatives of the family. Burial was in the Godfrey cemetery.

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SQUIRES, AMOS/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 25, 1913

Amos Squires, who, two years ago, declared on his eightieth birthday that a man should not quit working as long as he lived, died Tuesday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Daisy Hendricks, at Federal. His death was brought about by an ailment of rheumatism and kidney trouble which had been affecting him for over a year. Mr. Squires, in spite of his advanced age, would often go out and work for a week on the farm when hands were short, and when he was needed to help out. He lived up to the theory that he preached that everybody should keep at work and it was only within the past few months that he had to stop working. His wife died about two years ago. He leaves two sons, William Squires and Gus Squires, and a daughter, Mrs. Daisy Hendricks. His son, Marion Squires, died over a year ago in Jacksonville, Ill., and was brought to Alton for burial.

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SQUIRES, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 6, 1905    Football Claims Its First Victim in Alton - High School Right Tackle Dies From Injuries

James Squires, son of Frank Squires of Godfrey, died Monday morning shortly after 9 o'clock at the home of C. F. Sparks on Prospect street, from the effects of injuries he sustained in a football game October 21, between Alton High School and East St. Louis High school, at Sportsman's Park. Death was due to blood poisoning which began with an injury to the left knee of the player, and progressed until it caused a poisoned condition of the entire glandular system of the boy. The boy was 18 years of age last July 8. He was a student at the High School, and one of the best players in the team. He was a strong, active player and was ever in the forefront of the battle when his team was at play. The sad ending of the game of two weeks ago last Saturday was entirely unexpected, and Squires was the last one to be looked for to suffer such an injury. He played throughout the entire game and never once complained of being hurt. He was a strong, robust young man and seemed able to endure injuries incident to football playing without complaint. He finished the game with East St. Louis, which was said to have been an unnecessarily rough one of the part of the East St. Louis players, and went home that night apparently in good condition. He came to Alton Monday to attend school, and that day he complained of being slightly lame, and he supposed he had injured his knee in the football game, but was not certain. He remained in school on Tuesday, but went home that night and did not come back. The pains extended over his body and seemed to be worst wherever the large glands were located. Last Tuesday he was brought to the home of C. F. Sparks in Alton for treatment, as it was thought it would be better to have him in Alton convenient to physicians who were attending him. He was then in a delirious condition, and except at brief intervals he did not regain his normal condition of mind. St. Louis surgeons were finally called upon and an examination was made which resulted in the malady being pronounced not typhoid malaria but blood poisoning in the glands, due to an abscess which formed under the knee cap of the injured leg. An operation was performed and the abscess was relieved, but the poison had made fatal progress and he showed but little improvement in condition. He continued unconscious except at brief intervals. His condition became much worse Sunday night, and he died at 9:12 o'clock Monday morning. He was attended the last few days by his brother, Dr. John Squires of Dubuque, Iowa. The body was sent to Godfrey this noon, where the funeral services will be held. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home in Godfrey to the Congregational church. Burial will be in Godfrey. It is probable the entire High school will be dismissed Wednesday afternoon to attend the funeral, and that some of the members of the football team will serve as pallbearers. A quartet of members of the High school faculty will sing at the funeral. The young man was in the graduating class of the High school, and at least the third and fourth year classes will be dismissed on account of the funeral. The death of James Squires will end the football team of the Alton High school. In the same game in which Squires suffered his fatal injury, Edward Enos was badly hurt, and has not been in the game. Supt. Haight said today that last Monday the question of canceling the schedule of games was submitted to the players, and the boys voted as a unit to continue the schedule. The faculty believed that it would be best to end the schedule for the reason forthwith. However, one cancellation after another was received, and the boys were without a game to play. Supt. Haight said that undoubtedly the death of Squires would result in the closing of the football season, as the faculty would refuse to lend any aid or support to the game hereafter. Supt. Haight said that the reason for the school giving support to the game was that the boys were playing as a High school team several years ago, and the faculty felt it was necessary that if the boys were determined to play, they should do so under the direction of persons who could protect the interests of the school, and maintain a good game. The football team continued to grow stronger each year until this year, when it made the best record. The team was not scored against, and Squires contributed much toward its success. He was known as a star player and could always be relied upon to uphold his part of the play. He was a bright, intelligent boy, and exceedingly popular among his associates. In his home he was the pride of his parents, being the youngest son, and their hopes of a bright future for him seemed to be well justified. His death has cast a gloom over the High school, and also in Godfrey, where he was known and much admired. There is general regret throughout Alton over the tragedy of the football game, and on no one could the arrow of death have fallen leaving more regret than it has done in taking the life of James Squires.

 

SQUIRES, JAMES/Source: Utica, New York Herald Dispatch, November 7, 1905

Alton, Ill., - James Squires, a member of the Alton High School football team, died yesterday from the effects of an injury received October 21 in a game with the East St. Louis High School team. He received a kick on the knee, which resulted in blood poisoning. He was 16 years old. As a result of the death of Squires, the football team has disbanded.

 

EXPRESSIONS OF REGRET

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 7, 1905

There were expressions of sincere and deep regret in the Alton High school today over the death of James Squires, the first victim of the Rugy game in the Alton High school. The seat of their deceased classmate was draped in mourning and it was covered with white flowers by the pupils as an expression of the grief of the classmates over the death of Squires. Supt. Haight said that the mourning drapery would probably remain for some time in the seat as a mark of remembrance. The feeling of horror which has been cast upon the whole school, including teachers and pupils, is universal. The regret that the tragedy should have occurred is voiced by all, both pupils in the school and those out of it. The blow is a heavy one, and today it almost rendered study useless in the High school building. Supt. Haight said that it was definitely decided that the entire school would be dismissed tomorrow afternoon on account of the funeral, which will be held at 2 o'clock from the Godfrey Congregational church. Rev. J. A. Scarritt of Alton will conduct the services. Supt. Haight received a telephone message this morning from Principal Manners of the East St. Louis High school, in which he expressed the sincerest regret over the unfortunate ending of the football game. He said that the horror of it had overwhelmed the East St. Louis High school in such a manner as to be beyond expression. The members of the football team from East St. Louis, together with their physical instructor, will attend the funeral of Squires at Godfrey tomorrow afternoon as an expression of their regret and their willingness to do what they can to show their sorrow over the tragedy. The pallbearers for young Squires will be selected from the number of the members of the Alton High School football team. Musical selections will be sung by a quartette consisting of Supt. Haight, Messrs, B. C. Richardson, R. L. Bird, and A. E. Barradell. There will be a large attendance of Alton people at the funeral. Supt. Haight has informed the East St. Louis High school principal that the Alton players do not make any specific charges of undue roughness, but that the charge is a general unnecessary roughness in the game. The principal objection of the Alton boys was to the tackling, which was responsible for the boys being injured.

 

FUNERAL OF JAMES SQUIRES

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 8, 1905

The funeral of James Squires was held at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the residence of the father, Frank Squires in Godfrey, to the Godfrey Congregational church. The attendance at the funeral included many hundreds of schoolmates, friends and relatives of the young man. The funeral was probably the largest ever held in Godfrey. The church was not large enough to accommodate the assemblage. There was a large delegation of boys and girls and the faculty of the Alton High school at the funeral. The pupils of the High school esteemed highly their young classmate, and they expressed their grief by contributing beautiful floral emblem. Among those who attended the funeral were the members of the East St. Louis High school football team, the team which opposed Alton High in the game that caused Squire's death. The services at the church were conducted by Rev. J. A. Scarritt of Alton. A quartet consisting of Supt. R. A. Haight, Messrs. R. L. Bird, B. C. Richardson, A. E. Barradell, sang three musical selections in the church. The songs by the quartet were "Asleep in Jesus," "Sleep Thy Last Sleep," and "Go to Thy Rest in Peace." The pallbearers were selected from the Alton High school football team, and were Trueman Stelle, Olin Ellison, Gershom Gillham, Ned Sparks, William Koehne and Percy Lewis. The floral offerings sent for the funeral were rich and numerous. Several carriage loads were sent out by friends early in the day, and there was not room on the family lot to place all of them. The members of the senior class gave a floral "Gates Ajar," and the members of the football team lined the grave with evergreen and gave a floral blanket. A party of fully 150 persons went from Alton at noon to attend the funeral, and many others drove out in carriages and other vehicles. Burial was in the Godfrey cemetery, just a short distance from the Squires residence in Godfrey.

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SQUIRES, LUCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1908

Mrs. Lucy Squires, wife of Amos Squires, died Sunday evening at her home near East Alton after a long illness which developed into dropsy. She was born in Madison county January 9, 1836. She was the mother of nine children, of whom the following are living: Jerry M. Squires of Virden, Mrs. W. L. Betts of St. Louis, Frank A. Squires of Omaha, Neb., M. O. Squires of Lexington, Mo., W. W. Squires, August Squires and Mrs. Daisy Hendricks of East Alton. Almost all of the 73 years of life she had passed in Madison county. The funeral will be held from the family home on the Hassmann place, 2 1/2 miles from East Alton, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. T. N. Marsh of Upper Alton will officiate. Interment will be in Vaughn cemetery.

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SQUIRES, MARION/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 3, 1912

The funeral of Marion Squires, whose body arrived in Alton from Jacksonville, was held this morning at the home at East Alton. The Rev. Simeon Hussey officiated. The burial was in Oakwood cemetery in Upper Alton.

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SQUIRES, WILLIAM (FORDY)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 5, 1916          Asleep - - Rolls Into River - - Drowns After Booze Party

William (Fordy) Squires, aged 40, was drowned near the mouth of Wood river Sunday afternoon following a party in which whiskey figured to a great extent. Squires had been left asleep on the bank of the river, and it is believed that he rolled into the river. Squire had been working at the Fred Bowman farm near East Alton, and on Saturday evening he drew a check for $60 for a month's work. He started out to spend it Saturday night and Sunday. On Sunday a party including a number of his friends went on a fishing party with plenty of whiskey. About 1 o'clock they left him asleep on the river bank. A number of picnickers from Alton were the first to realize his condition. They had been enjoying a quiet day a short distance from the spot where he fell into the river, and his screams attracted them. Frank Goldboro and Harry Bauer rushed to the river bank and made vain efforts to get him to grab hold of boards and logs which they threw to him. Finally, they secured a boat and attempted to rescue him but it was too late. His body was recovered at once and the men and their wives made every effort to bring the man back to life. A physician was summoned from Wood River and the party worked over the body of the man until 5 o'clock in the evening when they finally gave up the attempt and the body was turned over to Deputy Coroner John Berner. Squires was well known in and about East Alton. He was the son of the late Amos Squires. He is survived by a sister in Peoria and another in St. Louis. Arrangements for the inquest or the funeral have not been completed as yet. At the time of his death only a small part of the sixty dollars he drew on Saturday evening was found on the person of Squires.

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SRUCIA, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1907

Frank Srucia, an Italian, aged 16, who was employed at the Equitable Powder works, died yesterday afternoon from malarial fever and was buried this afternoon.

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STACEY, MARIE/Source: Troy Call, January 18, 1918

Marie, the eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Stacey, died yesterday morning at 9:30 o'clock at the family home after a lingering illness due to valvular disease of the heart. The child's age was 8 years, 4 months and 8 days. The parents moved here from Vandalia, Mo., last summer and the child remained at Vandalia with her grandparents until a month ago yesterday, when she was brought here. There are three other children in the family. The remains will be shipped tonight to Vandalia for burial and it is expected to hold the funeral Sunday.

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STACK, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 5, 1906

Mrs. Annie Stack, aged about 40 years, died this morning at 8 o'clock at her home, 801 east Fourth street, after an illness which was not thought serious enough to require the services of a physician until yesterday. Mrs. Stack was a very healthy looking woman, weighed about 200 pounds and was always active and full of life, and her sudden taking away comes as a distinct shock not only to her family, but to her numerous acquaintances. She had not been feeling well for several days previous to Sunday when she became very ill and a physician was called. He went to the Stack home three times yesterday, but the kidney trouble had developed to such a degree that staying its progress was impossible and the end came this morning. Deceased was the wife of Edward Stack, a well known Big Four employee, and is survived by her husband and two children. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning from St. Patrick's church.

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STACKHOUSE, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1908

Mrs. Margaret Stackhouse, wife of Charles Stackhouse, died Friday afternoon at the family home on Ninth street between Belle and Piasa streets. She was 23 years of age and had been ill many month with consumption. Beside her husband, she leaves one child. The funeral was held this afternoon from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and burial was in Greenwood cemetery.  Rev. Fr. Tarrant conducted the services.

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STAFFORD, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 12, 1920

The death of Henry Stafford, 81 years old, occurred yesterday at the home on Lincoln avenue. He is survived by his wife and a granddaughter. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 from the Upper Alton Methodist church. Rev. D. M. Cole, the pastor of the Methodist church, will have charge of the service.

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STAFFORD, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1909

James Stafford, the plasterer who was fatally injured in Granite City on Saturday by falling from a scaffold, died last night in the Granite City hospital. The body will be brought to Alton this afternoon and the funeral will probably be held tomorrow. Robert Stafford, the plasterer living in Alton, is a brother to James Stafford.

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STAFFORD, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1911

John Stafford, aged 45, a plasterer, died at St. Joseph's hospital Thursday afternoon after a sickness from stomach trouble of three months. A number of years ago he was struck by a Big Four train at Union depot in Alton, and lost one of his arms. He is survived by two brothers, Robert and William, and one sister, Mrs. Anna Bristol of Chicago. The funeral will be tomorrow afternoon from the home of Robert Stafford, 1014 Belle street.

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STAHL, CYRUS S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 8, 1917

Cyrus S. Stahl, aged 71, was found dead in bed at his home in Moro Thursday morning by his wife, when she went to summon him. Mr. Stahl had been troubled with rheumatism for some time, and it is supposed that he suffered a heart attack which proved fatal. For years he had been the devoted nurse of his invalid wife. Mrs. Stahl, a talented woman, had been a long sufferer. Their only child, Miss Emily Stahl, had been teaching school in Madison and was at home very little. The aged couple lived together in the old homestead on their eighty acre farm. Mr. Stahl was his wife's nurse and during periods when she would be unable to look after any of the housework, he nursed her and did the housework and the cooking. The devotion of the couple to each other was one of the beautiful things of Moro. Mr. Stahl usually arose early and this morning when his wife failed to see him about the house, she went to his bed to call him and found him lifeless. Mr. and Mrs. Stahl are two of the best known residents of Moro township. Mrs. Stahl is a sister of Miss Lucretia Hamilton of Alton and belongs to one of the pioneer families of Madison County. Mr. Stahl and she were married when both were young, and they had grown old together. It was a hard blow to the wife when she found her companion in life dead, with no word of farewell for her. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the home.

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STAHL, HIRAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 4, 1912              Civil War Soldier and Octogenarian Dies

Hiram Stahl, age 86, died at St. Joseph's hospital last night after a brief illness of dropsy. He was thrice married and was a soldier of the Civil War, drawing a pension. Recently he left his third wife at Fountain Green, Ill., and lived with his daughter, Mrs. Mary Russell, until he was moved from there to St. Joseph's hospital about ten days ago, when it was seen that his ailment necessitated expert treatment. Since that time he has been at the hospital but on account of his age, has been gradually declining. Mr. Stahl was born and reared on a farm near Somerset, Pa., moving to Illinois when a young man. At one time he conducted a farm in Missouri, but returned to Illinois. After he became too old to farm he purchased a store and conducted it at Moro, Ill., which is now owned by his son, C. E. Stahl. His surprising marriage for the third time, at the age of 82, caused no little comment, but at the time he stated that he married so as to have a home and not be dependent on his children. He has been living with his third wife at Fountain Green, Ill., until the last year, when he decided not to live with her any longer and stayed with his children. This change was doubtless due to the changeableness of his old age, as his third wife was very kind and affectionate to him and regretted to have him leave the home. Even at the time he was at the hospital, she sent message after message inviting him to return home. Mr. Stahl was enlisted early in the Civil War in the Union cause, and fought in several hard battles. During the war he was appointed as an overseer of gangs of a hundred or more workmen. He was at the fall of Vicksburg and battles previous to that. He was in charge of crews of workmen that helped detour the bed of the Mississippi back of Vicksburg to admit of the passage of gunboats. Mr. Stahl's first wife was Miss Sara Boucher, of which union there are six children living. They are Daniel Stahl of Staunton, Ill., Mrs. Mary Russell of Staunton, C. E. Stahl of Upper Alton, Mrs. Ellen Frank of Fountain Green, Ill., Mrs. Mary Charles of Lawrence, Kas., and Mrs. Levina Freidline of Somerset, Pa.  She died about fifteen years ago at Moro. A few years later he married Mrs. Martha Yetter of Fountain Green, Ill., who lived about two years after the marriage. The last wife was Miss Martha Walter of Fountain Green, who survives him. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at the Presbyterian church in Moro, Mr. Stahl's former home for many years. He will be laid to rest in the cemetery at Moro beside his first wife, who is buried in the Moro cemetery.

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STAHL, MARY KATHERINE (nee HAMILTON)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 9, 1922

Mrs. Mary Katherine Stahl, nee Hamilton, died at the Old Ladies Home on State street last night at 6:30 o'clock. She was taken sick Saturday night. Her death follows closely that of her only sister, Miss Lucretia Hamilton, who passed away the day before Memorial Day and was buried from the First Baptist church, wrapped in a flag. Like Miss Hamilton, Mrs. Stahl was devoted to the flag of her country. Mrs. Stahl was 71 years of age. After the death of her husband, Cyrus Stahl, at Moro, in 1917, she was taken to the Old Ladies Home in Alton. She had not been in good health and she wanted to stay at the Old Ladies Home the remainder of her life. She was a devout member of the Presbyterian church, and was always interested in everything that was done there. She participated in church movements at all times. Her only child is Miss Emily Alden Stahl, who was named for a beloved instructor of Mrs. Stahl, a former teacher at Monticello Seminary who retired there after the death of Miss Harriet Newell Haskell. Mrs. Stahl was a graduate of Monticello, leaving that institution with the class of 1870. Before her death, Mrs. Stahl had selected her pallbearers and had indicated her wishes as to her funeral arrangements. The pallbearers she named are J. E. Kelsey, A. T. Bivens, E. E. Campbell, John S. C. Bergerm, Alfred D. Riley and Harvey E. Dorsey. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Moro Presbyterian church and services will be conducted by Rev. Edward L. Gibson of the Alton First Presbyterian church.

