Madison County ILGenWeb                                        


 

Births      Black History      Cemeteries      Census      Churches      Civil War Prison      County History      Deaths      Links      Marriages

Military      Miscellaneous      Newspaper Clips      Obituaries      Paranormal      Photo Album      Piasa Bird      Schools      Site Map

Surnames      Wann Disaster      Wood River Massacre

Home Page

 

Obituaries - Surname C

In order to comply with copyright laws, please submit only obituaries published before 1923.

 

NOTE:  All obituaries are copyrighted and may not be copied and posted elsewhere without permission!!!

 

Those names in bold, red lettering were well-known, a soldier, or of importance in Madison County.

 

A     B     C     D     E     F     G     H     I -J     K     L     M     N     O     P     Q-R     S     T     U-V     W     X-Z

 

SURNAME C

CABLE, BEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 5, 1902

Ben Cable, aged 22, died yesterday afternoon at the home of his stepfather, David Edwards, after an illness from typhoid fever. The body will be buried tomorrow.

**********************************

 

CABRILLIAC, JULIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1902

Mrs. Julia Cabrillac, widow of Bernard Cabrillac, died Wednesday morning after a brief illness at her home, 1502 State street. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Mrs. Cabrillac was about 82 years of age, and 60 or more years of her life were spent in Alton. She was wealthy and charitable in an unostentatious way. She leaves a daughter, Miss Mary, and three sons, Anthony B., George and Theodore, all of Alton. Mrs. Cabrillac was a native of Belgium but came to Alton when she was very young and was married here. She had made her home at 1512 State street over forty years, and was one of the oldest residents here. She had been troubled with heart failure the last two months, but was in apparently good health Tuesday. She was taken ill shortly after midnight and died within eight hours thereafter.

*************************************

 

CABRILLIAC, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 19, 1915

Miss Mary Cabrilliac, aged 74, a resident of Alton, died Tuesday night at 11 o'clock at her home, 1502 State street, after an illness of about 18 hours from a complication of diseases. She had not been feeling well for some time, but her case was not regarded as serious until Tuesday morning when she was taken with a very bad attack of the malady from which she had been suffering, and Tuesday night she succumbed to a second attack. Miss Cabrilliac was a native of Alton and lived here all of her life. She lived with her three brothers, Theodore, Anthony B., and George Cabrilliac. She was a quiet, home loving woman, and her principal devotion was to her home and her church. Her father, Bernard Cabrilliac, died sixty-one years ago in Alton, and her mother died here about thirteen years ago. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

***************************************

 

CABRILLIAC, THEODORE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1919

Theodore Cabrilliac, member of a well known and wealthy Alton family, died Saturday morning in St. Joseph's hospital, where he was taken four days before suffering from an acute trouble in the lungs. Mr. Cabrilliac had been in failing health for several months, but was not regarded as being in a serious condition until early this week, when it was decided to move him to the hospital for treatment. He was born in Alton and was in his seventy-fourth year. He had been out of the city but few times in his life, spending practically all of his time in the city of his nativity and by far the greater part of his time on his own place, the Cabrilliac homestead on State street, which he shared with the other members of his family. The only near relatives which Mr. Cabrilliac has are two brothers, George and Benoist. Their father was born in France and their mother in Belgium. "Tay," as he was generally known, was a man of extremely modest tastes. Though very wealthy he lived the life of one of very modest means. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 a.m. from the SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

******************************************

 

CAHILL, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 28, 1903

The funeral of James Cahill took place Wednesday morning from the home of his sister, Mrs. John Meehan, to the Cathedral, where a high mass of requiem was said. The church was well filled with mourners and the funeral cortege to Greenwood cemetery was a very long one. The pallbearers were John Riordar, James Rockets, Tim Guiney, John Malone, John Crowley, Charles Kelly of St. Louis.

*****************************************

 

CAHILL, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 1, 1910

James Cahill, an old resident of Alton, died Thursday morning at 6 o'clock at his home, 1121 Main street, after a few days' illness with pneumonia. Mr. Cahill had been in business in Alton for many years, part of the time in the grocery business. For a number of years he has been bookkeeper for the Noonan Coal Company. Mr. Cahill's wife and five children, four sons and one daughter, survive him. His sons are D. J.; John; David; and James, the latter is in London representing the Kallestone Company. The daughter is Miss Mamie. One sister, Mrs. D. Noonan, also survives. Mr. Cahill was quite well on in years. Mr. Cahill remained at his work until a short time ago, refusing to give up. The funeral will take place on Saturday morning from the Cathedral.

*******************************************

 

CAHILL, KATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 18, 1902

Katherine Cahill, wife of Joseph Cahill, died this morning at the family home on Vine street after an illness with pneumonia. She leaves beside her husband, four children. The body will be taken to Hamilton, Ontario, and the funeral party will leave tomorrow for Hamilton via the Knickerbocker. Mr. Cahill is a well known glassblower. Mrs. Cahill was 42 years old.

******************************************

 

CAHOOE, MICHAEL THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 31, 1917

Michael Thomas Cahooe died this afternoon at his mother's home after a long illness with complications of diseases. He worked at the strawboard factory until two years ago, when he became ill, and since that time he was operated upon twice, one in May of 1916 and in February of this year. He was born in Fosterburg twenty-one years ago. He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Sarah J. Cahooe, one brother, Irby J., and six sisters: Mrs. Al Tuckett; Mrs. Carl Christy; Mrs. Frank Hickey; Mrs. Frank Johnston; the Misses Mecca and Hattie. The funeral will be held on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. Burial will be in the Short Cemetery near Bethalto.

******************************************

 

CAIRNS, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1920

James Cairns, agede 65, was instantly killed this morning by the Chicago & Alton palace train due here at 5:40 a.m. Cairns, a sweeper at the Glass Works, was on his way to work and was crossing the track at the Plum street gate when the train hit him. His body was crushed and mangled by the impact of the locomotive. Mr. Cairns was in the employ of the glass company about two years. He went to work at 6 o'clock every morning. He had his home with his wife at 314 Danforth street. Mr. Cairns leaves his wife, four sons and three daughters, all of them of mature age. The three daughters, Mrs. Lizzie Bauer, Mrs. Nellie Hauter and Mrs. Harold Laux all live at Brighton. One son, Charles Cairns, lives at Wood River. The three other sons are William, Edward and Donald. He leaves several brothers and sisters also. He had lived in Alton about four years and part of that time was employed by the Springman Lumber Co., two years ago he went to work for the Illinois Glass Company. Besides his wife, sons and daughters, Cairns is survived by three brothers, Charles and Edward of Alton, and Alexander of Alton; and by two sisters, Mrs. Agnes Lyes of Chesterfield and Mrs. Elizabeth Spencer of Decatur. The three sons reside out of the city, William in St. Mary's, Mo., Edward of Antral, Wash., and Donald of Carlinville. Funeral arrangements are incomplete, awaiting word from the son residing in Washington.

*********************************************

 

CALAME, DORIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 19, 1903

Doris, the 2 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Calame of North Alton, died Sunday morning after a brief illness with diphtheria. An effort was made to save the child's life by inserting a tube in her throat, but the attempt proved a failure. The funeral was held this morning at 10 o'clock in private, and services were conducted by Rev. M. H. Ewers of the First Methodist church.

*********************************************

 

CALAME, FRANK (REVEREND)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 2, 1911

The body of Rev. Frank Calame arrived from Oklahoma this noon and was taken to the home of his father, Z. H. Calame, near Melville. Mr. Calame's body was accompanied by the widow and five children, and by a brother of Mrs. Calame, Louis Calame, who went south to bring the body back. The funeral will be tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of Z. H. Calame.  Rev. Mr. Calame had been in the south seven years, and he was a Methodist clergyman. The funeral services will be conducted by Rev. W. T. Cline of the First Methodist church. [burial was in Melville Cemetery.]

*********************************************

 

CALAME, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 17, 1901

Henry Calame, an aged resident of North Alton, died last night at 8:30 o'clock after an illness of ten days. He was a member of a well known family, and had lived in the vicinity many years. He was 72 years of age and leaves four sons, two daughters, and a widow to mourn his death. The funeral will be Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock and burial will be in the City Cemetery.

*******************************************

 

CALAME, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 12, 1911      Boy Drowns at "Gee Whiz" Club Camping Site near Elsah

Louis Calame, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Calame of Alton, was drowned this afternoon about 1:30 o'clock in the river at the Gee Whiz club camp near Elsah. The boy was in swimming with some other boys when he started to drown and called for help. The other boys in the camp tried to render aid, but they failed to be of any service and he sank, after coming up three times, in a hole that is said to have fifty feet of water in it. The hole where the drowning occurred is just around the end of a dike where the current scours out the bed of the river and forms an eddy. Help was procured at Elsah to go with drags to search for the body. With the young man was his brother, Fulton Calame, Theodore Formhals Jr., and several other boys. The camp is on Giberson Island.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 14, 1911

The body of Louis Calame was recovered Sunday in the river where the drowning occurred near the camp on Giberson Island. The young man had been making trips frequently through the shallow water to a sand bar some distance away, and had gone in safety, but the fatal time he missed his course, got into deep water by stepping off the edge of the reef and went down, being unable to swim. The body did not stir out of the place where it sank, and lay at the foot of the reef in deep water. The members of the camping party spent the remainder of Saturday, all Saturday night and Sunday morning searching for the body. W. D. Fluent went up with the yacht of C. H. James, and soon after his arrival the body was picked up. It was brought on to Alton immediately and turned over to Coroner Streeper, who took charge of it and will hold the inquest. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, 1007 Phinney avenue.

*********************************************

 

CALAME, LOUIS F./Source: Alton Telegraph, January 22, 1891

Mr. Louis F. Calame died very unexpectedly last Wednesday night (January 14) apparently without pain, not even a struggle. Grandpa Calame was born in Switzerland, 1814. During his boyhood, he lived on the farm with his parents, but in early manhood he learned the trade of watch making, in which business he was successfully engaged until the year 1849, when he came to this country, locating in Wood River township, where he lived nine years. He then removed to this neighborhood (Melville), and has resided in the house where he died ever since. Mr. Calame was an earnest Christian believer, and though the summons was sudden, he was prepared for the change. The funeral took place at the Melville church Monday, the 18th, Rev. O. C. Dickerson conducting the services, Rev. J. W. Flint, of the Alton M. E. church, assisting. A large audience was in attendance. The pall bearers were: N. Challacombe, Thos. Levi, Henry Meyers, Augustus Baker, George Norris and John Dressler. The funeral march was rendered most beautifully by Miss Lillie Howard.

************************************************

 

CALAME, LOUIS W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1913                Old Soldier Dies

Louis W. Calame, aged 75, died this morning at his home on the Grafton road, three miles from Melville, after an illness of three weeks. He sustained three strokes of paralysis, the third proving fatal. Mr. Calame was a native of Switzerland. He had lived in the vicinity of Alton since he was ten years of age. He leaves his wife and six children, Mrs. J. P. Murphy, Mrs. Arthur Webb, William, Arthur, Elmer and Edward Calame. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 10 o'clock from the home to the Melville church.

**************************************************

 

CALAME, VINA (nee NICOL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 26, 1903

Mrs. Vina Nicol Calame, wife of Charles Calame, died this afternoon at 2 o'clock after a lingering illness at her home near Melville. She was 25 years of age. The funeral will be announced later.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 27, 1903

The death of Mrs. Vina Nicol Calame, wife of Charles Calame, at the family home near Melville, was briefly noted in the Telegraph Thursday. Mrs. Calame had been an invalid for several years, suffering from a form of tuberculosis. Throughout her long illness she bore her suffering patiently and with fortitude. She leaves her husband, a young man to whom she had been married only four years, and she also leaves one child. Mrs. Calame was the daughter of Peter Nicol, a well known resident of Newbern who died recently. She was 25 years of age. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the family home at Melville.

***********************************************

 

CALAME, WESLEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 6, 1904

Wesley Calame, son of Z. H. Calame, died at the family home on the Grafton road near Melville, after an illness of several years from consumption. He was 33 years old and had lived in the vicinity of Melville all his life. A year ago the young man went to Arizona for the benefit of his health. The funeral was held this morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. M. H. Ewer officiating, and burial was in the Calame cemetery.

*************************************************

 

CALAME, Z. H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 21, 1916

Z. H. Calame, aged 77, died at his home on the Grafton road at 1 o'clock Friday morning after a lingering illness. He has been ill at his home for some time and within the past three weeks his condition became worse and the end has been expected for several days. Mr. Calame was born in Switzerland and came to the United States when he was eight years of age. He settled with his family near Wood River where they lived for a number of years. Later they moved to the present Calame place on the Grafton road where he has lived the greater part of his life. He was known for miles around as a very industrious farmer and took special pride in his fruit. He raised more small fruit than any other farmer in the neighborhood. Recently, his health has been such that his farm interests have been looked after by his son, Harvey, who has made his home with his father. Mr. Calame is survived by five children, four sons, C. E. of Nebraska; L. H. Calame of California; C. S. Calame of Colorado; and Harvey H. of Alton; and one daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth D. Levi of Carrollton, Ill. He also leaves 36 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. The funeral services will be conducted on Sunday afternoon, 12:30, from the home by Rev. Geyer. The body will be interred in the family burying lot on the farm where many of the relatives of Mr. Calame have been buried.

***********************************************

 

CALDWELL, ANNA M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 14, 1915        

Mrs. Anna M. Caldwell, widow of Charles A. Caldwell, for many years head of the Alton National Bank, died Friday morning at 5:30 o'clock at her residence, 1420 Henry street, from old age. She would have been 79 years of age December 19th. Mrs. Caldwell's death had been expected, as her condition had been bad for some time, and she had been unconscious for several days. Her home had been in Alton all her life. She was born here December 19, 1836, and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ebenezer Marsh. After her preliminary schooling in Alton, she attended the Crowell ladies boarding school in St. Louis, completing her course of study there. During her stay in St. Louis she united with the second Baptist church of that city, and transferred her membership to the First Baptist church here on her return to Alton. She had been a member of the First Baptist church about sixty years. She was married to C. A. Calwell in 1857. He died in 1890. Mrs. Caldwell was the mother of ten children, six of whom survive, and all of them are residents of Alton except the youngest son, a resident of Denver, Colo. The children are Mrs. H. S. Flagg; Miss Emma H. Caldwell; Messrs. A. P., C. A., E. M. Caldwell of Alton; and M. R. Caldwell of Denver, Colo. Mrs. Caldwell's health has been failing during the past two years, consequent upon her advancing age. She was forced to give up the many activities in her home, but it was only during the last week that she was confined to her room. Her final sickness was almost free of pain and the end came peacefully while her children were with her. Mrs. Caldwell was a fine character, a woman who was beloved in her home and she was deeply interested in both her home and her church. She had many friends who loved her for her fine womanliness, and her last sickness has been watched with deep interest by many who had known her and loved her during her long life in Alton. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock from the family residence.

***********************************************

 

CALDWELL, ARCHIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1917     Man Who Committed Daring Holdups of Alton Saloons Dies in Cheyenne, Wyoming

Archie Caldwell is dead in Cheyenne, Wyo., according to advice that was received in Alton today by his relatives. How he came to his death is not known. The message from that place simply says that he is dead and asks what disposition shall be made of the body. The relatives have decided to bring him back to Alton for burial. The body will probably arrive in Alton on Friday morning, if it is shipped at once. Caldwell is the man who committed the daring robberies in Alton several weeks ago, when he held up the Charles Hale saloon and the J. H. Elfgen saloon in a single evening, when both of the saloons were crowded. At the time he made away with over $100 in money. The police made a desperate effort to catch him at the time, because it was believed that he was insane and it was feared that he might do some damage. Nothing more has been heard from him since, although a search was made over the country for him. The two robberies were the most daring in the Alton records. Caldwell entered the saloon of Charles Hale at the corner of Fifth and Ridge street on the evening of the robbery, and asked that Charles Hale be called down from upstairs. When he was called down, Caldwell demanded that he hold up his hands as well as the ten other men in the saloon. After taking the money, he told Hale to turn his back. Hale started to run and make his getaway as the gun clicked but did not go off. Then Caldwell made his getaway, and while the police were hurrying to that saloon he went to the saloon of J. H. Elfgen at the corner of Broadway and Langdon, and asked to use the phone. When he got in a position where his gun would cover the entire crowd, he told them to throw up their hands and then proceeded to rob the till. A man from the Missouri guards across the street saw the hands above the curtains of the saloon and rushed over. He fired a shot through the window at Caldwell, but the latter saw him and dropped behind the bar in time to save himself, and then crawled on his hands and knees out of the saloon and made his escape.

 

Archie Caldwell Took Own Life

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 9, 1917

Cheyenne, Wyo., May 9 - Archie Caldwell, aged 31, a member of a respected family in Alton, took his life here yesterday by shooting himself. For the past month he had been a fugitive from justice, having robbed two saloons in Alton. Caldwell left a note addressed to his mother, Mrs. Alexander Caldwell, of Fifth and Ridge street, Alton, Ill., in which he asked forgiveness for the trouble he had caused her and the other members of his family. Word was received in Alton yesterday that Caldwell was dead, but nothing was known at that time as to how he met his end. The body is to be brought to Alton for burial.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 12, 1917

The funeral of Archie Caldwell will be held from the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Caldwell, Sunday afternoon. The letter he wrote to his mother before shooting himself shows the remorse the young man felt for his deeds and misdoings.  Burial will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CALDWELL, AUGUSTUS PRESCOTT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 12, 1917

Augustus P. Caldwell, member of a prominent Alton family, died at 1 o'clock today at his residence, 1426 Henry street, after an illness that covered a period of fifteen years. The cause of his death was diabetes. During the long time that Mr. Caldwell had been afflicted with the malady, he continued active, and attended to the duties of the responsible position he held in the National Bank of Commerce in St. Louis. It was only in recent months that he gave up his work and was confined to his home, when he was no longer able to go about. Augustus Prescott Caldwell was born October 4, 1861. He passed almost all of his life in Alton. He was married to Miss Susan Forsythe of Harre, Ont., in December 1894. He leaves beside his wife, two children, Mary M., and Nelson F. Caldwell. For several years he was associated with the W. E. Schweppe Grocery Co in St. Louis, and after that business was discontinued he took a position with the National Bank of Commerce in St. Louis, in which he continued to serve until failing health six months ago forced him to give it up. He was not a member of the First Presbyterian Church, but was a regular attendant there with his family, and was deeply interested in the welfare of that church. He was a man who was most highly esteemed in his family, and his death, while looked for, is a sad blow to his relatives. He had been very near death for a week, and last Sunday it was not believed he would last through the night. He showed wonderful rallying powers, and even yesterday when it was thought he was dying, he rallied again. He was a very capable business man, and highly esteemed wherever he was engaged. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from his late home. Friends are requested not to send flowers. Interment will be private.

*********************************************

 

CALDWELL, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1922                Youth of 18 Is Electrocuted at Dairy Here

The fact that he had his rubber soled shoes repaired by tacking on leather soles was the reason for a fatal outcome of a contact by Charles Caldwell with an electric switch at the plant of the Walnut Grove dairy yesterday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. The boy, who was the 18 year old son of David Caldwell, employed at the plant, accidentally touched the interior of a safety switch at a time when his hand was wet, and he was standing on a moist place on the floor in the dairy department. Even with all this, he might have escaped injury but for the fact that he had his worn out rubber soles repaired by use of leather, which furnished an excellent ground for his otherwise insulated body. According to officers of the plant, the lad had been around the plant off and on all of his life. His father has been employed there for many years. Recently he has been working steady in the plant. Yesterday afternoon he was standing near the open safety switch, the lid of which had been left ajar, and was leaning against the box. In some way his hand slipped down and came in contact with the points of the switch and he received the full effect of a 440-volt current. This would not have been fatal but for the fact that the young man's hand was wet, as he had just come from the cellar and was handling containers that were wet. When he came in contact with the switch point, he screamed and Jack Rowe, who was close by, made a dash for 20 feet and pulled the main switch to release the lad. It is said that he was in contact only a few seconds. Immediately when he was released from the electric current, he fell to the floor and apparently he died instantly. Efforts were made to revive him by the use of artificial respiration. Dr. Mather Pfeiffenberger said that when he arrived the lad's heart had ceased beating and it was too late to be of any service in reviving him. The father was out driving a wagon at the time the accident occurred to his son. The funeral will be held at two o'clock Thursday afternoon from the family home at 712 Ridge street, Rev. S. D. McKenny of the Cherry Street Baptist church will officiate. Interment will be in Oakwood cemetery.

************************************************

 

CALDWELL, EBEN M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 8, 1919       Former Banker and Manufacturing Manager at Elsah Dies

Eben M. Caldwell died at 8:30 o'clock this morning at the family home, where he was taken last Saturday on his return from a stay in a hospital in St. Louis. Mr. Caldwell had been in bad health a long time. His condition showed no signs of improvement, and in the belief that a surgical operation would be beneficial, he went to St. Louis a number of weeks ago and underwent a surgical operation. He stood up well under the operation, but the help that had been looked for failed to materialize. He came home Saturday and soon thereafter he collapsed and the end came this morning. Mr. Caldwell was born in Alton, April 26, 1866, and all his life he had passed in Alton. He was the son of Charles Caldwell, for many years president of the Alton National Bank. He worked as assistant cashier of the Alton National Bank until seven years ago, when he became president and manager of the Western Whiting Plant at Elsah. He continued in the latter position until his last sickness began to develop. His bad health of the past few years began to manifest an alarming phase about nine months ago. Since then his decline was steady. For thirty-seven years he had been a member of the First Baptist Church and a leading worker there. His efforts in the church had gained for him recognition as one of the most effective of the members. He was deeply interested, especially in the Men's Bible Class of that church, and his services as a public speaker at religious gatherings were in much demand in this vicinity. He served as superintendent of the Sunday school for a number of years, and was a deacon in the First Baptist Church at the time of his death. In 1901 he married Miss Lillian A. Blair, who, with two daughters, Harriet B. and Myra M., survive him. He leaves also two brothers, C. A. Caldwell of Alton, Martyn R. Caldwell of Denver, and Mrs. Hannah Flagg. The time of the funeral has not been set, as word is awaited from distant relatives. Announcement of the funeral will be made later, and conforming to the wishes of Mr. Caldwell, it is requested that flowers be omitted.

**********************************************

 

CALDWELL, ELIZABETH (nee FORBES)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 27, 1902

This estimable lady died at her home on Henry street in this city at 9:30 o'clock today, after a short illness from meningitis. She was taken ill last week at Gogebic, Michigan. Miss Elizabeth Forbes, daughter of James H. Forbes, married Charles A. Caldwell, April 16, 1891. This union was blessed with two children, one of whom died in Tucson, Arizona about one year ago. The other, a daughter, Elizabeth, survives the mother. Deceased was born in Alton, and at the age of 13 removed to St. Louis. Mrs. Caldwell was a lady of rare qualities of mind and heart, one who made home happy and who drew all her acquaintances into close fellowship with her. For a number of years she has been an invalid, necessitating long visits on several occasions in the west for her health. These visits, while interrupting the endearing family relations, only made the husband and relatives more desirous for her return to health and vigor. Besides her child and husband, one sister, Mrs. Ella F. Johnson of St. Louis, and two brothers, R. M. Forbes of Alton and A. E. Forbes of St. Louis, survive Mrs. Caldwell. All of Mrs. Caldwell's married life, except her visits to other parts in search of health, has been spent in Alton at the home on Henry street. The passing of so beloved a wife and mother is sad on any occasion, but is doubly so in this case, as she was in the prime of young womanhood, with a bright and happy future before her, had health and life been granted.

****************************************

 

CALDWELL, EMIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Caldwell, of 710 East Fifth street, were shocked this morning to receive news of the death of their son, Emil, at the home of his uncle, George Kleinpeter, in St. Louis. The message said that the young man, aged 28, a well known cigar maker, was found dead in bed and no particulars of the cause of death was given. Mrs. Caldwell departed at once for St. Louis to look after the body of her son and make arrangements for its shipment to Alton for burial. The young man leaves, beside his parents, five brothers and two sisters. Frank is at Camp Taylor, Leonard is in the Navy; Misses Margaret and Josephine and Messrs. Henry, Raymond and Oscar are in Alton. The funeral will probably be Wednesday.

********************************************

 

CALDWELL, EMMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1918              Killed in Auto Accident While Visiting Brother in Denver

Word was received in Alton Sunday at midnight telling of the death of Miss Emma Caldwell of Alton, in an automobile accident at Denver, Colo. The message, it was stated by C. A. Caldwell, gave the information that in the accident in which Miss Caldwell lost her life, Mr. and Mrs. Martyn R. Caldwell, of Denver, whom she was visiting, were injured also. The telegram said that Mrs. M. R. Caldwell was severely bruised and Mr. Caldwell, whose name was signed to the message, was slightly bruised. Owing to the fewness of details and the fact that after a telegram was sent back to get further information, there was considerable delay in the answer being received, it was feared that the sender of the telegram was minimizing his own injuries and that he was perhaps worse hurt than might be inferred from the message. Miss Caldwell was a member of one of Alton's oldest and most prominent families. She was a daughter of C. A. Caldwell, for many years president of the Alton National Bank, and a sister of C. A. Caldwell, cashier of the Alton National, also of Eben Caldwell and Mrs. Hannah Flagg of Alton and Martyn R. Caldwell of Denver. Her brother, A. P. Caldwell died recently in Alton. It was said by C. A. Caldwell after receiving word of the accident that his sister had been making a protracted visit in Denver with her brother. The other sister, with whom she lived in the old Caldwell homestead at Fourteenth and Henry streets, Mrs. Flagg, had gone to Texas for a visit and only recently returned home. Miss Caldwell was planning to be home within a week, too, and the Alton members of the family were looking forward to welcoming her back. The tidings of her accidental death filled with sorrow not only the members of her family, but also a large number of friends in Alton. It was the expectation that word would be received late this afternoon giving information as to the time of the shipment of the body of Miss Caldwell to Alton.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 26, 1918

The body of Miss Emma Caldwell, who was killed in an automobile accident at Denver, Colo., Sunday, is on the way to Alton where funeral services will be conducted at the home of her brother, C. A. Caldwell, 1007 Henry street. A long distance telephone message from Denver supplied the details of the accident in which many friends and the relatives of Miss Caldwell were deeply interested. She was out riding Sunday afternoon when the front wheels of the automobile struck a soft spot in the road and the automobile was turned over. Miss Caldwell was thrown out on her head and instantly killed. Mrs. Martyn R. Caldwell was slightly injured, and Mr. Caldwell was severely, but it is believed not seriously hurt. Both Mr. and Mrs. Martyn Caldwell were taken to a hospital but it was believed they would be able to return home at once. Neither is able to accompany the body of Miss Emma Caldwell to Alton, so word was sent that a Miss Bishop, a friend of the family, would escort it to Alton. The expectation was that the body would leave Denver Tuesday and arrive in Alton Wednesday evening, and that the funeral would be Thursday afternoon from the home of C. A. Caldwell. The request was made by members of the family that flowers be omitted. The news of the death of Miss Caldwell was most shocking to a large number of people who had known and loved her. In her family circle she had stood as a mother to the members of the family ever since the death of their own mother. She was beloved by all who knew her and her tragic end was an event of the deepest sadness to all. She was a teacher in the First Baptist Sunday school, and was a devoted worker there. Her class was one of young women, and was one of the best in the Sunday school.

*************************************************

 

CALDWELL, FRANK E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1918              Soldier Dies of Pneumonia

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Caldwell of East Fifth street, received a telegram from the government this afternoon stating that their son, Frank Caldwell, aged 27, had died in France on November 2 after an illness with pneumonia. Caldwell was a cook in Company E, 333d Infantry, and left Alton a year ago last September. He has served a term in the navy and was only home a year when he was called into the service. The family is in doubt as to the authenticity of the story of the death, as two weeks ago a card was received, dated November 3, in which Caldwell wrote that he was improving. The letter was written evidently by a nurse as it was not in Caldwell's handwriting. Caldwell stated on the card that he had just received a number of letters from relatives and told what he wanted for Christmas. Besides his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell, he leaves four brothers, Henry in France, Leonard and Raymond in the navy, the former on the U. S. Michigan, and the latter at Puget Sound, Oscar at home, and two sisters, Margaret and Josephine of Alton.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1920              

The body of Frank E. Caldwell, who died on November 28, 1918 at Le Mans, France, while he was a cook in Co. E of the 333rd Infantry, will arrive in New York on August 15, the parents of the young soldier have been informed. The date the body will arrive here is not known. The young soldier entered the army only a short while after his discharge from the navy, where he had served for some time. He was one of four brothers in the service, all sons of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Caldwell of 710 East Sixth street. He died of pneumonia, after the signing of the armistice. He saw active service at the front.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 20, 1920

The body of Frank Caldwell, who died overseas in the service of his country during the war, arrived in Alton this morning and was taken in charge by Undertaker Bauer. The remains were in a sealed casket that was flag draped. With the body was Private Elwell, who had been detailed to escort it home. The casket will be taken to the home of the parents, and there will remain until the time set for the funeral services, Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 23, 1920

A vast crowd attended the funeral of Frank E. Caldwell, which was held this morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's Catholic church. During the past few days many people have visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Caldwell on East Fifth street, where the body of the young soldier was in the casket. Caldwell died in 1918 in Le Mans, France, and his body was just sent home. Requiem High Mass was celebrated by the Rev. Joseph Meckel, pastor of St. Mary's church, with the Rev. Henry B. Schnelton as Deacon, and the Rev. George E. Faller as sub-deacon. The Rev. Fr. Kippling was Master of Ceremonies. The pallbearers were selected from members of Alton Post of the American Legion. The casket was wrapped in an American Flag. Interment was in St. Joseph's cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CALDWELL, MIRANDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 16, 1907

Mrs. Miranda Caldwell, widow of Robert Caldwell, died Monday morning shortly after 9 o'clock after an illness of one year with stomach trouble. Her death was expected for some time, as she had been suffering severely for several months. She was 56 years of age. Her husband, Robert Caldwell, died several years ago. She leaves nine children, Messrs. Archie, Robert, Thomas and Edward Caldwell, Miss Ella Caldwell, Mrs. Richard Fleming, Mrs. Manuel Simon, Mrs. Frank Schiem, Mrs. Fred Smith. She leaves also a brother, Thomas Clampitt, and a sister, Mrs. William Stone. Mrs. Caldwell belongs to an old Alton family. She was a good mother and a good neighbor and her death is a sad shock to her family. Mrs. Caldwell was born in Belleville, Ill., January 17, 1852. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Clampitt.

********************************************

 

CALDWELL, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 17, 1918

Robert Caldwell, aged 89, died Tuesday afternoon at 5:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital. He was taken to the hospital Sunday, suffering from pneumonia. He was the son of the late Robert Caldwell, a well known painter. The funeral will be held from the family home, Nineteenth and Market streets, Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

**********************************************

 

CALDWELL, UNKNOWN WIFE OF ARCHIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 22, 1905

Funeral services for the late Mrs. Archie Caldwell were held this morning at the home by the Rev. M. W. Twing, pastor of the first Baptist church, and were attended by numerous friends of the deceased and of the family. Interment was in City Cemetery.

********************************************

 

CALDWELL, WALTER JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 19, 1912

Walter Joseph Caldwell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Caldwell, died Wednesday morning at the family home, 712 East Fifth street, after an illness of over two years. The funeral time is not set until word can be received from his brother, Frank, who is in the United States Navy, and who has been notified of the death.

*********************************************

 

CALHOUN, UNKNOWN MAN/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 17, 1845
A stranger who came up to this city [Alton] on Monday afternoon in the Osprey from St. Louis was drowned soon afterwards, just as the boat was leaving the wharf on her way up the river. He was intoxicated at the time, and it is not certain whether it was in attempting to get onboard again or from some other cause that he fell into deep water and sunk almost immediately. His body has not yet been found, and his name and place of residence are unknown.

 

Source: Alton Telegraph, May 24, 1845

The body of the man whose death by drowning was announced in our last, was found floating down the Mississippi about a quarter of a mile below Shield's Branch, three days after the accident, and an inquest held over it by H. S. Summers, Esq., Coroner of this county. It appears from the papers found upon his person by the jury, that his name was ______ Calhoun, and that he had taken and paid for a deck passage on the Osprey from St. Louis to Baley Rudy's, some 14 miles this side of Peoria. He was supposed to be between 35 and 40 years of age, and had on steel-mixed cassinet pantaloons, jeans vest, cotton shirt, homemade flannel drawers, black silk neck handkerchief, woolen socks, and coarse boots.
**************************************

 

CALLAGHAN, ANN/Source: Alton Telegraph, April 17, 1913

Mrs. Ann Callaghan, widow of Dennis Callaghan, died Tuesday night at her home, Powhattan and Washington avenue, in Upper Alton, after a long illness, aged 83. She had lived many years in the vicinity of Upper Alton but had in recent years moved into town. She leaves two sons, Timothy and John Callaghan, members of what was a large family of children. The funeral will be Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church.

*********************************************

 

CALLAGHAN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1900

John Callaghan, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Callaghan, died at his home, 1228 East Second street yesterday morning after an illness of four weeks. He was 28 years of age and had lived in Alton all his life. He had been in ill health several years but was seriously ill only the last four months. The funeral will be Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

*******************************************

 

CALLAGHAN, NORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 28, 1905

Miss Nora Callaghan, daughter of Mrs. Julia Callaghan, died last night at the family home, 12:30 east Second street, after an illness with pneumonia. She was 20 years of age and is survived by her mother, a sister, Mrs. Warren Clocum, and a brother, J. P. Callaghan, the east end grocer. She also leaves a half-brother, Daniel Callaghan of Jackson, Miss.  She was a lady of most lovable character and has a large circle of friends who will be shocked to hear of her death. The funeral will be Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church to Greenwood cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CALLAHAN, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 15, 1901

Thomas Callahan, aged 87, one of the oldest and best known farmers living in this part of Madison county, died Saturday night at the home of his son, Thomas Callahan, at Old Orchard, Mo., where he was visiting. Mr. Callahan had been in feeble health for some time, and the hot weather was the cause of dissolution. After the death of his aged helpmeet in life, Mr. Callahan gave up his old home near East Alton where he had lived over forty years, and went to live with his children. He returned sometimes to visit the old place, but made his home away from East Alton. He came to America from Ireland in 1847 and lived nearly all that time in the vicinity of Alton. He was a good upright man and had many friends among people who knew him, as well as among the fast falling number of old residents of this part of the county. He leaves three sons, Thomas Callahan of St. Louis; John Callahan of Mexico, Mo., and James T. Callahan, the well known newspaper man of Alton. The body will be brought to Alton Tuesday noon via Big Four. The services will be at the Cathedral. The burial will be private at Greenwood cemetery beside the body of Mrs. Callahan, who died several years ago.

*********************************************

 

CALLAHAN, UNKNOWN WIFE OF WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 27, 1901

Mrs. William Callahan, who recently removed with her husband and family from Macoupin county to Bethalto, died at her home Thursday after a sickness with pneumonia. The funeral occurred this morning. Mrs. Edward Bell, 554 East Second street, this city, is a sister of deceased and has been at Bethalto since Thursday.

********************************************

 

CALVERD, FRANCES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 2, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. Frances Calverd, wife of Mayor William Calverd, will be held Tuesday afternoon in the Medora Baptist Church, Rev. T. N. Marsh of Upper Alton officiating. The death of Mrs. Calverd occurred suddenly Friday night from heart trouble. She was 62 years old. Mrs. Calverd was well known in Alton, she and her husband having formerly been in charge of the Alton Hotel.

*********************************************

 

CALVERT, MAMIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 31, 1917

Mrs. Mamie Calvert of 920 East Broadway, a mother of nine children, ranging in age from 19 years down to three years, died this morning at her home at 9:30 o'clock after a short illness. Mrs. Calvert was about 48 years of age. She was a member of the Maccabees. Besides her large family of children, Mrs. Calvert is survived by her husband, William Calvert. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

*********************************************

 

CALVEY, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 5, 1909

James Calvey, aged 74 years 6 months, died Sunday evening at 6 o'clock at his home, 907 Vandalia road, after an illness from weakness of old age. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Calvey, and eight children. There are five daughters, Mrs. J. J. Hurley, Mrs. Margaret McGarrahan, Mrs. John Siler, Mrs. Ed Pfeffer, Mrs. Charles Stierley, and three sons, William, Joseph and John Calvey. Mr. Calvey was an old time resident of Alton. He was a man of resolute will, very strong and determined, even in his old age, and when he seemed to be a tottering old man, the person who would have offered an insult to him or his family would have found it perhaps more than was bargained for. He was, however, a quiet, well doing citizen, and a man who was highly esteemed by all who knew him. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

*******************************************

 

CALVIN, BENJAMIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 19, 1915

The body of Benjamin Calvin arrived this morning from Madison, Wis., and was taken to the Keiser undertaking rooms, from where the funeral was held later. Burial was in City Cemetery.

********************************************

 

CAMELIA, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 27, 1922

Funeral services for Miss Ellen Camelia, who died Monday night at the home of her mother, Mrs. Minnie Camelia, 1722 Bozza street, will be at 2 p.m. at the family home, tomorrow. Interment will be in Oakwood cemetery. Miss Camelia was a member of the Women's Benefit Association of the Maccabees. Miss Camelia, who was 22 years old, had been ill for some time.

*******************************************

 

CAMERON, MARGUERITE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 20, 1911

The funeral of Mrs. Marguerite Cameron, who died at her home on Locust street in Upper Alton Sunday evening, occurred from the home this afternoon at two o'clock. Interment was made in the Oakwood cemetery in Upper Alton. The funeral was a large one, as Mrs. Cameron was one of the oldest residents of Upper Alton, having resided there over thirty years, and she had many friends.

******************************************

 

CAMP, DAVID/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 16, 1905

David Camp, aged 56, died Sunday morning at his home on Third street, between Oak and Walnut street, after an attack of apoplexy. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock from the home, and services will be conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenny.

******************************************

 

CAMP, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 12, 1902

The funeral of James Camp took place this afternoon from the residence, 1211 Alby street, the services being in charge of the Colored Knights of Pythias, of which deceased was a member. Interment was in Upper Alton cemetery.

****************************************

 

CAMPBELL, FANNY E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 6, 1903

Mrs. Fanny E. Campbell, wife of Albert Campbell of East Alton, died Sunday morning after a long illness, aged 43. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning from the home to Vaughn Cemetery.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 9, 1903

The funeral of Mrs. Albert Campbell was held at the home on Monday at 1 p.m. Interment was at the Vaughn Cemetery. Mrs. Campbell has been a sufferer for years, but this last year she was so much worse her life was despaired of many times. She has at last found rest. She leaves besides her husband, two daughters: Mrs. Lydia Hassmann and Maude Campbell; and two sisters, Mrs. Frank Worthington of East Alton and Mrs. James M. Clark of Upper Alton.

****************************************

 

CAMPBELL, JESSIE C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1920                Former Upper Alton Mayor   -   Gillham School Principal Dies

Jessie C. Campbell, for ten years principal of Gillham School, and an instructor in schools of Madison county for 29 years, died at 1 a.m., at his home, 2610 Humber street. He was 54 years old. His illness, a few days ago, became serious, and since Saturday he has been hovering between life and death. Friends and relatives hoped for the recovery of the man who for years has been prominent in the religious, educational, and civic life of Upper Alton, and general sorrow was caused today when news of his death became known. Mr. Campbell was born in Fosterburg and lived in Alton for 40 years. He taught in various schools of Madison County for 29 years, and was principal of the Gillham School here for ten years. Mr. Campbell had long been a prominent figure in Upper Alton. Before the annexation of Upper Alton to the city of Alton, he was a leader in the political life of the village. He was mayor of Upper Alton from 1900 to 1911. He also served three terms as alderman in Upper Alton. He was once the Democratic candidate for county superintendent of schools. Mr. Campbell was a member of the College Avenue Baptist church, and was prominent in many of the activities of that church. He was connected also with many fraternal organizations, holding membership in the Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen, Court of Honor, and the Junior Order of American Mechanics. Mr. Campbell was married on Sept. 23, 1890, to Miss Fannie Harris of Alton. He is survived by his widow, and two sons, Merle E. Campbell of St. Louis, and Leroy Campbell of this city. Funeral services will be conducted at the home at 2 o'clock, Thursday, by the Rev. David T. Magill, pastor of the College Avenue Baptist church. Interment will be in the Upper Alton cemetery.

******************************************

 

CAMPBELL, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1900         Found Dead on Track Near Delhi

Joseph Campbell of North Alton was found dead beside the tracks of the Alton at Ritchey's Crossing, near Delhi, Sunday morning. His head was severed from his body and the trunk was horribly mutilated by the wheels of the train. The Jersey county coroner held an inquest yesterday and the body was brought to the home this morning for interment. Campbell was a well-known resident of North Alton. He was unmarried, and the past two months he has been living on a little farm near Delhi, customarily walking in from Delhi to North Alton Saturday night. He was deaf, and it is supposed he was hit by a train as he was walking along the track. He made his home with William Bull at North Alton. His brother, James, was killed at Hop Hollow fourteen years ago by falling over the bluffs at the Huff place. He has relatives across the river. The funeral took place this afternoon at North Alton.

*****************************************

 

CAMPBELL, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1916

Mrs. Minnie Campbell died this afternoon at 3 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Robert Bushell, on Logan street, with whom she made her home. Mrs. Campbell was 79 years of age and old age was the cause of her death. Her son-in-law, Robert Bushell, dropped dead while at work two weeks ago.

******************************************

 

CAMPBELL, R. H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1902         Suicide by Hanging

A sad case of suicide caused by despondency on account of ill health occurred this morning about 5 o'clock at the home of D. E. McFaddin, 813 Stanton street. The victim was R. H. Campbell, formerly sheriff of Brown county, Ohio, and a prominent school teacher and insurance man of that place. He was a brother-in-law of Mr. McFaddin and a prominent resident of Georgetown, Ohio, who came here two weeks ago today hoping to find relief from the despondency which finally overcame him. He seemed much better late yesterday evening, playing crokinole with the family and appearing to enjoy it as much as anyone, but a restless night followed and he ended it after daylight by hanging himself in the water closet with a shawl strap, which he had evidently found somewhere and kept secreted for the purpose. He leaves a wife and one child at Georgetown, Ohio, where the remains will be sent this evening for burial. He was 41 years of age. The man was mentally deranged and had made many threats to kill himself. He was closely watched, but managed to elude his watchers this morning and succeeded in fulfilling his threats. He was found dead, hanging from a beam, the ends of his toes just touching the floor of the closet floor.

***************************************

 

CAMPBELL, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 15, 1913       Aged Fisherman and Former Raftsman Dies at Home on Bluff Street

Thomas Campbell, aged 80, died at noon today at the family home on Bluff street from uraemic poisoning. Mr. Campbell was for many years engaged in the occupation of fishing. He had followed the river since he was a young man, and he stayed with the river until recently when old age forced him to quit. He had been a raftsman before engaging in the fishing business. He came to Alton in 1842 and had lived in Alton almost continuously ever since. He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Robert Bushel, and a stepson, J. H. Shoolery, beside his aged wife, who survives him. The funeral will be at 10 o'clock Monday morning from the family home, Rev. E. L. Gibson officiating.

******************************************

 

CANDEE, SARAH/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 23, 1837

Died, on Wednesday, the 16th of August, at Upper Alton, Mrs. Sarah Candee, formerly of Wheeling, Virginia.

******************************************

 

CANHAM, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 7, 1902

Henry, 4 months old twin son of Mr. and Mrs. William Canham, died this morning at the home, 1112 east Second street, after an illness with summer complaint. The funeral will be tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock, and interment will be in the City Cemetery.

****************************************

 

CANHAM, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 13, 1917                Dies Away From Home After Wife's Dream

Following a troubled dream of the night before, Mrs. C. E. Canham of 602 Forest Home Place received a telegram this morning that her husband, who spent much of his time away from home on business, had been found dead in his room in his hotel, asphyxiated by gas. Mrs. Canham told neighbors today that in her dream she had seen her husband plainly, and that he appeared to be taking leave of her, remarking, she recalled, "I hate to leave you." To this remark, her dream made her reply, "Well, we will have you for dinner and supper." The dream troubled her, as separation from her husband always had. He had been home for the Christmas holidays, and prior to that had been home on the Fourth of July. He was working in the capacity of superintendent for the Walsh Construction Co., and his duties kept him away for long periods. At the time of his death he was at Fairview, N. J., representing his employers. He was born in Alton and regarded Alton as his home all his life. He was 43 years of age. He leaves in Alton his wife and eight children, also a sister, Mrs. Samuel Fanning, and a brother, William Canham of Alton. Besides these he leaves a brother, Ben of Loami, and another, George, of Clatskanie, Oregon. The funeral will be at Alton and the time will not be set until word is heard from the brother in Oregon, who may desire to attend it. The family had received no particulars of the death of Mr. Canham. There was great distress among the family and among the neighbors today over the sad plight in which the family is plunged by the death of the husband and father. He was very fond of his family, and devoted all the time he could spare from his work to them. They lived in a comfortable home and they looked forward to his infrequent visits home with great pleasure. Mr. Canham had many friends in Alton who were very sorrowful over his death. They are quite sure that his death must have been due to accident, and not to any plan on his part.

***********************************************

 

CANIPE, JULIA A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 15, 1902

Bethalto News - Mrs. Julia A. Canipe, a most estimable lady of 75 years, died quite suddenly Monday morning at 9 o'clock, February 10. Deceased was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, was married in Hillsboro, Ohio in 1849 to A. J. Canipe, a veteran of the Mexican War. They moved to Illinois in 1854 and have been residents of Bethalto since 1874. To this union were born eight children, three of whom together with the aged husband, are still living. The funeral took place from the M. E. church of which she was a member, Wednesday, services conducted by Rev. G. W. Randle, and interred in the M. E. cemetery.  Mrs. J. T. Sraham of Fort Madison, Ia. attended.

*****************************************

 

CANIPE, UNKNOWN/Source: Alton Telegraph, February 13, 1902

Mrs. A. J. Canipe, one of the most prominent residents of Bethalto, died suddenly Monday morning at her home in Bethalto after a brief illness from heart disease. She was 75 years of age. Mrs. Canipe complained of feeling ill yesterday morning, but rose and ate some breakfast. A short time afterward she suddenly expired. She leaves her husband and two children, Miss Emma and Henry Canipe, both of Bethalto.

******************************************

 

CANNAVON, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 20, 1903

Thomas Cannavon died Wednesday night at 11 o'clock at his home, 1208 Belle street, from general debility. He was 73 years old and moved to Alton only a few months ago from the Coal Branch [North Alton], where he had lived on a farm many years. He leaves a wife and seven grown children to mourn his death.

*****************************************

 

CANNELL, CHARLOTTE J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1908

Mrs. Charlotte J. Cannell died Monday evening at 9:15 o'clock at her home, 1530 State street. She had been severely ill for several weeks, but had been in failing health for several years. Her condition had been very grave for several days and her death was not unexpected. She was the widow of Thomas Cannell. Mrs. Cannell was born in Trenton, Michigan and was raised in Canada. She came to Alton about forty years ago and had lived here ever since. She leaves two sons, Charles A. and Herbert Cannell, and three daughters, Mrs. L. H. Weston and Misses Eva and Helen Cannell. She leaves also a brother, H. A. Fox of Jacksonville. Mrs. Cannell was a devout Christian and was a good mother. Her real worth was known chiefly to her family and her neighbors, in whom her greatest interest centered, and her loss will be greatest to them. The time for the funeral has not been set.

*****************************************

 

CANNELL, HELEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1916        Press Dispatch Says Miss Cannell Burned to Death in Kentucky

Miss Helen Cannell, member of a well known Alton family, was reported by a press dispatch received by the Telegraph today to have been burned to death at Hopkinsville, Ky. Inquiry was made of the Telegraph as to her family and the Telegraph was requested to inform them and ascertain whether the identification had been made correctly. Charles Cannell of the Alton Savings Bank, and Herbert Cannell of the Hartmann Hardware Store, when informed of the press dispatch, said that they were not informed as to the death of their sister. They could not even explain her being at Hopkinsville, Ky. The brothers had believed their sister was at St. Louis, where she was supposed to have gone two weeks ago to visit a friend....Miss Helen Cannell was a well known young woman, born in Alton, and for a period a teacher in the public schools. A number of years ago while teaching she suffered a nervous collapse as the result of overstrain, and she was unable to recuperate fully. She was believed to be much better, however, and her family and friends were much encouraged. She was allowed to go to St. Louis for a visit, it was said by relatives, and they were not informed that she had gone any further. Telephonic communication elicited the information that a young woman giving the name Helen Cannell had been at Hopkinsville, Ky. a few days before Thanksgiving Day. It was said that she had taken a walk out on a country road, and being overtaken by night and finding it necessary to take refuge from the weather in an old abandoned school house, had gone in. The next morning she appeared at the house of a neighbor, horribly burned, minus part of her clothing, having walked two miles over a country road. She died on Thanksgiving Day. With her, it was said, she always carried a shoe box and her name on this helped solve her identity. The relatives in Alton were not informed of their sister's death.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 13, 1916

The body of the young woman who died at Hopkinsville, Ky. on Thanksgiving day from the effects of burns, has been identified by Herbert Cannell of Alton as that of his sister, Miss Helen M. Cannell. The stories told by those who had conversed with the young woman indicate that she had been subject to hallucinations as a result of a nervous collapse she suffered years ago, and from which she had never fully recovered. There has been suspicions, as a result of stories she told, that she might have been brought to her death through the agency of some person interested in putting her out of the way, but friends of the young woman are unwilling to believe that her stories were anything but the vagaries of a mind that was disordered. A doctor in St. Louis supplied some information as to the state of the mind of Miss Cannell. She is reported by him to have threatened to kill herself, and had solicited poison from him, and when she failed she said that she would burn herself to death. She also told a story of having been subjected to a criminal attack in a store she formerly conducted in St. Louis, and the consequences of the attack, the doctor said, had been obviated by a surgical operation, and to this operation he attributed her state of mind. The doctor who is quoted had not been informed of the breakdown of Miss Cannell, which forced her to cease school teaching and which caused her to be a helpless invalid for a long time, and from which she had but recently recovered in part. It is supposed she had a relapse and that the tragic ending of her life was the result of the relapse.....Those who credit the suicide story believe that she decided to burn herself and selected the abandoned school house as a place to build the pyre. When the burning was in process, they think she changed her mind and then walked five miles in her burned feet to a house where she was given succor.....

****************************************

 

CANNELL, HORACE D./Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 11, 1895

Horace D. Cannell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cannell, died at the family home Saturday morning after a weeks illness with stomach troubles. Horace was a bright lad of 11 years, his death is a severe shock to his family and friends. The funeral was private and took place Monday morning from the family home. The services were conducted by Rector Crittenden, of St. Paul's Episcopal church, who spoke feelingly of the bright young life so unexpectedly cut off. The pall bearers were Clay Butler, Mather Pfeiffenberger, Andrew Pepler and Charles Klunk.
*****************************************

 

CANNELL, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, June 17, 1853

Buried - On yesterday the funeral of William Cannell, a young Englishman, took place. The deceased had been in this country some two years, and for several months past had worked in the machine shop of the Piasa Foundry. He was an excellent mechanic, and a worthy, moral young man, who was highly esteemed by his numerous acquaintances. Being an Odd Fellow, his sick bed was surrounded by friends and comforts, and his funeral was solemn, appropriately conducted and well attended. The deceased had the exclusive control of the manufacturing of the new steam engine for the Courier office. He was progressing rapidly with it, after an entire new and beautiful pattern, arranged by Mr. Guild, one of the proprietors of the Foundry, when sickness stopped the work, and death has stilled the arm of the skillful artist. He labors no more.

*******************************************

 

CANNON, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 3, 1911

The funeral of John Cannon was held yesterday morning from the A. M. E. church, where services were conducted in the presence of a very large number of friends and neighbors. Burial was in Rocky Fork Cemetery.

*******************************************

 

CANNON, REBEKAH ANN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 13, 1915

Mrs. Rebekah Ann Cannon, wife of W. E. Cannon, died Sunday morning at the family home on Twenty first street, from paralysis. She had been in failing health for some time, and was stricken with paralysis four weeks ago. She leaves her husband and eight children - four sons and four daughters. Mrs. Cannon was a native of Greene County, Ill., and came to Alton with her husband fifteen years ago. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the Cherry Street Baptist Church in which she held membership. Burial will be in City Cemetery. Mrs. Cannon's children are: Oscar, Elmer, Arthur and Roy; Ruth, Hazel, Esther and Mrs. Leslie Wallace of West Ninth street; also three brothers and one sister - William Moore of Havana, Ill.; George and Silas Moore; and Mrs. Edwards, all of White Hall, Ill.  Mrs. Cannon was born in Patterson, Ill., March 28, 1866; was united in matrimony with W. E. Cannon Dec. 8, 1886. Mrs. Cannon dedicated her life to her God when a child of 12 years of age. Her father was a Baptist minister, and her life proved she had followed his example. She was a devoted, loving wife and mother, and all who came in contact with her loved her. She leaves many friends to mourn her death.

*********************************************

 

CANNON, THEODORE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1904

Theodore, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Cannon, died from heart disease Thursday morning at the family home in North Alton, aged 7 years and 6 months. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from the family home.

********************************************

 

CANTWELL, PETER/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 23, 1837        Drowned in Mississippi River

We are sorry to state that a young man named Peter Cantwell, while bathing in the Mississippi river, opposite the lower part of this city, in the forenoon of Sunday last, unfortunately sunk to rise no more, before any effectual assistance could be afforded him. His body was recovered soon afterwards, but every effort to restore him to life proved unavailing. He was a stone mason by trade, and is said to have been a sober and industrious man.

********************************************

 

CAPES, JOSEPH JASPER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 13, 1921

Joseph Jasper Capes died yesterday at his home on Missouri avenue, at the age of 50 years. He is survived by his wife and two children. The arrangements for the funeral are incomplete.

***********************************************

 

CAPES, RILEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 27, 1921         A Friend To the Poor - Caretaker of Milton Cemetery

If all the poor people of Alton and vicinity for whom Riley Capes did a favor were to assemble tomorrow afternoon at Milton Cemetery, Riley Capes would have one of the biggest funerals ever seen in Alton. He died yesterday morning in a hospital in St. Louis where he was taken a few days before, suffering from a sickness he contracted in a logging camp on the Missouri River where he had been working for the past six or seven years. He was 64 years old. When anything for the benefit of the poor had to be done and nobody else cared to do it, Riley Capes was always a volunteer. For years he took care of Milton Cemetery. There was nobody else to do it, there was no pay in the job, and Riley did all the grave digging, and helped fill in the graves for the poor folks who were taken there because they didn't have money enough to pay for burial space in any other cemetery. According to Riley's friends it would take a long story to make a beginning of an account of what Riley Capes did. He was poor himself and he had a sympathy for poor folks and he was always doing something for them. He kept himself poor by his never ending services, as he never asked nor expected any compensation for what he did. Nobody ever heard anything discreditable to Riley Capes, though he lived here for many years. His heart was filled with kindness, and perhaps the highest tribute that could be paid to Riley was that he kept himself poor being good to other people. The Salvation Army will have charge of his burial tomorrow at Milton Cemetery.

*************************************************

 

CAR, C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 12, 1918

The funeral of C. Car, aged 45, was held this afternoon at 4 o'clock in St. Joseph's Cemetery in Alton. Car died yesterday at his home in Wood River from influenza. He is survived by his wife and son.

************************************************

 

CARDIFF, HARVEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1917                 Killed on Way to Funeral

Two were killed and one seriously injured when the southbound C. and A. train this morning at 9:30 o'clock struck an automobile near Miles station. The dead are Harvey Cardiff, aged 30, and Mrs. James Reader, aged 62. Mrs. Cardiff was not killed but is badly hurt. The party were on their way to attend the burial of Mrs. Frank Hupp, who died in Alton and was taken to Piasa for burial. The persons in the auto were old neighbors and friends of Mrs. Hupp, and were of a large number of people who were on the way to attend the services. Other people in the vicinity of the place, where the accident occurred, did not know of it until they had gone five miles further. Mrs. Reader was a guest of the Cardiffs during the trip to the burial of their old friend. At the crossing, a half mile from Miles station, the southbound passenger train struck the automobile, destroying it and hurling two of the occupants to death. The Cardiff family had just recently moved to the place where they lived, and the accident occurred about a mile from their home. The dead were taken to their homes, and Mrs. Cardiff was given surgical attention.

************************************************

 

CARDWELL, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 5, 1904           Former Convict Shot and Killed by Marshall Sheff

Edward Cardwell was shot and instantly killed by Marshall Sheff, aged 19, Wednesday night in East End place. Cardwell was trying to kill his wife, her mother and sisters, and when Sheff interfered made advances to kill him with a knife, when Sheff shot at him, two bullets entering his head and one his shoulder. Sheff surrendered to Officer Louis Luecker and was locked up in jail. Cardwell's body was taken to the police station to be held for a coroner's inquest. Cardwell married a daughter of Mrs. Emma Layton. Sheff was about to marry another one of the Layton girls and was calling at the Layton home when the killing occurred.  Cardwell has served a term in the penitentiary and has a checkered career, having been married several times prior to his last marriage. One marriage was to the widow of a man who worked with him across the river and who was mysteriously drowned off a Huse-Loomis ice barge while working with Cardwell. The widow and Cardwell made such unseemly haste in getting married after the death of the husband, that considerable suspicion was aroused but nothing ever came of it. The story told by the prisoner, Sheff, is that the Cardwell family were driven from their home by the flood and went to live with the Laytons. Cardwell returned to the Layton place Wednesday night drunk and quarrelsome and threatening to kill his wife and all her family. He held his wife in his arms and was preparing to use a knife on her when she broke away from him. Then he made a stab at her and missed. He tried to stab other members of the family and when Scheff appeared in the doorway, attacked him.  Sheff drew a revolver and when Cardwell continued to advance he fired three times, every ball taking effect. The witnesses of the killing were Mrs. Layton and her daughters, Kate and Theresa.  The testimony of the widow of Cardwell was that early in the evening while she and her husband were going to a store, her husband playfully pinched and teased her so that she turned back to her mother's home. The mother-in-law never did like Cardwell, and when he came back she refused to allow him to enter. Cardwell went away and returned several times, each time being more insistent than before in his demands for his wife and baby. Mrs. Layton refused to allow them to pass her door and finally Cardwell broke it down and entered the house wild with rage and drink. The evidence indicated that Cardwell's insane attack on his wife and her relatives was aggravated by members of Mrs. Cardwell's family.  The coroner's inquest was conducted by C. N. Streeper this afternoon. All the witnesses to the tragedy, including the widow of the victim, confirmed the story told by Sheff and all seemed much relieved that he was gone. Cardwell was about 35 years of age and leaves his wife and a child, about four months old. His mother-in-law said he was a very bad man and did not regret his taking off. Sheff said it was a case of his life or Cardwell's, and that he decided in favor of Cardwell being the victim. The girl who is Sheff's sweetheart visited him in jail and the meeting was a most affectionate one, the young girl apparently not caring who saw her demonstrations of affection. She is pretty. Sheff is a member of the naval militia and bears a good reputation for sobriety and industry. He works at the glass works.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 6, 1904

Marshal Sheff, the young man who shot and killed Charles E. Cardwell, was exonerated by the coroner's jury and released from jail about 6:30 o'clock. Waiting for him was his sweetheart, Miss Kate Layton, the pretty girl in whose defense Sheff killed Cardwell, her brother-in-law. Deputy Coroner Streeper is holding the body of Cardwell to be claimed by his mother. He leaves a mother and a stepbrother, living in Venice, and the mother was sent for yesterday.

 

[Note: The life of Marshal Sheff, member of the Naval Militia, was one filled with tragedy. In 1904 Sheff married the Layton girl and they had a child, which died in 1905. Another child, 2 months old, died in 1907 from bronchitis. The family lived on Joesting Avenue at that time. A daughter was born in 1908, and a son was born in 1910. In 1909 Sheff worked as a fireman, and in 1913 he worked at the strawboard factory and was injured in an accident. In 1915 he was working as a chauffeur for the police and city ambulance. He had taken part in the capture and arrest of a man, who threatened to take his vengeance. On September 10, 1915, Sheff was traveling through Granite City, on his way to St. Louis, to take care of business. He disappeared, and was never heard from again. His wife frantically searched for him, but he was never found. She believed the man who had been arrested killed him. Sheff's wife had no money, and went to work at the Western Cartridge Plant. She gave up 3 of her children to the Orphanage in Alton, and another child, nineteen months old, went to Charles Sheff. She later remarried to a Mr. Stone, and petitioned the court for the insurance money on her husband, who had been declared dead. Poor Marshal Sheff - if indeed he was killed by the man who was arrested - his body may have been thrown in the river or buried and never found.]

*******************************************************

 

CARHART, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1904

Mrs. Elizabeth Carhart, aged 89 years 7 months, died Wednesday night at the home of her son, George W. Carhart, Seventh and Langdon streets, after an illness since last June. Mrs. Carhart met with an accident last June, which caused injuries that resulted in her death. She arose one night after she had retired, and while trying to make her way about the house in a dazed condition, she walked to the head of the stairs and fell down. She was very severely hurt and was not able to get up from her bed afterward. She exhibited remarkable vitality, however, and lingered more than three months. Mrs. Carhart had lived in Alton most of her life. She raised her family in the city, of which two sons only survive. Mr. W. Carhart of Terre Haute, Indiana, and Mr. George W. Carhart, with whom she made her home. Her husband died many years ago.

***********************************************

 

CARHART, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1919

George Carhart, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Carhart of Seventh and Langdon streets, died in a hospital in St. Louis, where he had been staying for the benefit of his health for some time. He was 30 years of age. The young man was born in Alton and had lived here in his young manhood. He was married in Alton. The body will be brought to Alton for burial.

*************************************************

 

CARHART, HARRY/Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, September 30, 1875

Died of his injuries - Mr. Harry Carhart, of this city, who was stabbed on the 6th inst., in an encounter with Charles Burton, died Wednesday from the effect of his injuries. He survived his wound so long that strong hopes had been entertained by his relatives of his recovery. He was twenty-eight years of age.

************************************************

 

CARHART, MARY CONSUELLO [nee BALL]/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 12, 1920

Mrs. George Carhart, aged 70, died this morning at 5 o'clock at the family home on Seventh and Langdon street, after an illness which extended over a period of three years. Last summer Mrs. Carhart was very low for weeks, but rallied. Two weeks ago her fatal illness began and for several days death was expected. Mrs. Carhart was born in Delhi, Ill., but spent practically all her life in Alton. Her maiden name was Miss Mary Consuello Ball, being a member of a well known Alton family. She was prominent in church and social work and will be greatly missed by both family and friends. She was the wife of George W. Carhart. Two years ago on the 29th of January, Mr. and Mrs. Carhart celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary. Had she lived until the 30th of this month, Mrs. Carhart would have observed her 70th birthday. She was a member of the First Methodist church, and until her illness prevented her, she took an active part in all church work. She was one of the most active members of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. Mrs. Carhart is survived by her husband, George W. Carhart, 7 children and three sisters. Fourteen grandchildren also survive. The children are: Miss Emma Carhart of California; Mrs. Charles Norman of Norman Place; Mrs. Blanche McHenry of Elizabeth, New Jersey; Miss Elizabeth Carhart of Alton; Richard Carhart of Nova Scotia; Frank Carhart of Newark, New Jersey; and Dan Carhart of this city. The sisters are: Mrs. Bertha Cowan of Seattle, Wash.; Mrs. Theo Hinckell of Millers, Nevada; and Mrs. Dora Degnan of St. Louis. No funeral arrangements will be made until relatives at a distance can be heard from.

*************************************************

 

CARLETON, CHARLES/Source: Alton Telegraph, January 21, 1848

Died on the 12th inst., after a long illness, Mr. Charles Carleton, aged about 41.

**************************************************

 

CARMELA, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 1, 1904

William Carmelia, aged 39, died Thursday morning after an illness of several months with stomach trouble. He had lived in Alton many years and was well known in the East End. He leaves his wife and two little sons. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from St. Patrick's church.

***********************************************

 

CARPENTER, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 15, 1911

The funeral of Mrs. Anna Carpenter was held this afternoon from the home of her daughter, Mrs. James Tobin. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. W. T. Cline of the First Methodist church. There were many old friends of Mrs. Carpenter at the funeral. She was for years a nurse in Alton and was well known. The pallbearers were William and John Grenzebach, Prentice Noble, Charles Wade, Arthur Dixon, George Wendt.

*************************************************

 

CARPENTER, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 1, 1918       Civil War Veteran Dies in Quincy    [Note: the newspaper was torn, and very hard to read]

Henry Carpenter, 78, civil war veteran, died at the Soldiers home in Quincy Wednesday, after a short illness, according to advice received this morning by his daughter, Mrs. James Tobin. The body will be brought to Alton this evening. Carpenter was well known in Alton. He lived here the .....[unreadable] part of his life. He was a member of the 22 Regiment, Company B, Illinois Volunteers, and served .... the four years of the civil war. He participated in many of the big .....ties of the war. He is survived by ....Harry Carpenter of Jacks..., Fla., and Mrs. James Tobin of this city. He also leaves two grandchildren. The body will arrive in Alton this evening, and will be taken to the Lock Undertaking parlors. It will remain there until Friday afternoon, ..... o'clock, when the funeral will be held from the undertaking parlors to the City cemetery. The services will be private, and the family have requested that there be no flowers.

************************************************

 

CARR, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1921

Charles Carr, aged 56, a well known resident of Alton, died at his home this morning at 9 o'clock, six hours after he had been stricken with paralysis of the brain. Mrs. Carr had gone to Decatur to attend a sick sister, and was not at home when her husband was stricken and died. His death was a great surprise to everyone in his family circle. He had not been feeling well the night before, and about 3 o'clock he called for help. When his daughters, who were in the house with him, went to him, he told of a change coming over him and they summoned a physician, who said that he had suffered a paralytic stroke. His condition became worse very rapidly. Mr. Carr was for years a foreman for the Illinois Glass Co. at their Alton plant, and for the last six years had been a foreman at the Wood River refinery of the Standard Oil Co. Beside his wife, he leaves three children - Mrs. James Keith, Mrs. Leonard Elble and Archie Carr. He leaves also three brothers and three sisters, John Carr of Alton, Mrs. John Hessenauer of Alberta, Canada, Mrs. John Cassella of Alton, Mrs. T. H. Postelwaite of East Alton, Jonas and Carl Johnson of Alton. The funeral arrangements have not been made.   Interment will be in the Oakwood Cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CARR, EFFIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 11, 1904

Mrs. Effie Carr, wife of Edgar Carr, died this morning at the family home on State street after a brief illness, aged 22. Two weeks ago she gave birth to a child and did not recover. Her illness continued to become worse until this morning when death ended it. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning from the family home, and the body will be taken to Kana, Ill., for burial.

*********************************************

 

CARR, HENRY M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1904              Well Known Alton Business Man Dies

After lingering near death's door for several days, Henry M. Carr passed through the portals Tuesday evening after six day's illness. The fact that Mr. Carr was dangerously ill was given out Sunday, and it was a sad shock to his many friends in Alton. Few knew he was not well as usual. One week before his death, Wednesday, he was taken ill with the grip, which developed into a bad case of pleurisy and also settled upon his kidneys. His condition became alarming Saturday, and on Sunday it was announced that there was but little hope of his recovery. From that time until death ended the week of suffering, Mr. Carr was conscious but little of the time. Uraemic poisoning produced unconsciousness, from which he rallied Tuesday morning for a brief period, which gave his family and friends much hope, but he relapsed in a short time and passed away about 7:45 o'clock Tuesday evening. In the death of Mr. Carr the city of Alton has lost one of her best citizens; the Baptist church has lost one of its most valuable and active members, and the family have lost a member who at all times was devoted to them. Mr. Carr's friendship was one that was invaluable to those who knew him best. He was genial with all and counted in his circle of friends all those who knew him, and his acquaintance was a wide one. During the many years he was in business in Alton with Mr. W. M. Pierson, he had merited the confidence the people reposed in him. Mr. Carr's character was of the uncompromising type, always ready to go to great length to help a friend or to support a good cause, even at a risk of injuring himself. The destruction of the store of the Pierson & Carr Dry Goods Company by fire closed his business career in Alton. Mr. Carr was a member and treasurer of the First Baptist church of Alton, treasurer of the Baptist General Association of Illinois, and a trustee of Shurtleff College. His health was not good for a long time, and he went to Denver last summer, where he was much improved and returned in good spirits and apparent health. His previous ill health made him powerless to resist the acute disease that attacked him. Mr. Carr leaves his wife and one son, Lewis M. Carr. He was the son of Rev. Lewis C. Carr, a Baptist minister who arrived in Upper Alton about 1866, and who was well known in the Altons. His mother died nearly one year ago in this city. Mr. Carr was in his 59th year. Mr. Carr was born at Chard...., Ohio, May 16, 1846, and was the son of Rev. and Mrs. Lewis C. Carr. His father was well known throughout Illinois in Baptist work, and the son was equally well known, having filled the office of treasurer of the Baptist General Association for fifteen years. He came to Alton in 1866 and was engaged in the dry goods business most of the time until his retirement a few years ago. He was married in 1873 in Alton. He leaves beside his wife and one son, three sisters, Mrs. E. L. Armstrong of New Haven, Conn., Mrs. J. H. Stifler of Bryn Mawr, Pa., Mrs. C. C. Simmons of Verdon, Nebraska. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Baptist church.

****************************************************

 

CARR, MARY ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 2, 1903

Mrs. Mary Ellen Carr, mother of Mr. H. M. Carr, died Sunday morning at 9:15 o'clock at the home of Mr. E. D. Babbitt on Alby street, where she was taken ill three weeks ago. Mrs. Carr was nearly 79 years of age. Her death was due to general debility resulting from old age. Up to three weeks ago her mind was bright as ever, but her body had been failing since last summer and there was a sudden collapse of vital forces, and it became apparent to those who cared for her that the end could not be far away. Sunday morning she passed from unconsciousness into the deep repose that knows no waking in this life. Mrs. Carr was the widow of Rev. L. C. Carr, who was well known as a Baptist minister and worker in Illinois thirty years ago. She was born at Granville, Ohio, and came to Illinois in 1858, going to Moline with her husband to make her home. Her husband died in 1882 while spending a season in Florida, and he was buried there. Mrs. Carr was a member of the Baptist church from girlhood and was very deeply interested in the work of that church. She made her home in Alton with her son over twenty years, until recently, when she resided with some of her other children. On her return to Alton she was in failing health and the decline was rapid. Mrs. Carr leaves beside her son. H. M. Carr, three daughters, Mrs. J. M. Stiffler of Chester, Pa.; Mrs. C. C. Simmons of Kansas City, Kan.; and Mrs. E. L. Armstrong of New Haven, Conn.  The funeral will be Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Baptist church.

***************************************************

 

CARRICO, LETITIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1905

Mrs. Letitia Carrico, who was stricken with paralysis at the home of Mr. R. Porter last Wednesday, died at 6 o'clock last evening at the Porter home on east Fourth street. She was 79 years of age and was born in Ohio. The body will be taken to Laharpe, Ill. for burial. Mrs. Carrico was married at Carrolton and lived there about forty years. She had been making her home with her niece, Mrs. R. Porter, recently. She leaves two children and also two brothers, one being L. G. Coleman of Upper Alton, Mrs. Porter's father. The funeral will be held Friday at Laharpe.

*************************************************

 

CARROLL, BRIDGET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 3, 1904

Mrs. Bridget Carroll, wife of John Carroll, died Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the family home, Eighteenth and Easton streets, aged 60. She had lived in Alton about thirty-five years. All of Mrs. Carroll's children died before her, and she is survived only by her aged husband. Mr. Carroll was for many years engaged in the business of draying, and is one of the best known of the old-time residents of the city. The funeral of Mrs. Carroll will be Monday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

***********************************************

 

CARROLL, JOHN BROUGHTON/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 23, 1846

Died on last Monday morning, John Broughton, infant son of Mr. M. W. Carroll of Alton, aged 2 years and 7 months.