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STAHLHUT, F. GOTTLIEB/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1903           Death of a Picturesque Character

On Monday evening at his home in Ft. Russell Township, F. Gottlieb Stahlhut died in his 78th year. He was one of the few remaining "forty niners" in Madison County, and perhaps the more remarkable by reason of the unusual hardships that befell him and his companions that braved the passage over the western deserts, wildernesses and mountains to the land of gold. Of that famous dream that peopled the sunny land of California, none perhaps realized the value of the hardships and what he obtained of the largest representative of the business word, more than Gottlieb Stahlhut. He came from Germany to America, and with none of the wealth for which he became noted. As a land owner he was of the first in the quality of the lands and the acreage number in Madison county. He was a familiar figure and a sturdy character to all who knew him, and personality will long be remembered by those who knew him as he was. The writer of this believes him to have really been a great character developed from fierce contact with hardships. It cannot be said of his character, "Ill fares the land to hastening ills a prey, where wealth accumulates and men decay."  He leaves a large family of children, all married and long since grown to manhood and womanhood, and all mourn his loss. His funeral took place at the Lutheran Evangelical church in Edwardsville at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday.

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STAHLHUT, FREDERICK C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 6, 1903

Frederick C. Stahlhut, one of the most prominent and wealthy farmers of Fort Russell township, died at his residence Monday morning, aged 47 years, 11 months and 17 days. He was the oldest son of F. G. Stahlhut. He leaves a wife and eight children - four sons and four daughters, to mourn his demise. He was highly esteemed by a very large circle of acquaintances, all of whom counted him as a friend. The funeral will take place from his late residence in Fort Russell township on Wednesday, January 7, at 10 a.m.

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STAHLHUT, HENRY W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 7, 1918       Priminent Farmer Succumbs to the Influenza Epidemic

Henry Stahlhut, member of prominent Wood River and Ft. Russell township families, died Friday at noon from influenza. Mr. Stahlhut is survived by his wife and one child. The little one was christened at the Eden Evangelical parsonage in Edwardsville by Rev. H. Rahn just a few days ago. Mr. Stahlhut was between 31 and 32 years of age. He was a son of H. H. Stahlhut, and he farmed the old Gottlieb Stahlhut place in Ft. Russell township. He has two brothers in the army, two at home, and two married sisters. His wife, who was Miss Sanders, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. Sanders of Liberty Prairie, is doubly bereaved, for last week she received word that her brother, Corporal Fred Sanders, had been killed in action in France on October 12. The funeral arrangements provide for a service at the home on Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock, followed by services at the Eden Evangelical Church at 2 o'clock.

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STALDER, ARTHUR C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1918

Arthur C. Stalder, who was recently taken to the State Hospital, died there this afternoon. He was a member of a well known Upper Alton family and had worked in Alton at the barber trade. He recently planned to take charge of a bakery in Upper Alton, but his mind broke down from the effects of illness.

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STALDER, FRANK M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1917            Well Known Upper Alton Business Man Succumbs to Heart Failure

F. M. Stalder, well known Upper Alton business man, died suddenly this morning at 4:30 o'clock at the residence on Brown street in Upper Alton. Mr. Stalder had not been ill and the news of his death was a surprise to the community. Mrs. Stalder said she heard her husband breathing hard at 4:20 o'clock and she thought he was snoring. She realized that the breathing was unnatural for him, and she got up and went up to his bedside and spoke to him. He moved a little and took a deep breath and after that he breathed no more. Mrs. Stalder telephoned for a physician who made a hurried trip to the Stalder residence, but he was dead when the physician examined him. Frank Stalder was one of the best known young business men in Upper Alton. He had conducted a bakery and confectionery store on Washington avenue for a long number of years, and had been quite successful. His close attention to his business and the confinement that naturally goes with it was very probably responsible for bringing on his failure of health, although he did not realize that his health was being effected. He was in his place of business last night up to a late hour as usual, and did not complain of feeling badly. Mr. Stalder was a Mason, an elder in the Upper Alton Presbyterian Church, a member of the Presbyterian Brotherhood, and was an earnest worker in the church. He leaves besides his widow, his mother, Mrs. M. A. Brown, a former resident of Upper Alton who now makes her home at Piasa Chautauqua. Mrs. Brown arrived in Alton this morning after receiving word of the death of her son. He also leaves two sisters. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, but it has not been decided whether the services will be held in the home or in the Presbyterian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Stalder lived several years on Main street, but about two years ago they built a handsome, new home on Brown street, which they occupied since its completion. Deputy Coroner William H. Bauer held an inquest this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Stalder residence.

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STALHUT, H. G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 9, 1919

H. G. Stalhut, a wealthy farmer of Hamel township, dropped dead in the court house at Edwardsville this afternoon after eating a hearty dinner. He was one of several defendants in proceedings brought by Hamel township to open a road. The case had been under way in the morning and adjournment was taken over the noon hour. Stalhut is reputed to be a very wealthy man, and was prominent in the county. He was 50 years of age.

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STALL, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 25, 1919

Miss Mary Stall, who has been at the Alton Woman's Home for ten years, died at the home at 11 o'clock last night. She was 74 years old. Miss Stall is well known among older residents of the city. Before gong to the Old Ladies' Home in 1909 she was an active woman, and enjoyed a wide acquaintance and a large number of friends. The funeral will be at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.

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STALLINGS, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 28, 1903         Man Dies During Fire

While the fire [The burning of the Wheelock and Ginter's Planing Mill in Alton] was in progress, Charles Stalling, who boarded in a house on Second street across the street, was standing on the roof of the two-story house throwing water on burning brands that fell on the roof. He must have slipped on some ice on the roof, and in an instant shot down the steep declivity toward the cornice. There was nothing to stay his downward rust, and he shot over the cornice and down to the brick pavement 35 feet below, where he landed amid a crowd, striking on his left side and arm. One woman was standing near when Stalling struck the ground, his falling body just missing her. It was believed the man was killed, but he was picked up and carried to his room in the house from which he fell, and there he revived. Drs. Bowman and Shaff attended him and found that he had a fractured left elbow and compound fractures of his arm. He was moved to the hospital for treatment Saturday night.  [Later]  Stallings died in the hospital at 5 o'clock this morning from a ruptured blood vessel. He was 35 years old and leaves his wife and one son. The time of the funeral has not been set, as Mrs. Stallings is waiting to hear from her husband's relatives at Versailles, Ohio, where he formerly lived. The inquest will be held tonight or tomorrow by Deputy Coroner Streeper. Stallings had lived here since August.

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STAMPER, JOHN H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 30, 1904          Old Soldier Dies

John H. Stamper, an old soldier, aged 65, died at his home near Fosterburg this morning after a long illness. He had lived at Fosterburg about seven years. He is survived by his wife, three sons and three daughters.

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STAMPER, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1921

Joseph Stamper died today at 12:30 a. m. at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Francis Brown, 3001 Alby street, after an illness lasting a year. He was 89 years old. Mr. Stamper had been bedfast at his daughter's home for the past year, and his death was not unexpected. He had made his home with his daughter for the past three years. In the death of Mr. Stamper, the Alton neighborhood loses one of its well known men. Known as a man of high character, he was loved and respected by all with whom he came in contact, and general sorrow is caused by his passing. He was born in Cumberling, England in 1832, and came to America when 23 years old. He went first to Canada, and after a residence of several years there, came to Godfrey, and until recent years lived on a farm near Monticello Seminary. He was married in 1862 to Urana J. Calette, who died 13 years ago. He is survived by seven children and 24 grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. The children are Mrs. Brown and Joseph and Robert Stamper of Alton; Fred of Godfrey; Mrs. J. B. Welch of St. Louis; Harry and Mrs. L. N. Burris of Coffeeville, Kan. Funeral services will be at the old home at Godfrey at 2:30 o'clock Thursday, and interment will be in Upper Alton cemetery.

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STAMPER, URANA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 24, 1905

Mrs. Urana Stamper, wife of Joseph Stamper, died at her home in Godfrey Monday morning at 4 o'clock from heart trouble, which was a culmination of six week's illness from other diseases, dropsy being the first cause. While the family feared a fatal result, yet none of them looked for it so soon. Mrs. Stamper, beside her husband, has seven children living, viz: Mrs. Frances Brown of Alton; Robert M. Stamper of Alton; Mrs. L. M. Burris of Chanute, Kansas; Joseph Stamper of Godfrey; Mrs. J. B. Welch of St. Louis; and Fred and Harry Stamper of Godfrey. She was born in Upper Alton November 9th, 1843, and was married to Joseph Stamper at Bethany in 1862. The funeral will take place on Thursday from the family home in Godfrey at 2 p.m.  Interment in Upper Alton cemetery. Mrs. Stamper was a good and faithful wife and mother. Her demise leaves a sorrowing family, whose lives have been cast in deep gloom by the sad event. She was a most respected neighbor and friend, and a companion who made acquaintance a delight.

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STANARD, E. O./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 11, 1914

St. Louis - Former Lieutenant Governor E. O. Stanard, aged 82, was found dead in his bed at his home early today. His death came peacefully, from all indications. Mr. Stanard was the chief owner of the Stanard-Tilton Milling Company, owning the big flour mill in Alton. He made his start in Alton, and after beginning as a school teacher and afterward starting in business in Alton, he went to St. Louis where he became a very wealthy man. He seldom came to Alton in recent years. Some time ago his son-in-law, Mr. Tilton, succeeded him in active management of the milling company.

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STANHOPE, CHARLES JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 8, 1918

Charles, 3 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stanhope, died Sunday at the home on the Grafton road from acute indigestion after an illness of about 24 hours. The funeral will be Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the Cathedral.

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STANHOPE, JOHN R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 23, 1917            Took His Own Life With Shotgun

John R. Stanhope, aged 65, a farm hand, living near Melville, ended his life when he blew his head off with a shot gun some time during last night. He was discovered at his shanty this morning by John Lawless, when the latter stopped there to visit him. Stanhope had been ill for some time, and the men of the neighborhood had been stopping to visit him each day. When Lawless dropped in this morning, he found him dead and reported the case at once to the coroner. William Bauer took charge of the body. He stated that Stanhope had been dead for several hours before being found. A double barrel shot gun and a stick nearby indicated that he had laid on the couch in his shanty, placed the shot gun near his head, and then when he could not reach the trigger, he had used a long stick to pull the trigger. Both barrels had been fired and the loads from the 12 gauge gun went through the back of his head. Stanhope has been living in the vicinity of Alton for many years, working as a farm hand on different farms. He made frequent trips to the city and was well known in Alton. He has no living relatives so far as the authorities could learn. The inquest was held over the body this morning, and burial was held this afternoon. The closest neighbor is over 20 yards away, and they reported that they heard nothing of the shots being fired during the night.

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STANHOPE, LULU B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 9, 1904

Mrs. Lulu B. Stanhope, wife of Mr. John Stanhope of North Alton, died Friday night at her home on the Grafton road after a long illness with consumption. She was 19 years of age, and leaves besides her husband and 15 months old child, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Campbell, four brothers and one sister. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from the home.

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STANHOPE, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 17, 1922

Thomas Stanhope of the Piasa King Farm died instantly Saturday from a heart attack while he was engaged in hoeing watermelons in a field at his home place. Mr. Stanhope was a well known farmer, 53 years of age. He had proven very successful on the Piasa King Farm. He leaves besides his aged mother, Mrs. A. T. Stanhope, one brother, Clarence, and one sister, Miss Mabel Stanhope. Mr. Stanhope was formerly a school teacher, but on account of his health he took up farming as his occupation. The family rented the Piasa King farm and he took an active part in conducting the place. The funeral will be from Bauer's undertaking parlor Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock and burial will be at the Melville cemetery. Services will be conducted by REv. John F. Green.

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STANLEY, IRWIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 4, 1921    Death Results From Falling From Bicycle

Irwin Stanley, aged 14, died this morning at four o'clock at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Stanley. Death followed an accident which occurred two weeks ago, when young Stanley fell from a bicycle he was riding. He leaves his parents and a brother and a sister. The funeral will be held from the family home off Broadway, Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock. Interment will be in Upper Alton.

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STANLEY, MARTHA PARKS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1908

Mrs. Martha Parks Stanley, widow of Norman Stanley, died Sunday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the family residence three miles east of Upper Alton. She was in her 87th year. Mrs. Stanley had been ill a long time. Her great age had resulted in a breaking down of her physical being until she was almost helpless. She had been totally blind and her family had taken every care of her and had made her declining days as comfortable as possible. Mrs. Stanley went to Upper Alton fifty three years ago and she had been a resident of the place where she died ever since. She is survived by three children, Mrs. L. M. Castle of Springfield, Wasson M. Stanley of Upper Alton, and Mrs. A. L. Hoblit of Carlinville. She leaves also four grandchildren, Dr. Stanley Castle of Springfield, Norman and Jean Hoblit of Carlinville, and Martha Stanley of Upper Alton. The funeral will be held from the family residence Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

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STANLISKY, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 8, 1908                    Shot In Side While Trying to Force Way Into Home of a Friend

George Stanlisky, a Benbow City Pollock, who was shot in the side a few nights ago at Benbow City while trying to force his way into the home of a friend, died Friday night at 10 o'clock from the effect of the wound. The man who did the shooting has not been arrested. Deputy Sheriff Crowe sent a telephone message to Benbow City that the man who did the shooting be arrested and brought to Alton, and he went to Benbow City himself afterward, but returned without his man, and it is supposed, but not known, that the man who did the shooting took fright and made his escape. As told by the Telegraph, Stanlisky called at the home of his friend Wednesday night and pounding on the door demanded admittance. The man who did the shooting stood inside the door and demanded to know who it was desired admittance, and when the man outside failed to respond to three requests to make his name known, and when he tried to force the door open, the man inside shot through the closed door and Stanlisky fell wounded to the ground. He afterward exonerated his friend of all blame, saying it was his own fault. A coroner's inquest in this case will be merely a perfunctory matter. All the witnesses tell the same story and there seems to be proof of the fact that the wounded man exonerated the man who shot him. Coroner Streeper will make an investigation. Neither Stanlisky nor the man who shot him can speak a word of English.

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STANTON, CHARLES T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 1, 1914          Old Civil War Soldier Dies

Charles T. Stanton, in his 81st year, died Monday afternoon at his residence on Court street, after an illness of one month with liver trouble. His funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at three o'clock from the home, and services will be under the auspices of the Christian Science organization. The death of Capt. Stanton removes from Alton one of the oldest and best known residents of the city. For many years he was in the Alton post office where he discharged the duties as a mail clerk in a highly efficient manner. He retired from the service July 31, 1912. Capt. Stanton began his work in the Alton post office October 1, 1889. He had been in the railway mail service for 20 years, making in all forty-three years of service in the postal department. He became mail clerk under W. T. Norton, the life on the road having proved to be too much for a man of his years. He possessed unusual ability in the mail service, and was held in high esteem by all for whom he had worked. He had passed a civil service examination in four states, and his mind was filled with information about the geography and the railroads of the states. He was discharged from the service for political reasons under the administration of President Cleveland, the civil service not being enforced in the mail service at that time. However, he got back in the service a few years later under Mr. Norton, and he remained very active and very efficient up to the time he found it advisable to retire. He was born in Upper Alton, and all of his life he called Alton his home. He was a steamboat man and a pilot for many years, and at one time ran a boat from St. Louis to _____ City. He had a long and very honorable war record. He had ____ rank of ensign in the United States navy during the war, and one of the cherished treasures of the Stanton home is a picture of the young Ensign Stanton in his uniform. He was at the siege of Vicksburg and was on one of the boats that passed Vicksburg. He was also in the Banks Expedition on the Red River. His wife died six years ago. He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Henry Flach and Miss Mae Stanton.

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STANTON, JOHN WESLEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 20, 1923                     Never forgot the girl with the jet black eyes

John Wesley Stanton, aged 87, died last night at the Nazareth Home, where he had made his home for 12 years. Old age was the cause of his death. He was a brother of the late Thomas Stanton who worked for years in the Alton post office, and of the late Mrs. Jennie S. White. Born and reared in Alton, Mr. Stanton never forgot his old home town, though he traveled far in his life. He finally retired to his old home to spend the remainder of his life and he was made comfortable at the Nazareth Home. He leaves one nephew, H. Clay White, and three nieces, Mrs. E. C. Mack, Miss Alice Stanton and Mrs. Henry Flach. A few years ago Mr. Stanton was a visitor at the Telegraph office, and while there he was recalling his boyhood days here. There was one girl in Alton in those days who had eyes of jet. Mr. Stanton, speaking of that girl, said that he had traveled all over the country, he had seen all kinds of people, he had looked into many eyes that were beautiful, but never in all his life had he ever seen a pair of eyes that could match those of the young woman he had known in childhood and in young manhood. And he had never married the girl with black eyes, either. It was those eyes, doubtless, that kept his memories alive of his home town and that brought him back here to spend his declining years. The funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at Oakwood Cemetery at 2 o'clock, and will be conducted by Rev. Theodore Cates.

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STANTON, JULIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 23, 1907

Miss Julia Stanton, aged 22, died Sunday morning at her home on south Main street in Upper Alton after a long illness from consumption. She was taken ill last May with a cold and malaria, and it developed into lung trouble. Miss Stanton was born in St. Louis and lived there until three years ago when she came to Alton with her mother, Mrs. J. Stanton. Beside her mother she leaves a family of brothers and sisters, Mrs. Matthew Marx of Denver, Colorado, William Stanton of St. Louis, Lawrence Stanton, Mrs. C. V. Stahl, Mrs. John Hankhaus, and Vincent Stanton of Alton. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

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STANTON, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 22, 1908

Mrs. Martha Stanton, wife of Charles T. Stanton, died Monday evening at 8 o'clock at the family home, 310 Court street, from the effects of an apoplectic stroke. Mrs. Stanton was up and about her home yesterday morning and was stricken in her home Monday morning at 11 o'clock while going about the house. She never regained consciousness. Mrs. Stanton was 71 years of age. She was born and raised in the vicinity of Madison, but had lived the greater part of her life in Alton. Her husband has been connected with the mail service for many years and is chief clerk in the Alton post office. The family had resided on Court street for many years, and Mrs. Stanton was known in a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Beside her husband she leaves two daughters, Mrs. Henry Flach and Miss May Stanton.  Mrs. Stanton had been in as good health as usual up to the time of the apopletic stroke, and her death was very unexpected to those who were not informed of her brief illness. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home to the City cemetery. Rev. G. L. Clark of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church officiating.

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STARKEY, ALICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1908

Mrs. Alice Starkey of East Alton, aged ___, died this morning at 6:30 o'clock at her home in East Alton. She had been a sufferer for three years. Over three years ago while she was waiting to take an electric car at Second and Washington streets, she was badly injured. At that time the interurban cars did not run into the city of Alton, and she was standing beside the Big Four waiting room there to take the car. When this car came in the motorman could not stop it in time and the car ran on to where Mrs. Starkey was standing with her little daughter. She was caught and badly crushed between the car and the building. Up to that time she had enjoyed good health, but since then she had very poor health. Consumption developed from injuries she sustained. As Mrs. Starkey became a believer in Christian Science about four months ago and would not have a doctor, Coroner Streeper said that the only way a death certificate could be had would be to hold a coroner's inquest, and he will probably hold one. The funeral will be held Sunday morning at 10 o'clock from the East Alton Methodist church. Mrs. Starkey leaves one son and a daughter by her last marriage, and a son for a former marriage. Her husband, Louis Starkey, was fatally injured last summer by being sun struck, and died a short time afterward.

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STARKEY, JASPER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1907                 Prominent Bethalto Farmer Dies

Jasper Starkey, aged 66, died this morning at his home near Bethalto after an illness with pneumonia and jaundice. He was 66 years old Sunday. Mr. Starkey left for Texas with his wife and his son, Herbert, about four months ago for the benefit of the health of his son. During the time the family were in the south Mr. Starkey was sick most of the time, and he returned about a week ago ill with pneumonia and jaundice. His son's health, however, had been much improved. This morning Mr. Starkey passed away. He was a leading member of the Baptist church and he has one son, Lee Starkey, who is doing Y. M. C. A. work at Iola, Kansas. Besides his wife, Mr. Starkey leaves two daughters and four sons, Miss Eva Starkey, Mrs. Oliver Saunders, Lee Starkey, Edward Starkey of Bethalto Farmers' bank, David and Herbert Starkey. Mr. Starkey was born on the farm adjoining the one where he died, and he had lived there almost his entire life. He was well known and highly respected in the community where he lived, and leaves many friends to mourn his death.

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STARKEY, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1907

Louis Starkey, a watchman for the Equitable Powder Co., residing three miles from East Alton near Fosterburg, died at noon today at the result of having become over heated last Sunday afternoon. Starkey is 50 years of age, and leaves a wife. Last Sunday afternoon, Starkey started home from the powder works and walked over two miles in the hot sun, when he became dizzy, and fell over unconscious. Friends found him and he was removed to his home and given medical attention. He regained consciousness several times but became worse this morning and died at 12 o'clock. Starkey was injured in a fall several years ago and has not been well since. It is thought the hot sun as he walked along the country road caused him to become overheated and affected the old wound to his brain. This is the first heat fatality reported in the Altons. There have been several prostrations, but Starkey's case is the first one where death resulted. The funeral will be held from the home to the Milton Cemetery tomorrow afternoon.

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STARKEY, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 24, 1903

William Starkey, the 18 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Starkey of East Alton, died Thursday night at the family home after suffering several months with appendicitis. Arrangements for the funeral have not been made.   [Burial was in Milton Cemetery]

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STARR, H. B. (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 12, 1912         Former River Pilot Dies in Missouri

Harry Starr received a telegram this morning from Randolph, Mo., announcing the death of his father, Captain H. B. Starr. There are few of the older and middle-aged patrons of Alton who do not remember Captain Starr. His familiar figure on the old ferryboat Altonian was known to almost everyone. After selling the ferryboat he acted as chief of the Alton police for a short time, and later went to work for the Swift & Rost contracting concern, remaining with them until his death. Captain Starr was 76 years of age when he died. He was known as a fearless river man, and was also known for his wonderful physique, being a man of wonderful muscular strength. Two sons, Harry E. of Alton and Jesse of Hope, N. M., and a daughter, Mrs. Cora Armstrong of Denver, Colo., survive him. The remains arrived in the city this noon, and were taken to the home of H. E. Starr on East Third street. The funeral will be held from Mr. Starr's home tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1912

The funeral of Captain H. B. Starr, former master of the ferry boat Altonian, was held this afternoon from the home of his son, H. E. Starr, on East Third street, Rev. D. R. Martin officiating. The pallbearers of the former river master were old time friends, Senator Edmond Beall, Capt. Henry Brueggemann, Robert Curdie, Dr. Charles Davis, Edward Bowman, and H. William Bauer. The remains of Captain Starr were laid to rest in the City cemetery, in the city [Alton] he always considered his home, though he had been away a number of years.

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STARR, HARRY/HARRIE E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 7, 1923                     Well known athlete and musician dies

Harrie E. Starr, in his fifty-fifth year, died Sunday morning at ?? o'clock at his home, 630 East Fourth street, following an illness of seven weeks, which began with an attack of the grippe. The immediate cause of his death was stomach ulcers and inflammation of the heart, which were attributed to the attack of grippe with which he struggled three weeks before giving up and taking to his bed. He was home just four weeks when he died. The death of Harrie Starr removes one of the best liked men in Alton. He was a lifelong resident of this city, was educated in the Alton schools and graduated from the High school here. He was a musician of high talent, and Starr's orchestra for years furnished music for social gatherings and dancing parties in Alton. For twenty-five years Mr. Starr was connected with the Alton Steam Laundry. He had a long list of patrons who regarded Mr. Starr as their own personal friend. Mr. Starr, when taken sick with the grippe seven weeks ago, insisted upon staying at work until it became absolutely necessary for him to give up. He had all his life been possessed of a wonderful constitution and he knew little about sickness. It is recalled by many Altonians that when Mr. Starr was a boy he distinguished himself among other boys for his athletic ability and he was easily the leader in all athletic events among his schoolmates in days when athletics were not given any encouragement at all in the public schools. As he grew to young manhood, he continued his training. He was known as a skillful fighting man and many good judges had pronounced Mr. Starr as being fit material for world's championship among fighting men. They based their judgment of what the possibilities were on the size, long reach, lightning like quickness and great power. More than one professional fighting man Harrie Starr had knocked out in friendly contests. He never engaged in fighting for anything but the fun of it. At least one pugilist with a long record of victories met in Harrie Starr a man who could conquer him and he urged Starr to train for the heavyweight championship among fighters. But Mr. Starr was a man of a gentle disposition. He would not consider engaging in the fighting business. He preferred music and he gave much time to it. He was a violinist of rare talent and he delighted Alton audiences for years with his playing. Beside his wife, Mrs. Julia Starr, he leaves one daughter, Gladys, and one sister, Mrs. Cora Armstrong of Los Angeles, Cal. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home on East Fourth street and services will be conducted by Rev. O. W. Heggemeier. He was a member of Robin Hood Camp, Modern Woodman.

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STARR, JAMES E. (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 13, 1903 

James E. Starr, the first Odd Fellow made in Illinois, was buried this afternoon in City Cemetery under the auspices of the order in which he had been a prominent member and a leading worker since 18__.  ....The body arrived Sunday evening from Portland, Oregon, accompanied by his son, Charles Starr of Portland, and by Edward Brock of Paxton, formerly of Elsah. The remains were taken to the Odd Fellows Temple, which had been appropriately decorated by the Daughters of Rebekah. Among those who attended the funeral were Grand Master Charles Herrin of Galesburg, J. A. Lucas of Carlinville, C. M. Lysle of Decatur, J. W. Roberts, J. H. Duffield, Cosmos Keller and George H. Woodruff of Jerseyville, and H. A. Stone of Vandalia. James A. Lynn, Noble Grand of Western Star lodge had charge of the funeral arrangements. The services were held in the Odd Fellows Temple at 1:30 o'clock, and there was a large attendance in the hall at that hour. J. H. Raible, grand representative, president, as he was an old acquaintance of Mr. Starr.  Rev. J. A. Lucas of Carlinville, grand warden, Sovereign Grand Master C. A. Harris of Galesburg, and Thomas Corbett, deputy grand master, delivered addresses. The Odd Fellows ritual at the grave was given by officers of the Grand Lodge and by James A. Lynn, Noble Grand of Western Star Lodge. The pallbearers were J. H. Raible, William Flynn, and T. Corbett of Alton, Chris Loehr, T. W. Cook, and A. H. Stephany of Elsah.

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STARR, JOSEPHINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 25, 1904

North Alton News - The funeral of Mrs. Josephine Starr, aged relict of the late Augustus Starr, took place Sunday afternoon from the farm home near Godfrey, and was attended by a large number of friends and neighbors. Interment was in Godfrey cemetery, and services were conducted by Rev. J. Allworth.

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STAUFER, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 19, 1914      Soldier Dies From Football Game Injuries - 9 Years in Army

Frank Staufer, aged 28, discharged member of the United States Army, died this morning at the home of his mother, Mrs. Mary Staufer, 1128 East Third street. His death was due to injuries he sustained in a football game while nearing the end of his third three-year term of enlistment in the army. Staufer had enlisted first when nineteen years of age, in the Coast Artillery Service, and he was at Ft. Monroe when closing his third term. He had seen service in the Philippines and in Mexico. Large, powerful, a handsome looking young man, he was sought to fill a place in the football team representing his company, Co. 35, Coast Artillery Service. The team played a game last October, and in the game the young man was badly injured. One side was crushed in and several ribs broken. He continued in the service until the end of his enlistment, when he was given his discharge, February 26, 1914. Returning to Alton, he became an invalid at the home of his mother, and never recovered. His death was the result of the football game injuries he suffered last October. He leaves his mother, also one brother, Ben, and one sister, Mrs. Hattie Blalock of Alton. He leaves also six half-brothers. The body will be taken to Pearl, Ill., where services will be held at 9 o'clock Sunday morning from the Christian Church.

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STEBER, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 29, 1907

Frank Novak, the Pole [Polish] who shot Frank Steber to death in a saloon brawl at Granite City Tuesday night, who formerly lived in Alton and was seen here by some of his acquaintances Wednesday night and Thursday it is claimed. Granite City officers must have heard of Navok's presence in Alton, as they came up Thursday night and with Alton officers made a thorough search of all quarters in the city and vicinity where Poles and other foreigners of that class congregate, board, work or lodge, but failed to get their man. Novak is described as being a "dandified man," is always carefully dressed, uses face powder occasionally, has the picture of a woman tattooed on his right arm and a sword and flag on his left arm. He has black hair, dark brown eyes, is 5 feet 3 inches in height and weighs about 140 pounds.

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STEELE, LUCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 15, 1923

Miss Lucy Steele of Collinsville, Ill., 22 years old, was instantly killed and six other young persons seriously injured at 9:30 p.m. Saturday, when an automobile in which they were riding from their homes at Collinsville, fourteen miles east of St. Louis, to a dance at Wood River, was struck by an interurban car of the McKinley System at a grade crossing at Mitchell, Ill. Miss Steele, who was riding in the tonneau of the machine, died instantly from a fractured skull and internal injuries. Her sister, Miss Irene Steele, 20 years old, was taken to St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Granite City, suffering from severe cuts and bruises of the head and body and probably internal injuries. She will recover, according to physicians at the hospital....The girl who was killed and the injured were taken to the hospital by passing automobilists. Members of the automobile party have been in the habit of attending weekly dances at Wood River on Saturday nights and have been making the trip for a long time. Deputy sheriffs were told that the curtains on the automobile were drawn, and it is believed that Adelhardt failed to observe the approach of the car before arriving at the crossing with his machine. Other members of the party did not observe the car until it was almost upon them.

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STEELE, SAMUEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 2, 1907

The funeral of Samuel Steele was held this morning at 9 o'clock from the family home on Green street. Dr. Robert Gibson conducted the services. Burial was in City Cemetery. Mr. Steele died from injuries sustained by a fall last Saturday morning while at work on a building on Fourth street between Spring and Oak streets. Deputy Coroner Keiser will hold an inquest Monday evening.

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STEELE, UNKNOWN INFANT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Wednesday, February 5, 1902

The funeral of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Steele, which was found dead in bed Tuesday morning, took place Wednesday afternoon. The little one had been suffering with cold and croup and probably choked or smothered to death in its sleep. About 1 o'clock the mother nursed the child which appeared to be hungry and in much better health, but it was dead in the morning. The parents have the sympathy of all who know them in their sorrow.

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STEIN, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 7, 1909

Miss Anna Stein, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Stein, died this morning at St. Joseph's hospital following an operation for appendicitis. She was 18 years of age. Miss Stein was operated upon several days ago and failed to rally from the shock. The body was taken this afternoon to the family home at Fifth and Vine streets. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon.

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STEIN, SOPHIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 2, 1907

The funeral of Mrs. Sophia Stein, wife of Charles Stein, was held this afternoon from the home on east Sixth street and was attended by a very large number of friends of the deceased and of her family. Burial was in City Cemetery.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 31, 1907

Mrs. Charles Stein died this morning at 5 o'clock after a four weeks illness from typhoid fever at her home at 1127 east Sixth street. She was fifty-eight years old and came to Alton from Germany when in her sixteenth year. She was twice married and leaves four children by the first marriage: Edward and Fred Schmidt, Mrs. Benno Miller and Mrs. Louis Biesemeyer, all of Alton. Her husband, and one son, August Stein, by the last marriage, also survive. There are six grandchildren. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. Services will be conducted by Rev. Ernest Mueller.

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STEINER, CHARLES/Source: Alton Telegraph, February 25, 1875

We are called to record the death of Mr. Charles Steiner, a well known German citizen, under sad and peculiar circumstances. He resides near the Buck Inn, and on Wednesday last, as he was coming into town, he was overtaken by a farmer who was driving in with a load of wheat in a wagon bed mounted on runners. Steiner accepted an invitation to ride. Soon after the sleigh reached a sidling place in the road, and by some accident was overturned and the occupants thrown out. The fall was a severe one, but Mr. Steiner experienced but little inconvenience therefrom at the time, and came on into town, where he told the story of the mishap with much merriment. He complained, however, of pain in his side from the fall, but had no anticipation of serious results. After returning home he became worse, and it soon transpired that he had been severely injured internally. A physician was summoned at once, but could do nothing for him. He died on Friday. The funeral took place on Sunday. Mr. Steiner had lived in Alton for many years, and was much respected. He was engaged in buying grain for Capt. Sparks at the time of the accident. It will be remembered that one of Mr. Steiner's sons was killed last fall at Clifton by the accidental discharge of his gun. The family are deeply afflicted.

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STEINER, HELENA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 20, 1906

The funeral of Mrs. Helena Steiner was held this morning from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and there was a large attendance of relatives and friends of the family at the services. A requiem mass was celebrated by Rev. E. L. Spalding, assisted by Rev. Frs. Fennessey and Tarrent. Interment was made in Greenwood Cemetery.

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STEINER, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 8, 1904

Michael Steiner, for many years a well known resident and business man of Alton, died Sunday morning at the home of his son-in-law, Anton Kleinschnittger, in Upper Alton, aged 74. Mr. Steiner had been in fairly good health and was able to be around his home until Saturday night, when he complained of feeling unwell. He had been a sufferer from Bright's disease, but his condition did not seem dangerous. He did not rally from the prostration he suffered Saturday night, and died at 6 o'clock Sunday morning. He leaves four children: Mrs. Kleinschnittger, Mrs. Charles Gollmer, Albert Steiner of Alton, and Joseph Steiner of St. Louis. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

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STEINHEIMER, ADELINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 15, 1903

Mrs. Adelina Steinheimer, wife of Otto Steinheimer, who died Thursday afternoon at her home in Salu street, had been a resident of Alton 46 years and was well known. She was 61 years of age and leaves family of four children, all of adult age. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and Rev. Theodore Oberhellman will conduct the services.

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STEINHEIMER, BERNADETTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1906

Mrs. Bernadette Steinheimer, wife of Otto Steinheimer, died last night at 11 o'clock at her home, 615 east Third street, after a long illness from consumption and other troubles. Mrs. Steinheimer was an invalid for many years. She died on her birthday, and was ?0 years old. She leaves beside her husband, a sister, Miss Colia Mahon, a mute. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

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STEINHEIMER, OTTO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1919

Otto Steinheimer, in his seventy-eighth year, an old resident of Alton, died Friday afternoon at 3:15 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Gibbons, 3006 East Brown street. He had been failing for a long time, due to advanced age. Mr. Steinheimer was born in Schillinghaus, Bavaria, February 12, 1842. His wife died sixteen years ago. He leaves four children: Mrs. Gibbons, Mrs. Fred Theen, John and Otto Steinheimer; also two brothers, Baptiste of Alton and Frank of Colorado. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Friends will be welcome to attend the services at the home, but interment will be private.

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STEINHEIMMER, CHARLES J. 'HENRY'/Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, November 23, 1893

At 6 o'clock Friday morning [November 17], Henry Steinheimmer died at his home, No. 419 Alby street, after a short illness of pneumonia, aged 23 years. Deceased was an industrious young man, an employee of the glass works, where he was soon to become an apprentice blower. His illness has lasted but a few days. The funeral will take place at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon from the home. A peculiar coincidence regarding his death is that he was an intimate friend of Mr. Henry Thiele, and resided in the same house with him several years ago. The young men were nearly the same age, died within a few hours of each other, of the same illness and were buried at the same hour Sunday afternoon.

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STEINHEIMER, JOSEPHINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1912

The death of Mrs. Josephine Steinheimer, wife of Baptiste Steinheimer, occurred this morning at 4 o'clock at the family home, 517 East Tenth street. The death was caused by bowel troubles. Beside her husband, she leaves two daughters, Mrs. Rose Dill of Cape Girardeau, Mo., and Mrs. Dora Hunze of Alton; and one son, Frederic of Alton. Beside these, there are four grandchildren: Frederick, Albert of Cape Girardeau, and Josephine Berry Steinheimer and Mildred Hunze of Alton. Mrs. Steinheimer was born in Hamberg, Germany on October 9th, 1838. The funeral will be held from the family home on Thursday the 25th at 2:30 p.m.  Mrs. Steinheimer had been ill over fifteen years, and most of the time she was obliged to sit in a chair when she was not in bed.

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STEINMAN, DAVID/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 22, 1916

The funeral of David Steinman was held at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the Twelfth Street Presbyterian Church to the City Cemetery. The services were conducted at the church by Rev. J. Thompson Baker. A large number of the relatives and friends of the deceased attended the funeral.

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STEINMAN, FRED T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 19, 1909

Fred T. Steinman died at St. Joseph's hospital yesterday morning. He leaves his wife and three children. The funeral will be held tomorrow. Mr. Steinman was moved from his home on Harrison street several days ago, very ill with pneumonia, to the hospital.