************************************************

 

CARROLL, LILLIAN CORNELIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph                Old Resident, Alton Native, Passes Away ... Spent Whole Life in One House on William Street

Miss Lillian Cornelia Carroll, a lifelong resident of Alton, died this morning in St. Joseph's Hospital, where she had been taken for treatment when her health broke down. Death was due to a complication of diseases. The beginning of her illness was last August when she was stricken with a slight attack of paralysis while she was attending services in St. Paul's Episcopal Church where she had been a member since girlhood. She never was well since that time. About two weeks ago she became much worse and two days ago she was taken to the hospital for treatment. She was born and reared in the home where she spent all of her life, and she seldom was away from that home over night in all the years of her life. To that home her mother had come as a bride about 83 years ago and there the aged mother had lived all the rest of her days, tended by the hands of her faithful daughters, Misses Lillian and Emma Carroll. After the death of the mother, Miss Lillian and Emma continued to live there with their brother, George Carroll. The beautiful devotion of the two sisters to their mother was marked by all who knew the family and at the time of her death six years ago, at the age of 94, the two sisters were left without the one who had been the chief cause of their concern in life. The two sisters in the little old home always welcomed any who came to call and it was a most hospitable place to all visitors. Miss Carroll is survived by one sister, Miss Emma, and two brothers, George of Alton and Gus, living in Michigan. The funeral will be Wednesday at 2 p.m. from the Lock undertaking parlors and will be private. Rev. F. D. Butler will have charge of the services. Interment will be in City cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CARROLL, LOUISA B. (nee BROUGHTON)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 30, 1916               Dies at Great Age - Remembers Vividly Early Alton

Mrs. Louisa Broughton Carroll, in her ninety-sixth year, died Sunday morning at her residence, 512 William street. She had been sinking steadily since Thursday. For a long time she had been growing weaker, but there was no positive indication that her end was close until the breakdown came about three days before she quietly breathed away her life. Mrs. Carroll had lived in the one house on William street since 1842, when she moved there as the young wife of W. M. Carroll, then a prominent business man of Alton. In this house she passed all the remaining days of her life, and for the past eight years she had been unable to leave the house because of a fracture to her hip joint which made it very difficult for her to get about. Mrs. Carroll was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Broughton, and was born in Charlotte, Va., March 5, 1821. At the age of six years she moved with her parents to Nashville, Tenn., where the family resided until 1837, when the family came to Alton. Mrs. Carroll was married to M. W. Carroll of Alton, July 30, 1838, the ceremony being performed by Rev. Charles Howard. They took up their residence in a log house, which stood on what is the site of the Dale Market on City Hall Square, and there they lived until 1842, when the family removed to the house where she resided until the time of her death. Mrs. Carroll was the oldest of five children, all of whom have died except one sister, Mrs. Cornelia Cockrell of Omaha, Neb. Mrs. Carroll was a life long communicant in the Episcopal Church, and until old age disabled her and made it necessary for her to stay at home, she was deeply interested in the work of St. Paul's Church. Mrs. Carroll, though in the last decade of a century was possessed of a mind that was bright and her disposition was a happy one. She was popular among her neighbors and her birthdays were made anniversaries of note in the neighborhood, many friends gathering every recurring anniversary to felicitate with her. She could talk in an interesting manner of the early days of Alton, and could recall the early days vividly. Mrs. Carroll leaves two sons, August T. and George W., and two daughters, Misses Emma and Lillie Carroll. She leaves also a number of nephews and nieces, among the nephews being George T. Davis, Charles Davis of Alton; and Frederick L. Davis of Kansas City, Mo. The death of Mrs. Carroll is an event of more than an ordinary interest. She had a large number of friends, among those who were many years younger than she, and though she had grown to great age, she ever maintained her interest in what was going on about her. During her whole period of invalidism, she was given the most constant and devoted attention of her two daughters, who had given up their whole lives to the service of their mother, and in their bereavement they have the sympathy of all. The funeral of Mrs. Carroll will be held Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home, Rev. Arthur Goodger officiating.

************************************************

 

CARROLL, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1908

Mrs. Margaret Carroll, aged 73, died at her home on Dry street Saturday evening after a long illness due principally to her advanced age. Mrs. Carroll had lived in Alton sixty years, having come here as a young woman. She was twice married and by her first marriage leaves two children, John Sharkey and Miss Margaret Sharkey of Alton, and by her second marriage she had one son, William Carroll, who is a prospector in Alaska. The funeral took place this morning at 9:30 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

************************************************

 

CARROLL, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 29, 1901

Michael Carroll, a well known glassblower, died Sunday morning at his home, Third and Vine street, after a ten days' illness. He was overcome by heat and was sent to St. Joseph's hospital. He was discharged from the hospital Saturday and he went downtown to see his friends. On his return home he suffered a relapse and death resulted in less than eighteen hours. He was 40 years of age and leaves a widow and four children. He was one of the most prominent among the glassblowers and was a man of many good parts and had hosts of friends. Funeral will be Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

**************************************************

 

CARROLL, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 8, 1907

Thomas Carroll, a former resident of Alton, died at his home in East St. Louis Monday, and the remains were brought to Alton this morning, and the funeral held from the Cathedral. The remains were laid to rest beside the father and mother of the deceased in the Greenwood cemetery. Mr. Carroll left Alton when a young man and has been here little since. It was his request that when he died his remains be brought to Alton and laid beside his father and mother.

*********************************************

 

CARROLL, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 15, 1921    Death Strikes As He Was Preparing to Milk Cows...Body Found Two Days Later, Trampled by Cattle Frantic for Food

William Carroll, aged 63, of Alton, was found dead in a stable at the home of Bert Killam, Saturday night at 11 o'clock. He had been dead since Thursday evening, it is supposed, as he was last seen alive Thursday afternoon. His body was in such condition when found that it was impossible to hold a funeral over him, and he was buried Sunday afternoon in the Medora cemetery, brief services being conducted by the Methodist clergyman, Rev. Matthews. It was said today by Lee Carroll, a son of the deceased, that his father owns a farm near Medora and he frequently went up there to look after his interests. When the family of Bert Killam planned to go to St. Louis to spend three or four days, they engaged Mr. Carroll to look after their stock. They had three cows and several horses, and Mr. Carroll was to see that the stock was fed and watered and the cows milked. He had all the stock tied in the barn at the time of his death, and was in the act of starting to milk the cows when he fell over dead. It is supposed heart disease was the cause as he had some slight attacks of that trouble. He fell between two cows and lay there. The cows trampled the body considerably becoming uneasy at going so long without food and water and not being milked. It happened that the Killam family arrived home Saturday night at 11 o'clock, and not finding Mr. Carroll, an investigation was made and his decomposing body was found mutilated by the cows' hoofs in the stable. Word was sent here to his family, and two sons and a son-in-law went to Medora, made arrangements for immediate burial and had the service Sunday afternoon at the cemetery. Mr. Carroll is survived by his wife and two daughters, Mrs. Edward Bennett and Miss Alta Carroll, and two sons, Lee and Frank Carroll, all of Alton. The family reside at 717 East Sixth street. He leaves also two grandchildren, Ralph Bennett and Helen Carroll and one brother and two sisters.

**********************************************

 

CARTER, HENRY D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1901

Moro News - Henry D. Carter died on the 18th. Mr. Carter was 62 years old and with the exception of two years, he lived always on the same place where he was born. He was never married, and for many years he lived happily with his mother, and even after her death several years ago he would not listen to the entreaties of relatives to leave the old farm. Mr. Carter was long a pillar in the Ridgley Christian church, and he was held in high repute by a large circle of friends. Rev. Groner, his pastor, conducted the funeral services Friday, the remains were interred at Omphghent.

********************************************

 

CARTER, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 26, 1914

James Carter, aged 51, died from paralysis Friday morning at his home, 1203 Atwood street. He leaves his wife, one daughter, and two sons, and other relatives. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from Campbell chapel, and Rev. C. A. Brown will officiate.

********************************************

 

CARTER, JANE A./Source: Alton Telegraph, November 5, 1847

Died of typhus fever on the morning of the 4th inst., at the house of her brother-in-law, Mr. B. Runsin of this place, Miss Jane A. Carter, daughter of the late Mr. John Carter of this place, aged about 24 years.

********************************************

 

CARTER, PALMYRA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1914       70 Year Old Colored Woman Found Lying On Floor, Helpless and Suffering from Cold

An inquest was held by Coroner J. M. Sims of Collinsville on Mrs. Palmyra Carter, a colored woman 70 years of age, who died at her home on Washington street in Salu, Sunday, supposedly as the result of exposure from falling out of her bed and remaining on the floor all night. She lived alone, and has been feeling ill for the past few days, according to neighbors. Sunday morning when they saw no one stirring about the house, they made an investigation and found that she had fallen from her bed and lay helpless on the floor with just enough cover to keep her from freezing. She was cared for, but died a few hours afterwards. The coroner's jury decided that death resulted from natural causes.

*********************************************

 

CARTER, PRESLEY N./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1916

Presley N. Carter died last night at 9:30 o'clock at his home in Milton Heights after one week's illness with pneumonia. Mr. Carter was 63 years old. He was born in St. Louis county and spent the greater part of his life on the Missouri side of the Mississippi river. He came to Upper Alton about seven years ago with his family from West Alton, and since that time they have lived at Upper Alton. He leaves four daughters and one son besides his widow. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at West Alton. Mr. Carter drove a kindling wagon around the city. Last fall while driving out of the Illinois Glass Company yards on Second street his wagon was struck by the limited car on the interurban. The car was just new from the shops and was making its first run into Alton when the limited service was inaugurated. Carter's wagon was broken to pieces and he was badly hurt. His escape from death was miraculous. However, he finally recovered entirely and had been attending to his kindling business since. Last Wednesday when the city streets became covered with ice, Carter drove his horse to the blacksmith shop and had sharp shoes put on the animal so he could make deliveries around Alton in the kindling business. Thursday when the ice was still on the streets Carter's wagon skidded when loaded, and overturned on Mills avenue. He had gotten off the wagon just before the accident and was not much hurt. He took sick the same day and went home to bed and never got up again.

*******************************************

 

CARTER, UNKNOWN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 19, 1921

Mrs. John Carter died this afternoon at 1 o'clock at the home of Mrs. Eliza Hill at 633 Alby street, following a stroke of paralysis which she suffered Sunday. Mrs. Carter has long been a resident of Alton and for the past few years has lived at the Hill home. She was over seventy years of age. She leaves three sons, Sam and Robert of Alton, and Lee of Stockton, Calif., and one daughter, Mrs. Henry Allen of Jerseyville. The body will be taken to Jerseyville Wednesday morning for interment.

**********************************************

 

CARY, ANN (nee FAY)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1902

Mrs. Ann Fay Carey, wife of Joseph W. Cary, died shortly after midnight Wednesday morning after a short illness with acute indigestion. She had been a sufferer from stomach trouble and a few weeks ago had a severe attack, but recovered and was able to be about her home and to attend services in the Presbyterian church last Sunday. The illness returned about midnight, and Mrs. Cary seemed to be in such a painful condition that she was assisted from her bed to a chair in order to afford her ease, while Mr. Cary hastened for a physician to relieve her suffering. When he returned he found her in a dying condition and she breathed her last seated in the chair to which she had been moved when the illness came on. Her sudden illness and death was a sad shock to Mr. Cary and her daughter, Mrs. Waples, who did not fully realize that the end was near. Mrs. Cary's maiden name was Ann Fay. She had lived in Alton nearly all her life. She was the mother of two daughters, one of whom died some twelve or fifteen years ago when quite young. Her life has been a singularly happy one, and her home a model for her family. She was a well known member of society and the functions she gave were characterized by the quiet, yet genial hospitalities she dispensed. She was a tried and true friend to all her friends, and true in all her relations in life. In early life she was bereft of parental care and lived with her sister, Mrs. A. T. Hawley, until she married. When a young girl she united with the Presbyterian church and a more faithful, devoted member that church never had. She was constant in her attendance on all the services. It mattered little whether the weather was fair or foul, the regular attendant always counted on meeting Mrs. Cary. She allowed nothing to interfere with her judgment as to her duty in such matters, and whether it was the usual service on Sabbath or the mid-week meetings and social gatherings, she was rarely absent. In the Presbyterian church she will be sadly missed, as her assistance and substantial cooperation in all church work made her an invaluable member of the ladies societies of the church. Her advice was always heeded and was proved good. The regular meeting of the Aid society which was to have been held this afternoon was postponed on account of Mrs. Cary's death. She leaves a husband to whom she was married in October 1865, and one daughter, Mrs. Walter L. Waples of this city. She leaves also three sisters, Mrs. Elia Phinney of Alton, to whom the death of Mrs. Cary will be a heavy blow as they were twins and were together during their whole lives whenever it was possible; also Mrs. A. T. Hawley and Mrs. D. C. Adams of St. Louis, both of whom formerly lived in Alton. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock and services will be conducted at the family home on Twelfth street.

************************************************

 

CARY, JOSEPH W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1922             Retired Jewelry Merchant Dies

Joseph W. Cary, retired business man, died Sunday at 7:45 a.m., at his home on Twelfth Street, following an illness of four days. Death was due to a complication of diseases. He was 84 years old. Mr. Cary, notwithstanding his advanced age, was in good health until recently. He became ill Thursday of last week, and even then his condition was not thought alarming until Saturday when fears for his recovery were felt. Development of pneumonia, and a stroke, Saturday, rendered his condition serious, and Sunday morning the end came. Mr. Cary, during his business career, showed what industry will accomplish, and typified that ideal American, to whom rising in the world is part of his life. Entering business when 17 years old, he rose until he became the head of a great firm. Joseph William Cary was born January 6 1838, at Portland, Conn. He came to Alton in 1855 at the age of 17, and engaged in the jewelry business with his uncle, William Cary. Industrious application to his duties and a steadfast determination to master the details of the business soon made of him a leader in his profession, and it was not long until he purchased his uncle's interest and conducted the business himself. In the early 80s, seeding wider fields, he went to St. Louis and entered the firm of Steidman and Lange, a jewelry supply house. The firm later became known as J. W. Cary & Co. Five years ago, Mr. Cary retired. Mr. Cary, in 1863, was married to Miss Ann Fay, a native of Alton and a daughter of Thomas Fay, prominent in the pork packing business in the earlier history of Alton. Of this marriage, two children were born, of whom one - Mrs. W. B. Robinson, survives. The other daughter, Nellie Cary, died when ten years old. Mrs. Cary died more than 20 years ago. Mr. Cary is survived also by a sister, Mrs. H. W. Ibbotson of Brooklyn. It is not known if Mrs. Ibbotson will be able to make the journey to Alton, because of her advanced age. Death of Mr. Cary removes from Alton a well-known and greatly respected citizen. During his business career he made many friends by his affability. His competitors regarded him as one to be feared always in competition, but one with whom honor came first. The funeral of Mr. Carey will be held Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Mr. Cary went to school in Alton and there are still here some of those who went to school with him. He was devoted to outdoors sports and was known as an expert at sailing a yacht. He formerly kept a fast sailboat on the Mississippi, but for the past twenty-five years had confined his sailing to the times when he would be spending his summer vacation at Harbor Beach, Mich. He was planning only last week for going to Harbor, Mich., for the summer, and was looking forward with great pleasure to having an outing there with Frank R. Milnor of Alton, whom he had known from boyhood.

************************************************

 

CASH, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1908                 Old and Out of Work - Man Cuts Own Throat to Commit Suicide

James Cash, aged about 60, old and out of work, committed suicide in the bathroom at the Dawson hotel this morning by cutting his throat with a razor. Cash was formerly employed at the glassworks doing the work of a "carrying-in" boy, but he was too old and stiff to come up to the requirements and he was ____ missed about four weeks ago. He would try every day to get work, but much drinking and the advance of age had made him feeble. He had taken to drinking considerably since he got out of work and this morning he solicited several drinks at neighboring saloons before he cut his throat. He had a room near the bathroom. Clothed fully and wearing his hat and overcoat, he went to the bathroom and there cut his throat. He made four or five steps to a window where he laid the razor on the window sill, then he went back to the bathtub and leaning over it, let the blood drain into the tub to avoid making a muss on the floor. Mrs. Glynn, the proprietor of the hotel, had been kind to him and had not bothered him when he did not pay his board promptly so he evidently desired to spare all the trouble he could to his benefactor. The body was found in the bath tub by a man working at the hotel, James Lambert, who reported it to Mrs. Glynn. Dr. Duggan was called but he found the man dead. Coroner Streeper was summoned and he took charge of the body. At the hotel it was said that Cash had written to his sister, Mrs. Mary Blanchard at Bowling Green, Missouri, asking her to send him some money. He had told that he expected an answer to his letter this morning, and when it did not come he seemed to be very down-hearted. He told his friends he was going away shortly before he killed himself, and nothing more was seen of him until his body was found in the bathtub. Coroner Streeper will make an effort to find the relatives of Cash. They are said to be well-to-do and to own considerable real estate. Cash himself is said to have used up a large amount of money, most of which he spent for drink. The sister will send for the body.

*********************************************

 

CASNER, ALTA ZARA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 4, 1921

Mrs. Alta Zara Casner, a resident of Alton for a number of years, died Sunday evening at 6:30 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Chris Wohnlich on Rogers avenue, after a four days illness with pneumonia. The deceased is survived by her husband, W. L. Casner, one daughter, Mrs. Chris Wohnlich, and one son, Frank; also 12 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday afternoon with interment in Oakwood cemetery.

************************************************

 

CASON, CHARLES MACK FRANCIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 9, 1918

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cason, Charles Mack Francis, died at the family home at 920 Alby street this morning at ten minutes of four. The baby was born on the 29th of January. The body will be taken to Elsah for burial on Monday morning. The funeral will be held at 10 o'clock.

************************************************

 

CASTELLO, UNKNOWN CHILD/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, June 21, 1855

A child about two years old, son of Mr. James Castello, was run over by a load wagon, near the school house on State street, yesterday afternoon, the wheels of the wagon passing over and crushing the skull, and forcing out the brains, causing instant death. The driver, a young man from Jerseyville, was walking behind the wagon and did not see the child. An inquest was held over the body and the jury returned a verdict setting forth the facts mainly as stated, and censuring the driver for culpable negligence in driving his team. It is a long time since we have been called to chronicle so shocking an occurrence. We learn since writing the above, that the driver was arrested and examined before Justice Pinckard, who discharged him. This dreadful accident, we hope, will serve as a warning to careless drivers, especially in the streets of the city.

*************************************************

 

CASTLE, LYNUS "CHARLIE" T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1910

Lynas T. Castle, auditor of the Illinois Terminal railroad, died at his home in Upper Alton Friday evening at 9 o'clock after an illness of a few days. Mr. Castle never regained consciousness after he was stricken Wednesday night. It will be remembered he was engaged in winding the clock when he fell unconscious to the floor, and he never revived. The physicians pronounced his malady to be uraemic poisoning, resulting from kidney trouble, and from the first held out no hope of recovery. Mr. Castle was born in Upper Alton and was 56 years of age. He was the son of Prof. and Mrs. O. L. Castle, and his father was an instructor in Shurtleff college for many years. His family was always highly esteemed, and Mr. Castle was respected by all who knew him. Almost his entire life was passed in Upper Alton. He was employed by the Big Four railroad for many years, and filled the post of agent at the freight depot in Alton. He resigned that position to take charge of a mining venture in New Mexico, but when this failed he returned to his old home and later took a position with the Illinois Glass Co. When the Illinois Terminal needed his services he became auditor of that railroad, which position he held until his death. He was a man who made enduring friendships, and among the men who worked for him in the many years he was in railroad work there is not one but is sorry that "Charlie" Castle, as he was familiarly known, is dead. He was easy to get along with, was a just man, and very conscientious. He married Miss Nannie Warnock, who survives him. He had no children. He leaves beside his wife, his mother, who home is in Springfield with her son, L. M. Castle. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Upper Alton Baptist Church.

************************************************

 

CASTOR, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 23, 1908

Mrs. Mary Castor, wife of William Castor, died at 2:30 o'clock this morning at the residence, Third and Cherry streets, after an illness beginning more than a year ago and which developed complications. She is survived by her husband and three children, and the body will be shipped to Philadelphia tonight for burial.

**********************************************

 

CASWELL, HENRY C./Source: Alton Telegraph, March 2, 1844

Died, in Upper Alton, Illinois, on Tuesday the 27th of February, 1844, after a long and painful illness, Mr. Henry C. Caswell, in the 32d year of his age. The deceased was originally from Jefferson County, New York, where his father and several of his connection still reside, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him for his sober, industrious, and temperate habits, and the practical benevolence and charity of his life. He was prompt to relieve the wants and miseries of the distressed, and never did suffering humanity appeal to his benevolence in vain. For several years, Mr. Caswell had been a steadfast believer in the impartial and universal goodness of God to all his offspring, which would eventuate in the restitution of all things, and to the restoration of the whole human family to holiness and consequent happiness, in which faith he continued without wavering to the last. He has left a wife and three young and lovejoy daughters, to whom he had endeared himself by unceasing acts of kindness and attention. Other near relations and friends mourn his loss, but may all who feel interested in this dispensation be fully persuaded that their loss is his gain. May they perpetuate the memory of his character by copying his virtues, and may the mercies of that God, in whom he trusted, abundantly console and bless them.

************************************************

 

CAULEY, LIZZIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1916

Mrs. Lizzie Cauley, aged 46 years, died last evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Hugh McNary, at 659 E. Third street at 11 o'clock. Mrs. Cauley leaves three children, Mrs. Cauley, Sidney Cauley of Lock Haven, and Benjamin Cauley of Alton. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at three o'clock from the home, Rev. S. D. McKenney, officating.

************************************************

 

CAVENDER, ROBERT SMITH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1900

Robert Smith Cavender, one of the old residents of Alton, died at 9:30 o'clock this morning at his home on Franklin street, after an illness of several weeks of heart trouble. He was 68 years of age, and lived in Alton since 1863, being a member of one of the most prominent families of Alton. He leaves a wife and some distant relatives in this city. Mr. Cavender was born at Franklin, N. H., in 1831, and came west in 1836, making his home in St. Louis, where he remained until his health failed and he went south. In 1863 he came to Alton, having married Caroline Atwood, daughter of Moses G. Atwood, ten years previous. Mrs. Cavender is still living here. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home on Franklin street.

***********************************************

 

CHADWICK, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 29, 1913              Wood River Engineer Meets Terrible Death

Henry Chadwick of Wood River, engineer of the yard train in the Standard Oil refinery yards, met a tragic death Sunday, when he became caught in the cogs of his engine when a wire cable snapped and threw him into the machine and he was terribly torn and crushed. The accident occurred at 9 o'clock in the morning, and Chadwick was rushed to the St. Joseph's Hospital where Dr. Taphorn amputated his limb, but the shock to his system was so great that he died at 2 o'clock. A new crane, used for lifting coal from cars, had been installed, and Chadwick and his fireman, John Allen, were trying to correct the faulty working of the new equipment. The power had been shut off and Chadwick and Allen were under the machine seeking to make the correction. Suddenly, and for a reason that has not been explained, the machine started. A powerful steel cable snapped and one, curling about Chadwick's body, carried him into the cogs of the machine. Chadwick's foot was caught in the cogs and slowly, but surely, he was drawn toward certain death, despite his struggles to free himself. He cried for his companion to shut off the power. Allen was quick to realize the peril of his superior, and he already had thrown his full weight on the brake. This, in a measure, checked the progress, but already Chadwick's leg had been drawn through the cogs and the limb had been crushed to a point far above the knee. The fireman realized that if he stepped from the brake and reached the throttle and shut off the power, Chadwick's body would be drawn into the powerful machine and he would be killed instantly, and the body mangled out of all human form. Allen called loudly for help, and another workman was told to shut off the steam. The engine ceased its operations and the engineer still was unable to extricate himself from the cogs. He suffered untold agony as the machine was reversed and the wheels turned so that the cog's grasp of his leg was released. He was unconscious when he was extricated and was hurried to St. Joseph's Hospital in Alton. He did not regain consciousness, and died a few minutes after the surgeons began operating on him. Chadwick was 29 years old. His home was at Wood River, where he lived. Coroner Sims took charge of the body and conducted an inquest this afternoon. Chadwick leaves his wife and three little children, David, Ruth and Paul; also his mother, Mrs. R. S. Taylor. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1 o'clock, from the home in Wood River, and burial will be in the Oakwood Cemetery in Upper Alton. Dr. J. M. Sims of Collinsville arrived this afternoon to hold an inquest at 2 o'clock on Henry Chadwick at the Chadwick home in Wood River.

**********************************************

 

CHAFFER, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 3, 1902

Mrs. Elizabeth Chaffer, wife of William Chaffer, died Saturday afternoon at her home, 1234 Main street, after a long illness with Bright's disease. She has been in a dying condition several months and the end was expected when it came. She was 68 years of age and had been a resident of Alton many years. She leaves beside her husband, a family of children, all well known residents of Alton. The funeral services will be held at the Cathedral Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock, and burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

*********************************************

 

CHAFLANT, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 25, 1902

Mrs. Minnie Chaflant, aged 30, died at St. Joseph's hospital Wednesday evening, at 5 o'clock. The funeral will be tomorrow morning from the home of J. Fahrig at Ridge and Union streets.

**********************************************

 

CHALK, HARRY P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 16, 1913

Harry P. Chalk, aged 62, died at his home, 537 East Seventh street, Tuesday morning at 11:40 o'clock after an illness which had been acute since Sunday. Mr. Chalk's death was a shocking surprise to a very large number of friends and intimate associates. He had been in poor health for some time, but he said so little about it, and continued so steadily at his work that there was none who regarded his case as a serious one. He was employed as a salesman for the Scarritt-Constock Furniture Company of St. Louis. He had continued at his work up to the time he came home, and after that was around the streets and was greeted by many of his friends. Last Saturday he was taken very seriously ill, and his case became much worse as the malady progressed. Sunday night he was considered somewhat better, and his son, Harry, who had come from Chicago to see him, returned home. He was summoned back when the case continued to grow worse. Monday night it was believed he would not survive the night. He died shortly before noon Tuesday, surrounded by his family. Mr. Chalk came to Alton forty-seven years ago. He was married ten years later. He is survived by his wife and three sons, William P., Hart, and Harry Chalk, the latter of Chicago. Mr. Chalk was a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Elks, in both of which orders he had taken deep interest. He was a man of very pronounced convictions, a man who made firm friendships with those who knew him best, and he leaves a large number of devoted friends who sincerely mourn his death. The funeral of Mr. Chalk will be Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

*********************************************

 

CHALLACOMBE, HAROLD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 17, 1922           Deadly Anthrax Claims Victim After a Week   

Harold Challacombe, the 6-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Challacombe, of Challacombe, was dying from anthrax this afternoon at St. Joseph's Hospital. The dread disease, one that is prevalent among cattle and is recognized as incurable both in man and beast, made its appearance in the boy last Tuesday. He was complaining of a toothache and soon what was taken for fever blisters appeared around his mouth. His case continued to grow worse, and he was brought to St. Joseph's Hospital in the hope that something could be done for him that would save his life. The disease was diagnosed an anthrax. He has since continued to grow worse and today had reached a stage that made it seem impossible that he could last through the day. Anthrax is a disease which rarely appears in a human being. When it does, it is, as a rule, contracted from some horse that had the disease. Member of the family said today that they had no knowledge of how the boy became exposed to the deadly malady. Mr. and Mrs. Ray Birkenmeyer of Fidelity, grandparents of the little victim of anthrax, are in town watching the development of the little patient. Mrs. Challacombe is a niece of Mrs. Jesse Rich of Phinney avenue.

 

Anthrax Case Patient Dies in Hospital

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1922

The condition of Harold Challacombe, who has been a patient in St. Joseph's hospital suffering from the dreadful anthrax, continued very bad all night last night and morning, and he died at 1:10 p.m. Doctors who had viewed the boy did not believe that there was a chance for the lad to recover. There is a treatment for the disease which has been attended with some success, but the ideas had advanced far when it was diagnosed, after he had been brought to St. Joseph's hospital. The disease was suspected, and surgeons gave warning of their suspicions on the arrival of the patient here, but it was not until a microscopic examination of his blood had been made that the diagnosis was certain. The germs of the disease were shown plainly in the speciment of blood that was examined under a powerful glass, and extreme cautions were taken from that time on to guard against anyone becoming infected by the germs. Members of the family reiterated today that they have no idea as to how the disease happened to afflict the boy. They do keep sheep on their place at Challacombe, and often sheep have been known to have the disease, but so far as the family know there has been no sickness of any kind among the sheep. Medical books refer to the disease as one that is sometimes contracted by human beings who handle hides and pelts of animals which have been afflicted. Dogs and cats seem to be immune, as well as all cold blooded animals. The boy was believed to be dying yesterday afternoon, but he continued to live during the night, and this morning. He was delirious and the symptomic development of the case was reported to have been rapid. The death of the child this afternoon followed a period of complete collapse characteristic of the disease. The parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Challacombe, have another child.

************************************************

 

CHALLACOMBE, KATE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 16, 1921

Mrs. Kate Challacombe, widow of Aaron Challacombe, died this morning at 9 o'clock at the home of her son, Norman Challacombe, 1805 State street, after a long period of disability due chiefly to her age. She was 78 years old. Mrs. Challacombe had experienced difficulty in getting around owing to a crippled condition due to a fall, about a year ago. She had previously suffered very serious injuries by falling at her home on State Street, but she recovered, showing remarkable rallying power. She was a good mother to her family and in the neighborhood where she lived she was generally admired and loved. Her chief interest had centered in her home, but she was also always interested in her neighbors and friends. She was a member of the Beem family in Alton, and she leaves two sisters residing here, Misses Annie and Elizabeth Beem. She leaves also two sons, Norman and Allen Challacombe, both residents of Alton. She was a member of the Baptist church and the funeral services Friday afternoon will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing, pastor of the First Baptist Church. Mrs. Challacombe was born near Pittsburg, Pa., but was reared in Alton, having come here at an early age and she was married here.

****************************************************

 

CHALLACOMBE, NANCY GLORIANA (nee CARSON)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 8, 1920        Head of Four Generations Passes Away

Mrs. Nancy Gloriana Carson Challacombe, aged 91, and the oldest of four generations, died at her home on Locust Hill, at Challacombe, Ill., where she has resided for 70 years of more. She was the widow of Nicholas Challacombe, who died ten years ago. Both were well known in Alton. Mrs. Challacombe is survived by three sons: W. J. Challacombe of Challacombe; Nicholas of Everett, Wash.; and Wesley of Carlinville; and by four daughters: Mrs. Mary Hartwell; Mrs. Anna Searles; and Mrs. Dora Butler of Challacombe, and Mrs. Mabel Birchard of Everett, Wash.  Mrs. Charles Beall is a granddaughter. Mrs. Challacombe leaves a large number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. The Challacombe family is one of the best known in this part of Illinois, Mr. and Mrs. Challacombe going there to reside following their marriage, March 27, 1847. Their holdings are large, covering a great tract of land. Mrs. Challacombe was born in Franklin, Tenn., of Scotch parentage. Her death is the third in the family this year, the others being her brother, Gideon Carson, and her brother-in-law, Horace Warner, bot of whom died in January at their home near Challacombe. The funeral will be held from the home Friday afternoon, and burial will be in Summerville cemetery. Many from Alton plan to go out to attend the funeral.

************************************************

 

CHALLACOMBE, NICHOLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1913               Pioneer Melville Farmer Dies

Nicholas Challacombe, the pioneer Grafton road farmer, who was burned while fighting a fire in his field two weeks ago, died at his home at 9 o'clock Thursday morning. Mr. Challacombe was in apparent good health and was active about his farm up to the time of the accident. He was of an especially sunny disposition and bid fair to reach the century mark. The burns at the time of the accident were not supposed to be fatal, but poisoning set in and for the past week Mr. Challacombe has been sinking. He was surrounded by the members of his family at the time of his death. Nicholas Challacombe was one of the pioneer settlers in the Melville district. His wife, Mary Challacombe, who survives, is 83 years of age and still enjoys good health. She has been at the side of her aged husband constantly since his injury. Three daughters survive, Miss Jennie Challacombe, who resides at home; Mrs. O. H. Darrow of Champaign; and Mrs. R. L. Smith of Godfrey; and one son, James Challacombe. A sister, Mrs. Eliza Drew, the last member of the Challacombe family who came to this country from England, resides in Irving, Ill. There are also fourteen grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to the Melville church.

***********************************************

 

CHALLACOMBE, WILLIE M./Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, January 7, 1875

Died in this city [Alton] on the 5th inst., of scarlet rash, Willie M., son of Capt. A. and Mrs. Kate Challacombe, aged four years and four months.

***************************************************

 

CHALLACOMBE, EDITH M./Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, January 7, 1875

Died in this city [Alton] on the 30th inst., of cholera infantum, Edith M., infant daughter of Capt. A. and Mrs. Kate E. Challacombe, aged 2 years and 9 months.

**************************************************

 

CHALLENGSWORTH, BERTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 1, 1922

The funeral of Mrs. Bertha Challengsworth, wife of Harry Challengsworth, was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home at Fosterburg, and was attended by a large number of relatives, friends and neighbors.

***********************************************

 

CHALLENSWORTH, BESSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1901

Bessie, four years old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Challingsworth, died this morning at the home of cholera morbus. The child was alive and well yesterday afternoon, and was taken sick suddenly, and medical science could do nothing. She was a piece of William C. Shaefer of the city.

**********************************************

 

CHALLENGSWORTH, HELEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 5, 1922

Helen, the five year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Challengsworth of 402 Belle street, died Sunday morning from the effects of blood poisoning, which began with a bite of a mosquito. The attending surgeon diagnosed the trouble as being due to infection, and finally it became necessary to resort to a surgical operation in the hope of giving relief. The operation did not halt the spread of the infection, which progressed until finally it proved fatal, involving vital organs of the body. She had been in St. Joseph's hospital where she was taken for the surgical operation that was depended upon to halt the spread of the trouble. The bite was on the child's ankle. It may have been scratched by the child herself, and infection thus introduced into the wound. The funeral was held today and burial was in the Fosterburg cemetery. The family formerly lived at Fosterburg. The funeral was held from SS Peter and Paul's Cathedral, with the Rev. Peter Smith officiating. Music for the funeral was furnished by Mrs. J. B. Cahill.

*********************************************

 

CHALLENGSWORTH, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 13, 1908

Mrs. Martha Challengsworth, aged 73, died this afternoon at her home in Fosterburg after an illness resulting from the weakness of age. She had lived in Madison county 40 years. She was a native of England. Mrs. Challengsworth leaves four children, William and Amos Challengsworth, Mrs. Lucinda Hill and Mrs. Melinda Heines. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

******************************************

 

CHALLENGSWORTH, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 1, 1906

Thomas Challengsworth, a prominent resident of Fosterburg, died this afternoon after a long illness. He was about 50 years of age. He leaves his wife and several children. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

****************************************

 

CHAMBERS, JACOB/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 7, 1907

Jacob Chambers, aged 76, died Tuesday evening at 6:30 o'clock at his home in Godfrey township after an illness of one month from a complication of diseases. He had lived near Godfrey more than thirty years and he was well known in Alton and was highly respected by all who knew him. He leaves beside his wife, six children, four daughters: Mrs. Sallie Francis, Mrs. Annie Gerner, Mrs. Fannie Graves, Miss Lelia Chambers; and two sons: Jacob and John Chambers. The body will be taken to East Newbern for burial tomorrow morning, and services will be conducted by Rev. Albrecht of Elsah.

******************************************

 

CHAMPION, EDWARD/Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, May 8, 1902

Edward D. Champion, aged 65, died Thursday at his home on Fifth street, near Market, after a long and painful illness with dropsy. He was a well-known fisherman and had lived in Alton many years.