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STELZEL, CHARLES FREDERICK SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 6, 1905                    Pioneer Who Lived in North Alton In Stage Coach Days Dies

Mr. Charles Frederick Stelzel Sr., a resident of Alton and vicinity almost continuously since 1854, died Thursday afternoon after a protracted illness at his home in North Alton. He was born February 14, 1824 in Saxony, Germany, and came to America in 1854, coming directly to Alton. From here he went to Freeport, Ill., and later to Galveston, Texas, but returned in 1858 and located in North Alton where he has been a prominent and respected citizen ever since. He was married twice, the first union being contracted in 1860. His wife died in 1873 in October, and in 1874 he was married to Miss Frederika Krinard, who died about six years ago. Two children of the five born to him preceded him to the grave. The surviving children are Miss Rose Stelzel, who lived with her father; Mrs. Frank Winter of Decatur, Ill.; and Mr. C. F. Stelzel Jr., cashier of the Granite City National Bank. Deceased was always a hard working, economical man, and acquired a considerable competency. He was of a jolly, genial disposition, and "the blues" always left a crowd of people or a house whenever he was seen coming. He lived in North Alton in stage coach days, and was among the pioneers who knew what real deprivations in a new country mean, and he was also one of the most active of the nearby residents in striving to develop the country. He was a good father and citizen, and a good neighbor, and his death will be learned with sorrow by all of those who knew him best. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

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STEMM, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1909

Charles Stemm, a stone mason, was instantly killed Friday evening by the Big Four plug train near the Standard Oil tank east of town. He had only one wound on him where the train struck him on the temple. He was brought to Alton and Coroner Streeper took charge of the body and will hold an inquest. Stemm was the second husband of a woman whose first husband, John Sacker, was instantly killed by a train near the Indiana avenue crossing in East End place about seven years ago. Mrs. Stemm's troubles seem to be more than ordinarily falls to the lot of women. Shortly after the death of her first husband she gave birth to pair of twins, which are now seven years old. Shortly afterward she married Stemm, a stone mason. He has not been following his trade for some time on account of sickness, and was working on the Bluff Line railroad. Friday evening he returned home early and went out with a sack to gather up some coal to take home. The engineer on the plug train says that Stemm seemed to walk right into the front of the engine, and was evidently blinded by the storm of rain and sleet and did not see the approaching train. The unfortunate man leaves his wife, five children, three of them his own and two of them her former husband's children. When told that her second husband had met a fate similar to that of her first husband, Mrs. Stemm almost collapsed. Stemm is said to have been a hard working man and took good care of his family. He was a large, powerful man, of gigantic stature, and the handling of his body was attended with considerable difficulty.

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STEPHENS, WILLIS J./Source: The Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1931

Willis Jefferson Stephens, 52, died Wednesday at 1:30 at his home, 2949 Hillcrest avenue, after an illness of more than a year. Stephens had been a resident of Alton for the past nine years, moving here from Brinkley, Ark. Before his illness he had been employed at the plant of the Owens-Illinois Glass Co. His widow, Mrs. Fannie Stephens and two daughters, Miss Ora Mae and Mary Ellen Stephens, survive. He also leaves two sisters, Mr. Mary Forker and Mrs. Lillie Dailey and a brother, Eligie Stephens of Marwell, Ark.

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STEVENS, ZILLAH FOSTER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 4, 1915            Public Speaker of National Fame Dies in Home in Alton

Mrs. Zillah Foster Stevens, wife of M. P. Stevens, died Friday night at her residence, 1520 Langdon street, in Alton. Mrs. Stevens death was expected. She had been very seriously ill for over a month, and her family had suffered much anxiety. She was told that she must submit to a surgical operation, but doubting the efficacy of an operation to do her any good, Mrs. Stevens declined to permit it to be done. She had been very low for forty-eight hours prior to her death. Relatives were summoned, but her daughter, Mrs. John Rothacher, who is in a Chicago hospital, where a child was born to her a few days ago, could not be with her mother. Mrs. Stevens was a native of Peoria, Ill. She had long taken a very active interest in the work of temperance. She worked indefatigably for its success. She was also interested deeply in the work of the Sunday school, and her great ability was recognized in the international Sunday School Association when she was selected as chairman of the Temperance committee. Mrs. Stevens was an intensely practical, and a highly intellectual woman. She possessed a breadth of mind that made her a valuable counselor and assistant in any enterprise in which she engaged. She was a devoted member of the Congregational Church in Alton.....Mrs. Stevens was a member of the Executive Council of the V. I. A., which consisted of three members, Mrs. Stevens, Mrs. G. E. Wilkinson and Mrs. H. M. Schweppe....Her ability as a speaker on the platform was of such a character that her services were in great demand to make addresses at religious gatherings. She was one woman who could interest men deeply when she took the floor to make a speech. She had a logical mind, a strong grasp of any subject she chose to talk about, and her speeches were arranged in perfect order to get the most telling effects....Mrs. Stevens was born in Peoria, Ill., and came to Alton to reside at the time her husband acquired an interest in the John Armstrong Quarry Co. and moved to Alton. Soon after she came she took her place in the world of workers in Alton in behalf of the Sunday school and temperance....Mrs. Stevens leaves her aged mother, Mrs. C. Foster of Peoria, who is in her eighty-third year. She leaves also one brother, Edgar C. Foster of Peoria; and three sisters, Mrs. Mary Foster Bryner of Chicago, Miss Amanda Foster of Peoria, and Mrs. Frank Reisenberg of Oak Park, Ill....The body will be taken to Peoria for burial....

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STEVENSON, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, February 10, 1908

Edward Stevenson, a son of Mrs. William Howarth of the North side, died this afternoon at the home of his mother, aged 43. He had been ill for a year, but his death was due to a sudden attack of pneumonia, which began last Wednesday. He leaves beside his mother, a sister, Mrs. David Siegel of Alton, and a brother, Tobe Stevenson of Vandalia. Joseph, Frank, Louis and Ignatius Walter and Mrs. George Smith are half brothers and sister. The time of the funeral has not been set.

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STEVENSON, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 21, 1916          Boy Drowns in Old Swimming Hole in Foster Township

Harry Stevenson, an orphan, aged 16, was drowned Sunday noon while swimming with Albert Edsall in an old swimming hole in a creek in Foster township. The body was recovered two hours later and efforts were made to revive the boy, but in vain. A coroner's inquest was conducted. The two boys had gone swimming and Stevenson, who could not swim at all, got into water that was beyond his depth and lost his life.

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STEVENSON, JAMES AND WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 11, 1908     Brothers Killed by Train ..... Were Together Always

The two men who were run down and killed by a Wabash passenger train a mile east of Edwardsville Saturday night were identified yesterday as James and William Stevenson, brothers, of Bethalto, Illinois. According to friends of the pair, "Jim" and "Bill" were inseparable.  The brothers were Woodmen and were on their way home when the accident occurred. The two were singing, "Good-Bye, Eliza Jane, I'm Going to Leave You" when the train from Toledo came along. James Stevenson was struck and thrown dead and mangled to the side of the road. William's body was found across the tracks, 300 yards away from his brother. The Stevenson boys were unmarried. One was 38 and the other 36 years old. They always worked together and had their amusements together. James's body was found a day before his brother's. While testifying at the inquest, Henry Stegall, the engineer, dropped a remark that he believed that he had run down a dog before he struck Stevenson. Out of curiosity, the Coroner went down the track and found the other body.

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STEWARD, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 17, 1906

The funeral of Mrs. Martha Steward was held this afternoon at 3 p.m. from the Union Baptist church, and services were conducted by Rev. Griswold. Burial was in City Cemetery. Mrs. Steward had been a resident of Alton nearly 70 years.

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STEWART, DANIEL (CAPTAIN)/Source: Utica, New York Herald Dispatch, March 10, 1908

Upper Alton, Ill., - March 10 - Capt. Daniel Stewart, 94 years old, died yesterday at the home of his granddaughter, Mrs. John H. Diamond, after lying in bed 27 years, during the greater part of which he smoked a pipe. His death was the ultimate result of injuries suffered in a steamboat boiler explosion and was hastened on by his setting the bed on fire recently while smoking. He was dragged out of the burning bed slightly burned. The shock wakened him, and hastened his death.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 7, 1908

Capt. Daniel Stewart, aged 94, who died at his home near Upper Alton Friday morning from old age, had lived long over the usual span of human life, and he lived through suffering of 27 years of invalidism. For fifteen years his granddaughter, with whom he had lived, had been his devoted nurse, and she had done everything for him. He was born at Sandusky, Ohio in 1814, and had he lived ten days longer would have been 94.  He was crippled in 1855 by an explosion of the steamer of which he was Captain, on Lake Michigan. He came to Alton in 1850 where he has lived for the past 42 years. Capt. Stewart had been bedfast for the past 27 years. He leaves four grandchildren, Mrs. John H. Diamond, Mr. Harry Benson, both of Alton, Arthur W. Benson of Sandusky, Ohio, and Charles A. Benson of Washington, D. C., all children of his only child, Mrs. Henry C. Benson. His death occurred at his home, 2 1/2 miles north of Upper Alton where he had lived for the last 40 years.

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STEWART, LUCY B./Source: Troy Star, May 3, 1894

Mrs. Lucy B. Stewart, aged 80 years, died at her home in this city, Saturday, at 9 o'clock a.m. The funeral took place Monday morning to the Presbyterian church, thence to the Troy cemetery. Mrs. Stewart was for many years a respected resident of Troy, and leaves a number of relatives to mourn her death.

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STEWART, MARY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 3, 1917

Mrs. Mary J. Stewart, wife of C. C. Stewart, aged 41, died this morning at 10 o'clock after an illness of fourteen days with pneumonia. The death of Mrs. Stewart had been feared the last few days of her illness. On Friday it was known that she was in a very dangerous condition, and there was hardly a chance of her recovery. The Stewart family was well known in Alton through having lived here for seventeen years. She was born in Anderson, Ind. Since she came to Alton she had been very active in the work of the Congregational Church, in which her husband was one of the leading workers. The family moved away from Alton a few years ago to make their home in East St. Louis, much to the regret of all who knew them. Not long ago the directors of the Old Ladies Home at Alton were seeking a competent person to take charge of the home following the resignation of the other manager. They sought out Mrs. Stewart and induced her to take the position. She came back to Alton and to her many friends here, with her family, and they settled down to their duties in charge of the home. Fourteen days ago she was taken down with an illness which developed into pneumonia, and after a hard fight to save her life, the fight was lost. Mrs. Stewart leaves her husband, C. C. Stewart, and two sons, Russell and Creston. Mrs. Stewart was a woman who was highly esteemed by her neighbors and those who knew her best. She had many admirers in Alton. In a social way her companionship was much sought and in the work of the Congregational Church she was recognized as a powerful influence. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Congregational Church.

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STEWART, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 22, 1916         

Robert Stewart passed away at 2:40 p.m. May 20, 1916 at the home of his daughter, Mrs. R. J. Young, 412 Bluff street, at the age of 80 years. Mr. Stewart was born April 10, 1836 in the Township of Leesborough, Monaghan County, Province of Uaster, Ireland. He was one of a family of six children, all of whom came to this country. His parents were Scotch Presbyterians of the strictest sect. He was brought up in that faith and never forgot his early teachings. His father and mother, Robert and Jane Stewart, were descendents of the Dunns and Stewarts who formed part of the colony of Scotch Presbyterians who settled near Enniskileen, Ireland. At the age of 14, Robert Stewart came to this country to the home of his uncle, Alexander Dunn, at Chester, Ill. Later, he settled at Godfrey, which was his home for the greater part of his life. He was married November 19, 1862 to Maria K. Pattison of Godfrey, who died September 29, 1888. Seven children were born to this union, three of whom survive, Mrs. R. J. Young; Kate C. Stewart of Alton; and Charles H. Stewart of Chicago. He leaves three grandchildren, Alex and Will Crawford of Carlinville, Mrs. L. H. Maxfield of Godfrey. The funeral services were held from the home of his daughter, Mrs. R. J. Young at 3 o'clock this afternoon. Interment was in Godfrey Cemetery. Services at the house were conducted by Rev. McCann of the Congregational Church, and when the body arrived at Godfrey Rev. House took charge. At the house Mrs. Bern Degenhardt sang "In the Bright Forever." The funeral was attended by many friends from the vicinity of Godfrey, as well as Alton friends and relatives. The pallbearers were J. C. Tolman, C. W. Young, William Hancock Jr., Richard Compton, John McKeon and Herbert Armstrong.

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STEWART, UNKNOWN CHILD OF C. C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1907

The body of the 10 months old child of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Stewart, who died in 1901 and was buried in Anderson, Indiana, arrived in Alton today and was re-interred in the City cemetery. The family expects to remain in Alton and desire to have the body of the little one buried here.

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STEWART, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 4, 1908

William Stewart, the expert of the Baldwin Locomotive Works, who was crushed last Thursday under a new engine which he was oiling on a switch at the foot of Apple street, died Monday afternoon at St. Joseph's hospital, and the body will be shipped to Philadelphia tonight. It will be accompanied by his brother, George Stewart, who was with William when he died. The vitality shown by the young man, crushed and broken as he was, in fighting death for so many days was the wonder of physicians and nurses. He was a fine looking man, weighed about 225 pounds, and was 28 years old. His parents live in Philadelphia. An inquest was held last night by Deputy Coroner Keiser, and the jury returned a verdict of death by "accident; crushed under a steam engine," was found.

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STICE, UNKNOWN CHILD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 26, 1919

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stick died at St. Joseph's Hospital Christmas Day. The baby was born just four days ago at the hospital. Burial was in City Cemetery this afternoon, services being conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenny. The mother of the baby was before her marriage Miss Rachel Gresham.

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STILL, MARY (nee ALLEN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 8, 1917

Mrs. Mary Still, widow of Jerry Still, was found dead this morning in her room at the home of her only sister, Mrs. Arthur Dixon. Death was due to paralysis. Mrs. Still was stricken with paralysis August 10th while employed at the place of Dr. W. H. C. Smith in Godfrey. She was brought to the Dixon home where she had made her home for years when not elsewhere. She was believed to be recovering and was able to get around the house. Friday night she was about as usual when she retired with no indications of a sudden close of her life. About 7:30 o'clock in the morning she was found dead in her bed. It is supposed that a final stroke of paralysis caused her death. Mrs. Still was born in Alton December 24th, 1859. She was the widow of Jerry Still, who for many years was a shoemaker on State street. She was a sister of the late Benjamin Allen and James Allen,, the latter dying seven months ago. The funeral will be held at 2:30 o'clock from the Dixon home, Rev. A. C. Geyer officiating. Burial will be in City cemetery.

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STILL, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 10, 1907

Thomas Still, in his 88th year, died Monday night at his home in Godfrey from the weakness of great age. He had been growing weaker for a number of years, and his decline was steady, in recent months his condition having become so weak it was necessary for him to remain in his bed all the time. During his long illness he was attended by his wife who is 84 years of age, and is still strong and active. The couple celebrated the 63rd anniversary of their marriage last August 21. Mr. Still was born in Fonbanett, England, August 8, 1820. He was married August 21, 1844 to his wife, who survives him. He came to America and arrived in Alton March 17, 1848, and the couple resided in Alton a few years. Later they moved to a farm in Godfrey township, where they lived many years until their removal to Godfrey to spend the remainder of their life. Besides his wife, Mr. Still leaves one brother, Frederick Still of Murrayville, Ill., and eight children: Mrs. Annie Robings of Brighton, Edward S. Still of Godfrey, John Still of Upper Alton, Henry T. Still of Shipman, Emma J. Hunt of Shipman, James F. Still of Medora, Charles A. Still of Piasa, Mrs. Edward Pattison of Bloomington. He leaves also 28 grandchildren and nineteen great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from his late residence. Mr. Still was one of the oldest and best known men in Madison county. He had a brother living in Alton, Jerry Still, who died a few years ago.

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STILLWELL, J. F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 31, 1917             Postmaster at Edwardsville Dies

J. F. Stillwell, postmaster at Edwardsville, died there Friday morning at 2:30 o'clock from a complication of diseases, due to nervous troubles and ivy poisoning. Mr. Stillwell was prominent in county politics. He was chairman of the Democratic county central committee until appointed postmaster at Edwardsville. He had served as chairman of the county board of supervisors and was one of the leading figures in the county in a political way. He was named postmaster by President Wilson to succeed Thomas Crossman, after a hard fight had been made by Senator J. Hamilton Lewis to land William Dickmann in the postmastership there.

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STINNETT, PAUL CLARKE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 29, 1919

Mrs. Dora Stinnett, a widow, was bereaved by death Saturday of her little son, Paul Clarke, almost three years of age. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock and interment was in St. Joseph's Cemetery. The child's father died a year ago. The mother had been making her home with the family of Pearl Vinson, on East College avenue. The mother still has one daughter and two sons.

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STIRITZ, BARBARA (nee HECHLER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 4, 1902

Mrs. Barbara, wife of Louis F. Stiritz, died this afternoon at the family home on West Second street, after an illness of three days with congestion of the bowels. Besides her afflicted husband and three children, she leaves her mother, Mrs. Adam Hechler, one sister, Miss Lizzie, and four brother, John, Julius, Frank and Edward Hechler. She was 29 years of age. Funeral arrangements are not yet made.

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STIRITZ, EARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 5, 1912                  Kills Self by Shooting Top of Head Off

Earl Stiritz, the 22 year old son of Ed Stiritz, shot and killed himself last night in the barn at his father-in-law's home at Newbern. The young man had been in bad health and had been worrying. Yesterday a message came to relatives that he had evidently lost his mind, or was losing it, and that his case was very alarming. Last evening he went to the barn at the home in Newbern, and there he blew the top of his head off with a shotgun. He had been married about a year and he leaves a young wife and an infant child. He had not been working steady. His wife was a Miss Rintoul of Newbern, and it was at the Rintoul place the suicide occurred. Edward Stiritz, father of the dead young man, arrived in Alton Monday night from Johnson City, Ill., where he has been visiting a brother for several weeks. He says he received a letter from his daughter-in-law a few days ago, in which she stated that her husband has been very sick for three or four weeks, and that the doctor told her he was losing his mind. She urged the father to come home at once. Earl Stiritz and wife, who have lived in Logan street for some time, went to visit at the home of Mrs. Stiritz's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Rintoul, several weeks ago, and the husband was taken ill there. The father procured a buggy this morning and was driven to the Rintoul farm near Newbern. He did not know about the death of his son until this morning, although messengers were sent to Alton to notify him last night. It was learned he had left Johnson City for home when a telegram announcing the suicide was sent to the southern Illinois city. Mr. Stiritz told a Telegraph reporter that his son will be buried in the family lot in Melville. The funeral will be Wednesday from the Melville church at 2 p.m.

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STIRITZ, FREDERICKA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1903            Market Gardner for Half Century, Old Resident of Clinton Terrace Dies

Mrs. Fredericka Stiritz, who kept a stand in the Kirsch market place for fifty years, and was the best known and oldest person in the market gardening business in this city, died at her home, Clifton Terrace, Sunday afternoon after a brief illness. She was 81 years of age, and had lived at Clifton Terrace over a half century. Mrs. Stiritz was known as a kindly and motherly woman who made many friends and kept them. She did a thriving business for many years, and her patrons always patronized her notwithstanding other competitors for the business. When the firm of Kirsch & Schiess was started fifty years ago, Mrs. Stiritz opened a stand there for the sale of vegetables raised on her own place, and there she continued in business until five years ago, when she began selling her garden stuff in stores about town. She was born in Württemberg, Germany, February 1, 1822. She came to America when 10 years of age and was married in Philadelphia to John J. Stiritz, who died twenty years ago. In 1850 the family moved to Clifton, and there have lived ever since, Mrs. Stiritz making her home on one farm for more than fifty years. She leaves four sons and two daughters, Emanuel, Albert, Louis R. and Edward Stiritz, Mrs. D. Boedy of East Newbern, and Mrs. J. T. Crankshaw of Philadelphia. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the family home, and services will be conducted by Rev. J. Alworth of the Congregational church at Godfrey.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 25, 1903

The funeral of Mrs. Fredericka Stiritz took place this afternoon from the home at Clifton to the Melville church, and was attended by a very large number of people, many going from Alton and elsewhere. There were many beautiful floral offerings. Services were conducted by Rev. J. Alworth of the Godfrey Congregational church, and interment was in Melville Cemetery.