*******************************************

 

CHANEY, ELVIRA V./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 27, 1917         Invalid Woman Dies, Was Ill Nearly 55 Years, Following the Death of Her Civil War Soldier Husband

Mrs. Elvira V. Chaney died this morning at 6:50 o'clock at the home of her brother, B. C. Dailey, on Merchant street in Upper Alton, after an illness which dates back more than a half century. Mrs. Chaney would have been 77 years old next November. Her final illness commenced about one year ago, and since that time she has been very sick, but she had been an invalid practically 55 years, since her husband was killed during the Civil War. Mrs. Chaney was born in Alton and was a sister to B. C. Dailey. Her death this morning removes the last member of her family, with the exception of Mr. Dailey. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ephriam Dailey, old residents of Alton many years ago. There were eight children in the family, and today B. C. Dailey, the venerable Upper Alton business man, is the last survivor of his family. Mrs. Chaney was the widow of Johnston Chaney, and his tragic death about one year after their marriage was responsible for breaking down her health and leaving her an invalid the rest of her life. Soon after their marriage in Alton, the Civil War broke out and Mr. Chaney enlisted in the service. He had been away for a time and came home on a furlough. He had a friend who was an engineer on the Terre Haute railroad, and during the time Mr. Chaney was off duty in the time of war, he took a ride in the engine on the railroad with his friend, in the eastern part of the state. A heavy rain had occurred over the country, and there were many washouts along the railroads. After the engine had proceeded some distance, it ran into a washout and went into the ditch. Chaney was killed in the accident and was the only person in the wreck who was hurt at all. His wife was at the home of her brother, B. C. Dailey at the time the news came announcing his death. She had been a strong woman in the best of health up to that time, but never afterward was she well. She lived with her aged mother many years after her husband's death, but practically all her life she has spent with her brother, Mr. Dailey. For some time Mrs. Chaney has been quite ill, and it was known that she would not recover. During the last few days the relatives expected the end to come. Mrs. Chaney leaves no children. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at the home of B. C. Dailey, on Merchant street. Burial will be in Alton City Cemetery on the lot beside the body of her husband, who preceded her to the grave more than a half century ago.

*****************************************

 

CHANEY, JOHNSON/Source: Alton Telegraph, July 25, 1862

The corpse of the late Johnson Chaney, who was killed by the accident on the Terre Haute, Alton & St. Louis railroad, on Wednesday night last, arrived in this city last evening and was buried this morning in the City cemetery. Mr. C. had long been a resident of this city, and his relatives and friends feel deeply his untimely death.

**************************************************

 

CHANNON, DOROTHY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 17, 1902

Dorothy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Channon, died Wednesday evening at the family home, 409 Market street, after an illness of bronchitis and whooping cough, resulting from measles. The child had never recovered from an illness with the measles, and an acute case of bronchitis was developed. She was two years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Channing recently came to Alton, Mr. Channing have been appointed superintendent of the electric department of the Alton Railway, Gas and Electric Company. The body was taken to Quincy this afternoon for burial.

************************************************

 

CHAPIN, MARGARET A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1912

Miss Margaret A. Chapin passed away Wednesday night at 9:30 o'clock at the home of her niece, Mrs. John R. Perry Sr., on Washington avenue and Amelia streets, in Upper Alton. Her death had been looked for several days, and the end was watched for and expected any time. She would have been 85 years old on the 11th of next June. She had been ill only three weeks, and the end was hastened by a fall she sustained in the Perry home shortly after arriving there from St. Louis where she had been receiving treatment for her eyes during the winter months. The passing of Miss Chapin ends an interesting and remarkable career. She was born in Albany, N. Y., on June 11, 1827, and was educated in the East. She was a very highly educated and literary woman, and she started to make a fortune for herself in her young days by teaching school. She taught school in the city of St. Louis for thirty-one years, going back and forth from Upper Alton each day. She graduated from Oxford University with the first class that was sent out from that institution. Later, Miss Chapin studied at Monticello Seminary, and afterward she taught in that school a short time before commencing her work with the St. Louis public schools. She came west after completing her education in Oxford, and made her home in Alton, having lived here almost sixty years. She was a very careful and saving woman, and had the most shrewd business facilities. Her fortune was commenced with her first earnings at school teaching, and she always said that it was the first few dollars of a fortune that came the hardest. Back in the sixties in war times, Miss Chapin invested her earnings in government bonds, which with compound interest later on, yielded her immense profits and made her wealthy. She immediately invested in St. Louis business property in the days when it was cheap, and for years she had a handsome income from this investment. She also owns much real estate in Alton, the majority being in Upper Alton, where she held 1200 feet fronting on Washington avenue. Several times during her life she fell heir to some of the property of her relatives. She was a member of a family of nine children, and she is the last one of the family to go to the grave. Her sister, Mrs. Ball, was the last one to die before Miss Chapin, and her death occurred over twenty years ago. Major Chapin, a brother, died about the same time. The Ball estate is a part of Miss Chapin's holdings. Miss Chapin leaves no relatives except a niece, Mrs. J. R. Perry, and a nephew, John C. Matlock, Mrs. Perry's brother, of New York City. Mr. Matlock is on his way now to attend the funeral of his aunt. The funeral arrangements have not been made, but the body will be taken to St. Louis where all of the relatives of deceased have been buried.

**************************************************

 

CHAPLIN, ADDIS G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1905

One man was killed, Addis G. Chaplin, of Upper Alton, and about twenty persons were injured in a wreck on the Illinois Terminal railroad that occurred near the Illinois Terminal roundhouse just east of the Alton city limits, Tuesday morning. January is said to be the unlucky month of the Illinois Terminal, nearly every return of the month bringing around some bad accident. Chaplin's body was taken in charge by Coroner C. N. Streeper of Upper Alton and prepared for burial. He was 40 years of age and leaves a wife and several children in Upper Alton. He had been working for the terminal but a month, having formerly worked as car repairer for the Bluff Line.

***********************************************

 

CHAPLIN, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 27, 1917

Mrs. Anna Chaplin, wife of Jesse Chaplin, died this morning at 12:20 o'clock after an illness of years with complications of diseases. She has been very ill since the middle of May, and her death was looked for for days. Mrs. Chaplin died at the family home at 219 Madison avenue. She is survived by her husband, one daughter, Lela, and her father, who resides in Sonda, Iowa. She was about _1 years of age  [31 or 51].  The funeral will be held on Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home on Madison avenue. Burial will be in the City Cemetery.

**************************************************

 

CHAPMAN, ELIZABETH M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 20, 1911

Mrs. Elizabeth M. Chapman, daughter of Mrs. A. F. Foster of Alton, and a sister of Mrs. George F. Kirsch and Mrs. C. N. Pence, died at the Frisco hospital in St. Louis at 10 o'clock Wednesday night after a long illness. Mrs. Chapman's son, Frank, was employed in the hospital and she was taken there for that reason. She had been living at 702 Euclid place in Alton, and had been a resident of the city for many years. She was 54 years of age. Her daughter, Miss Helen Chapman, has been teaching school in East Alton and had been attending her mother. The body will be brought to Alton for burial.

*************************************************

 

CHAPMAN, LOUISE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 12, 1922

A decline in health which has extended over a period of several years today resulted in the death of Miss Louise Chapman, member of an old and well known Madison county family. The end came this morning at 7 o'clock at the Chapman residence on Hillsboro Avenue. For several weeks her steady weakening helped relatives to become reconciled that the end was near. The funeral will be private. Services will be conducted Friday morning at 10 o'clock from the Chapman residence. Rev. Thomas Dyke of St. Andrews Episcopal church will officiate. Burial will be at Woodlawn cemetery. Miss Chapman was a native of Alton, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Chapman, long time residents of the county. She had made her home in the same residence since 1861. She spent a quiet and home life, finding the greatest joys in her home. When young, she was artistically inclined, and did a great deal of portrait and other painting. Several sisters and brothers survive. They are Mrs. W. H. Hall, Miss Etta Chapman, Joseph and C. E. Chapman, Edwardsville; Mrs. M. W. Clark, Los Angeles, Calif.; Mrs. George F. Fritz, Black Hawk, Colo.; and Mrs. A. C. Atchison, St. Louis.

****************************************************

 

CHAPPELL, JEFFERSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 5, 1902

The funeral of Jefferson Chappell took place Tuesday afternoon from the A. M. E. church on Third street. Rev. W. H. Cole officiated, assisted by Revs. N. J. McCracken, J. W. Summers, P. W. W. Clark, and J. P. Coats. The deceased was highly respected by all who knew him, and was a useful member in the church. He will be missed and his place hard to fill. The pallbearers were: George North, Ba-- Darby, Jim Gill, Jessie Cannon, John Cannon, and John Lawrence.

***********************************************

 

CHAPPELL, LUELLA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1919

Mrs. Luella Chappell, 39 years old, died this morning at 8:05 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital, following an operation last Saturday. Mrs. Chappell has been complaining for years but became seriously sick only recently. Her condition became alarming last Friday and she was taken to the hospital. She lived at 27 East Fifth street. Mrs. Chappel was born at Elsah, Ill. and lived in Alton for nine years. She is survived by her husband, Ephraim Chappell, and three children: Mildred, Harold and Virgil, all of Alton. She is survived also by her mother, Mrs. J. A. Terry of Grafton, Ill., and two brothers, Langford Vanderslice of Harrisburg, Pa., and Ramsey L. Vanderslice of St. Louis. Funeral arrangements have not been made, word being awaited from the brother at Harrisburg.

*************************************************

 

CHARLESS, ANN/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 26, 1842

Died, on Thursday last, after a very short illness, Mrs. Ann Charless, consort of William A. Charless, of this vicinity, aged about 24; leaving a deeply afflicted husband and a young child to deplore their irreparable loss. The deceased was a native of Virginia, but removed to this county about three years since. Her many virtues and early death will long be remembered in the family circle, as well as among many friends and acquaintances, by whom she was highly cherished and tenderly beloved.

************************************************

 

CHARLESS, MAHALA/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, December 11, 1880

Mrs. Mahala Charless of Godfrey died at 4 o'clock this morning of pneumonia after an illness of several weeks duration. She leaves a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn her death.

*************************************************

 

CHARLTON, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 23, 1904

The funeral of Mrs. James Charlton of Fontanet, Ind., took place Sunday morning at 9 o'clock from the Methodist church. Interment at Milton cemetery.

*************************************************

 

CHAVER, UNKNOWN/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, January 17, 1856

A colored woman, named Mrs. Chaver, was burned to death in Hunterstown, the lower part of this city, on the 9th. The weather was excessively cold and she was ironing, standing near the stove, when her clothes caught fire and she was so badly burned as to cause death in a short time.

*************************************************

 

CHEESEMANN, LEVI/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 23, 1909

Levi Cheeseman, a well known Alton glassblower, died in a hospital in St. Louis Thursday morning about 10 o'clock. He was moved to St. Louis last Saturday in a very bad condition. He had been unconscious for about two weeks, almost all of the time, and his condition was said to be very dangerous at the time it was decided to take him to the St. Louis hospital. He was 40 years of age and leaves beside his wife, two children. Mr. Cheeseman was an expert glass worker. His wife's maiden name was Tillie L. Doepke. The family lived on Pearl street. At the time of Mr. Cheeseman's death, members of his family were with him. The body will be brought to Alton for burial and Allen Keiser was summoned to St. Louis to take charge of it.

***********************************************

 

CHEQUER, RICHARD I./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 12, 1909

Richard I. Chequer, aged 45, died at midnight, Friday, from aneurism of one of the large arteries near his heart. Mr. Chequer had been very ill for some time, although he was able to be out. The cause of his trouble is doubtful. It was believed that a heavy strain he underwent in East St. Louis over a year ago caused the illness, but experts in such troubles stated that they believed that a rheumatic attack he had in childhood was responsible. Mr. Chequer came to Alton about a year ago, and was the last member of the firm, Scheffel, Campbell & Chequer, who own a meat market in East St. Louis, and who bought out the Kirsch Company in Alton. The death of Mr. Chequer has an added touch of sadness in that just three weeks ago a child was born in his home. Mr. Chequer was in charge of the meat market here until he was taken ill, and Mr. Campbell has since been staying here. From the beginning of his illness the attending physicians could hold out no hope of his recovery. Mr. Chequer would be able to go down town occasionally, but was very weak and his condition was such the doctors said he would be liable to die at any moment. Mr. Chequer came here from East St. Louis last September and has been living at Sixteenth and Liberty street. He leaves beside his wife, two children. He was a native of Swindon, Wilkeshire, England. The funeral services will be conducted Monday and the remains will be shipped to East St. Louis Monday noon at 10:35 a.m.

***********************************************

 

CHERRIER, AMELIA (nee LAGARCE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 19, 1907

Mrs. Amelia Cherrier, nee Lagarce, died last Sunday at the age of 64 years _ months and 26 days at her home in Bethalto. She was born March 20, 1843 in St. Louis County, Mo., and died Sept. 15. Her illness was of short duration, only four days. Her parents were among the first settlers in St. Louis County coming from France, she was the youngest of a large family, all of whom with the exception of one sister, Mrs. Julia Ohaney of New Orleans, La., died before her. She was married at the age of 26 years to Peter Cherrier in St. Louis County, who died nine years ago. She had nine children, six boys and three girls, of which four sons, John, Albert, Fred and Robert, and one daughter, Mrs. William Elliot, are living. She leaves also three grandchildren. During her married life she resided in South Dakota, Florida and Louisiana, coming to Illinois in 1892 and living in Bethalto the past seven years. Rev. J. W. Richie officiated at the funeral Tuesday and she was interred in the City cemetery. The pallbearers were: J. W. McCracken, J. W. Leverett, Louis Fritz, Albert Behrends, John G. Klein, Walter Quillan.

*************************************************

 

CHESSEN, JAMES SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 20, 1917          Old Time Horseman Dies Monday Evening

James Chessen, old time horse trainer, is dead. He was 86 years of age. Readers of the Telegraph will recall that annually, after Christmas Day, there would be a newspaper account of a reunion of the Chessen family, and at each of these the old time horse trainer would be reported as dancing the "broomstick" dance, also he would sing one of those old-time interminable songs, "Old King Cole," and he could keep up the very difficult dance and the song apparently without trouble for a long period, or until everybody else would be tired out. These exhibitions of his strength of mind and body were interesting to his family and friends, and last Christmas he observed his usual form of celebrating Christmas. He also danced with the guests at the dinner party. A little while after Christmas the aged man was taken very ill with the grippe, and though he had remarkable strength for one of his years, he was unable to shake off the malady and it left consequences which proved fatal. He had been very sick for weeks, but at times would rally and seem in a fair way to recover. On the day of the opening of the Telegraph, January 20, he was unable to call and pay his respects at the office of the paper he had read for many, many years, but he insisted that his wife come to represent him and convey his best wishes. At that time Mrs. Chessen said that reports of his recovery were over optimistic, that he was far from being well. Jim Chessen was one of the best known men in the west side of Madison county. He was a native of England, and he made several visits back there and stayed for long periods when he would go. But Alton was his favorite home and he came back here to pass the closing days of his life. He was known as an expert trainer of animals. No man in the animal training profession ever understood an animal better, or had more success. It is related that when he was engaged in farming just east of Alton, on the East Alton Road, he had every animal on his place trained to perform tricks, with what seemed human intelligence. Horses, dogs, cats, pigs, poultry, monkeys - in fact, everything that came on the place had to go through a course of education. He was an expert trainer of race horses. Jim was an ardent Republican, and was always sure to be betting at election time on the success of the Republican party. He took a like interest in local elections. He had a stallion, Chessen Wilkes, sire of some fast racers, trained to manifest an ugly disposition and make vicious attack on any person who would call the horse a Democrat. This stallion performed many other tricks, among them to pick up with his teeth an object placed in the bottom of a barrel of water. To prevent "interfering" by a promising race horse, a bad defect, he trained a dog to run between her hind legs, avoiding her flying feet, and nipping at the horse's legs when the feet came too close together. Once a trained dog of his was lost in St. Louis. He was found by a policeman who required identification by the owner. Jim put the dog through a dozen or more difficult tricks, establishing his ownership. He always had a dog that would "drive" a horse for him. Had he engaged in the animal training business as a means of making a living, he would have made a great name for himself in the world, instead of having merely a local reputation. In a judicial campaign he had a dog trained to pick among the candidate cards for the correct one who was favored by Chessen, and that man was elected. Jim seldom lost money on an election. Illustrating the strength of the aged man, it is recalled that on his eighty-fifth birthday, last May, he celebrated by breaking in a horse. Friends of the aged man also commented that it was a coincidence that his death occurred so soon after the death of his old friend, Tom Belk. Said one friend, "There was nothing either of the old friends liked to do so well as to 'get it' on the other in a horse or cattle trade, and they frequently traded back and forth." James Chessen came to this country when a young man. He farmed for many years east of Alton, but when he felt a rest was necessary he retired and after spending several years at his old home in England, he came back to Alton, bringing a wife with him. Mrs. Chessen survives him. He leaves beside his wife, two children: James Chessen, the Belle street meat dealer; and Mrs. Julius Haas. He leaves also six grandchildren, and two stepchildren, Marian and Arthur Dines, both of whom lived with him. Mr. Chessen came to the United States from his birthplace, Wareham, Norfolk, England, when he was 21 years of age. He was born there in May 1, 1831. He came to Alton forty-seven years ago. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9:30 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1917

The esteem in which he was held by all classes of people was attested this morning at the funeral of James Chessen, Sr., by the large attendance at his funeral, which was held from St. Patrick's Church. Among the sorrowing friends were many residents of Wood River township, where he lived so many years, and many from Alton. Alton was represented by all classes of people - business, professional men, and other citizens - men, women, and children. A solemn requiem high mass was sung by Rev. Fr. Kehoe, the pastor, and assistants, and burial was in Oakwood Cemetery, Upper Alton, beneath a very heavy coverlet of flowers.

**************************************************

 

CHESSEN, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 6, 1903

Mrs. James Chessen, wife of the well known farmer and stock raiser, east of Alton, died Thursday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Julius Haas, at 200(?) Walnut street. Mrs. Chessen was brought to Alton recently in hope that the change would do her failing health good and in order that she might be nearer the attending physician. She continued to grow worse after the change, and her death was expected to occur at any minute during the last few days of her illness. Mrs. Chessen was 65 years of age. She was born in England and was married there to James Chessen in 1856. She came to America the following year with her husband, and some time afterward the family settled between Alton and East Alton. She was a faithful wife to her husband and a good mother to her children. She leaves beside her husband, two children: Mrs. Julius Haas and James Chessen Jr. of Alton. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence of Julius Haas, and services will be conducted by Rev. H. M. Chittenden. Burial will be in the Upper Alton Cemetery.

***********************************************

 

CHILD, GEORGE B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 26, 1922    Descendent of Pilgrims Brought to American on the Mayflower Dies

Funeral services were held Thursday for George B. Child, 71 years old, who died at Hardin, Ill, this week. He was descended from one of the Pilgrims who came over on the "Mayflower." Child was the last descendant of the old Colonial family. He died in the armchair brought over by his Puritan ancestors. His father, Benjamin Child, emigrated from Massachusetts to Illinois in 1835, going to the present site of Hardin, known at that time as "Child's Landing." Later, Benjamin Child donated this land to Calhoun County, and he named it Hardin, after Gov. Hardin of South Carolina. For 38 years the postmaster of Hardin was a member of the Child family. Benjamin Child was appointed postmaster in 1847, and with the exception of one year during Buchanan's administration, continued in the office till his death in 1872, when his son, George B. Child, succeeded him. George B. Child was the first Republican elected in Calhoun County to the office of sheriff or to the legislature. He served as sheriff in 1882, and in the legislature in 1890.

***********************************************

 

CHILD, HELEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 7, 1903          Original Member of First Presbyterian Church of Alton Dies

The body of Mrs. Helen Child was brought to Alton Friday morning from Hardin for burial. Mrs. Child died Wednesday from old age. She was a former resident of Alton, and was the widow of B. F. Child. She was also a sister of George T. Brown, a newspaper man in Alton many years ago, and of Joseph Brown, former mayor of Alton. The funeral party came down from Hardin in a gasoline launch during the night, arriving here early in the morning. The casket, accompanied by some old friends and relatives, was taken to City Cemetery where brief services were conducted by Rev. H. K. Sanborne of the First Presbyterian church at 10 a.m.  The pallbearers were E. P. Wade, W. T. Norton, H. M. Schweppe, Joseph T. Quigley, William Flynn, and H. J. Bowman. Mrs. Child was born in 1814 and was one of the original members of the First Presbyterian church of Alton, probably the last living. The Presbyterian church was organized in 1831. The services at Hardin, where Mrs. Child's funeral was held, were conducted by Rev. J. R. Sager of Hardin.

*********************************************

 

CHILDER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1915

John Childer, an old soldier, aged __ (77?), died at his home, 3146 Belle street, on Christmas morning. He had lived a great many years in Alton, and leaves a large number of friends. He is survived by his wife and several children. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the home, and all of the members of the Alton G. A. R. have been urged by their commander to attend the funeral services.

***********************************************

 

CHILDERS, ANN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1907

Mrs. Ann Childers, aged 69, widow of Andrew Childers, died this morning from heart disease after a brief illness. She was married twice and her first husband, named Tipton, was killed in a mine accident at Moro. She leaves two sons, James W. Childers and George Tipton, and two daughters, Miss Emma Tipton and Mrs. Ben F. Vorhees.

*********************************************

 

CHILDESS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1920

William Childess, aged 49, died at his home, 1608 Joesting avenue, last night. His death was caused from a complication of diseases. Childess is survived by his wife, Rose Childess, three daughters, Mrs. Katherine Semelroth, Mrs. Dean Downey, Miss Jean Childess and one son, Donald. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at three o'clock from the home. Burial will be in the City cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CHISM, DAISY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 6, 1917

Miss Daisy Chism, after an illness extending over thirteen years, died Tuesday evening at the home of her sister, Mrs. Charles W. Raines in Wood River, and the funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the Godfrey Methodist church, where services will be conducted by the pastor, Rev. Dr. Sauer. Burial will be in Godfrey Cemetery. Deceased lived with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Raines for the last twelve years, and they for a long time resided in Godfrey, where Mr. Raines was clerk of Godfrey township. She has hosts of friends in Godfrey and Alton who will sincerely regret to hear of her death, while at the same time recognizing the fact that she has found peace from prolonged suffering, which at times was intense. She was a lovable woman of fine Christian character, and bore her 17 years of pain, the while she was entirely cared for by Mr. and Mrs. Raines. Her malady was dropsical in character, and during the thirteen years she submitted to ten different surgical operations for its relief, and relief followed temporarily each time. Forty-eight hours before her death, after a period of keen suffering, she dropped asleep and she remained sleeping, apparently peacefully, until she woke up in Eternity. She was born in Greene county in 1878, and is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Raines and Miss Lulu Chism, the latter a teacher in the Illinois Institute for the Blind in Jacksonville; and two brothers, F. C. Chism of Medora and E. W. Chism of St. Louis, all of whom are now at the Raines home.

******************************************

 

CHITTENDEN, CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 20, 1906

Mrs. Charlotte Elizabeth Chittenden, wife of Rev. Henry M. Chittenden, rector of St. Paul's Episcopal church, died at 10 o'clock Thursday morning after a long illness. Her death was not unexpected as she has been steadily sinking for several weeks, and the malady which was causing her suffering was a mysterious one which baffled the attending physicians. Consultations between physicians could not result in a solution of the mystery until Wednesday evening when it was decided that Mrs. Chittenden was suffering from a malignant tumor. Her death was peaceful and her last manifestations of consciousness were expressions of interest in the welfare of her family and her trust in her Redeemer in whose footsteps she had endeavored to be a faithful follower. Mrs. Chittenden's illness was first noticed while she was in Denver, Colo., attending a niece, Miss Ann Chittenden, who died there last summer from a similar malady. She had made no complaint of being in ill health, but when she arrived home it was apparent that she was not in good condition. She was a patient sufferer, and it was not until a few weeks ago that she was willing to give up and consider herself an ill woman. She was so completely engrossed in her work in her husband's parish and among her people that she could find no time to be ill. Her death will be a grievous loss to many people to whom she was the means of getting comforts and necessities of life they were unable to buy. Mrs. Chittenden was widely known for her work of charity. She had the ability to interest people who were able to give in worthy causes, and her hand ever carried relief to the distressed, and she was always ready to give peace to troubled ones. She was constant in her attendance at all the church services and assisted most of the time as organist in St. Paul's Episcopal church. As a writer, Mrs. Chittenden was widely known, her pretty little poems appearing sometimes in publications of national reputation. Her principal forte was at writing children's stories, at which she excelled. She often expressed her preference for this kind of work as she loved to please the little ones, and she succeeded admirably. Many a child who has been accustomed to receive its only Christmas cheer at the hands of this lover of children will have personal reason for mourning the death of Mrs. Chittenden. She was a native of New York, being born at Wyoming, N. Y. in 1853. She was married at St. Louis in St. John's church, July 22, 1879, to Henry M. Chittenden. She leaves beside her husband, two daughters, Mrs. A. W. Sherwood and Miss Beth Chittenden. The funeral will be held Saturday morning from St. Paul's Episcopal church, and services will be conducted by Rev. F. A. DeRosset, arch deacon of the Springfield diocese. The body will be taken to Greenville, Ill. for burial, and services there will be conducted by Rev. J. G. Wright Saturday afternoon.

*************************************

 

CHITTENDEN, CHARLES N.(?)/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 22, 1838

Died, on Wednesday last, after an illness of ten days, Charles N.(?), infant son of Mr. W. E. Chittenden of this city, aged eight months. "Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not; for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven."

***********************************

 

CHITTENDEN, JULIA/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 9, 1838

Died, on Thursday last, after a long illness, Mrs. Julia Chittenden, consort [wife] of Mr. William E. Chittenden of this city [Alton], in the 28th year of her age. The deceased was a native of Whitesboro, Oneida County, New York; but removed to this place about 14 months since. In all the relations of life - as a wife, a mother, and a member of society - she exhibited, while she lived, the various graces of the Christian character; and died to perfect peace, and entire resignation and submission to the will of God - leaving a deeply afflicted husband, and two small children, together with a large circle of friends and acquaintances to deplore her loss.

************************************

 

CHORLEY, UNKNOWN WIFE OF WILLIAM/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 16, 1843

Died, in the city [Alton], on Thursday last, Mrs. Chorley, wife of Mr. William Chorley, aged 25.

************************************

 

CHORLEY, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 20, 1846

Died, in Hunter's Addition to Alton, on Sunday last, Mr. William Chorley, a native of England, but for several years an inhabitant of this city.

***********************************

 

CHRISTISON, LUCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1906

Mrs. Lucy Christison, who was taken to St. Joseph's hospital a week ago suffering from a bad form of malarial fever from her home in the lowlands back of the Illinois box factory, died Sunday morning. The body will be taken to Winchester for burial tomorrow. She was 56 years of age.

*****************************************

 

CHRISTMAN, JEANETTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 19, 1919         

Mrs. Jeanette Christman, wife of John M. Christman of Upper Alton, died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning a few minutes after 3:00 o'clock. The end came peacefully with the husband and sister, Mrs. Walter MacNair, of Chicago, and other relatives at the bedside. Mrs. Christman underwent a surgical operation ten days ago. When the operation was performed the surgeons discovered that in addition to the trouble they sought to eradicate, Mrs. Christman was suffering from a cancer of the stomach. This, they found, they could not remedy with a further operation. Then began a heroic fight for life, and the many friends of Mrs. Christman in all parts of the city were in deepest sympathy with the stricken woman in her efforts to overcome her affliction. Since Monday, however, the physicians held out no hope and the relatives and immediate friends awaited the end. Mrs. Christman, by her friends and acquaintances, was accounted as one of the most remarkable women in the city. Stricken several years ago with blindness, she did not permit the affliction to interfere with her activities in any way. In her domestic life, as well as her religious and civic activities, she overcame every difficulty that her apparent affliction placed in her way. She was one of the most active members of the College Avenue Baptist church in Upper Alton, and was equally active in the councils of the Daughters of Rebekah. In public and private charity she was most interested. As a result of her many and varied activities she had come in contact with many who became her friends, and when the news was given out that she had undergone a surgical operation at the hospital, inquiries were daily made from every quarter as to her physical progress. The funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock. The members of the family had planned to have a simple service at the family home on Walnut street, but the suggestions were so numerous that the service be held at the church that the decision was reached to have the funeral from the College Avenue Baptist church, where she worshipped so many years. The pastor, Rev. David T. Magill, will officiate. The body can be viewed at the home until 2:30 o'clock on the day of the funeral, and friends are invited. The casket will not be opened at the church. Interment will be in City cemetery.

************************************************

 

CHRISTOE, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 23, 1913

James Christoe, aged 76, died Saturday morning at the home of his son, E. J. Christoe, 1216 Washington avenue, after a brief illness. He had been suffering from kidney trouble for a long time, but his final illness began just about twelve hours before his death, and the end was unexpected. Mr. Christoe had lived in Alton and Upper Alton for about twenty years. Prior to that he was a school teacher, and had taught in Macoupin county for twenty-seven years. He was a well educated man, and a good citizen. Mrs. Christoe died fourteen years ago. He leaves two sons, E. J. and Harry Christoe, and two daughters, Mrs. Elbert Byron and Mrs. Owen Smith. The body will be taken to Girard for burial. The funeral party will leave Alton Monday evening, and the funeral will be at Girard Tuesday morning.

*************************************************

 

CHRISTY, MRS. E. M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1921           Commits Suicide By Shooting Self

Mrs. E. M. Christy, who fatally shot herself yesterday noon at her home, 130 Ninth street in Wood River, died about three hours after the shooting. She had evidently carefully planned the suicide and it is said that she was mentally unbalanced. She used a Winchester 30-30 rifle. Lying flat on her back on the bed, she hoisted the rifle so that it was perpendicular to her body and with one toe she pulled the trigger, discharging the weapon. The ball passed through her body, through the mattress and into the floor. At the time of Mrs. Christy's suicide she was attended by her mother and a sister who had come to see her and were preparing to take her back to her home in Iola, Kan., for a visit. She had been in ill health for a month or so, the attending physician, Dr. Vaughn, said. He said that he did not know definitely the cause of the sickness. The suicide is attributed by those who knew Mrs. Christy to her bad health and worry over her condition, which caused mental derangement. Neighbors said that Mrs. Christy was a woman who was much admired and there was great surprise over the suicide. It was said that when her mother and sister were in the house with her, Mrs. Christy retired to her bedroom and quietly made the arrangements for destroying her life, and that the first warning the mother and sister had was the shot. They ran into the room to find Mrs. Christy mortally wounded with a bullet hole through her body in the abdomen. They called for surgical help but nothing could be done for her. The jury impaneled by Deputy Coroner Streeper found a verdict of accidental death. The husband testified his wife had been sick since Christmas. He said he kept the gun loaded in the house for protection, and that he had never known her to handle the gun.

************************************************

 

CHRISTY, OSCAR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1921            Drowns at Illini Island, Body Identified Through Dental Charts

Identification was established yesterday afternoon of the body held in the morgue at St. Louis found floating in the river, as that of Oscar Christy, drowned Sunday at Illini Island, five miles above Alton. In order to complete the identification, Dr. Jeans, who had done some work on his teeth, took the dental charts with her to St. Louis and examined the mouth, checking all the fillings and absolutely identifying the body as that of the Alton traveling man. An inquest was held this morning in St. Louis, the body having been found on the Missouri side of the river and making it necessary that the inquest be held there. The body was placed in a sealed casket and will be brought to Alton for the funeral, which will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home on Bluff street, and will be under the auspices of Piasa lodge No. 27, A. F. & A. M., in which the deceased had been a member. The body will be entombed in the Grandview mausoleum. It was learned that there was but one body found floating in the river, the report that there were two being due to the fact that the body of Oscar Christy was reported from two places and confusion was caused. The pallbearers at the funeral tomorrow will be H. W. Weiner, A. E. Elliott, C. D. Tompkins, Fred Hart, Leo Ernst, Walter Smith, William Stofft Jr., Seymour Landau. Mr. Christy held membership in the Masonic Fraternity, the Elks, the United Commercial Travelers, the Egyptian Hustlers, and belonged to a side organization of the U. C. T., the Bagmen. He was for several terms head of the Alton Poultry Association.

************************************************

 

CHURCHILL, GEORGE W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1904

George W. Churchill, aged 79 years 5 months 21 days, died at his home in Godfrey, Friday morning at 7:30 o'clock after a long illness from dropsy. Mr. Churchill was one of the oldest inhabitants of Madison county, and had been a prominent citizen of Godfrey for many years. He was highly respected by all who knew him, and the progress of his illness has been watched with keen interest for several months by his family and his friends. He leaves besides his widow, one son, George Churchill of Chicago, and two daughters, Misses Minnie and Katherine Churchill of Godfrey. The funeral will be held Sunday at 2 o'clock in the afternoon.

***********************************************

 

CHURCHMAN, ELI JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 26, 1915

Eli Louis, the one year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Eli Churchman of 623 East Sixth street, died at the family home this morning at four o'clock after a short illness. The little one is survived by his parents and two sisters. The funeral will take place on Monday afternoon at two o'clock at the family home.

************************************************

 

CLAMPITT, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 14, 1904

Mrs. Martha Clampitt, widow of James Clampitt, a resident of Alton more than fifty years, died at her granddaughter's home, Mrs. Jacob Piggott, on Belle street, last night from senile debility. Mrs. Clampitt had been ill a long time and weakened by her great age. She was 78 years old when she died. Mrs. Clampitt's husband was a veteran of the Civil War. He died several years ago. Mrs. Clampitt is survived by three children, Thomas Clampitt and Mrs. Miranda Caldwell of Alton, and Mrs. Lucy Stone of Montana. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Piggott home on Belle near Ninth street, and services will be conducted by request of Mrs. Clampitt, by her old friend, S. H. Cossaboon, assisted by Rev. M. H. Ewers.

***********************************************

 

CLAMPITT, THOMAS J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph              Resident of Alton for 60 Years Dies

Thomas J. Clampitt, 61 years, died Saturday night at the home of is daughter, Mrs. James Hart, 278 Madison avenue. Mr. Clampitt was born in Belleville and came to Alton when a year old. For a number of years he was a drayman in Alton, being one of the leaders in that business before the advent of the automobile. He was later a watchman for the Chicago and Alton Railroad. In his residence here, Mr. Clampitt made many friends who became attached to him because of his willingness to be of service to others, and to them his death is the cause for grief. He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. James Hart and Misses Nellie and Catherine Clampitt, all of Alton. Funeral services will be at 9 a.m. tomorrow, at SS Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Mr. Clampitt had been confined to his bed for two years, but his death was unexpected. Even after becoming bedfast, he retained his hearty appetite, and Saturday night had eaten a hearty supper as usual. Shortly afterward he fell asleep, and when members of the family entered the room, he was dead.

***************************************************

 

CLARK, ADA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 20, 1904

After being buried four months in a Mattoon cemetery, the body of Mrs. Ada Clark was moved to Bethalto and buried in the Bethalto cemetery Thursday afternoon beside the body of her first husband, E. W. Humphrey. After the death of her first husband, Mrs. Humphrey married a man named Clark and moved to Mattoon, Ill., where she died four months ago. The body was interred at Mattoon and then the surviving husband decided to fulfill an expressed wish of his wife that she rest beside the body of her first husband. Accordingly, the body was disinterred and buried again at Bethalto Thursday afternoon without any funeral services.

******************************************************

 

CLARK, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1919                Interurban Kills Hospital Patient Near Oldenburg

Charles Clark, 48, of Alton, an escaped patient from the Alton State Hospital, was killed by a limited interurban car near Oldenburg just before noon yesterday. The body was taken over by a Granite City undertaking establishment and an inquest will be conducted there this evening. According to an official at the State Hospital this morning, Clark was one of a detail working on a coal pile, when he left the hospital. With the other members of the detail, Clark left the building and went to the coal pile about 8 o'clock. It was shortly after this that he was missed. Efforts to find him failed, and the news of his death received last night was the first information of his whereabouts. Clark had been at the hospital for some time and was described this morning as a quiet man who was in the habit of wandering about. He was never violent and talked but little, it was said. Mrs. Henry Kemper, 460 Bluff street, is the wife of Clark's adopted brother, and has visited him several times at the hospital. The funeral will be from her home at 10 a.m. Wednesday. Clark was not married. The body of the man was brought to Alton last night and is in charge of Deputy Coroner Bauer. The funeral will be tomorrow from Mrs. Kemper's home.