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STIRITZ, JENETTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 5, 1906

Mrs. Jenette Stiritz, wife of Louis F. Stiritz, died Sunday morning at 6:30 o'clock from a malady of an apoplectic nature. Her death was very unexpected and was a sad shock to her family. Her death followed shortly after the birth of a little daughter, and it was believed that the mother was in good condition and that she would recover, when she died very suddenly from the rupture of a blood vessel on the brain. Mrs. Stiritz was 36 years of age. She was a daughter of Julius F. Schneider of Melville, and a member of a prominent family.  Mrs. Stiritz leaves an infant daughter and her husband. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

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STIRITZ, LAURA (nee CALDWELL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 29, 1918

Mrs. Laura Stiritz, wife of Andrew Stiritz, aged 65, died at her residence, State and Bluff streets, Monday night at 11:30 o'clock, after a long illness with Bright's disease. Mrs. Stiritz was a lifelong resident of Alton. Her maiden name was Caldwell. She was married to Andrew Stiritz in 1879, and during all of that period the couple had resided in Alton. Beside her husband she leaves two sons, Roy and Frank Stiritz, and one sister, Mrs. D. H. Williams of St. Louis. Mrs. Stiritz was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church for many years. The funeral, which will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence, will be conducted by Rev. Frederick D. Butler. Mrs. Stiritz was highly esteemed by many who knew her. She was known as a good mother to her family, and there is general regret over her death. Her illness, it was realized for some time, must have a fatal termination, as her decline in health in the past six weeks had been very rapid.

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STIRITZ, LEROY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 25, 1912

The funeral of Leroy, the 2 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Stiritz, will be held Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home on Bluff street, and burial will be in City Cemetery.

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STIRITZ, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1909     Old Time Tavern-Keeper, Resident of Clifton Terrace Succumbs to Old Age

Louis Stiritz, the sage and pioneer of Clifton Terrace, passed away Tuesday morning at his home after an illness of several weeks duration from a complication of diseases. He was very seriously ill a few years ago, and his life was given up several times, but he recovered partially. He was never entirely well since, however. He was a large land owner in that vicinity and was reputed wealthy, and after his recovery from what was thought then to be certain death, he made a division of his possessions among his children and lived long enough to see them enjoying this while he was yet with them to enjoy it with them. He was 80 years old last August, and had lived in Clifton since 1850. He came to America in 1849, but traveled through the country considerable before settling upon Clifton as his future home. Clifton at that time boasted a saw mill, some stores and a few residences, but the country was not settled up much. He was an educated young man and could speak English before he came to this country, and had no difficulty in falling into the ways of the country. He was the first man in this section to utilize the hillsides and other parts of land not good for common crops by planting grape vines, and his faith in the Illinois hills being as good for producing grapes as are the hills of the Rhine in Germany was justified time and time again by the success he attained in growing grapes here. For many years he was a large maker of wine and the Stiritz wines made a fine name and reputation for themselves throughout the country because of their purity and excellence. He quit the wine making business, however, about 12 years ago. He was a progressive man and did much to develop Clifton and help make it the favored place it now is. His parents followed him from the Old Country, and their remains are resting in the Melville cemetery. Forty years ago he became a charter member of Greenwood lodge I.O.O.F. of North Alton, and he has been a member of the order ever since continuously. He transferred his membership afterwards to the Alton lodge from the Greenwood lodge, and is now a member here. His wife died 33 years ago.  He is survived by six children, Mrs. Julia Hochstuhl of Clifton; Louis F. Stiritz of Alton; Herman Stiritz of California; Mrs. Joseph Kehr of Alton; and Misses Mollie and Dora, who live at home. A sister, Mrs. Lena Gradolph of Clifton, also survives. Another sister, Mrs. Bertha Moren, resides in St. Louis, and a third, Mrs. Louise Essick, lives in Cronstadt, Germany. He was born in Laufen, Germany, August 1829.  The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 10 o'clock from the home to Melville cemetery.

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STIRITZ, LOUIS R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1918

Louis R. Stiritz, the Grafton road gardener and farmer whose serious sickness was mentioned several time in the Telegraph, died Saturday evening at his home near Melville - the home in which he was born 63 years ago, and in which he spent his life. He was one of the best known farmers in this section, and was a companionable, kindly, charitable man, and strictly honest in all of his dealings. He is survived by his wife, three brothers, and one sister, and a very large number of other relatives. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from the Melville Congregational church, where services were conducted by Rev. G. F. Brown, the pastor in the presence of probably the largest congregation ever assembled at that church at a funeral. He had been a friend of that church many years, and had done much to help it in a material way. Burial was in the cemetery at Melville. There is very general regret over his passing, not only throughout Godfrey township, but in all parts of Alton as well.

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STIRITZ, PAULINE (nee HACK)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 14, 1920

Mrs. Pauline Hack Stiritz, wife of Louis F. Stiritz, died Tuesday night at 10 o'clock in the Missouri Baptist Sanitarium in St. Louis following a surgical operation for the relief of a goiter that had been giving her trouble the past six months. She went to St. Louis last Thursday to undergo the operation, hopeful that she was about to gain some relief from the malady that had caused her intense suffering. It was recognized by her family that her case was a serious one and that the operation was a desperate expedient, and there was no surprise when it did not turn out well. Mrs. Stiritz's maiden name was Hack. She was married eleven years ago, and she leaves one daughter, Pauline, and four stepchildren, beside her husband, two brothers, Fred and Harry Hack, and a sister, Mrs. Walter Cobeck. She was beloved in her own home where she devoted all her efforts to making home a happy place, and in the home circle she will be most missed. Mrs. Stiritz was deeply interested in the work of the Evangelical church at Eighth and Henry Streets. She was in her fiftieth year. The funeral will be held Friday at 2:30 o'clock from the Evangelical church.

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STITES, LUCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 6, 1918

Lucy Stites, aged 13, died at her home in Woodlawn, Upper Alton, yesterday morning after a short illness with pneumonia. She leaves her mother, Mrs. Emma J. Robinson; three sisters and two brothers. Mrs. B. Dilling, William Stites, Frank Stites, Lucille and Amy Robinson are the sisters and brothers. The funeral will be held privately on Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment will be in Oakwood Cemetery.

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STITES, RACHEL A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1902

North Alton News - Mrs. Rachel A. Stites, aged about fifty eight, died Thursday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock at her home after an illness of less than a week with the grip. She leaves her husband, Mr. James Stites, and three sons, Will, Clarence and Lurten; two sisters, Miss Lydia Marshall of Fidelity and Mrs. H. W. Denny of Alton, and two brothers, Will Marshall of Piasa and James Marshall of Pawnee, Illinois, besides numerous friends to deplore her death. Mrs. Stites formerly lived in Alton where she has many warm friends to whom her sudden death will come as a shock. She was a good, kindly, charitable woman, a fond wife and mother, and most excellent neighbor. The funeral will be Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to Upper Alton cemetery. Rev. G. W. Shepherd will conduct the service.

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STOBBS, MARY ELLEN (nee KANNADY)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 15, 1921

Mrs. Mary Ellen Stobbs, aged 67 years, died Wednesday evening at 7:40 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. H. Schmoeller, at 409 East Ninth street, after an illness of seven months, during which time she has been confined to her bed, suffering from cancer of the stomach. Mrs. Stobbs had been in a very critical condition for the past two weeks, and the end had been expected since last Friday. Her children have been at her bedside constantly since Friday, when the turn for the worse came. Mrs. Stobbs was born and reared in Alton. At the age of twenty she was united in marriage with Joseph Stobbs, and seven children were born to this union: William D., Frank J. and Harry W. of this city, LeRoy E. of Harvey, Ill., Mrs. E. H. Schmoeller and Mrs. P. E. Vincent also of this city. One child died in infancy. Her husband died on January 13, 1904. Besides the six children, she is survived by fourteen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, two half-brothers, and three half-sisters, Frank K. Lowe, George Schott, Mrs. Peter Yost and Mrs. Humbert Lowe of Upper Alton, and Dr. August Schott of St. Louis. Her maiden name was Kannady. When a young girl Mrs. Stobbs united with the Upper Alton Wesley Methodist Church, and in later years she changed her membership to the Upper Alton Presbyterian Church. She has resided at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. H. Schmoeller, for the past twelve years. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 from the home of her son, Frank Stobbs, in Upper Alton. Interment will be in the Upper Alton Cemetery.

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STOBBS, JOSEPH B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 13, 1904

Joseph B. Stobbs, a native of St. Louis but a resident of Alton and vicinity practically all his life, died Wednesday night at 9 o'clock at the family home at Fifth and Spring streets. He was 56 years of age and leaves a wife and six children: William D., Frank J., Nellie E., Roy E., Jessie and Harry Stobbs.  Mr. Stobbs was an industrious, good citizen and a kind-hearted, charitable man, and his death will be regretted by very many outside of the immediate family. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 2 p.m. from the home, where services will be conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenney.

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STOEHR, KATHRYN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 19, 1908

Mrs. Katheryn Stoehr, wife of Lawrence Stoehr Sr., died Thursday morning from stomach troubles at her home on Bond street. She has been a sufferer for several months, but the disease did not become acute until ten days ago. She was born September 1, 1828 in Bavaria, Germany, and came to America in May 1849. Mr. Stoehr was on the same ship, and on the following July 4th the couple were married in New York City. They lived in Philadelphia for a time, and in Chicago later, coming to Alton in 1853. They have lived here since, and deceased was well known and generally respected throughout the city. Of the four sons born to the union, but one, Lawrence Jr., survives to mourn with the father the loss of a devoted motor and wife. A sister, Mrs. Margaret Gehren, lives in St. Louis, and has been at the Stoehr home several times recently. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence, where services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller, pastor of the German Evangelical church. Burial will be in City cemetery.

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STOEHR, LORENZ/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 30, 1912

Lorenz Stoehr, aged 88, died Saturday night at 10 o'clock at his residence, Beacon and Bond streets, after an illness which began with a heavy cold last spring. His death had been expected for some time, although the aged man refused to consider himself very sick, and only regretted that he could not be up and around as usual. Mr. Stoehr's physique was wonderfully strong. Up to last spring the aged gentleman preferred walking to riding, and when he would make his regular tours of the various farms in which he held interest, he would go afoot. He would walk from seven to ten miles in a day without causing himself any discomfort. Starting with nothing but his hands and a rare knowledge and skill at his trade of blacksmithing, Mr. Stoehr accumulated a nice fortune in Alton, and at his death he left a rich estate. When he arrived in Alton with his little family, he found little to do, and so he started out for Carlinville on foot, having heard of a job there. He walked to Carlinville, missed getting the job and walked back, all in the twenty four hours. When he did get a start in Alton, he prospered. He merited the confidence and high esteem of his fellow man. Mr. Stoehr's home life was ideal. His wife died a few years ago, and after her death her aged partner in life, who had been married to her about fifty years, remarked that in all that time they had never a quarrel. He did not quarrel with his fellow men. He possessed a nature that was peaceful, kindly and charitable. He was one of the very oldest members of the Masonic order in Alton, and so long as his strength permitted him to leave in the evening, he attended his lodge meetings. Lorenze Stoehr was born in Bavaria, Germany, May 4th, 1824. He came to America in 1849, and then went to Chicago for two years. He came to Alton in 1853. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, and will be under Masonic auspices. Members of Piasa lodge and sister lodges being invited to attend.

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STOFFT, UNKNOWN WIFE OF WILLIAM C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 15, 1917

Mrs. William C. Stofft, aged 46, dropped dead Sunday evening about 6 o'clock in the family home on Brown street in Upper Alton. Mrs. Stofft had been in poor health the last fourteen months, but during the past few days she has been feeling much better and on Sunday she had been better than in many weeks. She and her husband had been at home together all day, and in the evening, their only child, William Stofft Jr., who holds a position at Madison, had been at home with them. Mrs. Stofft was preparing supper Sunday evening and was talking to her son. Mr. Stofft stepped outside the house into the yard. The son was sitting in a chair in the dining room and his mother had stepped behind his chair to get something and was talking to him all the time. While behind the son's chair she suddenly dropped to the floor without speaking a word. Her son hurried to her and called his father into the house. They summoned a physician, who pronounced Mrs. Stofft dead. Mr. and Mrs. Stofft came to Alton 17 years ago from Pittsburg, Pa. The funeral will be held in the present family home, the Capt. Ed Young place on west Brown street, at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, and services will be conducted by Rev. C. N. McManis, pastor of the Upper Alton Presbyterian church, and burial will be at Oakwood cemetery. Mrs. Stofft leaves 3 brothers and 3 sisters, residents of Pennsylvania. Mrs. J. W. Beddow of Wylam, Alabama, an aunt of Mrs. Stofft, wired today that she would be here for the funeral.

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STOKES, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1919

Thomas Stokes, aged 47, who was one of the two victims of an accident at the Laclede Steel plant, died yesterday on the operating table at St. Joseph's hospital while work was being done on his legs. The doctors were amputating the leg which was the worst hurt. Stokes leaves his wife and four children. Deputy Coroner Krill will hold an inquest.

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STOLTE, HANNAH (nee GERFEN)/Source: Troy Weekly Call, January 24, 1913/Submitted by Marsha Ensminger

The funeral of Mrs. Hannah Stolte, wife of Henry Stolte, whose death was noted in the foregoing issue of The Call, took place last Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family residence to St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran church. Rev. Herzberger of St. Louis conducted the burial rites, speaking in both German and English, and the obsequies were attended by a large concourse of sorrowing and sympathetic friends, including many from out of town. The Frauenverein of St. Paul's church attended in a body and carried the floral tributes which were numerous and beautiful. Interment was made in the Lutheran cemetery. Deceased, whose maiden name was Gerfen, was the second daughter of Mrs. Louise and the late Frederick Gerfen and was born in Troy, September 9, 1870. She attended St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran school from which she was confirmed March 29, 1885. Her marriage to Henry Stolte, who survives her, took place February 28, 1892. No children were ever born to their union. Besides the husband and a foster daughter, she is survived by her mother, two sisters who are Mrs. C. Huxholdt of Brazil, Ind., and Miss Martha Gerfen of Troy, and one foster sister, Miss Louise Vorderhage, also of Troy. There are also a host of relatives. Mrs. Stolte was a staunch member of St. Paul's church and served as president of the Frauenverein for many years, being a leader in all its undertakings. She wns the kindest of neighbors and ever ready to assist those about her in sorrow or trouble or in the every day affairs of life. Her home life was beautiful and that of a devoted and loving wife, daughter and sister. Her taken away in the prime of her years has made a vacancy in the home circle which never can be filled and the bereaved ones have the sincere and heartfelt sympathy of a legion of friends in this their hour of sorrow and affliction.

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STOLZE, ANNA (nee JUN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1920

Mrs. Anna Stolze, the mother of six children, one of whom is three days old, died of influenza this morning at her home, 717 East Fourth street. She was 38 years old. Mrs. Stolze, before her marriage, was Miss Anna Jun of this city. She was born here and during her life residence made a large number of friends who are grieved at her death. Besides the three day old baby, she leaves five other children. She is also survived by her husband, Anthony Stolze, and a brother, Joseph Jun of Springfield, Ill. Jun formerly conducted a grocery store on East Broadway here. The funeral will be held Friday morning from the home and interment will be in St. Joseph's cemetery. The funeral will be private.

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STOLZE, FREDERICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1922

Frederick Stolze, 72, died at 3:30 a.m. today, at his home, 810 Union street, after an illness of a year and a half. Mr. Stolze was born in Germany and came to America with his parents when 6 months old. His parents soon moved to Alton and he had been a resident of Alton and Bethalto until his death. He is survived by four sons and six daughters. The sons are Fred W., Anton and Ernst C., of Alton, and Henry A. Stolze of St. Louis. The daughters are Mrs. Charles Goehring of St. Louis, Sister M. Salome, a member of the Notre Dame sisterhood at East St. Louis; Mrs. Frank Howard of Alton, Mrs. Adolph H. Howard of Alton, Miss Anna Stolze of Alton, and Mrs. George Baty of Alton. The funeral will be Saturday at 10 a.m., with services at St. Mary's church and interment in St. Joseph's cemetery. Mr. Stolze, up to the time he became ill, was employed at the Duncan foundry. He was a man noted for his kindliness and character, and his death was a shock to his many friends.

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STONE, BERTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 14, 1921              Typhoid Fever Causes Death

Mrs. Bertha Stone, wife of Dr. D. N. Stone, died Sunday morning at 4:30 o'clock at the family home on Market Street after an illness of about four weeks, death resulting from typhoid fever. The death of Mrs. Stone casts a gloom over this community for although it was known she had been suffering for some time, her death was not anticipated. Besides her husband, she is survived by a daughter, Bertha. The deceased had been a resident of Alton for nearly ten years, coming to this city from St. Louis. The remains were taken to St. Louis today, and the funeral will be held there on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

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STONEHAM, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1914            Fatally Injured By 85-Foot Fall - Dropped in Chimney

Frank Stoneham, a bricklayer, was fatally injured Friday afternoon by falling 85 feet from a platform at the Wood River refinery of the Standard Oil Co. He died at St. Joseph's Hospital at 2:30 o'clock Saturday morning. Dr. Taphorn, who attended Stoneham, said from the first that the man had very little chance of surviving the injuries he had sustained. After dropping the 85 feet from his scaffold, he struck on the concrete floor of the smokestack and was taken out through an aperture in the bottom of the stack. The chimney is six feet in diameter. Stoneham, with a helper Walter Forcade, was engaged in relining the chimney and was working on a platform inside the chimney, a circular platform was used which filled the chimney when set together. Half of it would be elevated at a time as the men would progress upward with their repair work, brackets being used to support the platform. Stoneham had just finished moving half of the platform and was standing on it. Evidently he had not made it secure, as suddenly the platform gave away and he fell to the bottom of the stack. When taken out he was horribly crushed, many of his bones had been broken and he was apparently suffering little pain, so severe was the shock of the fall. The worst injuries seemed to be in his spine. He was hurried to St. Joseph's hospital, where he sank steadily. Whether he had a premonition that he was going to be hurt, or whether it was merely a chance, Stoneham is said to have remarked to a friend that it might be risky to go into the chimney and he asked a man if he would like to make the ascent. The man said that he certainly would not. Mr. Stoneham was 25 years of age and unmarried. The father, Thomas Stoneham, and a brother and a sister, Miss Nellie, came to Wood River several years ago from Kansas City, and resided in Wood River with Mr. and Mrs. John Stoneham, uncle and aunt of the deceased. The father and son both worked at the refinery and were said to have earned high wages. They have been employed there since coming to Wood River. After the accident a telegram was sent to the other sister, Miss Esther Stoneham at Kansas City, to hurry home if she wanted to see her brother while living. The telegram though sent at 4 o'clock, was delayed and she did not receive it before 10 o'clock. She left at 11:20 p.m. and arrived in Wood River at 10:30 this morning, having missed out in the race by about eight hours as the brother had died at 2 o'clock. The remains will be left tonight at the Jacoby undertaking rooms, and tomorrow morning the funeral party, consisting of the father and two daughters, and Mr. and Mrs. John Stoneham, and as many others as can arrange to go, will leave for Kansas City, starting at 8 o'clock. The Knights of Columbus will escort the body to the train.