*******************************************************

 

CLARK, EMMA J. (nee FAHNESTOCK)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 30, 1920

Mrs. Emma J. Clark, widow of William P. Clark, died very unexpectedly Wednesday evening at 10:15 o'clock from heart trouble at her home, 508 William street. Mrs. Clark had been suffering from heart trouble for a few days, being taken sick Monday, but it was not supposed that there was anything seriously wrong with her and her family were not at all alarmed. Wednesday evening she was so much better that at 10 o'clock some of the members of the family had left her bedside and gone to their homes. A few minutes afterward she was suddenly stricken and died almost instantly. A neuralgic affliction of the heart was given as the cause of her death. Mrs. Clark was born in Munsey, Pa., March 27, 1845, and was in her seventy-sixth year. She was married February 12, 1867, to William P. Clark, who died January 20, 1903. She leaves five children: Miss Bessie Clark, Mrs. H. E. Scott, Mrs. James Vine, W. C. Clark, all of Alton; and Preston Clark of Chicago. When a child Mrs. Clark came to Madison County with her parents and she lived there until after her marriage to Mr. Clark. Her maiden name was Fahnestock. She lived at Bethalto a number of years, and twenty-five years ago moved to Alton to spend the remainder of her life. Beside her children she leaves nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Mrs. Clark was a devoted member of the First Presbyterian Church, and was a regular attendant at church services there until about two years ago when she fell, while on her way to church, and fractured a leg. She never was able to get around with great facility after that because of her age. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, and burial will be in City Cemetery. Rev. Edward L. Gibson will have charge of the services.

*************************************************

 

CLARK, EMORY L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1906

Emory L. Clark, an old soldier and former resident of Alton, died at the Quincy Soldier's home today. He was the owner of several houses in Alton, but had made his home at Quincy for several years.

***********************************************

 

CLARK, GEORGE ALBERT/Source: Alton Telegraph, July 9, 1842

Died, on the 29th of June near Upper Alton, George Albert, son of Mr. William and Mrs. Sarah J. Clark, aged one year and two months.

**********************************************

 

CLARK, HARVEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph November 23, 1914              Slain By Nephew - Quarreled in Front of Baptist Church

Harvey Clark, aged 50, was shot and fatally injured Monday afternoon about 1:30 o'clock by his nephew, Perry Clark, following a quarrel which began in their home in Ryan's row at Fifth and Market streets. Clark's left hand was shot off, and a hole about 2 inches in diameter was bored in his chest by the loads of shot which his nephew fired into him. The whole trouble arose over drink. Perry Clark lived with his father, John Clark, across from the First Baptist Church. It developed that Harvey had been forbidden admission to the house. Perry Clark, who did the shooting, is an industrious young man of about 26, and was employed usually by J. E. Cowling, driving ice and coal wagons. This noon, after dinner, Harvey appeared at the house and the trouble was started. Harvey Clark was ejected from the house by his brother and Perry Clark, and went on downtown. At that time Perry Clark tried to get a shotgun to use on his uncle, but his father took it from him, saying that he wanted no killing done. Perry Clark must have found another gun, and he started out of the house. He met his uncle, Harvey, coming along Market street in front of the Baptist Church. Then the quarrel was renewed again. This time Perry was armed with a shotgun. Harvey had a long bladed knife in his hand. The two men struggled there for possession of the weapons. In the fight, Perry Clark pulled the trigger and shot the left hand off Harvey Clark, as Harvey had the hand gripped over the muzzle of the gun. Then Perry back away and taking aim at close range he fired a charge of shot into the breast of his uncle. Harvey Clark fell to the sidewalk, and Perry made a hasty retreat. Going back home he put the gun away in the house and declared that he believed he had killed his uncle. Mrs. Henry Schneenage, neighbor, witnessed the fight. James Green, who was talking to his father at the time in the neighborhood, was one of the first to reach the wounded man. Harvey Clark never spoke after being shot. He was taken to the hospital and there he died a few minutes after being carried into the institution. Perry Clark, after going home and putting away the shotgun, made his escape and police were put on his trail. Harvey Clark was a well known character about town. He was a laborer, but seldom worked more than a few hours at a time. He was a conspicuous figure in a gang which spent most of its time loafing around the corners downtown, and most of the money he got he spent for liquor. His nephew, who slew him, was quite a different sort of a person. Perry Clark was caught hiding in the c. & A. round house shortly before 2 o'clock by Officers Herms and _____, who were among the first of the ______ to take up the chase. When he was brought to the police station, Clark seemed very defiant about the deed. He stated to the officers that Harvey Clark entered his home and began to abuse his father, and he shot Harvey when the latter attempted to return to the house and cause further trouble. He stated "I shot him, and I am not sorry for it. I am ready to go to jail." After being put in jail however, his defiant manner broke and he spent the greater part of the afternoon crying over the crime.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1915            White Whiskey Figures in Clark Murder

Three rounds each of "white whiskey" from glasses at a barrel house, and six half pints of the same "white whiskey" from bottles caused the murder of Harvey Clark, who was shot by his nephew, Perry Clark, near the Baptist church some months ago. This fact developed this morning in the trial at Edwardsville, in which Perry Clark is being tried for his life....Perry testified that his uncle, whom the latter shot, left the house and that in the afternoon he (Perry) started down to Harry Wendt's to trade a shotgun for a rifle. He met his uncle, Harvey Clark, near the Baptist church, and at fifteen paces, witnesses testified, shot him, killing him.

 

[NOTE: Perry Calvin Clark, age 22, was found guilty of manslaughter by a jury in the Madison County Circuit Court, and sentenced to from one to fourteen years in the Penitentiary at Chester, for the killing of his uncle, William Harvey Clark. In 1916, a petition was circulating to pardon Perry Clark, as it was seen by some that the killing was done in self-defense. It was announced in the newspapers on December 26, 1916, that Perry Clark would be paroled in February 1917. He was actually released in January 1917, and returned to Alton. In January 1922, Perry Clark married and set up housekeeping at 439 East Broadway. One week later his wife, who was at home alone, was attacked by "two negroes" (one with two revolvers, the other held a knife) who attempted to rob her. They struck the woman, covered her face and tied her hands behind her back and threw her to the floor. She was found lying on the floor tied to a leg of a table. The only items missing were silverware from the buffet. Her husband, a painter employed at the Luer Bros. Packing Company, returned home the next day, saying he had been visiting a friend. Mrs. Clark remained ill following the attack, and filed for and was granted a divorce in March 1922. In 1926, Perry, who was working at the Boston Store in downtown Alton, was accused of stealing men's pants from the store, and selling them at a low price. In November of that year he was charged with stealing 31 pairs of pants. Perry Clark died on September 26, 1947. He was found dead in his home on West 4th Street in Alton, and is buried in the Alton City Cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CLARK, IRWIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 9, 1914    Died While Firing Furnace in Savoy Hotel

Irwin Clark, who has for the past few years been choring about Alton, died suddenly today after falling in a fainting fit in the basement of the building in which the Savoy hotel and bar is situated. He went into the basement to fire the furnace, and when he did not return an investigation was made. He was found almost lifeless on the basement floor. Dr. Halliburton was called but he died shortly afterwards. Clark worked for various saloons and has at times worked as an undertaker's helper and at the Seibold livery stable. At one time he was one of the foremen at the Western Cartridge works, but lost his position through illness, being subject to frequent attacks of epileptic fits.

********************************************

 

CLARK, JAMES F./Source: Alton Telegraph, October 10, 1840

Died, on Saturday last, at the residence of Mr. James M. Murphy, in the American Bottom, Mr. James F. Clark, aged about 35. The deceased was an Englishman, and had resided in this country about 15 months.

********************************************

 

CLARK, JOHN WATSON/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 3, 1844

Died, in this city [Alton], July 12, after a long and painful illness, John Watson Clark, son of William and Ann Clark, formerly of Ohio, aged 9 years and 12 days.

*******************************************

 

CLARK, MIRAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 30, 1920               Upper Alton Resident, In Madison County Since 1854, Dies

Miran Clark, one of the best known old residents of Upper Alton, died at 11:30 this noon at the home of his son, W. A. Clark, at the corner of Washington and College avenues. Mr. Clark would have been 80 years old next Saturday, April 3. The death of the old resident followed a long illness and a long period of total disability. Last Decoration Day he was taken to Oakwood Cemetery to attend the services of the day by his son in an automobile. Only one time since that day was Mr. Clark down stairs, and that was in August when he was taken out for a brief ride. After that he did not care to be disturbed, but preferred to remain quietly in his home. During the past week his condition was very bad and his death has been looked for at any time. Miran Clark was born in Aurora, Ind. in 1840, but he went with his parents to St. Louis when he was very young. His father was a steamboat builder and the family lived in St. Louis until 1854. During that year they came to Madison County and located southwest of Bethalto on the farm known as the Clark place. Mr. Clark was married in 1868 to Miss Mary S. Wood and she survives. Mr. Clark raised his family on the farm southwest of Bethalto, but in 1892 they moved into Upper Alton, and have lived here ever since. Two sons, W. A. Clark of Upper Alton and Ira Clark of St. Louis survive, and also one daughter, Miss Birdie Clark of Upper Alton. One brother, James Clark, of Brown street, and one sister, Mrs. Silas G. Cooper of East Alton, also survive. Since the death today of Mr. Clark two members of the old family survive - Mrs. Cooper and James Clark.  W. A. Clark stated this afternoon that the funeral arrangements would not probably be complete until tomorrow.

**************************************************

 

CLARK, MURRAY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 5, 1905

Murray Clark, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Clark, died at the family home in Edwardsville Wednesday evening after a long and painful illness. He was 22 years of age and a civil engineer by profession. He had many warm friends in the Altons who sincerely regret to hear of his untimely demise.

**************************************************

 

CLARK, NANCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1912

Mrs. Nancy Clark, the aged octogenarian who was moved to a poor ward in St. Joseph's hospital about ten days ago by Mrs. Sophia Demuth, after her son, Harvey Clark, had squandered her pension check and forced her to accept charity, died last night at the hospital. She was loath to leave her home in spite of the squalid circumstances in which she lived, and had to be taken away to die almost by force. She was suffering when removed to the hospital, and it was predicted at the time that her death would be only a matter of time. The son was locked up for a day or so to sober up from a spree he got on from the liquor bought with his aged mother's check, but was not prosecuted, as the mother made a special request to the authorities that he be forgiven for the offense. The funeral will be held from the Bauer undertaking establishment Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and burial will be in the City cemetery.

**************************************************

 

CLARK, OLIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 20, 1904

Olin Clark, the three and a half year old son of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Clark, died last evening at the family home on Manning street. The child had been ill for some time with measles, and had almost recovered from that trouble when pneumonia seized him, and the death followed. The child's death is a shock to its parents, and they have the sympathy of the community. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon, and services will be conducted at the family home. The services will be private.

***********************************************

 

CLARK, SARAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 1, 1900

Mrs. Sarah Clark died at St. Joseph's hospital after a long illness with dropsy. The funeral will be Thursday morning at 9 o'clock, and services in St. Patrick's church will be private.

**********************************************

 

CLARK, UNKNOWN SON OF T. P./Source: Alton Telegraph, October 1, 1842         Youth Loses Life Trying to Save Another

We regret to state that a lad, about fourteen years of age, son of Mr. T. P. Clark of the neighboring village of Upper Alton, lost his life on Monday afternoon under the following painful circumstances. He was riding into the town, in company with two younger children, on the top of a cart load of brick. When nearly opposite the residence of Mr. DeBow, one of the children accidentally fell into the road. The unfortunate youth, who was driving, immediately attempted to jump off to its assistance, but stumbling in front of one of the wheels, it passed over him, crushing him so severely as to cause instant death. The child whom he wished to rescue sustained no material injury.

**********************************************

 

CLARK, UNKNOWN SON OF W. H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 3, 1900

The 8 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Clark died this morning at 3 o'clock after an illness with brain fever. The funeral will be at 10 o'clock tomorrow morning, and services will be held at the family home on Second street, near Langdon.

*********************************************

 

CLARK, WILLIAM P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 20, 1903

William P. Clark, aged 61, died this morning at 8:30 o'clock after a long illness with a complication of diseases. He had been living with his family at 508 William street, and was well known in this city. During the past year he was an invalid and unable to be out of his home much. He leaves his wife, two sons, William C. and Paul P. Clark; three daughters, Mrs. H. E. Scott, Mrs. James Vine, and Miss Bessie Clark. He leaves two brothers, W. C. Clark of Alton and P. Clark of Chicago.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1903

The funeral of the late William P. Clark will take place Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to the City Cemetery. Rev. H. K. Sanborne of the First Presbyterian church will conduct the services. Mr. Clarke was born in Mt. Holly, N. J. in 1842, making him 61 years old at the time of his death. He leaves beside his wife, three daughters: Mrs. H. E. Scott, Mrs. James Vine, and Miss Bessie Clark; two sons, W. C. Clark of Alton and P. Clark of Chicago. In addition to these, Mr. Clark leaves one sister, Mrs. Anna Morfield of Pana, Ill.  He leaves a host of friends who are grieved to learn of his death, and his family has the sympathy of the community. Mr. Clark lived in Illinois 55 years.

*********************************************

 

CLARKE, GEORGE R. "WINDY DICK"/Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, March 25, 1897

George R. Clarke, better known as "Windy Dick," of this city, was probably hanged at Grand Center, South Dakota, yesterday, under an alias of John Kelly. He was tried and convicted under that name, and just before being hanged, stated that his name was George R. Clarke of Alton, Illinois. Chief of Police Kuhn endeavored to place him, and has concluded that he is none other than our own "Windy Dick" of local unsavory reputation.

***************************************************

 

CLARKE, JOHN C. C. (DR. REV.)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 17, 1915       Aged Theologian, Writer, Dies in His Easy Chair in Upper Alton

Rev. John C. C. Clarke, D. D., aged 82, died Thursday afternoon while sitting in his easy chair at his home in Upper Alton. Death came to the aged clergyman, author and religious philosopher as the sun was setting in the western sky. Peacefully, he passed over without any apparent struggle, and with as little change in his position as if he was merely dropping away into a deep sleep. He was alone in the house at the time, and was found by a member of the household who entered his room about a half hour after his death occurred. It is supposed that death was due to neuralgia of the heart, as the aged man had complained of neuralgia pains for some time. The death of Dr. J. C. C. Clarke came before he could know that the views he had set forth in his books would be accepted generally. He was an author of religious philosophical books of great depth of reasoning. He had just finished and still was seeking to get published a religious novel, "Herodias," which it was believed would have made good in the world of fiction. he had previously written two books, one, "Man And His Divine Father," and the other "The Making of Christianity." It was this latter book that the kindly, mild mannered gentleman who had labored years to collect the matter and set down the thoughts he there put on paper, found his greatest disappointment. He could get no one to read it, he complained. He set forth theories in this book in which he had evolved what he termed a key to the Bible. He endeavored to interest clergymen, thinkers, and finally he decided that if the book would not sell he would give away every copy of it and get his ideas before the people. Dr. Clarke was known widely as a sound reasoner, a deep student, a man of great mental strength. There were few men who would express a thought more powerfully, more concisely, and with more beauty of construction. He was a powerful preacher and when he was younger and able to give more time to that work, his services were in demand, filling pulpits. His chief work in life had been teaching. He was connected with the old Chicago University, and in later years was at Shurtleff college. However, in the sunset of life he gave up all other work to setting down the views he held on the subject of man's relation to God, and the gradual evolution of the idea of Christianity. In his "Making of Christianity," he does not attack the accepted beliefs of the Christian churches, but he contended that his book was explanatory, that it should be read as a correlated handbook with the Bible. There is no doubt that his literary works were done with a scholarly finish that was a credit to the great scholar that this mild, unassuming, but indefatigable student and reasoner was. Dr. Clarke was born in Providence, R. I., February 27, 1833, and was graduated from the Rochester University in the Class of 1859. His marriage to Frances Elizabeth Greenough took place in August 1861. She died sixteen years later. There were four children born to the couple, of whom two survive - Mrs. A. E. March of Macon, Ga.; and Grafton P. Clarke of St. Louis. Dr. Clarke was married a second time in November 1879 to Mrs. Sarah J. Cole of Upper Alton, who died February 19, 1914. Dr. Clarke was pastor of Baptist churches at Yonkers, N. Y., Madison, Wis., Cincinnati, Ohio, Chicago and St. Louis. He retired from pastoral work in 1874, and he took up teaching. His last teaching was at Shurtleff College form which he retired in 1886, and devoted his time to study and literacy work. He leaves three stepchildren, Hermon and Nathan Cole, and Miss Grace Cole. Miss Grace Cole is in the East, and an effort was being made to get word to her of her step-father's death. The funeral will probably be Monday from the home in Upper Alton, but definite arrangements could not be made. [Burial was in Upper Alton Oakwood Cemetery.]

*****************************************************

 

CLARKE, SARAH J. COLE (nee NEWELL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 20, 1914        Death of Wealthy Upper Alton Woman

Mrs. Sarah J. Cole Clarke, aged 81, died Thursday afternoon at 5:10 o'clock at her residence, 319 east College avenue, Upper Alton, after an illness of a few days from pneumonia. Her case had become very bad on Wednesday, when a collapse occurred and death was expected at any time during the day. Mrs. Clarke, the wife of Rev. Dr. J. C. C. Clarke, was for many years known as one of the wealthiest women in Madison County, and was for a long time Madison county's largest woman tax payer. Mrs. Clarke was a resident of Upper Alton since young womanhood, when she came there with her father, Rev. Newell, who was prominent in church work for many years, and whose name is remembered by many in Alton and vicinity. The children left by Mrs. Cole are Herman Cole, Nathan Cole and Miss Grace Cole. The stepchildren by her first marriage are Mrs. Alice Smith, widow of William Elliott Smith; Mrs. George Kendall; C. B. and H. B. Cole of Fargo, N. D.; Dak Cole of Los Angeles, Cal. Those by her second marriage are Mrs. Fred Marsh and Grafton P. Clarke. Mrs. Clarke was born in New York State, March 24, 1832. She was the daughter of Isaac D. Newell, a leading pioneer Baptist preacher, and did much toward developing Baptist churches in Illinois. He was the founder of a girl's school at Peoria. In 1847 he brought his family to Upper Alton, and he began financing the first endowment fund for Shurtleff College, which amounted to $15,000. Mrs. Clark herself graduated from the forerunner of the Illinois Woman's College at Jacksonville, Ill. She taught in public schools for a number of years, and was active in educational work at Bunker Hill. She was married three times. The first time to Joseph Flanigan at Bunker Hill in 1857, who died two years later. She continued teaching school. In 1862 she married H. C. Cole of Chester, then engaged in the milling business. The ceremony was at Carrollton, Rev. Justus Bulkley officiating. The couple lived at Chester until 1868, when they moved to Upper Alton, buying the old Castle estate, where she passed the remainder of her life. Mr. Cole died in October, 1874, and later she became the wife of Dr. J. C. C. Clark. Mrs. Clark was for many years a benefactor of Shurtleff College, was deeply interested in the cause of the college students and lent them a helping hand when they required it. She was one of the first directors of the V. I. A., and was deeply interested in that organization. Her business qualifications were remarkable. At the death of Mr. Cole she was left with a large estate, and she had no previous experience in handling property. She managed it successfully, and increased the value of the property. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. Sarah J. Cole-Clarke was held Sunday afternoon at 2:15 o'clock at the family residence on College avenue in Upper Alton. The service at the home was conducted by Rev. Dr. L. A. Abbott, an old time friend of deceased. The service was attended by many Alton people and by numerous friends and relatives from out of town, and the house was filled. The service was simple, and Dr. Abbott gave a fitting tribute to the life of the aged lady. Two hymns were sung by Mrs. A. I. Epstein, "In Heavenly Love Abiding," and "One Sweetly Solemn Thought," with Mrs. C. B. Rohland accompanying. The floral offerings were the most magnificent seen in Alton for many years. Besides many pieces from individual friends and families, there was a fine one from the Upper Alton Woman's club and another from the V. I. A., both of which Mrs. Clarke was a member. The body was taken to Oakwood Cemetery, where it was laid to rest in the family lot. The pallbearers were: C. A. Caldwell, Robert Forbes, D. A. Wyckoff, Grafton Clark, Prof. L. M. Castle, Mr. Scott Humphrey, Hermon Cole Sr., and Hermon Cole Jr. Some of the relatives from abroad who attended the funeral were C. B. Cole of Chester, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. George A. Kendall of St. Louis; Mrs. Helen Smith Hay of Springfield, Ill.; Scott Humphrey, Springfield; Rev. Isaac D. Newell of Glenville, Neb., a brother of deceased; Mrs. Jennie Marsh of Macon, Ga.; Dr. C. B. Roberts of Farmersville, Ill.; and Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Cole of Springfield.

****************************************************

 

CLARKSON, ELIZABETH B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 26, 1916           

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Clarkson, known generally in the Presbyterian Church as "Mother" Clarkson, realized her hope of years Tuesday morning when she crossed over into the eternal life she felt was to be hers. There were no sighings of farewell when Mrs. Clarkson crossed. She had been looking forward to that moment for six years. She had not sat idly waiting for it, but had been keeping busy with the work she had in hand, that of being kind and lovely to everyone who met her. Though she was to have been 97 years of age next October 31, she was still useful, and the nearer her end approached she was the happier, such was her faith in the religion in which she had trusted for her whole life. Some time ago she was taken ill and she thought then that she was near to death. She sent for some of her old class of Sunday school boys of years ago, and she asked that arrangements be made by them to serve as her pallbearers. She taught class after class at the Sunday school of the First Presbyterian Church, and she maintained her interest in them ever after, even when they left Alton. She continued to write to them, when she was unable to get out of her home because of weakness of old age. Her interest in public work was keen. Though her financial means were limited, she spared $100 recently from her money to be spent on a drinking fountain which was set up on Broadway near the Princess Theater, so everyone could get a drink of water. She was an active member of the W. C. T. U., and it had been her heart's desire to live long enough to see the downfall of the liquor traffic, for which she prayed daily. Her influence was widespread. She had a gentle power over men and women, and inspired them to go ahead with work she had become too feeble to do. For several months she had required the constant attention of a nurse, but she was thoughtful and considerate of her attendant. She was sending messages to those outside her home whenever she had opportunity, always counseling for the right. In the First Presbyterian Sunday school and church, Mrs. Clarkson was for many years a modest, yet effective leader in the work. There she was held in the utmost veneration and love. She had a perfect record in the Sunday school for years. When she could not go to Sunday school her class of boys would go to her house and be instructed there, a fact that gave her greatest pleasure. Mrs. Clarkson was a native of England. She came to Alton when a young woman and most of her life after that was spent here. She leaves two sons, James of Carthage, Mo., and William of Owatonna, Minn. She leaves also two foster daughters, whom she had made as her own daughters, and who will mourn her loss as sincerely as her own sons do. The aged woman had earned the respect in which she was held by those who knew her. She never lost an opportunity to do works of charity and mercy, and her gentle reminders kept many a man going along the paths she wished him to travel, in the way of moral rectitude. The death of her sister, Mrs. Gilman, some time ago, was not the cause of mourning for her. She said at the time it was but a brief separation, and she viewed the approaching end of her earthly life as the beginning of a greater happiness than she had ever know, though she was a very happy woman. The sons of Mrs. Clarkson are expected to arrive tomorrow, and until they come no funeral arrangements will be made.

************************************************

 

CLAWSON, JOHN/Source: Alton Telegraph, March 8, 1837

Died in Upper Alton on Wednesday morning last, at the residence of his brother, Mr. John Clawson, after a long and severe illness.

**********************************************

 

CLAWSON, MINERVA/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 5, 1842

Died, on Thursday morning last, Minerva, infant daughter of Mr. Lewis J. and Mrs. Minerva Clawson of Upper Alton. Aged about twelve months.

********************************************

 

CLAWSON, ROSE ELLEN/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 11, 1838

Died, on Saturday last, Rose Ellen, infant daughter of Mr. Lewis J. Clawson, merchant of this city; aged 13 months and 8 days. "Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, Death came with friendly care; The opening had to Heaven conveyed, And bade it ____ there."

*********************************************

 

CLAYTON, ANNA L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 13, 1901

Upper Alton News - The death of Mrs. Anna L. Clayton occurred yesterday morning at 9:10 o'clock. Mrs. Clayton had been ill for some time. The funeral service was held at St. Mary's church this afternoon, Rev. Father Meckel officiating. Messrs. Belk, Snider, Simms and Vogelpohl and Stanley and Emil Vogelpohl acted as pallbearers.

********************************************

 

CLAYTON, CHARLES T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 21, 1909               Soldier of Civil War Dies

Charles T. Clayton, an old soldier, died today at the home of his son, William Clayton, on Salu street in Upper Alton, from paralysis. He was stricken three months ago and was completely helpless thereafter. Up to that time he had been in good, robust health, and was seldom sick. He was 77 years of age. All his life he had spent in Upper Alton and vicinity, being born on the old Clayton farm a few miles from the village. He was the son of Philip Clayton who died at the age of 97, twelve years ago. Mr. Clayton served in the 144th Illinois regiment during the Civil War. He leaves four sons, three in Upper Alton and vicinity, William, Harry, and Douglas; and a fourth son in Wyoming, Thomas, who has not been heard from. The funeral will not be set until word comes from the absent son.

**********************************************

 

CLAYTON, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1919

Mrs. Minnie Clayton died at her home on Brown street Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock following a month's illness. Mrs. Clayton was taken ill with influenza about a month ago, and never recovered fully. She was able to be up and around until a short time ago when she suffered a relapse. Mrs. Clayton, who was 58 years of age, is survived by her husband, William Clayton, and 4 sons, Chauncey, Frank, George and William. One son, George, is with the A. E. F. in France. The deceased was a member of the Mutual Benefit Society. No funeral arrangements were made today, awaiting word from relatives not in town.

*************************************************

 

CLAYTON, MRS. SUSAN D./Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, January 7, 1875

Died near Upper Alton on December 21, 1875, of typhoid pneumonia, Mrs. Susan D. Clayton, in the 66th year of her age.

***************************************************

 

CLEMENS, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 12, 1907         Bartender on the Spread Eagle Falls Into River and Drowns

Henry Clemens, bartender on the Spread Eagle, was drowned at 12:30 o'clock Monday morning by falling between the wharfboat and the steamer. Clemens was about 45 years of age, and it is said that he was not given to excessive drinking. He was transferred yesterday from the Spread Eagle to the Alton, and Sunday night he was waiting for the boat to return. When he returned from a trip uptown he found the Spread Eagle lying at the lower end of the wharfboat. He went out on the lower end of the wharf, stepped over a big spar and a number of ropes which were in the way, and walking toward a part of the boat where he was about five or six feet from the steamer deck he stepped in. The fireman on the Spread Eagle saw him coming and shouted to warn him but Clemens paid no attention to the warning. Gus Johnson, night watchman on the wharfboat who sleeps in the tug Echo at the lower end of the wharfboat, heard the warning cry of the fireman and he looked out the window just in time to see Clemens fall in and hear the splash. The Eagle Packet Co. employed Capt. W. D. Fluent to drag for the body and detailed four of the crew of the boat to aid in the work. Clemens leaves a wife and two children in St. Louis. He is spoken of by his employers as being a very steady, reliable man and his drowning is regretted by them.

**********************************************

 

CLEMENT, ELLEN R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1902

Mrs. Ellen R. Clement, widow of Edwin Clement, died Thursday evening at the home of her son, E. A. Clement on Grove street. Mrs. Clement was 83 years old and was one of the oldest residents of Alton. She had been in declining health several years, due to advancing age, and her death has been expected for several months. Her old home was at Cavendish, Vt., and to that place the body will be taken for burial. Funeral services will be held this evening at the family home prior to the departure of the funeral party. Mr. Frank Clement will accompany the body of his grandmother to Vermont. Rev. G. Gebauer of the Unitarian church will conduct the services.

*******************************************

 

CLEMENT, EVERETT ATHERTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 7, 1908

Everett Atherton Clement died at 6:30 o'clock this morning at his home on Grove street, surrounded by the members of his family. He has been in a very weak condition for the past week, and his death did not come as a surprise to the members of his family who were gathered at his bedside. For ten years Mr. Clement has been a sufferer from locomotor ataxia, and has all of that time been beyond the skill of physicians. Suffering terrible pain almost every minute of this time, he refused to take narcotics, and was cheerful and kindly always through it all.  Mr. Clement was 62 years of age and has lived most of his life in Alton, coming here from the east. About twelve years ago he laid out what is known as Clement Place in Middletown, placing on the market one of the first plats of ground which had been improved with sidewalks, curbs, and streets, ever offered for sale in Alton. In latter years Mr. Clement has been unable to handle himself, but his mind remained clear, and being a great lover of card playing his friends found him a worthy antagonist in the car games they played with him day after day, and year after year. Beside his wife, two daughters, Miss Mabel and Mrs. E. G. Meriweather, and four sons, George, Frank, Chester and Sidway survive him. Mr. Clement was born in 1846 in Bridgeport, Vermont. He completed his education in the Alton High school and Shurtleff college. His first business engagement was with C. B. Hubbell, wholesale shoe business in St. Louis; afterwards with his father in the marble works conducted by him in this city. He was in partnership with his father in 1868. He afterwards entered into a partnership with his father-in-law, G. D. Sidway, in the leather and saddlery business in this city in 1872. He was engaged with the Union Leather and Hide Company in Chicago, conducted by an uncle of his wife. Following this he was in the employ of the State, superintending the shoe department at Joliet. In 1874 he returned to Alton bringing his family to this city to reside, and was out of business owing to ill health until his death. In 1868 he was married to Miss Emiline Sidway, daughter of G. D. Sidway, a prominent business man of Alton. Arrangements are being made to hold the funeral Thursday afternoon and Rev. George R. Gebauer of Duluth, Minn., formerly of Alton, will be here to conduct the services. Interment will be at City cemetery and will be private.

*******************************************

 

CLEMENT, LAURA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1910             Follows Sister to the Grave Within Six Weeks

Miss Laura Clement, the last of her family, and sister of Mrs. William M. Pierson who died January 3(?), died Wednesday evening after an illness of eight years. Miss Clement was a native of Springfield, Ill., and was the daughter of Benjamin S. Clement of Milford, Del., who settled in Springfield in the early days. She came to Alton in 1854, and spent the remainder of her life in this city. At the time of her coming, she united with the First Baptist church, and for fifty-five years she was a devoted a consistent member of that organization. Her life's work was school teaching, and for thirty years she was an instructor in the Alton schools. About fifteen years ago she was forced to give up teaching because of her failing health, and eight years ago she suffered a complete breakdown. She was very efficient as a teacher. Most of her work was done in what was known as old No. 3 on the rear of the property now occupied by Garfield and the High school. During her career as a teacher she instructed many of the present day older business men and prominent citizens of Alton, and by all of them she is held in loving remembrance. She was a teacher in the Baptist Sunday school forty years. During the last 37 years of her life she was a member of the family of Mr. and Mrs. Pierson, by whom she was given the most devoted attention during her long illness. The funeral will be held from the home of W. M. Pierson, 321 east Fifth street, Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and burial will be in City cemetery beside the body of her sister. At the time of Mrs. Pierson's death, her sister was in a very bad condition, and it was not expected she would outlive Mrs. Pierson.

**********************************************

 

CLEVELAND, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1907

George, 15 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cleveland, died at noon today at the family home on Belle street from bronchitis. The funeral will be held Saturday probably.

**********************************************

 

CLEVELAND, LEE/Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, July 19, 1919

Lee Cleveland, 36, died in his room at 322 Belle street last evening from heart failure. Cleveland has been ill off and on for some time but his condition was not considered serious. Cleveland has lived in Alton for many years and was very well known in all parts of the city. He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Mary Cleveland, and two brothers, George of Alton and Harry of Wood River.

*************************************************

 

CLEVELAND, LON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1921             Father Killed in Rail Tragedy - Sons Are Spared

Lon Cleveland, aged 55, a resident of Wood River, was killed by a Chicago & Alton train No. 31, Sunday morning at 9:30 o'clock as he was crossing the track about 350 feet north of the North Wood River crossing. Some track workers had left some discarded railroad ties on the right of way, and Cleveland was carrying them across the track to his home for use as fuel. His two sons were with him, helping with the moving of the ties. The two boys saw the danger and jumped off the track just in time to avoid being hit. The father, though he saw his danger, was a trifle slower in moving and the hesitation cost him his life. The train was stopped and the body taken to the railroad station at Wood River, where the agent, Frank Dotson, took charge of it and notified Deputy Coroner Streeper. Dotson witnessed the accident but was too far away to give any alarm that would have the man. He did not realize at first, after the accident, that the two boys had escaped with their lives, as it appeared that all three of them must certainly be run down by the oncoming train, so close was it to them. Cleveland leaves his wife, two sons and two daughters. The funeral of Mr. Cleveland will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Lock Funeral Parlors on State St.  Burial will be in City Cemetery. The minister of the Wood River Methodist Church will officiate.

***************************************************

 

CLEVELAND, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1917

Robert Cleveland, in his 21st year, died this morning at the home of his mother on Rodgers avenue, after an illness of about eighteen months. The end came after several weeks of certain knowledge on the part of the invalid that his end was near, and his only wish was that it might come quickly and close the hopeless fight. Robert Cleveland was one of the Telegraph's most valued employees until ill health forced him to terminate his connection with the paper. He was taken sick just at the time that he was finishing his trade as a journeyman printer, and was forced to take a rest for about a year. He had apparently overcome the malady and insisted upon returning to work, at least to be given a trial. He broke down after a short time and was never able to attempt to work again. He was one of the most promising young printers the city of Alton has ever produced, was a high grade workman, and very conscientious. He was a devoted member of the First Baptist church, and constant in his attendance at services there until he was no longer able to be out of his home. He could not be swerved from what he thought was right and he lived closely up to his religious profession. In his home he was a dutiful son and a kind brother. In her deep affliction, his mother, who has seen more than her portion of sorrow, has the sympathy of everyone. He is survived by his mother and three brothers. His death was the sad closing of a life that was promising of great usefulness. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Baptist Church.

************************************************

 

CLIFFORD, ELIZABETH B./Source: Alton Telegraph, March 12, 1847

Died on Sunday evening inst., Elizabeth B., daughter of Mr. A. Clifford of Upper Alton, aged about 6 years.

**********************************************

 

CLIFFORD, EUGENIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 6, 1906

Miss Eugenia Clifford died last night in a St. Louis sanitarium where she had been taken in hopes of curing the disease which caused her death. Miss Clifford is the daughter of Mrs. Helen M. Clifford of 438 Bluff street, and had been a life-long resident of Alton. She was attacked with a disease which undermined her health two years ago, and in spite of the best medical attention and changes of climate a cure could not be effected. Miss Clifford was 25 years of age, and the news of her death is very sad to those friends who cherished her acquaintance. She was a devout member of the SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and up to the time of her illness, spread much cheer and companionship among those who were her close acquaintances. The body will be brought to Alton tonight, and will be removed to the home on Bluff street. The funeral will be held Wednesday, and will be private.

***********************************************

 

CLIFFORD, JOHN B./Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, July 30, 1874/Submitted by Myra Ann Best

CLIFFORD---At Buck Inn, (Greenwood), Illinois, on the 26th inst., Mr. John B. Clifford, in the 31st year of his age. He leaves a wife and two young children to mourn his loss.*

*Some of the above information is incorrect. According to his probate papers at IRAD in Carbondale, Illinois, he left three surviving children as heirs: Sarah, age 5; Lilly, age 3; and John, age 6 mos.
***********************************************

 

CLIFFORD, KATE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 9, 1905

The death of Miss Kate Clifford, Saturday evening at 6 o'clock removes from Alton one of the remnants of an old-time family. She was 68 years of age and had lived in Alton fifty-seven years. Miss Clifford had been ill with cancer for many months and was staying at St. Joseph's hospital. The funeral was held Monday morning at 10 o'clock, and burial was at Greenwood Cemetery.

*********************************************

 

CLIFFORD, SAMUEL HARNED/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 9, 1837

Died on Friday evening, 4th inst., Samuel Harned Clifford, youngest child of B. Clifford Jr.

*********************************************

 

CLIFFORD, THOMAS E./Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, September 11, 1893

After months of intense suffering, Mr. Thomas E. Clifford passed away at 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon. Death came to him suddenly, despite his long illness, as only a few moments before the end came, he was talking to some friends and had scarcely finished eating a peach when he gasped and died. He would be 39 years of age the 28th day of October, and besides his two half brothers, Messrs. J. G. and Emmet Melling, leaves numerous relatives in this city. The funeral took place this morning from the Cathedral, where a requiem high mass was celebrated, to Greenwood cemetery, and the obsequies were attended by a large number of his friends. The pallbearers were L. A. McGinnis, William Conian, William Batterton, Harry F_lloy, Frank Pieper and J. T. Callahan.

***************************************************

 

CLIFFORD, UNKNOWN DAUGHTER OF THOMAS/Source: Alton Telegraph, April 9, 1842

Died, in this city, on the 4th inst., daughter of Mr. Thomas Clifford, aged 6 years.

***************************************************

 

CLOUGH, JESSE T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1921               Pioneer In Asparagus Business Dies

Jesse T. Clough died Sunday night at the Clough homestead on Amelia street in Upper Alton after nearly twenty years suffering from rheumatism, which finally completely disabled him and then caused him to lose his eyesight completely. The death of Jesse Clough removes one of the old residents of Upper Alton. It is probable the largest part of the people in that section of the city never knew Mr. Clough because of the fact that he was confined to his home more than twenty years by total disability and never got out. Even many people who used to know him when he was able to be out at his work had not seen him in the past twenty or twenty-five years since he ceased to get about. He lived at the old homestead with his two sisters, neither of the three being married. Jess Clough was known many years ago in this locality as an asparagus raiser. He was the original big shipper of asparagus in this locality. He and Albert Draper engaged in the asparagus business jointly on the Draper farm on the east limits of Upper Alton, and they set a patch of forty acres to "grass." Mr. Clough had complete charge of the big asparagus farm, and during the long number of years that he operated it he employed thousands of workers - men and women - to cut, pack and ship the product. He continued at this work until about twenty-two years ago when he became disabled from rheumatism and never worked again. After he became disabled he was cared for by his two devoted sisters who have given their lives over to his care. The following was written by an Upper Alton minister concerning the life of Mr. Clough:  Jesse T. Clough, son of Samuel and Lucy T. Clough, was born in Upper Alton, Ill., November 28, 1854, and was aged 66 years 6 months and 1 day. Mr. Clough's parents settled in this city in an early day, about 1837, where they resided all their life; they were among the well known people of this city for many years. Jesse Clough is also well known throughout this city. In his youthful years he was very industrious, trust-worthy, and loved by all who knew him. He met his affliction in the strong years of his manhood, which was about 18 or 20 years ago. He bore his affliction with an unusual amount of patience, often saying what is the use of fretting or worrying others, since it cannot be helped. His severest affliction came to him about six or eight years ago, when he lost his eyesight entirely. Up until this time, he was a great reader of the daily news, and current events, well posted on things of the country. Oftentimes his sisters, who were his never failing companions, would read to him and help him to occupy his mind, and thus the years have passed away. He possessed the spirit of patience, thankfulness and gratitude for all favors conferred upon him - one of his oft quoted phrases, "I thank you; I thank you." He is survived by two sisters, Miss Georgeana and Miss Diadema Clough. Volumes could be written with reference to their special and undivided and never failing attention to this, their beloved brother. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Cates, pastor of the Wesley Methodist Church, assisted by Rev. Morrison, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, at the residence, 2517 Amelia street, Tuesday, 3:30 p.m. Interment in Oakwood Cemetery.

**************************************************

 

CLOWERS, ARTHUR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1919             Cramps Cost Life of River Swimmer

Cramps in the legs cost the life of Arthur Clowers, 26, when he was swimming in the river at the foot of Illinois avenue, last evening. Clowers was swimming with William Center, his half brother, and Bob Whalen, at the time he met his death. He was out in the river when suddenly he disappeared. Efforts to secure the body at once failed, and it was not for four hours that the body was recovered. Clowers was the sole support of his aged mother, and he was living with her at 34 Illinois avenue. Clowers until recently had been working at the Federal Lead Co. He contracted lead cholic and has not been to work for some time. He was recovering from the sickness, and had just regained his strength enough to want to go swimming. When the body was recovered after four hours of search, it was found that he had suffered from cramps in his legs and this had been the cause of his drowning. The inquest was held this morning at the Bauer undertaking establishment.

*************************************************

 

CLOWERS, AUGUSTA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 9, 1912              Sixteen Year Old Commits Suicide - Had Father Jailed For Incest; Brother In Jail for Arson

Augusta Clowers, aged 16, whose testimony caused her father to be convicted of incest and sent to the penitentiary, and whose charges caused the confinement of her brother in the county jail, first on a charge of intimidating her and later for attempted arson, died from a dose of Paris green [note: copper(II) acetoarsenite, used for insecticide], Tuesday morning at St. Joseph's Hospital. Worry is said to have caused the girl to kill herself. She was making her home with Mrs. M. B. Copley on Rozier street, where she was given a home by Mrs. Copley at the solicitation of Mrs. S. Demuth. The girl went to the Copley home after the arrest of her father, Charles Clowers Sr., on charges based on a story she told Mrs. Demuth. The father pleaded guilty and accepted a penal sentence. Mrs. Copley missed the girl Tuesday afternoon, and going in search of her found her locked in a shed out in the yard. The girl had taken a dose of Paris Green she had found, which was used to kill potato bugs. Mrs. Copley notified Mrs. S. Demuth, who hurried to the place, and after administering some home remedies as antidotes, had the girl conveyed to St. Joseph's hospital. It was seen at once that she was in a bad way and would probably die. The girl was attended at the hospital by Dr. D. F. Duggan, it was said at the hospital today, but nothing could be done to save her life. She was able to tell her troubles to Mrs. S. Demuth, and from it the conclusion is reached that worry was the cause of her death. The arrest of her brother, Charles Clowers Jr., on the charge of attempting to burn the home of the Copley's as a means of driving the girl away from her refuge, weighed on the girl's mind. She was the only witness against her brother. The fact that she had found it necessary to prosecute her father and send him to the penitentiary was another burden on her mind. She had become dissatisfied in the home of the Copleys, and an effort was being made to find another place for her where she would be farther from the scene of her troubles and would not have so many reminders about her of what had happened. When the girl's attempt at suicide was reported to Mrs. Demuth Tuesday, nothing was said about it except to the people it was necessary should know about it, and it was hoped her life would be saved. She had gone through many hard experiences and she was not blamed for his misguided course. She lingered until 9:15 a.m. today, when she died in the hospital. The brother, Charles Clowers Jr., had served several terms in St. Louis as a delinquent boy, and he seemed to be bent on a life of criminal actions. Mrs. Demuth said today that she had a talk Monday morning with Augusta Clowers, and the girl told her that she could not hope to get over the shame of the wrong her father had done to her. Mrs. Copley would try to persuade her otherwise, but the girl would not be comforted and she must go away. About 1:30 o'clock Mrs. Copley found the girl in the coal shed with the door fastened. Mrs. Demuth was summoned again and she found the girl blackened by coal dust and showing evidences of having been vomiting. The girl denied she had taken anything and said she was subject to such spells. Mrs. Demuth was not altogether unsuspicious, but she worked with the girl, had her take some simple antidotes, and could get no good results. finally, after telling the girl death was certain and that she must tell the truth, Mrs. Demuth said prayers for the girl and then Augusta told that she had taken Paris Green. Mrs. Demuth worked with her and tried also to get a doctor, but could get none, all the physicians being out of their offices. She received no regular medical attention until she reached the hospital after 4 o'clock, about three hours after the poison was taken. The girl told Mrs. Demuth, in her death agonies, that she had told the truth about her father and her brother, and that her father's conduct especially was what caused her to take the poison. She did not want to live, and when she knew that her life might be saved she refused to tell that she had taken any poison and would not tell her secret until she knew that death was certain.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 10, 1912

Coroner Streeper today called an inquest over the body of the girl suicide, Augusta Clowers, who killed herself because of the shame her father had brought upon her, for which he is serving a penitentiary sentence. Mrs. S. Demuth, who was well informed about the case, will be principal witness. She tells of revelations made by the girl, and discoveries made by herself after the girl's death which members of the coroner's jury will incorporate in the evidence, and in event of any application being made for the parole or release of the father, the evidence will be used against him. Mr. and Mrs. John Ellington, uncle and aunt of the girl, came here to look after the body and have it shipped to the grandparents at Carrollton, Ill. The grandfather is John F. Herring.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1912                    Coroner's Jury Finds Unusual Verdict

The jury impaneled by Coroner C. N. Streeper, to inquire into the suicide of Augusta Clowers, the girl who killed herself because of the shame brought upon her by her father, Charles Clowers Sr., who is now in the penitentiary, found an unusual verdict. The jury found that the girl had committed suicide and attributed, in its verdict, her action to the wrong done to her by her father, and also to the fact that her brother had persecuted her and had attempted to burn down the house where she had taken refuge. The jury adopted a recommendation to the Board of Pardons of the State, that Clowers, the father, who is under a 14 year sentence to the penitentiary, be required to serve out the full time in prison, and that the grand jury find an indictment against the brother, Charles Clowers Jr., and hold him for trial on a charge of attempted arson. The members of the jury, H. H. Lessner, R. S. Cousley, A. F. Blossey, R. C. Hardy, Will Gillham, and Officer Barney Fahrig, believed that the girl's wrongs could be avenged only by the sufficient punishment of her father and brother. The father might be released on parole after 11 months and gain his discharge from custody a year later by good behavior, but the jurors believed that the brutal father ought to be held in prison for the full term, and if there was any way of keeping him there for life, that he be kept there. It was one of the most unique verdicts ever found by a coroner's jury, and while the finding is purely of an advisory character, still, when coupled with the evidence taken, which will be preserved for record, it should have an influence on the board of pardons when Clowers asks to be paroled, as he probably will do, after 11 months. It was with the understanding he could be paroled that he pleaded guilty to the incest charge and escaped prosecution on the charge of criminal assault, which would have barred him from parole if conviction was secured on the latter charge.

*****************************************************

 

COATS, CLINTON L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 17, 1904              Assessor of Wood River Township for Two Years Passes Away

At 6 o'clock this morning occurred the death of one of the best known and most respected citizens of Upper Alton, Mr. Clinton L. Coats. Mr. Coats had been a sufferer from liver trouble for two years past, confined to his bed for the past two months only, but finally succumbed to the disease which baffled the best physicians in Alton and noted specialists in St. Louis, the latter of whom operated on him some two months ago for cancer. Patient through it all, clinging to the last ray of hope, yet at the close fully resigned, willing and ready to meet his Maker if it were His will. He was conscious to the end, falling in his last sleep as sweet and peacefully as a babe upon its mother's breast. In his death, Upper Alton loses a valuable citizen. To know him was to love him, and all Upper Altonians loved "Doc" Coats, as he was familiarly called. His popularity was shown by his election for assessor for several different terms, including the past term, and for alderman some few years ago. Whenever he ran for office he was never defeated, and one of his dying wishes was to thank the "boys" and people for their constancy in elections. He wanted so much to thank them again and again and to bid them goodbye, hoping to meet them all in heaven. Mr. Coats was a member of two orders. The Masonic order, which he dearly loved. His own words were "First my God, then the Masons," and was also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. Clinton L. Coats was born near Carrollton, Greene county, Illinois, February 28, 1854. He moved to Upper Alton in 1880. In 1875, August 26, he was married to Miss Cornelia Whiteside, also of Carrollton, and to this union was born two children, both of whom, together with his wife, survive him. The children are Mrs. John Megowan and Harvey Coats, both of Upper Alton. He also leaves a sister, Mrs. Mary E. Bradley of Upper Alton, and an aged mother, Mrs. John Louie of Alton. No arrangements for the funeral have as yet been made, but will be announced later.

***************************************************

 

COATS, UNKNOWN CHILD OF A. C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1903

The two year child of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Coats died yesterday at the family home in Middletown, after being ill some time with summer complaint. The remains will be shipped Tuesday to Kane, Illinois for burial.

***********************************************

 

COBECK, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1915

John Cobeck, aged 66 years, and for many years a resident of this city, died Wednesday morning shortly after midnight, at the home of his son, Walter Cobeck, 822 East Second street. He has been a sufferer from dropsy for some time, and has been quite sick for four months or so. He sat in a chair the last four weeks and a half, being unable to remain in bed, and an attendant was with him day and night. He was employed at the Hapgood Plow works for many years, and was a very efficient employee. He was industrious and honest and made friends of all acquaintances since coming to Alton. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at two o'clock from the Walter Cobeck home. He is survived by two sons, Walter and Rohland, both of Alton, and one daughter, the wife of a minister at Lebanon, Ill. She will arrive in Alton this evening. A peculiar feature of this case is that it was exactly similar to that of a twin brother of Mr. Cobeck, who died in St. Louis some time ago. He was seized with a dropsical trouble, and the malady developed like that of the Alton sufferer. Both spent the last week of their lives sitting in a chair, and both were wishing death would relieve them. A sister of the deceased, also, died a few years ago from dropsy.

************************************************

 

COBINE, NANCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 11, 1905        Oldest Woman in Madison County Dies - 100 Years Old

The oldest woman in Madison county was buried in Edwardsville Wednesday evening. Mrs. Nancy Cobine, 100 years old, died Monday at her home, a mile and a half northeast of Livingston. There was no particular ailment, merely a wearing out of the vital machinery due to her advanced age. She was the mother of Carson Cobine, who made his home with her; of Mrs. Becky McConch of Staunton, and Sam Carson, who lives in Missouri. Mrs. Cobine at one time lived on the Valley View Farm, northeast of Edwardsville. According to a telegram received today by Edward Cobine of this city, the body will arrive in Edwardsville at 6:40 this evening and will be taken from the Wabash depot to Woodlawn Cemetery.  Edwardsville Intelligencer.

**********************************************

 

COFFEY, WILLIAM E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 18, 1918

William E. Coffey died today at 1715 Bozza street, aged two years. The little one will be buried in the City Cemetery.

************************************************

 

COLBERT, MINNIE C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 12, 1921

Mrs. Minnie C. Colbert, aged 57 years, died this morning at eleven o'clock at the Nazareth home after suffering from a paralytic stroke. She is survived by her husband, George A., and two sons, Lolbert Colbert of Olinburg, and John W. of Grenada, Miss. The funeral arrangements have not been made as yet.

************************************************

 

COLBERT, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 17, 1903

Mrs. James Colbert died at her home on Belle street Tuesday evening at 6:30, aged 49 years. She leaves a husband and three children. The funeral will be Friday morning at 9 o'clock.

**********************************************

 

COLE, ANGELINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 25, 1901

Angeline Cole of Putnam street died Sunday at her home after a long illness, aged 58. She leaves six children. The funeral will take place Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

*********************************************

 

COLE, HERMON C./Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, October 22, 1874

Died, in Upper Alton, Hermon C. Cole, at 12:05 a.m. on Tuesday, the 20th inst., in the 62d year of his age.

 

Source: Alton Telegraph, October 22, 1874

We regret to record the death of Mr. Hermon C. Cole, a resident of Upper Alton, and a leading business man of jSt. Louis, which took place Monday night at his residence in the former place. He was ill about one week. His disease was pneumonia. He was a brother of ex-Mayor Cole of St. Louis, and has long been prominent in commercial circles. He was a leading member of the Baptist denomination in this part of the State, and his death will produce a profound feeling of sorrow in a large circle of relatives, friends and acquaintances. His many virtues and sterling qualities of heart and mind had endeared him to all. In him, Upper Alton has lost one of its most liberal and enterprising residents, and St. Louis one of its most esteemed and valued business men.

 

Source: Alton Telegraph, October 29, 1874

The funeral services of Mr. Hermon C. Cole took place Wednesday afternoon from the Baptist church, Upper Alton, in the presence of a large concourse of friends and relatives from Upper Alton, Alton, Chester, Saint Louis, and elsewhere. The solemn services were conducted by Rev. Dr. Bulkley, assisted by President Kendrick and Prof. Stifler. The pallbearers were the four sons of the deceased, his son-in-law, and two nephews.

 

Source: Alton Telegraph, October 29, 1874            A Tribute to His Memory by One Who Knew Him Long and Well

Today, they tell me, the remains of our dear brother were laid in the tomb! How it grieves me, that I could not be here on the mournful occasion. His spirit gone home to the Lord! How the new thought haunts me! I walk the streets - it seems I shall certainly meet and grasp his warm hand once more. But no, they tell me. It must be so. "Lord, if thou hadst been here our brother had not died." O, Mary, Mary, thy faith is little - "too much to throw away; not enough to live by." The Lord is with us in our afflictions, and yet His presence and goodness did not save the dying from death! And wherefore? "He doeth all things well." I bow in submission, and yet I make my lamentation over his grave. Who doth hinder me? I do believe that outside of the near relatives of the deceased, he has not a more sincere mourner than I am. I have more cause to remember him gratefully and affectionately than all other outsiders. For more than 20 years I have watched and regarded the good qualities of his heart and head. For the ten years of my life spent in Chester as pastor of the Baptist church, he was my chief helper. Our relations were intimate and trustful. He confided in me, I never betrayed that confidence. I relied upon him, and he did not disappoint me. I admired the man for his simplicity, honesty, and real worth. I loved him for his great heart, out of which grew such abundant sympathy and helpfulness toward me in my Christian work in Southern Illinois. Then, as to his family, I grew up with them. Our relations have always been so pleasant and happy. I believe the feeling is reciprocal. I have rejoiced with them when they did rejoice, and now weep with them when they do weep. This afflicting bereavement touches me. These words but poorly expresses the high tribute which my inmost soul pays to the memory of the late Hermon C. Cole. This, and much more, it would have given me pleasure to have said at the funeral obsequies, could I have been present. The afflicted family is assured of the enduring sympathy and regard of myself and mine.  O. L. Barler.  October 21, 1874.

********************************************

 

COLE, UNKNOWN WIFE OF LINCOLN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1912

Mrs. Lincoln Cole died in Upper Alton Saturday afternoon, leaving a husband and four children. She was 24 years of age. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at the Second Baptist church in Upper Alton.

************************************************

 

COLEMAN, HARRIET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 5, 1908

Mrs. Harriet Coleman, aged about 55 years, most of which she spent in Alton, died last evening shortly before 7 o'clock at the home of her grandson, Henry Bradshaw, in the North side. Mrs. Coleman had gone to the Bradshaw home to spend the night and was in apparently good health when she arrived there. Shortly afterwards she complained of feeling sick and grew worse steadily. Within an hour of her arrival she was pronounced dead by Dr. Joesting, who happened to be in the neighborhood calling on a patient and was summoned to the Bradshaw home. Heart disease caused the death. Mrs. Coleman was well known in Alton, was a hard working woman and reared a large family. She owned the home at 1819 Belle street. The funeral will probably be held tomorrow afternoon.

********************************************

 

COLEMAN, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 5, 1905

Mr. Henry Coleman, living at 1269 east Fifth street, died Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, after a lingering illness with consumption, aged 50 years. He had lived in Alton ten years, having come here from Carlinville. His wife and five children survive him. His children are: Will, Clara, Harry, Nettie and Pearl. The funeral will take place Sunday at 2:30 o'clock from his late home, 1269 east Fifth street.

********************************************

 

COLEMAN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1919

John Coleman, an inmate of the Alton State Hospital, died suddenly Thursday while returning to his cottage from the dining hall. Coleman was taken suddenly ill and sat down on the curbing, expiring immediately. Deputy Coroner William H. Bauer held an inquest later in the morning. Coleman was 63 years old. He has no relatives so far as the hospital authorities know. Funeral services will be held at a date to be determined later, and the burial will be in the hospital cemetery.

******************************************

 

COLEMAN, JULIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 5, 1900         Fatally Burned by Kitchen Stove

Mrs. Julia Coleman, wife of Alfred G. Coleman, sustained fatal injuries this morning by being burned at the family home in the Vanpreter house at Sixth and Ridge streets. In the house with the mother when she was being burned were her two little children, and their safety she placed above her own, for in her shrieks for assistance she asked that her children be saved and that no attention be given to her. The house was badly damaged by fire, the woman rushing about the house in her frantic endeavor to get outside where assistance could be rendered her. The doors of the house had been locked, and in her pain she was unable to open them, entrance being effected finally by a passerby forcing the front door open. The origin of the fire is not clearly known. Mrs. Coleman said that she believed she set fire to her clothes by contact with the coals in the kitchen stove, about which she was working. Another theory is that a large hanging lamp that was over the stove fell to the hot stove, and that the oil set fire to the place. Pieces of the lamp were on the floor after the fire, which confirms the lamp theory. When Mrs. Coleman found that her clothes were afire, she attempted to escape from the kitchen by the back door, but could not. Then she ran to the front of the house and tried to get out, but found that door locked also. Frantic with pain, she ran to and fro in the house screaming in her agony, and no assistance could be given her. Mrs. Gus Meyer, a neighbor, hearing the screams, ran to Mrs. Coleman's aid, and with the assistance of a man, broke down a door and extinguished the fire. Surgeon were sent for. Dr. Bowman pronounced her injuries fatal. Nearly all the clothing burned from her body, and her flesh was burned deep. Not an inch of sound skin was left on her, and her agony was horrible. In her pain she thought only of her family and was fearful that her two little children might be burned. She begged the people who went to save her to let her alone and save the children, who were upstairs. The fire in the house was soon extinguished, and but little damage was done. A peculiar incident was that two five-gallon cans, filled with gasoline and coal oil, were in the kitchen and they were safely carried out of the burning building.

 

Mrs. Coleman died at 12 o'clock this noon, four hours after the accident occurred. She leaves, beside her husband, four children - two sons, aged 18 and 16 respectively, and two daughters, aged 8 years and 16 months, respectively. Mrs. Coleman was well-known in the East End, where she was very popular. Her husband is a glassblower and is highly esteemed by all his fellow workmen. They have lived in Alton nearly fifteen years, coming from the East. Mrs. Coleman was 38 years of age. [She is buried in the Alton City Cemetery.]

**********************************************

 

COLEMAN, KATE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 12, 1909

Mrs. Kate Coleman, wife of A. Coleman, died at her home at 812 east Sixth street at 1 o'clock this morning after an illness that extended over a period of almost five years. She leaves beside her husband, six children, three daughters and three sons. Mrs. Coleman was known as a wonderful woman by those who knew her best. She had been a constant sufferer for several years and was known to make few complaints. The funeral will be held from the Congregational church of which she was a member, Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. Clark of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church will preach.

**********************************************

 

COLEMAN, LUCINDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 19, 1901

Mrs. Lucinda Coleman, an aged colored woman of Upper Alton, died last night about 12 o'clock. Mrs. Coleman was thought to be 103 years old. She came to Illinois from South Carolina several years ago. She was the mother of 15 children, all of whom were born in slavery, and only two survive her. Funeral services will be held at the A. M. E. church tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1901

The funeral of Mrs. Lucinda Coleman, an aged colored woman of Upper Alton, took place this afternoon from the A. M. E. church.

***********************************************

 

COLEMAN, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 19, 1917

The funeral of Mrs. Joseph Coleman was held Sunday afternoon from the home of Miss Lettie Coleman - the Myrtle House - on Front street, and was attended by a very large number of friends and relatives of deceased and of her family. Services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Cline of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, and burial was in City Cemetery, beneath a coveerlet of flowers the offerings of friends. The obsequies were attended by many members of the G. A. R., the Woman's Relief Corps and Daughters of Veterans.

***********************************************

 

COLLINS, D. D./Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, January 13, 1892

D. D. Collins, one of the early settlers of Collinsville, died Monday evening [Jan. 11] at 9 o'clock after an illness of three weeks. He was 77 years old. The funeral will take place Friday.

*************************************************

 

COLLINS, DAVID/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 11, 1910

The body of David Collins, who died at St. Joseph's Hospital Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, was taken today to the home of his nephew, M. Keeffe, of 2005 Alby street, from where the funeral will take place Saturday morning to the Brighton cemetery. Mr. Collins leaves two grandchildren, Mrs. T. W. Hensley (nee Minnie Collins) of Pittsburg, Pa., William Collins of Cicago, besides several other relatives in Alton.

***********************************************

 

COLLINS, FLORENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1919

Mrs. Florence Collins, wife of Claude Collins, died last night at their home, 612 Ridge street. She was 18 years old. She leaves her husband and an infant daughter, two weeks old. The funeral will be Saturday morning at 10 o'clock.

************************************************

 

COLLINS, HAROLD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 2, 1919              2 Alton Boys Killed at Rail Crossing

Two Alton boys, Earl Yenney and Harold Collins, both 18 years old, were killed Sunday morning at Monroe, Mich., when their automobile was struck by a fast train on a railroad crossing. The bodies of the two boys will be brought here for burial Wednesday. Mr. and Mrs. August Beineke of Detroit were seriously injured.  All the parties in the accident were formerly of Alton and well known here. The two boys, until a year ago, were employed at the plant of the Brokaw-Eden Company in Alton. Mr. Beineke was a glassworker. The message received have but meager details of the accident. It was known to their relatives in Alton that the four mentioned, with Mr. and Mrs. Frank Yenney, formerly of Alton, were planning an automobile trip from Detroit to Cleveland, during the weekend and over Labor Day. Apparently the accident occurred enroute. Mrs. Frank Yenney was the sister of Collins. Yenney's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Yenney, now make their home in Detroit, as do his brothers, Albert, Russell and Frank. A brother, Charles, and a sister, Mrs. Charles Godfrey, live in St. Louis. Another brother, Chester, is in Cleveland, O. He has other relatives in Alton. Collins' mother, Mrs. Charles Suess, lives at 715 Clement Place in Alton. His mother, who has been seriously ill and recently underwent a surgical operation, was expecting him home on a visit after he had completed this trip. It was a double shock to her as Mr. Beineke is her brother. He leaves a sister, Mrs. Frank Yenney, in Detroit, and a brother, W. C. Collins, in St. Louis. Both the killed and injured had many friends in Alton. The message telling of the injury of Mr. and Mrs. Beineke described his injuries as serious. The fact that Mr. and Mrs. Frank Yenney decided not to come on with the bodies, but to stay there with the Beineke couple, indicates to relatives here that Mrs. Beineke must be in a bad way. Messages asking as to his condition were dispatched Monday, as there was deep interest in the chances of the Beineke couple recovering. The funeral of Earl Yenney will be tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church, where services will be conducted by the Rev. E. C. Combrink, pastor of the church, and interment will be in the City cemetery.

****************************************************

 

COLLINS, JOHN./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 26, 1903

The four year old son [John] of Mrs. K. Collins died this morning after an illness with scarlet fever, and the funeral took place this afternoon, interment being in Melville cemetery. Two or three other members of the family are ill with the same disease, and the sympathy of the community goes out to Mrs. Collins, who is a hard-working widow, in her afflictions.  [Note:  See obit of Sadie Collins]

********************************************

 

COLLINS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 23, 1921

John Collins, a negro, died yesterday at St. Joseph's Hospital of bullet wounds received in a quarrel with Harrison Beechem, also colored, at the plant of the Federal Lead Co. last Friday night. The two negroes engaged in an argument over a board bill, it was said, and Beechem fired several times at Collins, three of the bullets entering Collins' body. Beechem, who has been held under $5,000 bond to the grand jury on a charge of assault with attempt to kill, will be held without bail when the coroner's jury has held an inquest. He was held under bond pending the developments in Collins' condition. An inquest will be held by Deputy Coroner Streeper some time after Thanksgiving. Collins' body has been shipped to Collinsville. Collins in a dying statement, blamed Beechem for his plight, and asserted the only trouble the two men ever had was over the board bill, due to Beechem.

***********************************************

 

COLLINS, LEWIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1907        Death From Lockjaw Follows Slight Hurt

Lewis Collins, a well known Alton negro, formerly employed by H. K. Johnston Hardware Co., died from lockjaw Sunday night after a week's illness. He was employed at the glassworks and was living on Mechanic street near Seventh. He was returning home from his work Saturday evening a week ago, and while going around the corner of his house he stumbled and fell, striking his nose on the ground. No attention was paid to the wound until tetanus set in Friday. Dr. H. R. Lemen, who attended him, said that he was assisted by several other physicians but nothing could be done. The wound on his face appeared to be only a slight scratch and did not interfere with his work. He was married February 6 for the third time.

*********************************************

 

COLLINS, SADIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 6, 1903

The hand of affliction is bearing down heavily upon Mrs. Mollie Collins, and has left her heart bruised and torn and bleeding, but that the faith in her soul is still strong and her hope bright was evidenced Sunday at her agonizing cry of "Oh spare the others my dear Savior," broke from her lips as she followed, Sadie, the second of her chidlren to die within a week, to her last resting place in Melville Cemetery, Sunday morning. Her son, John, died a week ago from scarlet fever, and Saturday evening Sadie, a lovable eight year old child, succumbed to the disease. The others who were sick with the same disease are recovering. The case is a very sad one. Mrs. Collins is a widow, with a large family, and she has worked hard to support them. Her trouble because of the nature of the disease had to be borne alone, and alone she was forced to go to the grave with her loved ones for the same reason. The neighbors were powerless to help, although eager to do so because of their own little ones and the fear of contagion. She has the sincere sympathy of the community.

********************************************

 

COLLINS, WALTER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 16, 1903

The funeral of Walter Collins was held this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home of Clement Collins, on East Third street. Mr. A. M. Scott conducted the services. There was a large attendance of friends of the young man and of the family. Burial was in City Cemetery. Mr. Collins died at Chattanoogo, Tenn.  He learned the trade of glassblowing in Alton and was well known in the city.

********************************************

 

COLLMANN, HARM H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 12, 1922

Harm H. Collmann, aged 72 years, died Wednesday evening at eleven o'clock at the family home near Bethalto, after an illness of one year, suffering from a tumor of the stomach. Mr. Collmann was born in Germany on April 19, 1850, during the year 1869 he came to Bethalto, where he made his home until his death. For the past fifteen years he has resided on the farm owned by Tom Belt. Last fall he purchased a farm. The deceased is survived by his wife, six sons, John of Dallas, Tex.; Herman of Pierre, South Dakota; George of Alton; and Heye, Edward and William of Bethalto. Two daughters, Mrs. George Deye and Miss Anna Deye of Bethalto. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at one o'clock from the Lutheran church. Interment will be in the Dorsey Lutheran cemetery.

***********************************************

 

COLLY, UNKNOWN INFANT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 2, 1906

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. William Colly died at her home on the Joehl farm east of Upper Alton this afternoon. The burial will occur Friday afternoon.

*************************************************

 

COLONIUS, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1899

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Colonius are deeply bereaved in the death of their three year old son, George, after a two week's illness. The boy was taken with a severe case of the trip, but several days ago it was thought he was on the road to recovery. A relapse set in, however, and death came at eleven o'clock this morning. The child was a manly little fellow, the pride of his parents, and admired by all who have seen him. His death is a severe blow to the parents, and much sincere sympathy is expressed for them.

*********************************************

 

COLTHAR, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1902

Clarence Colthar, aged 22, an employee of the Beall Brothers, retired Saturday night apparently in the best of health. He boarded at the home of the Pattersons, 212 West Seventh street, and William J. Patterson was his bedfellow. The latter was awakened early Sunday morning by a peculiar noise being made by Colthar. Investigations showed that the latter was apparently suffering intensely or dying. Medical aid was summoned but nothing could be done to prolong life. The jury that was impaneled by Deputy Coroner Streeper found that "heart disease" was the cause of death. Deceased was a member of Madison camp, Modern Woodmen. He leaves relatives at Bunker Hill, being the son of Mrs. Lot Colthar, formerly of that place. The body will be taken to Bunker Hill this evening and will be accompanied by a delegation of Modern Woodmen. The funeral services will be held Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock in the Bunker Hill Methodist church, and burial will be at Woodburn.

**********************************************

 

COLWELL, UNKNOWN WIFE OF EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 1, 1918

The funeral services for Mrs. Edward Colwell were held this afternoon from the family home on Lincoln avenue. The services were private. The burial was in Oakwood cemetery. The death occurred Tuesday at Edwardsville.

*************************************************

 

COMLEY, ESTHER J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 9, 1918

Esther J. Comley, aged 4 years, died yesterday at the family home, 2210 Main street. The body will be laid to rest in the Upper Alton Cemetery.

**********************************************

 

COMMONS, CARRIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1914

Mrs. Carrie Commons, wife of Manly Commons, died at 3:40 o'clock Sunday morning at the family home, State and Belleview avenue, after a long period of suffering. Mrs. Commons had been bedfast for many months, and prior to that she had been an intense sufferer from a malady that had been diagnosed as being of a cancerous nature. She bore her suffering with admirable fortitude, and during a long period she insisted upon being engaged actively in the work of her home, refusing to yield her place there until it became physically impossible for her to continue. She was the mother of seven children: two daughters, Misses Pearl and Merle Commons; and five sons, Dennis, Bernie, Dorf, Ralph, and Carl Commons. She leaves also her husband and her father. Mr. Commons is master mechanic at the plant of the Alton Boxboard & Paper Co. The funeral will be at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon from the family home, Rev. W. T. Cline officiating. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

***********************************************

 

COMPTON, SARAH D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 27, 1909

The funeral of Miss Sarah D. Compton was held this afternoon from the Godfrey Congregational church, Rev. W. A. Cotton officiating. There was a large attendance of friends of the deceased. Miss Compton's father was one of the original members of the church, and she had been a working member since girlhood. Burial was in the Godfrey cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CONDON, ANN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 13, 1901

Mrs. Ann Condon, widow of Dennis Condon, died at her home, 1037 Union street, this morning, aged 76. She leaves four daughters, Mrs. John Burke, Mrs. Walter O. Day and Miss Katherine Condon of Alton, and Mrs. Robert Johnson of Monette, Mo. The funeral will be Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

********************************************

 

CONDON, MARIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 24, 1902

Mrs. Maria Condon, an inmate of the Woman's Home, died Sunday morning after a long illness, aged 79. She had lived in Madison county over fifty years. She leaves two adopted children, Mrs. E. Borden of Los Angeles, and William Condon of Oklahoma. She was a resident of Upper Alton, but became an inmate of the Woman's Home when that institution was established. Burial was this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Woman's Home to Upper Alton cemetery. Rev. M. W. Twing conducted the services.

*********************************************

 

CONE, MARY L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 20, 1917

Mrs. Mary L. Cone, aged 74, died at the home of her brother, J. F. Leeper, 1506 Washington avenue, this morning at 8 o'clock. Mrs. Cone had not been feeling well for a few days and last Thursday consulted a doctor. She was up and around this morning, and shortly before her death she complained of feeling sick. She fell over and in fifteen minutes had passed away. Mrs. Cone formerly lived at Godfrey. There she was an ever ready help to the girls attending Monticello Seminary. She was an expert at needle work and her services were in great demand among the girls, who kept her busy much of the time. She possessed a sweet disposition which made her beloved by all who met her. Her husband died forty years ago. She lived at South Bend, Ind., with her daughter for a long time, until the daughter died, and then she came here to be near her only brother. Mr. Leeper was in Washington, D. C. at the time his sister died. The funeral arrangements would not be completed, it was said, until his return home, which will probably be tomorrow.