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STOTZ, AMALA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 17, 1919

Mrs. Amala Stotz, aged 93, died this morning at 10 o'clock at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Will Heiens, at Fosterburg, from the effects of injuries she sustained last September when she fell, fracturing one of her hips. She had been an invalid since. Mrs. Stotz was born in Germany but came to America when very young and practically all the rest of her life she spent in the Foster township neighborhood. A little more than a year ago she moved to the home of her granddaughter to live. She leaves no children, but is survived by five grandchildren, Henry Stotz, Fred Stotz, Mrs. James Chadwick, Mrs. Will Heiens, and Mrs. J. G. Brandt. The time of the funeral has not been set.

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STOWELL, SOPHIA P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 27, 1910

Mrs. Sophia P. Stowell, wife of Oliver S. Stowell, died at 4 o'clock Tuesday morning at her home, 510 east Eleventh street, after an illness which began Saturday morning. Mrs. Stowell's case has been regarded as extremely dangerous since she was found by her daughter, Miss Lucy Stowell, lying on a lounge in the family home, on the daughter's return to the home. Mrs. Stowell was unable to speak then, and was never fully conscious from that time. Her malady was diagnosed as uraemic poisoning. Monday she was believed to be a little improved, but the hope that came with the apparent change for the better was dispelled later when she failed to continue to grow better. Mrs. Stowell was a native of Alton, the daughter of Dr. B. K. Hart, who was one of the pioneers of Alton, and a very prominent and wealthy resident here in the early days. Her whole life was spent in Alton. She leaves beside her husband, one daughter, Miss Lucy Stowell, and a son, Frank Stowell. The illness of Mrs. Stowell caused profound sorrow in the large circle of friends where she was best known. While it was realized that her condition was extremely grave, there was a generally expressed hope that she would rally from the sudden attack of illness. She had been a woman devotedly attached to her home, and outside of her home and her church, which included a very large circle of friends, she had little interest. In her home she was a gracious hostess, in her church she was a deeply interested worker, and for many years since girlhood her efforts in behalf of the First Presbyterian church had done much toward maintaining its work at its highest efficiency. To her husband, who has been prominent for many years in the work of that church and Sunday school, she was a wise counsellor, and lent her active sympathy that went far to stimulate all who met her in the church organization to higher effort. In the church societies she was a busy woman. In her home she was a kind, loving mother, and her family reciprocated the affection she bestowed on them. She was the last of her father's family, her sister, Mrs. Charles Wright, having died a number of years ago, and like her sister was deeply interested in the Presbyterian church work. Mrs. Stowell was 58 years of age. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon from the First Presbyterian church.

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ST. PETERS, JACOB and OLIVER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1910           Brothers in Melville Died Same Night

There were three more deaths of little children at Melville Thursday night, all from the same dread disease that had already claimed five little folks, and had a score or more of them very ill. The families which were bereaved by death last night were those of Jacob St. Peters, Oliver St. Peters, brothers, and John Heafner. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob St. Peters lost a 20 months old boy, the second within a week. Mr. and Mrs. Oliver St. Peters lost a two year old boy. Neither of the St. Peters families now have any children, as the result of the scourge.

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ST. PETERS, PHILIP/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 21, 1910         Commits Suicide by Drinking Carbolic Acid

Unable to endure the remorse which overwhelmed him in the holiday season over differences with his family because of some acts of waywardness, Philip St. Peters, the 24 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Anton St. Peters, living near Newbern, committed suicide Tuesday night at the home of his uncle, Henry Vahle, in Upper Alton. The young man had trouble of various kinds, but it is said that his parents were kind and indulgent. The father let him have a horse and buggy a few weeks ago, which he drove to Alton and sold. The father remonstrated with him for this. Then, a few days ago, the son cashed a check for $30 in Alton, to which he had signed his father's name. The father met the son in Alton yesterday and had a talk with him, but he says he had not threatened to have the son arrested or to punish him for his misdoings. The father stayed in Alton all night, but he did not learn until about 9 o'clock Wednesday morning that the son had taken his own life. About 11:30 o'clock young St. Peters drank carbolic acid, and he died about midnight. He was taken in charge by Coroner Streeper, who will hold an inquest. It is said that the young man enlisted in the navy once, and deserted before the end of his term of enlistment. The parents have four other sons. Mr. St. Peters, who is a prominent and well to do farmer, said today that he had no intention of taking any action against his son for the wrongs he had committed. The only solution of the young man's suicide is that he could not endure going through the Christmas holidays with the knowledge that he had defrauded his father in the manner that has been mentioned. The father left for his home in Jersey county this afternoon to notify his wife and other members of the family of the tragic end of the son. The body of the latter was taken later to the St. Peter's home by Undertakers Lock.

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STRATTON, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 23, 1910            Dies From Wound Received in Civil War - Shot Through Lungs

William Stratton, aged 72, died Tuesday evening at his home in Yager park from lung trouble. His death is said to have resulted from a wound he sustained in the army nearly 50 years ago. He was pierced by a bullet, the ball passing through his lungs. He was never strong afterward, and recently was given an increase in pension to $46 a month on account of his disability. He was a member of the G. A. R.  His wife survives him, and he leaves also some stepchildren. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

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STRAUBE, CHRISTINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 14, 1921          Alton Resident Half Century

Mrs. Christina Straube, in her ninety-fifth year, died at 1:30 o'clock this morning at her home, 507 State street, after an illness of only a few days. She was 94 years of age last September 17. Mrs. Straube's death came after a life of great activity. She was remarkable in that she continued to perform duties about her home up to the time of her last illness. She had not been able to do very much, but she remained housekeeper in her home, or was pleased to regard herself as such, as she would never admit that she had grown too old to be very useful in her home. She was born in Konitz, Schwartzburg, Rudolstadt, Germany. She was married to Herman Straube January 6, 1852 in Sohkoelen, Saxe Weimer, Germany, and lived there until 1870, when the family came to America and directly to Alton. Her husband died in August 1891. She reared six children, all of whom are living. Of these, there are four sons, Herman of Godfrey; Otto and Oswald of Alton; and Albert of North Judson, Ind.,; also two daughters, Miss Tillie Straube and Mrs. Louise Perrin. On Monday, Mrs. Straube was still going about her work in her home and took her usual pride in her household duties. Her death was due to a general break down due to her great age. Mrs. Straube was always very active, was a deeply religious woman, a lover of her home and family and was most hospitable. She was beloved by all who knew her. She was deeply interested in all public events and one of the greatest joys she had was when she was privileged to participate in the election of a President of the United States, casting her first successful vote for President last November when she was 94. During her illness she had the devoted care of her two daughters. She was very much iinterested in the work of the Evangelical church. Besides her children, she leaves 18 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

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STRAUBE, KARL OSWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 19, 1914

Karl Osward Straube died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Straube, three miles northeast of Godfrey, at 9:15 this morning. He was 19 years of age. He leaves beside his parents, five brothers, William, Herman and Frederick of Colorado; Otto and Louis of Godfrey; and five sisters, Mrs. Louise Ulrich, Emma, Julia, Tillie and Frieda of Godfrey; and his grandmother, Mrs. Straube of Alton. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon from the Methodist Church at Bethany. Burial in Bethany cemetery.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1914

The funeral of Karl Straube held yesterday afternoon from the home in Godfrey township to the Bethany church on the Brighton road was attended by a large number of people who assembled from the neighboring country. The little church at Bethany was crowded to its capacity and many stood outside, unable to gain admission. There were 125 farmers' vehicles in line, aside from the livery equipages sent out from Alton. The body was carried from the church to the little cemetery across the road, where interment took place. Rev. F. H. Brown of the Godfrey Congregational church conducted the services. There was a very large number of floral offerings sent by friends and relatives of the young man.

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STRAUBE, UNKNOWN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1922

Mrs. William H. Straube of 429 East Broadway dropped dead at two o'clock this afternoon at 826 East Fifth street. Mrs. Straube was working with her daughter, Mrs. Ruth Nichols, in preparing a new home into which Mr. and Mrs. Nichols expected to move within a few days. At two o'clock Mrs. Straube collapsed and the physician who was called stated that death was caused by a hemorrhage of the brain. Mrs. Straube had not complained of being ill, and the news of her sudden death was a shock to friends as well as to members of her immediate family. She was 40 years of age. She is survived by her husband, one son, William C. Straube, Jr., Miss Irma Straube and Mrs. Ruth Nochils. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

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STREEPER, HARRY C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 5, 1911      Former Constable Kills Self - Unbalanced As Result of Growth on Head

Harry C. Streeper, former constable, and one of the widest known men in Upper Alton, died by his own hand this afternoon, having taken a drink of carbolic acid with suicidal intent. He killed himself at his boarding place about 2 o'clock. He was 52. Streeper had been mentally unbalanced for years as the result of a growth on the back of his head, and his relatives and intimate acquaintances knew this. He had been drinking heavily of late, and this contributed to his suicidal end. He was a son of the late I. H. Streeper of Upper Alton, and a brother of Coroner C. N. Streeper. His wife and even children are dead. He leaves six brothers: R. F.; I. H. Jr.; C. N.; J. E.; R. H.; and W. F. Streeper; and one sister, Mrs. Hattie Henry.

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STREEPER, ISRAEL H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1907

Israel H. Streeper, aged 77, died Saturday afternoon at 4:10 o'clock after being helplessly paralyzed since January 18, 1906. Mr. Streeper's death was long expected and during the week which passed just before, his death was looked for to take place at almost any hour. His vitality was remarkable. During the long months since he was prostrated he had lain in his bed at his home in Upper Alton, where he could look out of the window and see what was going on in the outside world, but he was not able to move out of his bed. He had lived in Upper Alton since 1864. During fifty years he was engaged in the hardware and undertaking business at the same stand now occupied by his son, C. N. Streeper and George Penning. He disposed of his interest in the business three years ago and retired. Mr. Streeper's wife died fifteen years ago. He was the father of eleven children, eight of whom, seven sons and one daughter, survive. The children are R. F.; W. H. C.; L. H.; C. N.; J.E.; R. H.; and W. F Streeper. He was prominently identified in the work of Franklin lodge, F. & M., and the funeral will be under Masonic auspices Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

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STREEPER, PEARL (nee LESSNER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1919            Young Wife, 23, Takes Own Life

Mrs. Pearl Lessner Streeper, wife of Wilbur T. Streeper, shot and killed herself at noon today at the family home on Main street near College avenue. The ball entered her right breast. She died a few minutes later, before a physician could be summoned. Mr. and Mrs. Streeper had been away from home for the past week, attending the sick bed of their aunt, Mrs. Hattie Streeper Henry, living in Jersey County. Their adopted son was left at home, and when the couple returned they found the house badly upset, and this annoyed the wife. Shortly after Streeper went to the rear of the house, and immediately he heard a revolver discharge. Returning to the house he found Mrs. Streeper dying from a wound in her breast and a revolver near by. Mrs. Streeper has been married to Streeper about a year, being before her marriage Miss Pearl Lessner. She was 23 years of age and is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Lessner of Humbert street. She was a niece of Streeper's first wife. She is survived by her husband and adopted son, a lad of sixteen, who was adopted years ago by Streeper and his first wife. She also leaves her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Lessner, two brothers, Andrew and Harry, and one little sister. The suicide caused great comment in Upper Alton, as both the dead woman and her husband are well known. On numerous occasions friends have commented on the devotedness of the couple and how they were always together.

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STREET, JENNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 17, 1907

Mrs. Jennie Street, widow of the late Isaac Street, died at the home of her sister, Mrs. B. F. Day in Otterville, after an illness of about five weeks, December 16, 1907. Funeral services will be held from the home of her nephew, Chester S. Stamps, 1624 Common street, Alton, Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 18, at 1:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. J. W. Webster of Shipman. She leaves to mourn her loss one sister, Mrs. B. F. Day of Otterville, and two brothers, Richard Baker of Alton and Clark F. Baker of Jerseyville. Interment at Upper Alton cemetery.

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STRINGER, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 6, 1909

Mrs. Mary Stringer, aged 84, died at 3:30 o'clock this morning at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Charles Ingham, _14 Main street, from paralysis. Mrs. Stringer had lived in Alton 53 years and almost all of her time in Alton she had resided in a little brick house on Belle street between Sixteenth and Seventeenth streets. She had seen much of the seamy side of life during her stay here, as out of her family of seven children, all but one, Mrs. John Martin of Arkansas City, Kas., died before her. Of late years she was more comfortable as her granddaughter, Mrs. Ingham, gave her a home and gave her also loving attention that would make the old lady's lot a happier one. She was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal church, and the funeral will be from that church tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. During her stay in Alton Mrs. Stringer was known as a hard-working woman. She was good to her children and when death took them she was brave and bore her mental anguish with fortitude. She had many friends who were interested in her welfare. She was the widow of Nevin Stringer, for many years a well known painter here.

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STRITTMATTER, WILLIAM 'WILL'/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1917                Died A Hero's Death .... Sacrificed His Life

William Strittmatter, aged 22, who was drowned Saturday afternoon in the Mississippi River, lost his life in a vain attempt to save that of Eugene Ferris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Amos Ferris. Going to the rescue of the Ferris boy, Strittmatter caught the drowning boy by the hair and started ashore with him, but must have been caught in a death grip by the boy and both sank and were drowned. The double drowning was the tragic close of a delightful outing of a troop of boy scouts, organized by Strittmatter, among the boys of the Evangelical Church at Eighth and Henry streets. He was deeply interested in church work, had recently been chosen Sunday school superintendent, and was also secretary of the Federation of Men's Bible Classes and Brotherhoods in Alton. To interest the boys he had planned to organize the boy scouts troop, and a few days before he was drowned had sent away the necessary papers and the middle of this week expected to have the authorization to constitute the troop. Preliminary to this he had taken nine of the boys out for a hike. Part of the boys had gone in the morning, taking their luncheon, and Strittmatter, their scout master, went up in the afternoon and joined the boys on the river bank. Three little boys had joined the party without being included in it. One of these was Eugene Ferris, who would be 10 years of age tomorrow, a brother of Ray Ferris, one of the boy scouts troop. Efforts to induce the little fellow to go on home were unavailing. Some of the boys begged to go swimming, and Strittmatter reluctantly gave consent and they went in. He was swimming farther out in deep water and the little Ferris boy went into the water too. In a very short time the lad was in too deep water, according to members of the party. Fred Kolkmeier, one of the troop, called to the scout master that the Ferris boy was drowning. Strittmatter swam fast to the sinking boy and caught him, but must have been caught and both went down. The boys reported the drowning and a searching part was made up. Meantime, at home, the parents of Will Strittmatter, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Strittmatter, were all unconscious of the terrible blow that had fallen in the death of their only son. Mrs. Strittmatter was getting supper and the father, recently recovered from a very serious illness, was working in the yard. A neighbor knew of the drowning, having been informed about 4 o'clock by the Telegraph of what had happened, but she, like others, could not believe it was true and did not tell the mother. Finally, the mother was informed that her son would not be home to supper. She immediately was prostrated by the sad news. The Telegraph, possessed the facts of the drowning, and knowing that the paper would be at the Strittmatter home in a short time, omitted to mention the names of the boys, fearing that the parents would get their first tidings in the paper, before neighbors had broken the news to them. Will Strittmatter was for years a faithful employee of the Telegraph, and was one of the very best boys ever employed on the paper. He was regarded as a member of the Telegraph family, and the grief in the Telegraph office over his drowning was keen. The young man was employed by the Beall Bros. at East Alton in a clerical capacity, and was a highly efficient member of the office force of that firm. He was conscientious, of a deeply religious mind, and was a leader in the work of the Evangelical Church, notwithstanding his youthfulness. Not long ago he was drafted for the army, and was very conscientious about it. He refused to consider making any pleas, stating in advance that he had none to make, but the surgeons rejected him because of eye and foot trouble. In the Sunday school, over which he had been chosen as superintendent, he was tireless in his planning. He had planned out the rally day exercises for Sunday. He had also made plans for the work of the school for the year, and it lay very close to his heart. Eugene Ferris, the other victim of the tragedy, was a bright, manly little fellow, very adventurous, and was beloved in the neighborhood where he lived. His mother was not home at the time of the drowning, and was hurried home and the news was broken to her of the death of her son. Deputy Coroner took charge of the two bodies on their being recovered Saturday evening, and held an inquest Sunday afternoon. A verdict of accidental drowning was found in both cases. The funeral of Will Strittmatter will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Evangelical Church. All the members of the Bible Classes and Brotherhoods have been requested to attend the funeral in a body. The funeral of Eugene Ferris will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the family home. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1917

A suggestion has come out of the drowning of William Strittmatter and Eugene Ferris, that the City of Alton commission someone who would be the official lifesaver for the city - someone who could be looked to for instant help and would have the proper equipment to drag for bodies. The boys who were in the party when the two lost their lives made every effort to get someone immediately after their scoutmaster and the boy had been drowned. They asked some fishermen to help, and they refused, declining even to loan a boat, and then the boys turned to others, who declined to go to the rescue of the boys, according to the young boys. Harry Gissal offered to pay the fishermen for any damage to their nets that might result from the nets dragging over the rocky bottom of the river, but they would not help. Finally, Capt. W. D. Fluent was called upon and he hurried to the scene, leaving his own business without a question, and expecting no compensation.....Capt. Fluent, in speaking of the recovery of the bodies, said today that the recovery Saturday evening made the 108th body he had taken from the river in 32 years.....

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STROHBACK or STROHBECK, JOHANNA LOUISE (nee BRUEGGEMAN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 1, 1910

Mrs. Johanna Louise Strohback, (nee Brueggeman) died November 20, at home of her son, August, north of Fosterburg. She was born July 11, 1835, in the village of Salzufer, Lippe Dettmold, Germany. She came to America in 1853 and lived near Brighton till she was married to Geo. H. Strohbeck in 1857. This marriage was blest with 10 children, two of whom died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Strohbeck spent most of the married life on the farm about one miles north of the burg. They were both members of the Fosterburg Presbyterian church until 1890, when they united with the German Methodist church and remained as true and faithful workers to the time of their deaths. Mrs. Strohbeck was an estimable old lady, and was loved and respected by all who knew her. Mrs. Strohbeck is survived by eight children, 24 grandchildren, and 1 great-grandchild, besides numerous other relatives. The children are Messrs. August, Theodore and William Strohbeck, living east of Brighton; George Strohbeck and Mrs. Ida Scheuer living near Fosterburg; Samuel Strohbeck and Mrs. Emma Faust of St. Louis; and Mrs. Lou Lowe of Upper Alton. The funeral of Mrs. Strohbeck was held from the Methodist church last Wednesday morning. Services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. Schmidt, assisted by Rev. Austerman and Rev. Eitelgeorge. The funeral was one of the largest held in Fosterburg for some time. Burial was in the Fosterburg cemetery.