***********************************************

 

CONE, UNKNOWN INFANT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 26, 1914     Infant Near Death in Mother's Arms On Street Car - Arrives At Father's Home Just in Time

With her six months old daughter dying in her arms, Mrs. Helen Cone, wife of Jesse Cone, arrived in Alton this morning at 9 o'clock. She was on the way to her home in the East End of Alton, and the child was taken sick last night. The mother stayed all night in Edwardsville, then came on to Alton this morning, not realizing that her child was dying. While the mother was sitting on the interurban car with her sick infant, a fellow passenger noticed that the child had gone into a state of collapse and directed the mother's attention to it. He asked whether the child was asleep, and the mother said she supposed it was. Then it was noticed that the child was apparently not breathing. She had noticed the child's condition, but being powerless to do anything about it, she had been hoping that she was mistaken. The discovery by fellow passengers of the child's condition confirming the mother's worst fears was made just before the interurban car reached Alton. When Mrs. Cone carried her baby to her home, and there a half hour later, and after Dr. L. L. Yerkes had seen the child, the little girl died. Dr. Yerkes said he did not know what was the trouble with the child as he had no opportunity of examining it until it was so close to death that the end had practically come. The supposition is that a very acute attack of summer complaint had caused the child's death. The father of the child, Jesse Cone, is a railroad man living at Venice, Ill.

**********************************************

 

CONLAN, MRS. PETER/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, February 28, 1893

The funeral services of Mrs. Peter Conlan of North Alton, took place this morning at the Cathedral and her remains were laid to rest in the St. Patrick cemetery. A large number of the friends and relatives of the deceased attended.

*************************************************

 

CONLEY, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1905

Edward, the 14 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Conley of 407 Henry street, died at 11:15 a.m. Friday after an illness with typhoid fever. It was supposed that the boy was getting along nicely and his condition during the last twenty-four hours was such as to give his parents great hope. The last night had been a very restful one for him and in the morning his prospects seemed more encouraging than ever before since the illness began. Very unexpectedly the end came after a brief prostration. The boy was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Conley. He was employed at the Co-operative bakery and was a remarkably bright young man for his year. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home to St. Patrick's church.

**********************************************

 

CONLEY, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1912

Frank Conley died very suddenly at Excelsior Springs, Mo., Monday afternoon about 4 o'clock. A telegram was received by his son, Charles Conley, telling of the death of his father, and he started at once for Excelsior Springs to bring the body home, after breaking the sad news to his mother. Mr. Conley had gone to Excelsior Springs a few days before with his brother, Patrick. It was not supposed he was in a bad way, and he merely wanted to recuperate a bit. The news of this death caused a sensation downtown, as Conley was among the best know men about town. He had conducted a saloon for many years in Alton, and was known as an all around devotee of sports. He had just completed remodeling the front of his saloon, the "Turf," which he had invested with a marble paneled front, and the panels were adorned with life-sized horse's heads and many electric lights. He was especially proud of the handsome finish he had given the front of his place, and boasted that he now had the most conspicuous saloon front in Alton. A number of years ago he retired from the glassblowing trade to give all his time to his place of business at Second and Piasa streets. He had a wide acquaintance among sporting men and politicians in general, and there will be deep interest in his death at more places than his home city. Mr. Conley leaves a wife and five children, Edward of East St. Louis; Charles, William, Mrs. Mary Newman, and Miss Irene Conley of Alton; two brothers, Patrick and Edward Conley of Alton; and one sister, Mrs. James Brown of Pittsburg, Pa.; and three grandchildren. Mr. Conley died in his 59th year. The remains will arrive in Alton tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock, and the funeral will be held Friday morning at the Cathedral. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

*************************************************

 

CONLEY, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 16, 1907        Railroad Watchman Dies While Speaking to Son

James Conley, aged 59, died Saturday afternoon at Godfrey from heart disease at his home, east of the C. & A. depot. He had left another man in charge of the crossing while he went home to carry some coal he had picked up. As he was entering the house he noticed his boy rolling a big snowball, and he stopped long enough as he was opening the door to say to the boy, "If you had to do that you wouldn't want to do it." Then he dropped dead with his hands on the doorknob. He leaves his wife and five children. The funeral was held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CONNOR, E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 24, 1916          Old Soldier Dead

E. Conor, aged 89, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Vermillion, at 1006 East Broadway this afternoon after an illness of some time. He is survived by two sons and two daughters. The funeral arrangements have not been completed.

************************************************

 

CONNOR, SILAS F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 20, 1919     Former City Official and Grocery Store Owner Dies

Mrs. H. S. Matthews received word late yesterday of the death of her cousin, Silas F. Connor, for many years a resident of Alton. He had been making his home in St. Louis for some time, and the end occurred in that city. Mr. Connor had been totally blind for several years. His failing eyesight had caused him to leave Alton, and he went to Leavenworth, Kan., to be with the family of his son, E. H. Connor, remaining there until the son was called East to help with war work. Then Mr. Connor went to St. Louis where he lived with a family including some members afflicted as he was. Silas F. Connor was one of the most prominent business men in Alton for many years. Not only was he prominent as a business man, but he also held official positions. He served as a member of the city council, was city comptroller, and at the time his sight failed him, he was serving as clerk of the City Court of Alton. He was deeply interested in all the Masonic bodies in Alton, and for many years he carried a large share of the responsibilities of an official character in the various Masonic bodies of Alton. He was a man of remarkable good preservation of body and faculties, and but for the loss of his sight his closing years would have been happy ones, as physically he was in good condition. Many years ago he started a store on Third street, where he retailed fancy groceries. He was known as a man of bluff honest, blunt in his speech, but withal a kindly sympathetic friend and most devoted to his family. One of the touching features of his life was his devotion to his invalid wife to whom he gave constant attention up to the time of her death. He leaves two sons, E. H. Connor and Charles Connor. Mr. Connor was in his 84th year and had been in ill health for several years. The funeral will be held some time Friday. The body will be brought to Alton and the Masons of which Mr. Connor was a long time member, will have charge of the funeral. Mr. Connor was a member of the Unitarian church and Mr. Holloway of the local Unitarian church will be the minister in charge.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 21, 1919

The funeral of Silas F. Connor will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Unitarian church and burial will be in City cemetery. The body will be brought to Alton tomorrow noon and taken to the Keiser undertaking establishment to remain until the day following. The funeral services will be under Masonic auspices. All the Masonic bodies in Alton will be represented as Mr. Connor was for more than a half century a very active worker in all the bodies.

*************************************************

 

CONSTANTINO, ANDREWS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 4, 1904

Andrews Constantino, a Greek, died at St. Joseph's hospital Sunday, aged 45, from the effects of being overheated one day last week. Constantino had no relatives or friends in Alton, and the body was turned over to Undertaker W. H. Bauer Tuesday morning for burial.

*************************************************

 

CONTER, UNKNOWN WIFE OF WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1900

Mrs. William Conter, wife of a well known farmer residing two miles east of East Alton, died last night after a short and painful illness. She was 26 years of age, and leaves a husband and two children.

***********************************************

 

CONVERY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 14, 1907        Body of Well Known Upper Alton Business Man Found in Back Yard by Wife

The body of John Convery, a well known Upper Alton business man, was found by his wife Wednesday night shortly after 9 o'clock, lying in the back yard at the family home on Liberty street. His death was due to heart failure and was a severe shock to his wife and to the entire community. Mr. Convery had been suffering from heart trouble for almost two months, but few of his friends or business associates were aware of the fact. He had been complaining of a pain over his heart for some time, and he believed it was rheumatism until he was told by a physician that it was heart trouble. Since that time his condition grew steadily worse and he became weaker, but continued at his business without informing many of his condition. Mrs. Convery was in the habit of going to her husband's office in the evening and remaining with him until closing time and then they went to their home. They were together last night at the office as usual and closed up shortly before 9 o'clock and went home. After being in the house a few minutes, Mr. Convery stepped out into the back yard and when he did not return as soon as his wife thought he should, she became alarmed immediately and carried a lamp out to the back porch and called him. Receiving no answer she set the lamp down and ran into the yard to look for him and fell over his lifeless body lying on the ground. The shock to her was so great that she was helpless, but she attracted the attention of men at the livery stable next door. The body was carried into the house and physicians were summoned, but the spark of life had gone out long before any medical aid arrived. His relatives in various parts of town were notified of his sudden death and the shock to them was great.  John Convery had been a resident of Upper Alton almost twenty years, and had been in the coal and ice business continuously. He was a quiet and industrious man, and during his business career here had made many friends. He was born and raised in Alton where his aged mother, Mrs. Mary Convery, resides. He was 48 years old. He is also survived by his widow and two sisters, Mrs. Bertha Boeschert and Miss Pauline Convery of Alton. Mr. Convery was a member of the Woodman lodge and the order will attend the funeral, but the arrangements for it have not been made.

***********************************************

 

CONVERY, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 19, 1907

Mrs. Mary Convery, aged 73, died Sunday morning at 5 o'clock after an illness with stomach trouble at the home, 905 Liberty street. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Martin Boschert and Miss Mary Convery, both of Alton. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from St. Patrick's church. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery. Mrs. Convery was an old resident of Alton. Her son, John, who was for many years a prominent business man in Upper Alton, died recently, very suddenly.

*********************************************

 

CONWAY, HATTIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 22, 1905

The funeral of Mrs. Hattie Conway was held this morning from St. Patrick's church where a Requiem mass was said by Rev. Fr. O'Reilley. There was a very large attendance of friends and neighbors at the funeral and many lovely floral offerings. The members of the Court of Honor and other fraternal societies attended the obsequies in a body. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

*********************************************

 

CONWAY, PATRICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 29, 1904

The body of Patrick Conway, who died at his home in St. Louis Wednesday morning, was brought to Alton today and interred in Greenwood cemetery after services at the Cathedral. Years ago Mr. Conway was a well known resident of Alton, and conducted a shoe shop on Belle street. He was about 87 years of age.

********************************************

 

COOK, BLANCHE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 15, 1910

Blanche, the 8 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Cook of Wood River, died Friday morning shortly after 2 o'clock after an illness of four months. Her death was directly due to injuries she sustained one day last winter, four months ago, when on her way home from school. She fell on the icy ground and sustained what was believed to be a slight injury, and she walked on home. Nothing was thought of the injury until some time later when the girl began to suffer intensely and her condition grew steadily worse. Doctors were puzzled and could not tell what was the trouble. It was decided after some time that she had suffered a shock to her brain and spine by the fall that resulted in her being completely disabled. She had lain for several weeks unconscious and her death was expected almost any moment. Her vitality surprised everyone, as for over a week she took no nourishment whatever, and the attending doctors had given her up to die. The funeral of the child will be held Sunday, and the body will be taken to Grafton, the old home of the family, for burial.

************************************************

 

COOK, EDWARD A. (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 24, 1918        Dr. Cook Dies From Blood Poisoning - Martyr to His Duty

Dr. Edward A. Cook, aged 49, one of the best known physicians in Alton, died at St. Joseph's Hospital at 12:50 o'clock, noon, Saturday, from blood poisoning resulting from appendicitis. Dr. Cook's death was the direct result of his sacrificing himself to the calls of duty, when his surgical knowledge would inform him that he was in a bad way himself and he should have been resting and taking treatment to recuperate. At a time when he was going about waiting on others who needed a doctor's attention, Dr. Cook himself was in a very serious condition and was in need of immediate treatment by a skilled surgeon himself. The attending doctors who were called to look after him when he broke down, and found conditions as they were, said that they were convinced that Dr. Cook must have known that he was in a bad way, but that he was kept so busy attending to others he had not taken the time to help himself. He had been serving as a member of the district medical advisory board in the draft, as well as taking care of a large number of sick people at home. He had been, also, serving with the local exemption board as an examiner. It was while he was so busily engaged that Mrs. Cook was called away from home to assist Dr. Cook's parents in preparing for a trip. When she came back she found her husband very ill. He had been in bed and was summoned to take care of a case, but had made arrangements for another doctor to go. The family insisted that he go, not knowing that he was a very sick man. Dr. Cook got out of bed, attended to the case, and went back again to his bed. Then he had to go to the hospital, where a specialist was called and he advised an immediate operation to relieve a bad case of appendicitis. That was one week ago last Friday. He showed from the first that there was very little chance of his recovery, and practically no hope had been held by these around him that he would get well. He became unconscious during the night and died about ten hours later. Dr. Cook had been a resident of Upper Alton ever since he began the practice of medicine about seventeen years ago. He had been very active in public affairs, had served as a member of the city council and also as a member of the Board of Education. He had been prominent in medical society work and at all times was willing to assume new duties and obligations that might be imposed on him when there was some public work to be done. He was a very conscientious man and devoted his utmost energies in any service he undertook. Dr. Cook was born in Jersey county and he graduated from the Jerseyville High School in 1891. Teaching school for a few years he made his way through medical college and after graduating he came to Alton. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. William Cook, who reside in Jersey County. The father is attending the G. A. R. national encampment in the state of Washington, and the mother is visiting her only daughter, Mrs. Ruth Cooper, in Coates, Kan. There are six brothers surviving: Elmer of St. Louis; Herbert and Rolla of Jerseyville; Walter of Alton; Dr. Arthur B. Cook of Portland, Ore.; Harry Cook of the state of Washington. Dr. Arthur Cook is on his way to Alton, and four of the brothers were here when the death occurred. Besides these, Dr. Cook leaves his wife and one son. The time of the funeral has not been set, but it was asked today by Mrs. Cook that a last request of Dr. Cook be observed. He wished that, instead of money being spent for flowers to be sent to his funeral, that the same money be sent to apply on the milk and ice fund for the babies of Alton who need the help. He had said, "I will have no need for flowers, then, and the babies do need the milk and ice. It would be better to give it to them."

*****************************************************

 

COOK, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1904

Harry Cook, aged 20, a towerman employed by the Big Four at Mitchell, was struck and instantly killed by Chicago and Alton train No. 9 at 6:35 o'clock this morning. His body was hurled 150 by the impact of the blow he sustained, and was not mangled.  His skull was split off above the eyebrows, his head being struck in the forehead by the pilot bar of the engine. Cook arrived at Mitchell just the day before to take charge of the new interlocker tower there. He was walking along the wagon road and approaching the crossing when the Wabash and the Alton trains were racing toward the crossing. Cook was watching the Wabash train and apparently did not notice the C. and A. midnight train. Just as the engine was about to hit him, as he stood on the road crossing, he turned his head and was struck full in the forehead, between the eyes. Just a few days before Cook left his home in Indianapolis, saying farewell to his mother there. He was a bright young man and was holding a responsible position. A telegram notifying his mother was sent to Indianapolis.

********************************************************

 

COOLEY, JAMES ASHLEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 12, 1899                Brick layer and builder of many Alton businesses

James Ashley Cooley, one of the oldest residents of Alton, died at 8:45 o'clock Thursday night, aged 77 years, after a short illness. Although in feeble health consequent of his great age, he was able to be down town every day until last Saturday. On Friday afternoon he sprained his knee by a fall and he was compelled to remain at his home. On Wednesday he was taken with the grip, and his feeble constitution soon collapsed and he died Thursday night after only 36 hours illness. In the death of Mr. Cooley, there passes one of the most interesting characters in the history of Alton. He had lived in Alton for over half a century, having come here from New York at a time when Alton was in her infancy, and not even a shadow of her present importance. He was a bricklayer by trade and was for many years a leading contractor. Most of the large brick buildings in the business part of town were built by him and he often spoke of his connection with the early up-building of Alton. The first building erected by Mr. Cooley after coming to Alton is the one used by the Alton Savings Bank. It was built for the use of the Alton Bank, now the National Bank, and was and is a fine structure. He also erected the building in which the Telegraph is published. He was quite wealthy, and one of the influential citizens of Alton in his early days. Of late years, old age and weakness prevented him from following his accustomed pursuits, and he was obliged to content himself with sitting around and observing events as they took place with a younger generation actively engaged in his place. On the streets, he was a familiar figure, and his condition is well described -

He walked along the streets And he looks at all he meets So forlorn;

And he shakes his feeble head That it seems as if he said: They are gone.

During the war he filled the position of assistant provost marshal. For many years he was Judge of Election in the First Ward, and there he will be missed most. He leaves two daughters, Misses Emily and Alice Cooley, with whom he made his home on State street. Mr. Cooley was one of the most intelligent men in Alton, fully conversant on all current topics, whether social, political, financial or otherwise. Since the organization of the Republican party, he had been an earnest and effective member of it, always taking a leading position in its councils, until laid aside by the infirmities of age. The funeral will be Saturday, at 2 p.m., from the family home.

 

[Cooley is buried in the Alton City Cemetery.]

****************************************************

 

COOPER, CHARLES MORTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 4, 1921     Remains of Charles Cooper, Killed in France, Will be Interred on Tuesday in Moro

The remains of another overseas soldier, Charles Morton Cooper, arrived in Moro Saturday night and the funeral is to be held on Tuesday. Cooper, the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Cooper of Moro, was born March 24, 1894 at Moro, and spent his early life there, graduating from the public school and later enrolling at Bunker Hill military academy where he was a student for two years. Cooper entered the army service on February 23, 1918 at Alton, and on June 15, 1918 was made a corporal in Company K, 135th Infantry, 84th Division at Camp Taylor, Ky. He was transferred shortly thereafter to Camp Sherman, Ohio, and later to Camp Mills, N. Y., embarking for overseas on September 3, and was assigned as a replacement to Company K, 28th Infantry, First Division, going into action with that division. On October 15th, 1918, he met his death in action while making an advance with his company in the direction of Sedan. The body was interred in a military cemetery in France, and arrived at Hoboken, N. J., the early part of last week, reaching Moro Saturday. Cooper was well known in this vicinity, and was a member of Bethalto lodge 406, A. F. and A. M. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Cooper, one brother, August, and a sister, Miss Mararetin Cooper. Funeral services will take place at noon Tuesday from the home of the parents, while the Masonic fraternity will have charge of the services at Cooper Cemetery, which is in the front yard of their residence.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 5, 1921

Impressive funeral services were carried out at noon today over the body of Charles Morton Cooper, who died in France and whose body was returned to Moro Saturday night for final interment in the Cooper cemetery at that place. The Masonic order of which deceased soldier was a member had full charge of the funeral services at the cemetery. Services were conducted at the Cooper home in Moro, with Rev. Meuhlinghaus of the Evangelical church officiating. Rev. Cates of the Upper Alton Methodist church also participated in the services. A number of relatives of the deceased from this city attended the funeral. They were: Mr. and Mrs. A. Mohr and son, Joe, and daughter, Miss Charlotte; Mrs. Jack Hickey and daughter Betty; Mrs. R. G. Huskinson; Mrs. Margaret Unterbrink; Miss Edith Faulstich; Mrs. J. E. Schullenberg; Mr. and Mrs. John Dietchey; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Unterbrin; Mrs. Henry Unterbrink; and Misses Florence and Amelia Kuhn

****************************************************

 

COOPER, CHARLOTTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 3, 1905

Mrs. Charlotte Cooper, aged 68, died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning from senile debility. She leaves four children, Peter Cooper of East Alton, Harry Cooper of Troy, and John Cooper and Mrs. James Stockton of Cincinnati, Ohio. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

*************************************************

 

COOPER, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1920

The funeral of Frank Cooper, who died from a complication of diseases Monday morning at his home two miles north of Bethalto, in Foster township, will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from his late home and burial will be in Zimmerman cemetery. Mr. Cooper was a thrifty farmer, had a good farm, and had accumulated considerable wealth. He had never married. In the past ten years he had his sister, Mrs. Frances Piggott, as his housekeeper. He was a breeder of good livestock, especially draft horses.

***************************************************

 

COOPER, GEORGE W./Source: Alton Telegraph, January 20, 1844

Died, in Upper Alton, on the 15th instant, of lung fever, George W., son of John and Susan Cooper, aged 4 years and 11 months. His sufferings were great, but he bore them with extraordinary patience for one of his age, and sweetly fell asleep in Christ, without a groan or a struggle. All his relatives and friends, but particularly his parents, feel sensibly, and mourn their loss, but they sorrow not as those who have no hope, for they fully expect ere long to go to him, and reign with Christ, where there shall be no more parting, no more sickness, pain or death.

*************************************************

 

COOPER, JOHN/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, September 5, 1882    Gypsy Dies Near Rock Springs

We gave Saturday an account of the death of John Cooper, a member of the band of Gypsies encamped near Rock Springs, a short distance this side of Upper Alton. The funeral has not yet taken place, as the arrival of a brother of the deceased is expected. In accordance with the custom of that strange race of people, they have burned the most of the effects of the dead man. His clothing, saddle, bridle, tent and other articles have been destroyed in that way. His wife and two children now lodge with other members of the tribe, all being related to each other. They would also have burned a valuable wagon belong to Cooper, had it not been necessary to use it in their removal South, which will soon take place. The principal business of these Gypsies is horse trading, fortune telling, being but as incidental kind of a recreation, although they are credited by most people with great skill and acumen as sight-seers, or foretellers of future events.

**************************************************

 

COOPER, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1906

Joseph Cooper, aged 60, died Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the home of his son, J. W. Cooper, in East Alton, from fatty degeneration of the heart. He had been suffering for many months and recently was moved from Hartford to his son's home. Cooper achieved distinction during the trial of Joe Nolan for the murder of two fishermen. Cooper was proprietor of the saloon at Hartford being run in opposition to Nolan, and it was because of the business rivalry that the murder was attributed to Nolan. Cooper was one of the star witnesses, and on his testimony much of the case hinged. He testified that Nolan had tried to kill him several times and that bullets had passed in dangerous proximity to his face. He claimed to have identified Nolan outside his saloon as the man who carried the shot gun and .....od sentry, and he also claimed to have seen Nolan following the two men down the road. Cooper leaves two sons and one daughter. His daughter arrived from Hannibal Sunday afternoon a half hour after his death.  He was a well known character in the vicinity of East Alton and had many friends.

*************************************************

 

COOPER, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1914

Joseph Cooper died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Zeph Bivens in Moro, Sunday, aged 94 years. Mr. Cooper had been dying for several weeks from old age and the effects of the weather. He had been staying for some time at Bunker Hill, but when his health failed he went back to Moro where he had lived for the greater part of his life. Mr. Cooper was an old time and well known Madison County farmer. Mr. Cooper was a wealthy owner of real estate, and leaves a valuable estate. His children are George, John O., B. E., and Arthur; and Mrs. Zeph Bivens. The funeral will be Wednesday.

***************************************************

 

COOPER, LEONARD P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 14, 1921         East Alton Postmaster Fall Out of Car - Killed    [This obit was extremely hard to read - some is missing]

On the eve of his 50th birthday, Postmaster Leonard P. Cooper of East Alton was fatally hurt Sunday evening by falling from the running board of his automobile, six miles north of Granite City, and striking his head against the curbing, fracturing his skull. He died before he could be carried to Granite City. The accident was the tragic close of what had been a very happy day for the Cooper family. They had gone to St. Louis to be the guests of Mrs. _____ sister, Mrs. Lottie Fields, ______ were returning home. In the car were Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Cooper, H. Cooper, and Mr. and Mrs. Clifford ______. The ______ was in the back, and thinking that a rear tire was flat he opened the car door and stepped out on the running board to look and ascertain whether or not the tire had gone flat. In doing so, a ____ of the car caused him to lose his grip as the car was running 25 miles an hour, and he was hurled headlong into the curbing. The driver of the car did not know Mr. Cooper was going to step on the running board and did not check the speed of the car. Mr. Cooper was knocked unconscious by the fall. He was picked up, put back in his own car and a flying trip was made to St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Granite City, where he was dead before he reached it. Mr. Cooper was a member of an old Madison County family. His mother was born in the county, as was his father. He had lived in the county almost all of his life. He was married at Hannibal, Mo., to Miss ____ Brown, and spent about two _____ there, about twenty-five years ____moving to East Alton. Had he lived another day, he would have been ____ years of age. He was a Democrat all his life and eight years ago he was appointed postmaster at East Alton, a position he held up to the time of his death. He was very prominent in Wood River township. His father was Joseph Cooper, who died a ____ of years ago. He leaves his _____, Mrs. Mart Surratt of Han____, one sister, Mrs. Della Drum____, and one brother, Wilbur Cooper, in addition to his widow, Mrs. Ala___ Cooper, and two sons, Homer and Clifford. Mr. Cooper was a member of the Knghts of Pythias, holding membership in Alton. The duties of postmaster were taken over this morning by Mr. Cooper's ____, Miss Maude Apple, until ____ hear from Washington. The ____ of Mr. Cooper will administer ___ office until a successor can be found.

*****************************************************

 

COOPER, NANCY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 5, 1900

Mrs. Nancy J. Cooper, one of the oldest and best known residents of Upper Alton, died this afternoon at her home after a long illness. She had been in failing health for a long time, and her death was not unexpected. She was a member of a well known family of Upper Alton, and was 92 years of age. She leaves two daughters, Miss Allie Cooper and Mrs. Warnock.

**************************************************

 

COOPER, S. G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 19, 1921          Former Justice of the Peace in East Alton - Lifelong Resident of Madison County Dies

S. G. Cooper, for many years a well known resident of East Alton, died Monday night at 9 o'clock in St. Joseph's hospital after an illness of three years. Death was from a general breakdown due to old age. He was 73 years old. Mr. Cooper was born and reared in Madison County and spent all of his life here. He came of a family of pioneer settlers. In the Civil War days he enlisted as a private in Co. D., 10th Illinois Cavalry at Alton, serving for three years. Fifty years ago last December Mr. Cooper was married to Miss Laura Clark, who survives him, but is in poor health herself. She also was reared in Madison County. Four children are living, Mrs. Jessie Howard of Bonners Ferry, Idaho; Mrs. Blanche Hamilton of Atlanta, Ill.; Roland Cooper of Baxter Springs, Kan.; and Mrs. Edna Hale of East Alton. He leaves one sister, Mrs. John Jones of Los Angeles, Calif. All the children are here except the Mrs. Howard and her arrival from her Idaho home is being awaited. Mr. Cooper served for many years as a dispenser of justice in East Alton, being re-elected time after time as Justice of the Peace. He also was in the insurance business. He retired about ten years ago on account of failing health. He spent last winter with his son in Kansas, and intended to spend the summer in East Alton. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of the deceased daughter, Mrs. L. H. Hale, with Rev. Marsh of Upper Alton officiating. Interment will be in the Montgomery Cemetery. The Montgomery Cemetery is located eight miles east of here.

****************************************************

 

COOPER, SAMSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 9, 1903        Old Gypsy Stabbed to Death at Madison and Belle Streets in Alton

Samson Cooper, an old gypsy, was stabbed to death Sunday night about 6 o'clock at Madison and Belle streets under the full glare of an electric light, by Jacob Love, an Alton negro of unsavory reputation. Love is in jail, having been arrested Sunday night about midnight in a barn on the place of A. K. Root, where he had taken refuge with Charles Townsend. The murder was a most unprovoked one. Cooper came to town a week ago with a party of gypsies who encamped on Belle street opposite the Deadman home, at the city limits. He was 60 years old, and on account of his age had given up horse trading, but his roving spirit would not permit him to settle in one place. He was traveling with a party consisting of Dick Joles, William and Oliver Broadway. Sunday the old man had been drinking and was downtown. About 6 o'clock he was going along upper Belle street, when he met Carroll Hall, a young lad, whom he asked to help him to the gypsy camp on Belle street. Hall was assisting the old man when he was approached by Jacob Love, a negro, who commanded the boy to let him take care of the old man and he would take him to the camp. Hall obeyed the order of Love, who is a stout burly fellow, and left Cooper in his charge. Within five minutes thereafter Cooper was mortally stabbed, one knife thrust penetrating his heart and the other his brain from the back of his neck. Frank Deadman found the body lying at the roadside near Dixon's quarry about 6:30 o'clock, and the body was still warm. He gave the alarm and in a short time the story was out. Mrs. McHenry, who lives across the road from where the murder was committed, saw Love strike Cooper, but did not know what was being done. She said she could identify the man. The description given of the assailant of the old gypsy fitted Love, and the whole police force were started in search of him. The search was kept up throughout Alton and North Alton, at all of Love's haunts until midnight, when a party of officers found the murderer hiding in a barn where he had taken refuge with Charles Townsend. At first Townsend denied that Love was hiding with him, saying that he had been there but left. Deputy Sheriff Laughlin, Officer Lyons, Constable Batterton demanded permission to search and Townsend demurred. Deputy Sheriff Laughlin then announced his intention of making the search. Townsend refused to lend the officers a light, and they were compelled to borrow one nearby. Love was found cowering in the loft of the barn. He had told Townsend that he had trouble with a man on Belle street who tried to rob him, and that he struck his assailant on the head. When Love was arrested a knife was found on his person. The longest blade was found bent as though the steel had turned when Love had stabbed his victim. On the knife was found a blood stain. Lenus Vogelpohl of Upper Alton, who says he married a gypsy girl and knew Cooper well, told the police where relatives of the dead man could be found. He represented them to be wealthy gypsies and said that doubtless Cooper had a large sum of money on his person when killed. A telegram was sent to Arthur Wells at Winona, Miss., and another to Bessie Wells at Indianapolis, informing them of the death of their relative. Representatives of Cooper's family are expected to come here, and it is said by Vogelpohl, who knows them well, that they will spare neither time nor money in prosecuting the murderer of the old man. Deputy Coroner Streeper took charge of Cooper's body. Love was identified Monday morning by Carroll Hall as being the man who forced him to turn the old gypsy over to him Sunday night, saying, "I will take him to his camp."  Deputy Coroner Streeper has summoned for the inquest Henry Wolf, who was said to have met Love on upper Belle street Sunday evening. Love is said to have told Wolf that he was waiting for an old gypsy who owed him a quarter, and that "if the old man did not pay he would cut him and cut him deep."

 

NOTE:

Jacob Love was arrested and held without bail. In March 1904, Love was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of Samson Cooper.

*********************************************

 

COOPER, SUSANNA W. (nee VEAL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 6, 1900

Upper Alton News - Mrs. Susanna W. Cooper, one of Upper Alton's best known, beloved and oldest residents, died at her home Friday, October 6, at 3 o'clock p.m., aged 88 years, 10 months, and 2 days. Susanna Veal was born in Knoxville, Tenn., Jan. 4, 1812. She was married May 9, 1831 to Mr. John Cooper. With her husband and two sons, she came to Upper Alton in 1834, where they lived happily till the death of her husband, March 2, 1868. Of this union were born ten children, three of whom survive her: Mrs. M. J. Warnock and Miss Allie Cooper, bot of Upper Alton; and C. H. Cooper of Dallas, Texas. Sixteen grandchildren and three great-grandchildren, of whom are Mrs. L. T. Castle and Mr. C. H. Burnap of Upper Alton, are living. Mrs. Cooper became a Christian at the age of 14 years, and has been an active member of the M. E. church since her conversion. With the exception of 11 years spent in Chicago and Dallas, Texas with her children, Mrs. Cooper has lived in Upper Alton. Funeral services will be held in the Methodist church Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. J. A Large and C. W. Nash of Jerseyville will conduct the services. From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. the body will lie in state at the home.

********************************************

 

COOPER, THOMAS M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 4, 1901

Moro News - Thomas M. Cooper died at his home December 31, near midnight, after an illness of only ten days with lung fever. He was a progressive and prosperous farmer, and a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Cooper, and a brother of John O., Earnest C., and Arthur Cooper. Mrs. Zephaniah Bivens was his sister. Mr. Cooper was in his forty-second year, and the most of his life was spent within a mile of where he was born. He was married some fifteen years ago to Miss Rosa Southard, who with four children survive him. He was a prominent member of Moro District Court of Honor, and carried $2,000 insurance in the order. The funeral services will take place from his late home Thursday morning. The interment will be at Edwardsville.

*******************************************

 

COOPER WILLIAM E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 9, 1917

William E. Cooper, aged about 80, died in St. Louis Monday evening at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Henry Kroeger, where he had been taken from his residence in Ft. Russell township when he was taken sick with a bad cold recently. He was taken to St. Louis to see a specialist in the hope that he could be benefited. Mr. Cooper was one of the oldest residents of Ft. Russell township, and was a large owner of real estate. He owned large estates in Madison and Macon counties. In Moro township he owned the old farm that was owned by John M. Palmer, former Governor, and former United States Senator and one time candidate for President of the United States. It was on that farm in Moro township there grew a cherry tree, and which was cut down at the time that Palmer was elected United States senator. The tree furnished the material from which 101 walking canes were made and were presented to the loyal 101 who stood by Palmer in the long balloting for United States senator preceding the breaking of the deadlock by the election of Palmer. Mr. Cooper leaves his wife, a son Henry, living in Ft. Russell township; a son William, living in Moro township; a daughter, Mrs. Harry Kroeger; and a son, John, living in St. Louis. The body was taken back to the old home from St. Louis today, and the funeral will be held Thursday.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 10, 1917

The funeral of the late William Cooper will be held at the family home at Bethalto on Thursday morning at 11 o'clock. Afterwards the body will be taken to the Moro Presbyterian Church where services will be held. The body will be laid to rest in the Cooper private burial grounds on the Springfield road, instead of at the regular cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. John Schulenberg, Mrs. Margaret Unterbrink, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Unterbrink. O. J. Unterbrink, Mrs. Guy Huskinson, and Mr. and Mrs. A. Mohr will be among the Alton relatives to attend the funeral.

**********************************************

 

COOPER, WILLIAM M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1902

Mr. William M. Cooper died at his residence at Moro at 5:50 Sunday evening, from erysipelas, in the 74th year of his age. He had lived in the neighborhood of Moro for 55 years. He was a Second Lieutenant in the 125th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, in the War of the Rebellion. Two sons and two daughters survive Mr. Cooper. Mrs. A. L. Lowe of Upper Alton is one of his daughters. The funeral will be tomorrow at 11 a.m.

***********************************************

 

COPE, LOREY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. Lorey Cope was held this morning from the Nazareth Home, Requiem Mass being celebrated by Rev. Stephen Schauwecker. Interment in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

****************************************************

 

COPLEY, ALIZE ELIZA/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 27, 1847

Died on the 21st instant, at their residence in Alton, Alice Eliza, daughter of Milton and Eliza I. Copley, aged 16 months and 14 days.

***********************************************

 

COPLEY, JOHN SINGLETON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1908                      Octogenarian Dies At Home of Daughter

John Singleton Copley, aged 87, died Sunday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Herone Sypneske, in St. Louis, after a long illness from the weakness of great age. He was born in New York, but came west when a young boy. He was one of the oldest residents of Madison county. Mr. Copley came from a family of great longevity. A sister, Mrs. Marie Deleplaine of Iola, Kansas, is 91 years old, and a brother, George W. Copley of Alton, Ill., is 82.  His wife, who also survives him, and is a lineal descendant of Commodore Perry, is 71.  A short funeral service will be held at the home of his daughter in St. Louis at 9 o'clock a.m. Wednesday morning, and services and interment will be in Godfrey cemetery at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. A special car on the A. J. & P. at 1:30 p.m. will carry the funeral party and friends on Wednesday afternoon. He was born in Whitestown, N. Y., January 16, 1821, and moved with his father's family from that place in 1824, living for a short time in Washington, Pittsburg, Covington, Ky., and Dayton, Ohio, finally arriving in St. Louis in 1834. The family left St. Louis on July 5th, 1834, arriving in Alton on July 6th, 1834. They entered 120 acres of government land then built the old homestead one mile west of where Monticello Seminary now stands, where he has lived continuously until last April, when he went to St. Louis to visit his daughter. He was a mechanical engineer of rare ability, and from 1845 to 1860 constructed many of the saw mills and grist mills throughout the several states of the Mississippi valley. Sickness contracted in the southern swamps compelled him to abandon this line of work and for many years thereafter he followed the vocation of steamboat engineer, running on the big packet lines on the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. For a number of years he was engineer in the city mills of Alton. In 1889 he gave up this work, and retired to the old home, where he spent the last twenty years of his life with his family. He was married in St. Louis September 1st, 1858, to Miss Lucy A. Holt of Vergene, Ill.  Five children resulted from this union, Mrs. O. C. Sypneski of St. Louis, Jerome W. Copley who resides in the old homestead at Godfrey, Elmer J. Copley of St. Louis, Mrs. E. M. Stiritz of Oklahoma City, and W. B. Copley of Alton. Besides his wife and children he is survived by his sister, Mrs. M. O. Deleplaine of Iola, Kas., who is in her ninety first year, and a brother, G. W. Copley of Alton, who is in his 82nd year.