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STRONG, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1902

North Alton News - Mrs. Anna, wife of Richard Strong, died this morning at 1 o'clock after a long illness with consumption. She was 28 years of age and leaves a husband and three children, the eldest 7 years, the youngest 2 years old. She was a daughter of the late Jacob Youngblood, and was one of the executors of his will. She leaves many relatives and friends to mourn her demise and to sympathize with the bereaved husband and motherless little ones. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to Godfrey cemetery. Services will be conducted by Rev. H. M. Chittenden.

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STRONG, BENONA O./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 13, 1907

Benona O. Strong died Tuesday night about 10 o'clock at his home on Walnut street in Upper Alton at the age of 82 years. Mr. Strong has been a resident of Upper Alton for almost forty years. The illness which proved fatal was of short duration. He took a bad cold about two weeks ago which developed into pneumonia, and on account of his advanced years and infirm condition, he was unable to recover from the effects. Mr. Strong was born in Connecticut and spent his younger days in the East. He was married in Cincinnati, Ohio forty nine years ago, and had he lived until next November, he would have celebrated his fiftieth wedding anniversary. He is survived by his widow, and out of a family of five children, one, Mrs. P. G. Hale, survives. In the past years Mr. Strong made a business of driving through the country in this vicinity buying farmers' produce and selling them groceries. During the past six or seven years he has lived a retired life on account of the weakness of old age. The funeral has not been set on account of relatives abroad not being heard from. Mr. Strong will be remembered by many Alton people as a vendor of garden truck. He drove around the streets in a covered wagon, generally sitting in a chair in the wagon. His white hair and long white beard made him a conspicuous object. He had many friends in Alton years ago.

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STRONG, FRANCES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1916

Miss Frances Strong, who has been an invalid for many years, died this morning at 7 o'clock at the old Strong home in the North Side where she lived with some of the members of the family. Miss Strong was taken very ill last Monday with a malady that caused her death. She was a member of an old time North Side family, and she leaves two brothers, Richard Strong and James Strong, and four sisters, Miss Laura Strong, Mrs. Ben Lageman, Mrs. Marshall, Mrs. Henry Lageman. Miss Strong was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Strong, and was born July 1, 1874. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from Trinity chapel on State street. Interment will be in Godfrey Cemetery.

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STROTTMEIER, GERTRUDE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 12, 1923

Miss Gertrude Strottmeier, in her ninety third year, for fifty three years housekeeper for Rev. Joseph Meckel, rector of St. Mary's church, died this morning shortly before three o'clock at the Nazareth home where she was taken last Monday following a breakdown. The death of Miss Strottmeier was due to old age. She would have been 93 years of age in September. Miss Strattmeier had been housekeeper for Rev. Fr. Meckel ever since he was ordained as a priest. She was born in Germany and came to this country at the time of the ordination of Fr. Meckel. Ever since she came here his home had been her home and she had the full charge of the house. In recent years her age had made it impossible for her to have full charge of the care of the home of the priest, but she continued to remain there in the honorary position of housekeeper and it was only when she broke down and it was necessary for her to have more attention than she could be given at Fr. Meckel's home she was removed to the Nazareth Home. Until six weeks ago her health had been good. Miss Strottmeier had a wide acquaintance in St. Mary's parish. She was a highly efficient housekeeper and the loss of his faithful helper is a sad one to the aged rector of St. Mary's. The body will be taken to the chapel of St. Mary's church Saturday and the funeral will be held Monday morning at 10 o'clock in St. Mary's church.

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STRUBEL, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 25, 1906

Mrs. Elizabeth Strubel, aged 69, died this morning after an illness at her home, 737 Market street. Death was due to general debility. She was a native of Germany, but had lived in Alton many years. She leaves four children. The funeral will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. from the home, and burial will be in City Cemetery.

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STRUBEL, FREDERICA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 29, 1915

Mrs. Frederica Strubel, widow of Jacob Strubel, died at noon Friday at her home, 616 East Eighth street, after an illness of a few days. Mrs. Strubel had been slightly ill for several months, but the collapse did not come until a few days before the end came. Mrs. Strubel would have been 79 years of age had she lived until next Monday. She was born in Germany and came to Alton when she was a very young woman. She spent all of her married life here and raised a family of five children, beside losing five children by death. Her husband, a well known resident of Alton, died sixteen years ago. Mrs. Strubel was a member of the German Evangelical Church for many years. After the death of her husband she was left in charge of his estate and she manifested much ability in looking after his property. Mrs. Strubel's children are one daughter, Mrs. M. J. Gill, who is in Washington D. C., and four sons, William, John, Joseph and Richard.

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STRUBEL, JACOB/Source: Alton Telegraph, January 9, 1899

The death of Jacob Strubel occurred Saturday afternoon, after an illness of only four days, in the seventieth year of his age. Last Wednesday he was taken ill and from the first his illness had a fatal turn. He died at four o'clock Saturday at his home on Eighth street, between Liberty and Henry streets. Mr. Strubel was one of the old substantial German citizens. He came to Alton many years ago and here he raised a family, most of whom are now residing in Alton. His children are William Strubel, Mrs. M. J. Gill, John Strubel, Jacob Strubel and Joseph Strubel. The funeral took place at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the family home, and there was a very large attendance, the German Benevolent Society attending in a body. Services were conducted by Rev. William Hackman. The pall bearers were: B. Schlageter, N. Seibold, G. Graner, H. Gissal, William Schmoeller, A. Volper.

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STRUBEL, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 23, 1915     Proprietor of Tobacco Store in Alton Dies From Paralysis

William Strubel, for many years a business man in Alton, and proprietor of a tobacco business on Piasa street, died Tuesday morning in St. Vincent's Hospital in St. Louis from paralysis. Mr. Strubel had been in failing health for a long time, and about two weeks ago he suffered a sudden breakdown. It was decided necessary to take him to a sanitarium in the hope that the change would help him....William Strubel was a native of Alton and had lived in the city all his life. For years he conducted a grocery store on Second street, and in later years had been conducting a tobacco store on Piasa street between Second and Third streets. He comes of a well known Alton family. His mother died about two years ago. He leaves his wife and two sons, Alois and Clarence. He leaves also three brothers, John Strubel, the well known Alton contractor; Jacob of St. Louis; and Joseph of Chicago. He leaves also one sister, Mrs. M. J. Gill of St. Louis. The body of Mr. Strubel will be brought to Alton for burial....Members of the family are in St. louis making preparations to bring him home.

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STRUCK, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1915                    Old Soldier Dies

As he would have wished it, the old soldiers of the city of Alton will bear the body of John Struck to the soldier's burial ground in the city cemetery tomorrow afternoon. The funeral is to be held at two o'clock from the Lock Undertaking parlors. John Struck, an old soldier, aged 80, died at 9 p.m. on Saturday evening at the St. Joseph's hospital from an attack of appoplexy. He was well known in Alton and the vicinity where he has lived for a great many years. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

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STRUCKHOFF, MARY/Source: Troy Star, October 18, 1894

Died, Saturday morning [Oct. 13] at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. F. W. Stienhaus, in her 75th year, Mary Struckhoff. The funeral took place from the above residence, Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock, to the Lutheran church, where the funeral sermon was delivered by Rev. Doruseif. A large number of relatives and friends were present. Mrs. Struckhoff has been a resident of this vicinity for a long number of years, and leaves to mourn a brother, several children and a host of friends.

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STRUIF, ANGELA (nee CONLEN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1923

Mrs. Angela Struif, wife of A. J. Struif, died last night at 10:15 o'clock at St. Joseph Hospital. She underwent an operation on February 12, last, for removal of gallstones, and never regained her strength. She was 55 years old. A contributing cause of Mrs. Struif's death was sorrow over the loss of their oldest son, Gus, who died on September 7, 1920. Her grief was so great over the loss of her son, that Mrs. Struif's health failed. The death of Mrs. Struif is a sad blow to her family. She had been a devoted wife and mother and all her interests centered in the family. She was a woman who went away from her home but little and when she did she always showed a marked preference for being accompanied by the members of her family. She was a devout member of SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral and was regular in her attendance there at church services. In the neighborhood where she lived, she was greatly beloved as a kind and thoughtful neighbor and there has been the deepest of interest in her case and great sorrow among those who had known her well. Those who knew her best say that there was no doubt about it that the death of her son was what caused the breakdown in the health of the devoted mother. Though she had other children left, she mourned her eldest son with a grief that could not be assuaged. It was a break in her family circle that was a fatal blow to the mother. She is survived by her husband, A. J. Struif, four daughters, Miss Angela and Lucille Struit of Alton, Mrs. Oliver L. Parks of Bloomington and Sister Eulalia of Collinsville, two sons, Gene and Frank of Alton. Her family were with her during the serious stage of her illness and when she died. Mrs. Struif was a native of Alton, and spent her entire life here. She was born on December 8, 1867. Her maiden name was Angela Conlen. She was a woman of sterling character whose greatest pride was her home and children. All who met her became her steadfast friends, and her passing causes general sorrow. Funeral services will be Saturday morning at 9 o'clock at SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.

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STUBBLEFIELD, MAY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1910             Wife of Surgeon Dies After Surgical Operation

Mrs. May Stubblefield, wife of Dr. F. A. Stubblefield, a surgeon in the Illinois Hospital for Insane at Jacksonville, died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning from appendicitis. She was visiting her two sons, E. M. and M. L. Stubblefield, two young men who are farmers near Miles Station, and she was brought to Alton to be operated on for appendicitis, after being taken suddenly ill. She was operated on a week ago, but did not have the strength to survive the shock. Mrs. Stubblefield was 52 years of age, and belonged to the Montgomery family. Her father was a brother of Z. B. Job. She was born and raised in the vicinity of Miles Station, where the Montgomery family was prominent. She will be buried there Saturday noon from the church at Miles Station. The husband and two sons will remain here until Saturday, and will accompany the body to Miles Station. Dr. Stubblefield is a well known doctor, and has long been connected with the Insane Asylum at Jacksonville, where he has over 400 patients under his care.

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STUCKENBERG, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1906            Bartender Shot and Killed by Drunken Ex-Convict

Crazed with drink, Christopher Davis, an old soldier, shot and killed Charles Stuckenberg yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock in Fred Immenga's saloon, where Stuckenberg was employed as bartender. Davis entered the saloon under the influence of liquor. It is reported that he was enraged because he had been requested not to patronize the place by Mr. Immenga, and drawing a revolver as he entered he began firing. The revolver was a six shooter, and he discharged five shots in the saloon. Two of them struck Stuckenberg, one in the breast and one in the mouth. Stuckenberg's mouth was open when the bullet that struck his mouth was fired, and there was no wound on the outside to indicate where the ball entered. There were in the saloon at the time many men, and all of them say that not a word had been addressed to Davis and that the shooting was without any provocation. Stuckenberg was at work behind the bar when Davis began the shooting. Immenga, who had just entered the saloon and is believed to have been the object of Davis' aim, dropped down behind the bar and escaped unhurt. Stuckenberg was evidently hit before he knew what the drink-crazed man was about to do. He fell to the floor immediately and lived only a short time after he was carried up to Dr. Porter's office in the next building. Immediately after doing the shooting, Davis rushed out of the saloon, and putting the revolver to his own head he tried to shoot himself but missed, and the ball entered the cigar store of Gerhardt & Grossheim. Office Pack was nearby and overpowered Davis and took his revolver away from him. Davis' only coherent remark after the killing was that he was sorry there was not another bullet in the revolver for himself. Mayor Beall requested Sheriff Crowe to remove Davis from the city jail to the county jail at Edwardsville, and within an hour after the killing he was on the way to the county jail. Davis is the man who shot Benjamin Allen of the night police five years ago and was convicted and served a penitentiary term for it. His time expired about one year ago. He did the shooting of Ben Allen without any provocation, as Allen had said nothing to him. Davis was regarded as being a very violent man when intoxicated. The body of Stuckenberg was taken to his home on Alby street between Fifth and Sixth streets, after the sad news had been broken to his young wife. He leaves beside his wife, who only recently came to Alton, a young baby. The victim himself was only 26 years of age and was regarded as a very estimable young man. Sheriff Crowe, who took the murderer to the county jail, says that Davis showed not the least remorse. He was not so drunk as he pretended he was, and immediately after getting out of the city talked as intelligently as anyone. He declared that "they had brought it on themselves," and he asked if the man was dead. Davis did the shooting with a new cheap revolver, which he had just bought, and there is no doubt he bought the weapon for the purpose of killing Mr. Immenga because Immenga had ordered him to stay out of the saloon. Stuckenberg lived in St. Louis before coming to Alton, and the body will be sent there for burial. The coroner's inquest will be held Monday evening. The body will be sent to St. Louis Monday morning.

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STUTZ, CARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 11, 1918             Killed in Auto Accident

Carl Stutz, 21, is dead, Charles Van Dusen of 126 Missouri Avenue, Wood River is in a critical condition, and William Carpenter of the Sering Place Avenue was injured as the result of the auto truck in which they were riding colliding with a Broadway car at Spring and Broadway Tuesday night. The accident occurred at 11 o'clock. The four young men were riding in the Mutz & Klein of Wood River truck. The truck was being driven by Harry Doerr, an employee of the company. The young men just out for a ride. They were gong west on Broadway at the time of the accident. The street car was traveling east. One witness of the accident says that it happened because another machine was trying to get out of the way of the street car at the time. The other machine was also coming east on Broadway. Doerr tried to give this machine room, and in doing so his car sideswiped the street car. Both were going at a good rate of speed at the time. Stutz was riding on the running board of the car and that is one of the reasons he was so badly injured. With the exception of Doerr, all were taken to the St. Joseph's Hospital. Rawling and Carpenter were able to be removed to their homes after their injuries had been attended to. Stutz suffered from an injury to the hip and the head. He died at 1 o'clock this morning. Van Dozen [sic] has been badly injured and his condition is considered serious by the attendants at the hospital. Stutz is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stutz of 1010 Washington avenue. He was but recently twenty-one years of age and was preparing to leave Alton for the army during the month of October. He was a large stout boy, a fellow well met, who had a large number of friends, especially in the eastern part of the city. Stutz has one brother, John, who is now serving with the American army in France. R. G. Carpenter was motorman of the car, and J. Fink was the conductor. They stated in their report to the company that the auto truck ran into them. A light mist that was falling at the time of the accident might have made it more difficult for the man in charge of the auto to handle it. The disappearance of Harry Doerr caused an unusual amount of confusion this morning at the Mutz & Klein store this morning when the time came for opening the store. Doerr had the key to the store and it finally became necessary for the young lady clerks to climb into one of the windows to open up the store. It was stated at the store this morning that employees of the Mutz & Klein store were allowed the use of the auto truck in the evenings, and according to the statement Doerr would not have been doing anything wrong in having possession of the automobile, had he driven it with the proper precaution. Mr. and Mrs. F. V. Mutz are in Detroit, Mich., on a week's vacation, and Miss Norma Mutz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mutz, is in charge of the store during the absence of her parents. The machine of Mutz & Klein was taken without the permission of the owners. At 8 o'clock last evening they believed it had been stolen and called on Constable H. A. Hoffman. Hoffman reported this morning that he had searched all around Wood River for the car, but could find nothing of it. He heard it was in Alton, and by the time he arrived back in Alton he learned of the accident. Constable Hoffman said this morning that he had been unable to locate Doerr.

 

Source: September 13, 1918

A verdict of accidental death was returned by the coroner's jury in the case of Carl Stutz. Stutz was killed Tuesday evening when the auto truck in which he was riding collided with a street car. The funeral of Carl Stutz was held this afternoon from the home at 1010 Washington street. Interment was in the City cemetery. A large number of relatives and friends of the young man attended the services.

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STUTZ, CHRISTINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 1, 1922

The funeral of Mrs. Christina Stutz, wife of Charles Stutz, took place this afternoon, services being held in the Evangelical church at Eighth and Henry street, Rev. O. W. Heggemeier officiating. The church was well filled with friends and neighbors of Mrs. Stutz when the services began at 1:00 o'clock. The body was entombed in the Grandview mausoleum.

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STUTZ, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 2, 1904         Old Alton Citizen Dies from Pneumonia, Aged 78

John Stutz, a prominent old resident of the east end of the city and the owner of large holdings of real estate, died Friday morning at 6 o'clock after a brief illness with pneumonia. He was taken ill the day after Thanksgiving day from the effects of exposure while working about his place. Mr. Stutz came to Alton from St. Louis about fifty years ago. He acquired considerable property on east Second street, and was considered one of the most substantial residents of that part of the city. He was engaged on the police force for a number of years. He was 78 years of age. Mr. Stutz leaves six children: Mrs. Joseph Hermann, Lenhardt Stutz, Lisetta Stutz, Charles and John Stutz, and Mrs. Anna MOran. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, Rev. Theodore Oberhellman officiating.

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STUTZ, JOHN JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 31, 1923                       Alton Man Suicides by Shooting Himself

John Stutz, a life long resident of the east end of Alton, aged 52, shot and instantly killed himself this morning at his home, 1612 East Broadway. The bullet he fired into his forehead pierced his head and came out behind. According to neighbors, Stutz had been worrying over the loss of one forefinger. He had suffered blood poisoning in the finger and the surgeons had amputated it to prevent the spread of the poison in his body. Apparently he was all right physically, but the loss of his finger seemed to cause him unceasing worry and neighbors attributed his suicide to mental derangement indicated by the worry over the loss of the finger. This morning Stutz went to his bathroom about 8 o'clock and there he shot himself. His wife was in the house at the time, and hearing the shot, ran to investigate and found her husband dead. The body was turned over to Undertaker Bauer. At the undertaking shop it was found the bullet had pierced clear through the head. Stutz was the owner of considerable real estate in the eastern part of the city. He was a member of an old and well known family there. He was a quiet man, and apparently little given to worries such as would have resulted in the suicide. He leaves his wife and two children, also a brother and three sisters. The children's names are Anna and Louise. One of the sisters, Mrs. Anna Moran, lives in East St. Louis. The other two, Mrs. Sophie Herman and Miss Lizzetta Stutz, live in Alton. The brother's name is Charles Stutz. Stutz's finger had been cut some time ago by a piece of broken glass, while he was working in a sewer. Neighbors say that while he was inclined to worry about the finger, he had acted naturally. The tragedy was a shock to all who knew him, they said. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from Bauer's undertaking parlors. Burial will be in the City Cemetery.

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STUTZ, LIZETTA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 7, 1916

Mrs. Lizetta Stutz, widow of Leonhard Stutz, died just before noon Monday at her residence, 1852 East Broadway, from the effects of injuries she sustained a month ago in a fall in her home. She stumbled and fell in front of a stove in her house, and it was found that she had sustained a fracture of her hip joint. She was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital and there she remained until a week ago, when she insisted on going back home. Mrs. Stutz was 86 years of age. She had no children. She owned considerable real estate, but had disposed of most of it in recent years. She lived many years in the double brick house on East Broadway between Washington and Shields streets, and was one of the oldest residents of the eastern part of the city. The death of Mrs. Stutz removes one of the original members of the German Evangelical Church at Eighth and Henry streets, and also one of the original members of the Ladies' Society of that church, organized over fifty years ago. She is the last of her family, the only relatives she leaves being nephews and nieces.

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STUTZ, PHILIP/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 16, 1907         Death of Aged Fosterburg Pioneer

Philip Stutz, aged 82, died Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock from old age at his home in Fosterburg township. He was a pioneer of the county, having lived in Fosterburg over 56 years. He was married in St. Louis, and his wife, whom he married 56 years ago, survives him. He leaves six grandchildren, two of them, Henry Stutz and Mrs. Henry Chadwick, being residents of Alton. He was a member of the Baptist church, which he helped to build. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 10 o'clock from the Fosterburg Baptist church. Mr. Stutz was a native of Germany, but came to America when a young man. He lived in Alton for a while and followed the cooper's trade.

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SUCCO, JOE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1915

In a saloon and dance hall conducted by Sam Zameroni at Collinsville, a shooting affray was started Sunday night, and after it was over Joe Succo, a member of the orchestra, was found dead, and Joseph Prisi is dying from a wound in his bowels. No one would admit knowing what happened or who did the shooting. All the Italians in the place are keeping silent. Coroner Sims will attempt to sift the mystery as to how Succo met his death.

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SUDBROCK, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 7, 1903

John Sudbrock, aged 33, died Sunday morning at St. Joseph's hospital after a short illness. He was a son of Henry Sudbrock, who is ill at the hospital also. Sudbrock was a young glassblower. The funeral was held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of Mr. Will Brandewiede.

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SUDBROCK, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1904

John Sudbrock, an aged resident of Alton, died suddenly at Edwardsville, yesterday, without any apparent illness previously. Mr. Sudbrock had not been well mentally for some time. While eating dinner yesterday he fell over dead. He was over 70 years of age and had been a resident of Alton more than 80 years. He leaves his wife and two children, Henry Sudbrock of Delhi, and Mrs. Will Brandewiede of Alton. The body will be brought to Alton and the funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of Will Brandewiede.

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SUDBROCK, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 5, 1913

Mrs. Minnie Sudbrock, aged 78 years, residing at 1312 Garden street, was found dead on the floor of one of the rooms of her home shortly before noon this morning. Neighbors noticed Mrs. Sudbrock did not come out and they went to investigate. She lay on the floor, where she had fallen from a chair. Apoplexy is given as the cause of her death. Mrs. Sudbrock leaves one son, Henry, and a daughter, Mrs. William Brandeweide. Deputy Coroner John Berner took charge of the remains. Mrs. Sudbrock had been living alone at her home for fifteen years. She was the widow of Henry Sudbrock. She had lived in Alton over fifty years, and was well known. She had been in fairly good health and the sudden death of the aged woman was a sad shock to her son and her daughter. From the appearance of the body it is believed she had been dead at least twelve hours when found. It was supposed she had risen in the night and had fallen over. The inquest will be held tomorrow afternoon.

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SUE, PANG/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 12, 1903          Chinese Laundryman Succumbs to Malarial Fever

Pang Sue, the well known Chinese laundryman, succumbed to a brief illness from malarial fever Tuesday afternoon at 5:30 o'clock in St. Joseph's hospital. The funeral will be held Sunday and arrangements for it are being made by his only relative in this country, Tong Hong. Pang Sue was no longer a believer in the doctrines of his native land. He embraced the Christian religion in Cincinnati, before he came to Alton, and was baptized in the Second Presbyterian church of Cincinnati. He had been a resident of Alton thirteen years, and in that time had accumulated large wealth for one of his nationality. He was implicitly trusted by those who knew him and was one of the hardest working persons in Alton. Besides his nephew, Tong Hong, Pang Sue leaves a wife and a son in China. It is not known how many daughters he leaves, as Chinese do not count their daughters in enumerating the members of their families. He was 46 years of age. A few days ago Pang Sue's illness took a serious turn and it was urged by the attending physician that he be taken to the hospital. Pang at last consented after many objections, and he did not long survive the change.  [Burial was in St. Louis]

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SUESSEN, MAMIE (nee WIESE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 12, 1906/Submitted by Marsha Ensminger
Mrs. Mamie Suessen died Saturday at her home in Liberty Prairie, between Bethalto and Edwardsville, under circumstances which caused more sorrow than usual over such a bereavement among her neighbors and acquaintances. Seven weeks ago, on April 19, Mrs. Suessen, then Miss Mamie Wiese, was married to George Suessen, a young farmer. Their marriage was made the occasion of an extensive celebration in the community. Two weeks ago, while crossing to the house from a pasture at their place, she essayed to climb a [illegible]-and-rider fence instead of going around to the gate. She slipped and fell, one of the timbers striking her in the side. Blood poison developed on Sunday of last week and she lived but six days. The funeral was held this afternoon at 1 o'clock. Mrs. Suessen was 19 years old.

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SUHRE, HENRY/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, May 24, 1916

The funeral services for Henry Suhre, aged 41 years, whose body was found in Leclaire lake yesterday afternoon, after he had been missing from his home for three days, was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence of Rudolph Bloemker in Leclaire. Services were conducted by Rev. H. Rahn, pastor of the Eden Evangelical Church. The body will be shipped at 7 o'clock tomorrow morning to Alhambra, where services will again be held at the home of F. W. Sanders, a brother-in-law. Burial will be at Alhambra. Coroner J. Morgan Sims of Collinsville conducted an inquest last evening at the Marks, Weber & Company Undertaking establishment. The jury returned a verdict that death came by accidental drowning.

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SUHRE, JOHANNA HENDRICKS SCHEIBE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 7, 1919

Word has been received of the death in New Orleans of Mrs. Johanna Hendrincks Scheibe Suhre, 71 years old, a former resident. She has two sisters and a brother living in East Alton: Mrs. Fred Penning, Mrs. Henry Eckhard, and Henry Hendricks.

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SULLIVAN, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 23, 1907        

Mrs. Margaret Sullivan, widow of the late P. O. Sullivan, died this morning at 3 o'clock at St. Joseph's hospital where she was taken yesterday morning from her home, 222 west Seventh street, at her request. Her death was caused by the heat combined with old age infirmities. She is survived by one son, David Sullivan of Chicago. The children of J. C. Meehan by his first marriage are grandchildren of deceased, and one of them, Thomas, has lived with his grandmother for years. The body was taken to the home this afternoon and the funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. P. O. Sullivan and wife were among the early day settlers in Alton and were well known to old settlers. The husband did his part towards developing the city and was a man whose memory is cherished by those who knew him.

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SUMMERS, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1916                Head-On Collision of Freight Trains Kills Fireman

Harry Summers, fireman, was killed, and Laurence Hornback, engineer and H. A. Rule, conductor of freight train number 120 of the C. and A. railroad, were injured Tuesday morning in a head-on collision of two freight trains on the C. and A. in the rear of the Western Military Academy. A mistake in the giving of orders was the cause of the wreck. The two freight engines each pulling trains of cars came together shortly after eight o'clock in the morning. The crash could be heard a long distance. Train number 89, in charge of Conductor Abbott, and Engineer Gordon Childers carrying in all 50 cars, was running from Godfrey on the downgrade. According to the story told by Childers of Bloomington, he heard the train approaching from the south, and whistled in an attempt to attract the attention of the crew of train 120, which was coming from the south, carrying Conductor H. A. Rule of Bloomington, Engineer Laurence Hornsback of Roodhouse, and Fireman Harry Summers of Roodhouse. People who witnessed the collision said that the crew of train 89 from the north left the train and went over into the field before the smaller local freight train carrying but three cars crashed into the big train. Both of the conductors claimed they had a right of way to the track and each carried a staff which gave him the right of way. At Godfrey, when it was discovered that a mistake had been made and there were trains on the same track headed toward each other, an effort was made to avert the accident. Mrs. S. P. Winters, wife of the section boss, was called on the telephone at her home in Upper Alton and told to flag the train from the south. She grabbed a red hat and started out to flag the train, but the train had rushed past carrying the fireman to his death.....The cab of the smaller engine was telescoped into the tender and was reduced as a pile of junk. This was the cause of the death of Summers. At the time he was firing the engine, and he was caught under the debris between the engine and the tender. Five tons of coal fell upon him, and it is believed that he was killed at once. If he was not, he met a more horrible death because the hot steam from the broken steam pipes thoroughly cooked the body. Hornsback crawled from out of the wreck only slightly injured.....By this time to relief corps of the Western Military Academy near by had arrived on the scene. With axes they attempted to chop away the debris and free the fireman who was caught and who, they believed, might still be alive. Their efforts met with little success, however, and a short time later an engine from Alton came over the cutoff and pulled the engine and the tender apart. The body of the fireman was taken out. The dead body was loaded in the city ambulance and was taken to the hospital with Engineer Hornsback. Summers is 37 years of age. He has been divorced from his wife in Roodhouse, but he leaves two children there. At least a hundred people were badly burned by the car of crude sulphuric acid which sprung a leak shortly after the wreck. This flowed down into the field near the wreck and the spectators who were in a hurry to see the wreck hurried through this thinking it was water. Clothing and shoes were ruined, and several children and others had their feet badly injured. A number of the doctors who had been called to the wreck to take care of the injured were called upon to care for those who were burned. In one instance Dr. Lemen had his shoes burned and his stocking burned off his feet by the acid. The bandages he had carried to the scenes of the wreck expecting to use them on the injured were used upon himself and some of the other sufferers.....

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SUMNER, CHARLES JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 24, 1917

Word was received here today of the death of Charles Sumner Jr., aged 20 years, a resident of Alton, in Ohio. Sumner's death was caused from pneumonia, with which he had been ill for several weeks. Charles Sumner was out in Ohio for the buying of horses for the English army when he became ill. The father was obliged to return without bringing his son home. He left with another son, James Sumner, today for Ohio to make arrangements for the burial and have the body brought to Alton.

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SUNDERLAND, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 30, 1917

Robert Sunderland, aged 53, well known saloon proprietor in Alton, died Monday evening at 7:20 o'clock at his home after an illness of two weeks with pneumonia. He had been in a desperate condition the last four or five days of his life, and all hope for his recovery was given up the last of last week. Mr. Sunderland leaves his wife, his mother, and four brothers, Frank, George, William and John Sunderland.

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SUTTER, BARBARA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 7, 1918

The funeral of Miss Barbara Sutter will be held Thursday at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church. Interment will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SUTTER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 19, 1907                  Alton Business Man Dies

John Sutter, one of Alton's oldest and best known business men, died at 7 o'clock Tuesday morning at his residence, 427 east Fourth street. He had been in feeble health for a week, and his condition had become such that he was considering going to the hospital for treatment, but was unable to go after he had decided to do so. He was feeling better this morning and had gone out into the yard at his home, before 6 o'clock. Feeling weak, he returned to the house and collapsed on the back porch. He was taken into the house and expired there a few minutes later. The death of Mr. Sutter was a great surprise. Although not actively engaged in the management of the business with which he was connected, he remained at the head of the Sutter-Dreisoerner Co. on Third street, and was about his place of business frequently. Advancing years had caused him to retire from immediate charge of the business, and he had turned it over to his son, John Sutter Jr., in connection with the other members of the company. During his long career as a business man in Alton, he had merited and received the universal respect of those who had business dealings with him, and he was regarded as one of Alton's most reliable and upright citizens. He had lived in the city over fifty years. He came here as a poor young man, and by thrift and economy he had built up a good business. His wife died nine years ago leaving Mr. Sutter with but one surviving member of his family, his son. Heart trouble had been causing him to stay at home for about a week, and owing to his age it was feared that he had little chance of recovery. John Sutter was born at Solothwin, Switzerland, April 26, 1829. He came to America when a young man, and to Alton in 1855. He was married here in 1858, his wife dying in 1898. He was a carpenter by trade, but in the course of a business transaction he got possession of an undertaking business in 1863. He engaged in the furniture business in 1866, and for four years he was in partnership with John Bauer, who survives him. In 1870 he sold out his furniture business, and engaged in the manufacture of furniture for a few years, but he resumed the retail furniture business later. He leaves beside his son, only one sister, who is a resident of the old home in Switzerland and is older than her brother. Mr. Sutter was a member of the Masonic fraternity for many years, and he held membership in Piasa lodge of Alton. The funeral will, by his request, be conducted under the auspices of the order. The funeral services at the home will be conducted Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock, Rev. Ernest Mueller of the German Evangelical church officiating. At the cemetery the Masonic burial service will be given.

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SUTTERER, THERESA M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1902

Mrs. Theresa M. Sutterer, wife of Anton Sutterer, died Sunday morning at the family home, 1205 East Sixth street, after a long illness from abdominal cancer, aged 43. She was married twice, her name by her former marriage being Klopfer. She was born and married the first time in Germany. Her first marriage was at the age of 17, and she was mother of fourteen children, six of whom are living. She was well known in the East End and had many friends. The funeral will be Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church. Interment will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

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SUTTON, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 23, 1914

Mrs. Anna Sutton, wife of George Sutton, died this morning at her home in Moro after an illness of a year. A year ago she fell and broke her hip, and since has been an invalid. She was 73 years of age and has resided in Madison county most of her life. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon, when the remains will be taken to Ridgely for burial. Services will be held in the Christian church there, and Rev. Mr. Grouer will officiate.

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SUTTON, NELLIE WOODVILLE (nee LOWE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 15, 1903

Saturday morning at 11:30 o'clock occurred the death of Mrs. Nellie Woodville Sutton, nee Lowe, at the home of her brother, W. W. Lowe, after a lingering illness. She was brought here from her home in Winchester, Ill., a few months ago, with the hope that the change might cause a rally in her condition, and she improved for the time, but death has won. She was born November 9th, 1860, daughter of Sylvester W. and Sarah A. Lowe, and spent most of her life in Upper Alton where many know her and affectionately remember her. She leaves a husband, A. H. Sutton, and two little girls; also two brothers, John H. and W. W. Lowe, both of Upper Alton. She was a woman of gentle, kindly spirit, and the break in the family circle is an exceptionally sad one. The funeral will be held Monday at 2 p.m. from the home of her brother, W. W. Lowe, in Upper Alton.

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SWAIN, EVAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 16, 1908                         Old Civil War Soldier Dies

Evan Swain, one of the old residents of Upper Alton, died Tuesday morning at his home on Annex avenue at 5 o'clock, aged 76 years. Mr. Swain had been ill for the past two months. His illness commenced with a general breaking down the latter part of the winter, and his relatives became worried about his condition, but he improved and became better but never regained his former strength. The last few days his condition had been very low and his relatives expected the end to come at almost any time. Mr. Swain was born in the southern part of Illinois and had made his home in his native state almost all his life. He was a veteran of the Civil War and came to Upper Alton with his family about twenty years ago when his son, Prof. R. D. Swain, became a member of the faculty of Shurtleff College. He is survived by his wife and seven children, Prof. R. D. Swain of Clinton, Ky., Herd Swain of California, and Whetsel, Charles K., Mrs. U. P. Johnson, Mrs. A. Neff and Mrs. D. G. Ray of Upper Alton. The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon from the family home.

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SWAIN, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 23, 1914

The man who died at St. Joseph's hospital, without ever having been able to tell his name, and with no means of ascertaining his identify, was identified Saturday by a co-laborer who had worked with him on a farm. The two men had come to celebrate the birthday of the man who died. They had tarried in Alton celebrating the birthday as they felt was the most befitting, and finally they became separated. The man who survived left town and went to the farm where he worked, but the other stayed. He evidently tried to walk home, fell in the streets from a cerebral hemmorrhage, and he never regained his senses. An autopsy was performed on him, and it was learned that he died from apoplexy. He was buried in the City cemetery, with a record made of his proper name. It was thought he would have to be buried as unknown, but his friend saved him from that kind of a burial. The name of the man proved to be William Swain, and he was in his fifty-fourth year. He is said to have relatives in southern Illinois.

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SWAN, AL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1916         Killed at Oil Works

Al Swan, aged 39, who had charge of an electric hoist in the boiler room at the plant of the Standard Oil Co., was killed this afternoon, presumably by a fall, when he was released from an electric contact which had gripped him. Swan was running a clam shell machine which was used for moving coal. Overhead was the electric mechanism, and Swan went aloft after finishing his work, to oil up. It was understood, it is said, that the electric power was to be shut off before anyone went aloft to work with it, but Swan evidently overlooked that part of the precautions enjoined for safety of the men. The electric current was only a 200 volt current and not strong enough to kill the man. When he became fast on the contact he shouted for fellow workmen to throw the switch and release him. When this was done, Swan toppled over, falling headlong to the ground and struck on his head. The accident happened during the afternoon. It was said that it was supposed Swan broke his neck by his fall. He leaves his wife and four children, who live at Wood River.

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SWANSON, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 29, 1915         Fatal Accident at Insane Hospital Kills Man

Clarence Swanson, who lives on the Fosterburg Road, was crushed to death at 2:10 o'clock this afternoon at the Alton hospital site. He was a member of a gang of men employed by Charles Brandt, who had bought an old barn on the Kirkpatrick farm and was having it torn down to be removed elsewhere. The barn was all down except the frame work, which was heavy, and had been up many years. Just as work of removing the frame work was started, the whole structure swayed and fell. Swanson was the only man caught. A heavy timber of the frame fell across the head and chest, killing Swanson instantly. He was said to be about __ [25?] years of age, and to have a wife.

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SWANSON, LAWRENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 18, 1923                     Farmer Dies Soon After Heart Stroke

Lawrence Swanson, a well known colored man, running a farm near Wood Station, died suddenly yesterday at St. Joseph's Hospital, ten minutes after being taken there. Swanson came to town with a wagon load of wheat. With him were his wife and a hired man, Ed Woods. Swanson had been suffering for two years from heart trouble. While coming to town he had another attack and at Broadway and Oak streets in Alton he felt so much worse he got off the load of wheat and help was called. He was taken to the hospital and lived but a short time. Swanson leaves his wife and two children. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Swanson and beside his parents he leaves four sisters and five brothers. The funeral will be Monday at 2 p.m. from the Salem Baptist Church.

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