*********************************************

 

COPLEY, LUCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 20, 1919

The funeral of Mrs. Lucy Copley was held this afternoon from the home of her son, J. W. Copley, one half mile south of Godfrey. The service was conducted at 2 o'clock by Rev. F. N. Brown of the Godfrey Congregational church, and was attended by many friends of the aged woman. Interment was in Godfrey cemetery. A lover of flowers all her life, Mrs. Copley's friends saw to it that her burial was accompanied by many beautiful tokens of love by sending handsome floral offerings. Mrs. Copley was the widow of John S. Copley, and died Saturday night at 9:30 o'clock from pneumonia. Her great age prevented her recovery when once she became a victim of the disease. Mrs. Copley was a very interesting character, possessed a lovely disposition and led a christian life. She was a member of the Godfrey Congregational church. She was very fond of flowers, and her yard contained many handsome plants of flowers which were greatly admired by passersby and visitors to the Copley home. Mrs. Copley is survived by three sons, J. W. Copley of Godfrey, Elmer of Webster Groves, W. B. of Alton; also by two daughters, Mrs. Edith Stiritz of California and Mrs. Olive Pine of Oklahoma. Mrs. Copley was born on Feb. 12, 1837, being at the time of her death, 82 years, at Vergrune, Ill. She was married in 1858, her husband dying in 1908. She spent the greater part of her life at Godfrey, and was interested in all that went on about her. She was an active member of the Guild of the Congregational church.

************************************************

 

COPLEY, LYNNHURST B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1920

Lynnhurst B. Copley, second son of Mr. and Mrs. James Copley, died yesterday at the family home in Godfrey, following an illness of influenza and pneumonia. Copley was taken ill a week ago last Saturday. He was 19 years of age. Copley was born October 11, 1901, at Godfrey, and was raised in the town of his birth. He was a popular and well liked young man, and his death is the cause of great sorrow to a large circle of friends. Besides his parents, he is survived by two brothers and two sisters. The sisters are Mrs. Althea Goodyear of Indianapolis; and Mrs. Lucema March of Louisville, Ky.; and the brothers are Chester and Deane. The funeral services will be held at the Godfrey Cemetery at 2 o'clock on Thursday. Rev. John Green of the Godfrey Congregational Church will officiate. Interment will be in Godfrey cemetery. Friends from Alton can go out to Godfrey on the 1 o'clock train, and will be taken to the cemetery.

**************************************************

 

COPLEY, MILTON E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 29, 1917

Milton E. Copley died suddenly Sunday morning at 2 o'clock at his home, 706 Rozier street. The circumstances attending his death are more than usually distressing. He had been confined to his home two weeks suffering from the effects of injuries he sustained while engaged in his usual vocation as engineer at the plant of the Stanard-Tilton Milling Co. He was crushed about the hips, but his injuries were regarded as merely of a painful, and not of a dangerous character. He had so far recovered that he was expecting to leave home Sunday morning to look after his duties at the mill, during the time the mill would be shut down, and even he did not suspect that he was so near to the end. Late Saturday night he was stricken with violent heart pains, and expired soon afterward. The physicians who were called did not consider that the death of Mr. Copley was due to the injuries he had received, and for that reason they would not issue a death certificate without an autopsy. It was also decided that a coroner's inquest would be held. The impression was that Mr. Copley had suffered a sudden attack of heart trouble, which had proved fatal. Mr. Copley was 67 years of age. He was an expert engineer and had served very capably in charge of the engines of the Stanard-Tilton mill for a number of years. He was a kindly gentleman, an exemplary citizen and the Copley hospitable home was the scene of social gatherings frequently. Mrs. Copley had only recently recovered from a nervous collapse and spent six months in the East with a sister. The effect on her caused by her husband's death was feared by her friends, but Mrs. Copley was bearing up wonderfully well. Mr. Copley leaves beside his wife, two sons, Edward and Marsdon. He leaves also a brother and a sister. Mr. Copley was born in Alton, but when a boy went to Godfrey and then to Brighton with his parents. When 17 years of age he learned the trade of engineer and served for years under his father as a marine engineer. In 1902 he came to take charge of the post of engineer for the Stanard-Tilton mill. There he showed the highest capacity for handling the engines of that mill, and his services were greatly valued by his employers. Besides his wife and two sons, he leaves a brother, Charles W. Copley of Webster Groves, Mo.; and a sister, Mrs. Thomas Seadey of Chicago. She is now in Florida. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Unitarian Church, and burial will be in City Cemetery.

*************************************************

 

COPLEY, WILLIAM B./Source: Alton Telegraph, April 11, 1846

Died at his residence near Monticello [Godfrey], on the 6th instant, Mr. William B. Copley, in the 81st year of his age. Mr. Copley has left behind him a wife and family who were warmly attached to him, and many acquaintances whose respect he secured by his sincere and upright life. He was an honest man, and a devoted student of the theological writings of Emanuel Swedenborg, in which he found much not only to direct him in life, but also to cheer him on the approach of death. This change of state, so much dreaded by many, to him had no terrors, for he was well instructed in that Word which declares "Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth. Yes, said the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors, and their works do follow them."

*************************************************

 

COPPINGER, BRIDGET/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 7, 1901                    Submitted by Steph McGrath     

Death of Mrs. Bridget Coppinger. Mrs. Bridget Biggins Coppinger, widow of Hon. J. W. Coppinger, died Saturday morning, at (?):30 o'clock, at the home of her sisters, the Misses Biggins, at State and Dry streets. Mrs. Coppinger's death ends a long period of suffering from a malignant disease that began to develop nearly one year ago. Since last April, her suffering was most intense, and she has spent much of the time in St. Joseph hospital, where all that could be done to relieve her was done. She underwent several surgical operations in the hope of relief that was so anxiously sought, but all the efforts to better her condition were in vain. Three weeks ago she was removed to the home of the family, where it was expected she would pass away. Her death has been looked for several months. Mrs. Coppinger was born in Alton, and was the (eldest daughter of Mr. Thomas Biggins. She was 50 years of age and had lived here all her life, except during brief periods when she accompanied her husband to the posts to which his duties called him, She was a member of one of the best known of the oldest families in Alton. She leaves three daughters and four sons. The death of her husband was a heavy blow to her, and followed soon afterward by the death of her third son. Her life during the last year had been filled with deep sorrow. All that is mortal of the loved and lamented Mrs. J. W. Coppinger was laid reverently, sorrowfully to rest by grief stricken relatives and friends in Greenwood cemetery Monday. Services were held at the Cathedral at 10 o'clock where a Requiem High Mass was celebrated by Rev. E. P. Spalding, assisted by Rev. Fathers Cusack and Fennessey. The immense structure was tilled with those who knew and esteemed the deceased lady, or had been the recipients of her kindly words or acts and unostentatious charity. No greater tribute was ever paid to any one than the bitter, uncontrollable tears of the very poor because their benefactress who never "let her right hand know what her left hand was doing," had been taken away from them forever. She knew sorrow; she suffered a living death; but she had charity and hope and faith and love, and while her gentle spirit had gone to its reward her body was placed to rest beneath flowers which were fragrant and beautiful as was her character. The pall bearers were F. Crowe, J. J. McInerney, C. F. Degenhardt, K. A. Burke, J. F. McGinnis and David Ryan. A great many people were present from other cities and towns.

*************************************************

 

COPPINGER, JOHN W. (HONORABLE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 10, 1900

Hon. John W. Coppinger died Saturday night at his home on State street. Death resulted from kidney trouble, aggravated by a carbuncle on the back of his neck, which appeared one week ago last Thursday. His death was not unexpected, as it was known several days he could not recover. The end was attended with great suffering, and his death was a relief to him and his friends who were agonized to watch his contest with the terrible malady.  John W. Coppinger was a native of the city of Alton, and son of John E. Coppinger. He would have been 49 years of age in January. He was a resident of Alton his entire life, except the four years he resided at Toronto, Canada as U. S. Consul at that place. Mr. Coppinger was probably the best known and most prominent Democratic politician in Southern Illinois. He has filled more posts of honor than any other Democrat in Alton. After serving as City Attorney and Mayor [1885-1887], one term each, he turned his attention to State politics and was elected as a member of the lower house of the Legislature in 1886. Four years later he was elected State Senator, and served one term, where his skill as a practical politician won for him immediate recognition. He was elected president pro tempore of the Senate, and presided part of the time during the session. During the stormy period in the Senate when Gen. John M. Palmer was elected United States Senator, the Senator from Madison county bore his part well and was a leading figure on the stage of action. He was a member of the famous "101" that held together until it had elected the choice of the party to succeed the Republican Senator. After serving Gen. Palmer so yeo-manly in the State Senate during the struggle for supremacy, the victorious aspirant for the Senatorial toga rewarded his friend with appointment as consul to Toronto, which is one of the best paying consulates at the disposal of the President. The appointment of Senator Coppinger as consul to Toronto startled some of the old-time politicians with its suddenness, as it was not generally known he was aspiring to such a high position. It was characteristic of the man to keep his own counsel and his strength and success lay in the fact that his rivals never knew what "Copp." was about until he sprung the surprise on them. He served four years at Toronto, and was succeeded by a Republican on the accession of President McKinley. On his return to Alton, Mr. Coppinger did not busy himself in politics because of ill health, and he has been retired since that time. His active life broke down his health and he has been very ill several years as only him family knew. Recently a carbuncle formed on his head, and it gradually yielded to treatment but it was scarcely gone when another formed on the back of his neck. The last time he was out of his home was election day, when he voted. In his associations with his fellow citizens in Alton, Mr. Coppinger was always the perfect gentleman, dignified and courteous in his treatment of all, and whether friend or foe, he gave to each the courtesy due from a public official. Death occurred at 7:30 o'clock Saturday evening. The news of the death of Mr. Coppinger was flashed over the wires throughout the country in a short time after he passed away, and there was general sorrow among those who had known him through his active life. He leaves many friends in both parties who had been associated with him in a political way. Mr. Coppinger leaves a widow and 8 children. The time of the funeral was not set until late last night, when a message was received from his son, Will, who is attending Niagara University, that he would be home today. The funeral will be Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock, and services will be at the Cathedral.  [Coppinger was buried in the Greenwood (St. Patrick's) Cemetery in Godfrey.]

 

Source: December 27, 1900                    Submitted by Steph McGrath   

Hon. John W. Coppinger, of Alton, who served in the State Senate several years during the '90's [1890s], died a few days ago, and was buried Tuesday, December 12, in Greenwood cemetery, Alton. Mr. Coppinger was one of nature's noblemen. He had a big heart and a big brain, was able and useful as a public servant, popular as a citizen, and true and steadfast as a friend. Peace to his ashes.

 

Source: Alton Telegraph, January 23, 1902

Fraternal Order Refuses to Pay Policy of $1,000 on Life of the Late State Senator. John F. McGinnis and Mamie D. Biggins, executor and executrix of the will of Bridget Coppinger, deceased, have instituted suit against the Ancient Order of United Workmen for $1, 000, the amount of a policy on the life of the late Hon. John W. Coppinger. The fraternal order refuses to pay the insurance policy and the representatives of the estate have filed the suit In the Alton City Court for the February term. The refusal of the insurance company to pay the policy grows out of an alleged failure of Mr. Coppinger to pay his assessments while he was consul at Toronto, Canada. Consul Coppinger made arrangements for having his bills paid at Chamberlain's drug store, and his assessments were collected there when due by the representatives of the A. O. U. W, One assessment, was not paid, and Mr. Coppinger was so informed on his return from Toronto. He tendered the money to the collector for the A. O. U. W. but that officer refused to accept it and Mr. Coppinger was informed he must pass an examination and be readmitted to the order. At the time Mr. Coppinger's health had become so bad he was unable to pass the examination and he refused to comply. He continued to hold the policy and refused to consider that he had been dropped from the membership of the A. O. U. W. At his death a demand was made on the A. O. U. W. for the amount of the policy and payment was refused. The representatives of Mrs. Coppinger's estate will try to enforce the payment demanded.

******************************************************

 

COPPINGER, WILL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 15, 1900           Son of Judge Coppinger Dies

Will Coppinger died this morning at 8 o'clock, after an illness of several weeks, aged 21. The young man had been attending the University of Niagara, at Niagara Falls, N. Y., where he was studying for the priesthood, graduating from the college last June. This year he was in the seminary, where he would have continued his studies had his life been spared. His last illness dated from last summer, when he contracted a severe cold while in a baseball game with the Spaldings. He never recovered completely from the cold, and later his condition was rendered worse by exposure during a football game at his school. He was captain and quarterback of his eleven, and was considered one of the hardiest and healthiest boys at the school. His physique was perfect, and he had made good records in athletic sports, being rated one of the best football and baseball players in Alton. It was not known here that he was playing football at the university this year, and his family was not aware of his illness. When he received the message announcing the serious illness of his father and summoning him home, he was on his way to the hospital at Buffalo, where he was going for treatment. He started for Alton, and learned of his father's death first when he reached home Monday morning. The shock was so severe that the young man fainted, and he did not rally. He was unable to attend the funeral of his father, and from the beginning of his illness at home his condition was considered dangerous. Death was due to uraemic poisoning. His suffering until a few days ago was intense, when unconsciousness mercifully relieved him of his pain. Will Coppinger was a bright young man whose natural ability was plainly made manifest in his school life, and he gave promise of being a brilliant success in life. His character was unimpeachable, and he looked forward to his life work in the church with great earnestness of purpose. He has many friends in Alton and his death will strike profound sorrow to the hearts of all who knew him. The family will have a double portion of sympathy in their heavy affliction, having been stricken twice within a week with death of members. One week ago this evening the father passed away. The funeral will be Monday morning at 10 o'clock and services will be in the Cathedral.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 17, 1900         

The casket covered with beautiful flowers, suggestive of his own innocence and purity, and moistened with the tears of sincere sympathy and bruised love, the earthly part of the lamented Will Coppinger was borne tenderly and reverently from the grief stricken home this morning, to the Cathedral, where a requiem high mass was celebrated by Rev. E. L. Spalding, assisted by Fathers Cusack and O'Connor. The sad double bereavement had awakened sorrow and sympathy all over the city, and the services were attended by a very large number of people who desired thus to express in a small degree at least, the esteem in which they held the deceased youth, and the sorrow they felt for those "left behind." The taking away of Will Coppinger is inexpressibly sad - so young, so bright, so manly, so true a type of generous, loving, self-sacrificing man, and only those who have suffered the pangs of sorrow, pain and disappointment from a similar cause can realize approximately the grief which has entered the home. To them now only the Lord Himself can be a comforter, but the hearts of the people of Alton throb with pity for the anguished mother and for the brothers. and sisters so suddenly parted. The interment was in Greenwood beside the grave of the father who was buried one week ago tomorrow. The pallbearers were: C. D. Haagen, L. A. Schlafly, Charles Davis, Dennis Ryan, Allan Challacombe and Charles Degenhardt. Among out of town folks who attended the funeral were Rev. C. A. O'Reilley of Edwardsville, Rev. James Howard of Springfield, Rev. Father Kane of St. Louis, and Rev. Father Snyder of Carrollton.

*****************************************************

 

CORBETT, BOSTON W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1908         Wife Returns to Find Husband Lying on Floor With Bullet Holes Over Heart

Boston W. Corbett, one of the best known young men in the city, was found dead in his home on Seventeenth street, Wednesday morning. He was found in the kitchen of his home lying on the floor, and two bullet wounds over his heart and a revolver lying close by told the story of his unfortunate death. Mr. Corbett had gone to Chicago on a business trip and returned at 6 o'clock a.m.  His wife had gone over to spend the night with her sister during her husband's absence from the city, not knowing the exact time he intended returning. Wednesday morning at nine o'clock, with her little daughter Catherine, Mrs. Corbett went to her home expecting her husband would return home during the day. Upon entering the house she found Mr. Corbett on the kitchen floor, and a hasty examination proved life was extinct. The alarm was given, and investigation showed that two bullets had been fired into the young man's breast just above the heart, and that death must have been instantaneous. Deputy Coroner Allen Keiser held an inquest immediately, and the jury brought a verdict that the young man came to his death from two pistol wounds which caused instant death, and no one was held responsible for the shooting. The unfortunate death of Boston Corbett will bring sadness to many hearts in Alton tonight. Bright and affable, good humored and filled with that good fellowship that made him fast friends, blessed with a sweet wife and babe and a pleasant home, there can be no reason ascribed for his deed. The members of his family cannot think of anything that should have caused him to be depressed in mind, and some sudden illness that robbed him of his right mind is the only explanation. Boston W. Corbett was 25 years of age, and the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Corbett. Besides his parents he leaves one brother, James Corbett, resident manager of the Standard mills, under whom he was employed, and three sisters, all residing in Alton. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

*********************************************

 

CORBETT, EMMA I./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1900

Emma I. Corbett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Corbett, died this morning a 6 o'clock after a year's illness with stomach trouble. During her long period of suffering that ended this morning, the young woman bore all with courage and was ever hopeful that she would recover. Her malady did not improve, and about one month ago it took a turn for the worse. During the past month her illness has been considered dangerous, and her family and friends were much alarmed at it. After long suffering, she passes away this morning in the twenty-third year of her age. She was a very popular young lady in the society in which she moved, and will be greatly missed. She was an officer in the Alton lodge, Daughters of Rebekah, and one of the most prominent members. The services will be under the auspices of the Daughters of Rebekah at the cemetery, and will be conducted by Rev. G. W. Shepherd in the Methodist church, of which she was a member and sang in the church choir. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock, and services will be conducted in the First Methodist Church.

********************************************

 

CORBETT, MALINDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1918

Mrs. Malinda Corbett, wife of Thomas Corbett, died Sunday morning at the family home at 924 Market street after a three weeks illness with pneumonia. From the first her condition was known to be serious and at 7:30 o'clock yesterday death relieved the well known woman of her suffering. Mrs. Corbett was born in 1851 in Cincinnati, O., but came to Alton when a young girl. After coming to Alton she married and spent the remainder of her life here. She is survived by her aged husband and three daughters, Mrs. Joseph Bund, Mrs. Albert Calame and Mrs. Ralph Burns; also by one son, J. T. Corbett, superintendent of the Stanard-Tilton Milling Co. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home. Rev. A. C. Geyer will conduct the services at the home. The Rebekahs will have charge at the grave in City Cemetery.

**************************************************

 

CORDELIA, SISTER M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1921

Sister M. Cordelia, aged 33, died last evening at 7:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital a short time after the young Religious had undergone an operation. Sister Cordelia's condition was known to be serious and her death was not unexpected. For eleven years Sister Cordelia has been a member of the Most Precious Blood Order, and for eight years had been connected with the Catholic Orphanage on Prospect street. She was well known among the friends of the Orphanage, and her death has caused much sorrow among the little ones of the institution and their benefactors. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and later the body will be taken to the mother house of the Order at Ruma, near East St. Louis, Ill., for burial.

************************************************

 

COREY, OLIVER P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1913

Oliver P. Corey, who would have been 89 years of age next Fourth of July, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. George J. Carstens of Wood River, Friday morning at 1:25 o'clock from the effects of injuries he sustained by falling last Saturday at midnight. The aged man had stepped out on the porch at his daughter's home when he walked off the porch and fell to the ground, fracturing his right leg below the hip. He had lived with his daughter at Wood River over five years, but formerly had lived at Kane. Mr. Corey had followed the trade of carpenter until he became too old to continue it any longer. His wife died about fifteen years ago. He leaves seven children, William M. Corey of Kane; Mrs. Henrietta Carr of Jerseyville; Mrs. F. E. Felter of Alton; Mrs. A. J. Harrig of St. Louis; Mrs. G. J. Carstersn; and Miss Rose E. Corey of Wood River; and Mrs. G. B. Tompkins of Chicago. The funeral will be held at Kane on Sunday. The body will be taken from the home at 8 o'clock and will be put on the train for Kane accompanied by the relatives. He stayed at Kane before coming to Wood River, and the funeral will be held at the home of his sons in Kane.

**************************************************

 

CORMACK, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JESSE/Source: Alton Telegraph, March 2, 1844

Died, at Ridge Prairie, Mrs. Cormack, wife of Mr. Jesse Cormack.

*************************************************

 

CORNSTOBBLE, MALINDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1906

The funeral of Miss Malinda Cornstobble, the 15 year old Alton girl who died from lockjaw in Litchfield Friday evening, was held yesterday afternoon from the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Brannan in Yager Park, and was attended by many friends of the family. Burial was in City Cemetery, and services were conducted in the cemetery by Rev. S. D. McKenney of the Cherry Street Baptist Church.

*********************************************

 

COSSABOON, MATHILDA I./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 15, 1920

The funeral of Mrs. Mathilda I. Cossaboon will be held Thursday at 2 o'clock from the Grace Methodist Church. Rev. David Wahl, the pastor, will officiate. Interment will be in the Upper Alton Cemetery.

***********************************************

 

CO---EL, CHARLOTTE REBECCA/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 29, 1841   (name was hard to read)

Died, on Sunday last, in Marine town, Mrs. Charlotte Rebecca, wife of Major Joseph Co--el, in the twentieth year of her age. It is a melancholy task at all times to communicate the death of a friend. But it is with peculiar emotions of grief that we are called upon to pay the last sad tribute of respect to the departed memory of one so highly gifted as was the subject of this obituary. But one short year has lapsed since she stood smiling amidst the gay and idolizing throng, a happy and joyous bride, in all the bloom, beauty, and loveliness of youth, promising a tall assurance of a long life of usefulness to society, and a rich blessing to her then happy but now bereaved husband. With a mind naturally quick, and highly cultivated by education, she was endowed in a high degree with all the superior graces, and nobler attributes of her sex. She possessed rare mental acuities, that filled her to shine in the proudest and most exalted station in society; together with the most ____able qualities of heart, and true excellence of character that won the admonition of all that enjoyed an acquaintance with her. Mrs. C. came from the state of New York to this county in the spring of 1837, where she has resided till her death. Her untimely departure has shed a deep gloom over the society in which she moved. She has left behind a large circle of acquaintances and friends to mourn her death. She has gone to another and a better world, to reap the rich reward of a virtuous but brief career.

**********************************************

 

COTTER, HENRIETTA P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 6, 1915

Mrs. Henrietta P. Cotter, widow of John S. Cotter, died at her residence, 506 Bond street, Tuesday morning at 6:45 o'clock, from the weakness of her great age. She was in her eighty-fifty year. Her death had been expected for over a week, and all the members of her family had been in attendance and were with her when the end came. She had been failing for several months and the last three weeks she had been confined to her bed. For nearly two weeks she had been unable to take any solid nourishment and those attending her marveled that she should be able to hold out so long when there was nothing but her bodily resources to hold her up. She had been unable to recognize anyone for several days. Mrs. Cotter was born in Sangamon county, Ill., April 18, 1831. When a young girl she moved with her parents to a farm in Macoupin county, where the town of Atwater, Ill. is now located. She was married at Carlinville, Dec. 6, 1853, to John S. Cotter, and in 1879 she came to Alton and had lived here ever since. She leaves a large family of children: L. F. and John A. Cotter, both of Chicago; William S. of Fulton, Ark.; Mrs. O. G. Stelle; Mrs. Jason Bramhall; Henry S.; and Samuel T. Cotter, all of Alton; and Manning M. Cotter of Elsah. Mrs. Cotter came of a long lived family and she is the last of them. Every one of her brothers and sisters lived to be over eighty years of age. At one time in recent years she was called twice in two weeks to attend the funerals of two of her sisters, and then three years later, a brother and a sister died within another period of two weeks, thus wiping out the family with the exception of Mrs. Cotter, whose death closes the record of her own family. Her death makes the fifth in the family of her parents at more than eighty years. Mrs. Cotter was a member of the Christian Church of Carlinville in which she held her connection since there was no church of that denomination in Alton. The funeral services Wednesday morning will be held at 10 o'clock from the family home, and will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Gibson. The body will be taken to Carlinville and funeral services will be conducted by Rev. G. W. Wise of the Christian Church of Camp Point.

****************************************

 

COTTER, JAMES M. (JUSTICE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1908

James M. Cotter, one of the best known residents of the city of Alton, died at St. Joseph's hospital Friday morning from cancer of the tongue and throat, after a painful illness. He was 61 years of age. Mr. Cotter had been in public life in Alton over thirty years. He was probably best known as assessor of Alton township, a position he filled so satisfactorily to the voters that he was considered invincible. Mr. Cotter was assessor for twenty-four years. Many times he had no opposition, it being considered that the fact that he wanted the office was equivalent to his election. Once, after a long continued and unbroken series of successes at the polls, he was defeated by an opponent, but the following term he was re-elected and he kept office from that time forth until H. W. Denny came into the field. He defeated Mr. Cotter and later, J. J. Hammond came into the arena, and he has held the office ever since. Mr. Cotter's ill health and his advancing years, which rendered him unable to get around and make the acquaintance of the new crop of voters, probably accounted for his defeat in later years and his retirement from the office. In proof of the fact that he still had many friends who would stay by him for some other office, he was triumphantly elected justice of the peace, a public office. He filled the office of supervisor at one time and held few years ago and continued in other public office. He had lived in Alton 42 years. Mr. Cotter was a native of Ireland, but came to Alton when a young man. He was a man who could make friends and hold them. He was genial, always in a good humor and a good politician. He held no grudges against anyone and probably would not have gone a step out of his way to do harm to anyone. He leaves beside his wife, four daughters, Miss Lilly Cotter, Mrs. T. W. Atchison and Mrs. Will Richards of Alton, and Mrs. Frank Mackin of San Francisco. All of his family was with him when he died. Recently the malady which caused his death began to give him trouble, and about three weeks ago he became unable to take solid nourishment or to speak. He was removed to the hospital for a surgical operation which might lessen his suffering, although it was known it could not save his life. Knowing the dangerous character of his illness and the danger of the operation, he submitted, but survived only a few days. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral to Greenwood cemetery.

******************************************

 

COTTER, LILLIAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 2, 1917

Miss Lillian Cotter, daughter of Mrs. James Cotter of 457 Bluff street, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Wednesday morning at 4:30 o'clock after undergoing a surgical operation last Friday for relief of a malady that was not believed to be of such a serious character. The operation developed, however, that her case was worse than had been anticipated, and that relief of a permanent character could hardly be expected. The condition of Miss Cotter was a surprise to all her friends. It was known to a few of her most intimate friends that she had not been in the best of health, but it was generally supposed that the operation to which she submitted would cause her to be restored to good health. She had been a sufferer from a case of chronic appendicitis, and this had set up complications which caused the fatal termination of her illness. Miss Cotter was born in Alton and had lived here all her life. She had served as a very capable teacher in the Alton public schools for seventeen years and was esteemed as a faithful, efficient and conscientious teacher. Her place in Irving school where she had taught many years will be difficult to fill, as she gave complete satisfaction to those in authority and to the parents of the children. She possessed many traits of character that made of her a good instructor for children, and she was generally beloved by them. The death of Miss Cotter caused a gloom over Irving School where she had been employed during her teaching career. Miss Cotter leaves her mother, the widow of former assessor James Cotter, and three sisters, Mrs. T. W. Atchison, Mrs. Annie Mackin and Mrs. Will Richards. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Friday morning from the Cathedral.

*********************************************

 

COURTNEY, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 29, 1920

Mrs. Catherine Courtney, widow of Daniel Courtney, died last night at the family home on Langdon street, after an illness of influenza and pneumonia. She was 64 years of age. For many years the family resided on East Broadway. Mrs. Courtney was the mother of six children, Miss Mary Courtney; Owens Courtney; Mrs. Annie Richey; Edward Courtney; Margaret Wright and Dan Courtney. She also leaves four grandchildren and one brother, Owen O'Malley of Bingham, Ill. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 11 o'clock from the home, and will be private. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.

************************************************

 

COURTNEY, DANIEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 10, 1914

The funeral of Daniel Courtney was held this morning from the Cathedral where a requiem mass was said in the presence of a large gathering of the friends and former neighbors of deceased and of the family. Many people from Montgomery County attended the obsequies. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery, where the mound was covered deep with flowers, the offerings of sympathizing friends and sorrowing relatives.

***********************************************

 

COUSINS, JOHN F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 4, 1922      Soldier, Shell Shock Victim, Takes His Life ... Jumps Into Cistern ... Gassed While in France

Despondent because of physical disability brought about by injuries he received while fighting with the American Army in France during the Great War, John F. Cousins, 34, yesterday ended his life by jumping into a cistern at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Cousins, four miles north of Upper Alton. Mrs. Cousins was doing the family washing on the back porch of the home. The former soldier was standing near the cistern. While his mother was in the house for clothes, Cousins jumped into the cistern. When Mrs. Cousins again came to the porch, she noticed her son was not there. Seeing the lid of the cistern open, she immediately looked there, and saw her son as he rose to the surface of the water in the cistern. She retained her presence of mind and threw him a rope, but he refused to grab it, and sunk to his death. The former soldier had been melancholy for the past two weeks, it was said. While in the service he was gassed, and was a victim of shell-shock. He had been drawing total disability compensation. It was said the effect of the shell-shock left him slightly unbalanced. It was said he was the victim of frequent attacks of melancholy. During the war, Cousins was first a member of Co. C, of the 333rd infantry, with which regiment he trained at Camp Taylor. He was later transferred to the 129th Infantry, Co. C, with which he fought in France. His record as a soldier, friends say, was a notable one. He will be buried Thursday at 1 p.m. Pallbearers will be former servicemen who were in his regiment. They are Dr. O. A. Meyer, William Graul, Oscar Schlissner, Herman Bockstrup, Edward Hermes and William Hermes. They will wear uniforms. Alton Post of the American Legion voted last night to send a firing squad to the funeral. Cousins is survived by his parents and three sisters, one of whom lives at home, one in Marissa and one in East St. Louis.

******************************************************

 

COUSINS, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 16, 1919

Joseph Cousins died this morning at three o'clock at his home, 210 Ridge street, after an illness of a few weeks. He was 62 years and ten months of age. Mr. Cousins had been a resident of Alton for 25 years. He was born in New Jersey and came here when the glass blowing trade was flourishing. He was well known among glass blowers of the city. During his 25 years' residence in Alton he has made a large number of friends by whom he was respected and loved. He was a member of St. Patrick's church. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Anna Cousins, five sons and three daughters. The sons are: George, Joseph, Clarence, Leo and Lee, all of Alton; and the daughters are: Mrs. H. H. Gill of San Diego, Cal., Mrs. R. E. Murphy of St. Louis, and Mrs. T. V. Emmons of Alton. He leaves also four grandchildren and two brothers, Michael F. Cousins and George Cousins, both of Alton. The funeral will be Thursday morning at 8:15 from the home on Ridge street to St. Patricks church, where requiem mass will be celebrated, and interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.

*************************************************

 

COUSINS, MAMIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 20, 1922

Mrs. Mamie Cousins, wife of George Cousins of 1112 Central Avenue, died last Saturday in St. Louis following an operation which she underwent on Friday. The news of the death came as a surprise to friends, many of whom did not know that Mrs. Cousins had been operated upon. She was 35 years of age. Her maiden name was Mamie Quinn, daughter of Mrs. Mary E. Quinn of St. Louis. Mrs. Cousin is survived by her husband, one child, Helen Cousin, her mother, five sisters, Mrs. M. Green, Mrs. William Bentz, James and Leo, Mrs. P. Monaghan, Mrs. Frank Monaghan, Ann Quinn. With the exception of Mrs. Monaghan, all of the brothers and sisters reside in St. Louis. The body was brought to Alton yesterday and taken to the Monaghan home at 1518 east Fourth Street. The funeral will be held from the Monaghan home to St. Patrick's church Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock.

***********************************************

 

COUSINS, PHILIP/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 30, 1900

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cousins was darkened this morning by the death of the twelve year old son, Philip Cousins, after an illness of six weeks with dropsy. The funeral will take place Friday afternoon, and services will be in St. Patrick's church.

*********************************************

 

COUSLEY, AGNES J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 12, 1901

Died - at the residence of her son, J. A. Cousley, at 2:30 a.m., April 12, Mrs. Agnes J. Cousley, aged 90 years and 11 months. Mrs. Cousley was born in County Derry, Ireland, May 12th, 1810. She was married to Robert Cousley in 1828. Her husband died in February 1848. Two years later she came with her family of eight children to America, landing in New York June 1850. In the fall of the same year she came west, reaching Alton on Christmas day, where she has since resided. She was an almost life-long member of the Reformed Presbyterian church, and maintained her connection with the church of that denomination at Staunton, Ill.  One week before her death her health, which had been failing gradually for a number of years, broke down, and she suffered a physical collapse due to great age. Four of her children survive her, viz: James Cousley of Sedalia, Mo.; Mrs. Agnes Johnston, John A., and Robert C. Cousley of Alton. The funeral will take place Sunday afternoon, April 14th, at 2:30 p.m. from the residence of her son, 533 Alby street.

************************************************

 

COUSLEY, ANN E. (nee RUTHERFORD)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1904

Mrs. Ann E. Cousley, wife of John A. Cousley, died suddenly Saturday morning from heart disease after a brief illness, at the family home, 533 Alby street. She had been subject to attacks of heart trouble for several years, the trouble being of an asthmatic nature. Friday noon she began to feel slightly indisposed, and on Friday evening she retired, but her condition was not deemed to be of an alarming nature. During the night she became slightly worse, and about 6:00 o'clock in the morning she slipped away in her sleep into the long slumber of death. Mrs. Cousley was born at Florence, Alabama, January 13, fifty-three years ago [1851].  She was the daughter of Col. and Mrs. Friend S. Rutherford, and her aged mother survives her. She was married 35 years ago last January 13, and was the mother of eleven children, of whom seven are living: Mrs. William G. Edgar of Lufkin Texas; and six sons: A. F., Paul B., John A., Robert S., Benjamin and Gordon.  Mrs. Cousley was a member of the Presbyterian church from childhood, and was a granddaughter of a Presbyterian minister. During her whole life she exemplified the teachings of the religion in which she had the most profound faith. Her life was one of the purest simplicity. Her whole mind was wrapped up in the welfare of her family and in her home she was the mistress of the hearts and affections of her entire family. In her quiet way she was a power for good in her little community, which included all her neighbors. Her hand was ever ready to help those in need of assistance, her manner was devoid of any ostentation and her deeds of kindness were known only to those to whom she ministered, and to herself. Her nature was of the gentle sort, ever active in promoting peace and good will among those whom she met, and the voice of discord was always silenced when she was about, wherever she went. Never was she known to give voice to anything that might be of a derogatory character concerning anyone she knew. She was always glad to look upon the brighter side of life, and would give little attention to the dark side, except to make it brighter for those who were in trouble or affliction. No sacrifice she could make for her family or her friends could be too great for her, if thereby she could promote happiness. Cheerful, hopeful and kindly, she ever shed abroad in her home circle the true Christian light. Knowing the nature of the malady which had troubled her for many years, she never would refer to any possible fatal outcome of it, and few knew of the recurring attacks to which she was subject. For her Death had no terrors, and in her mind the thought was ever uppermost that she would meet her Redeemer when the lost long sleep might come. Her death was a sad shock to her family and her friends, although they feared the result might be fatal at some time. Peacefully and without a struggle she slipped away, leaving her family and her friends who will miss her sorely. Besides her immediate family, Mrs. Cousley is survived by four sisters: Mrs. J. F. McGinnis, Mrs. William Russel, Miss Mary Rutherford of Alton; Mrs. William C. Johnston of St. Louis; and one brother, Mr. Friend S. Rutherford of St. Louis. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home. [Burial at City Cemetery]

*******************************************************

 

COUSLEY, BENJAMIN C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 12, 1915

Benjamin C. Cousley, aged 32, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Thursday afternoon at 5:45 o'clock following a surgical operation performed as a last resort to save his life. The young man did not rally from the operation and died a few minutes after being taken from the operating table. It was found that he had suffered necessarily fatal injuries from the crushing of his internal organs. He had suffered intensely from the time of the accident, but bore the pain with fortitude, making very little complaint, although opiates failed to have any effect toward alleviating his sufferings. He remained conscious clear up to the time he took the anesthetic before submitting to the surgeons and it was his urgent request that the surgeons hasten, knowing as he did that the probability was that he would not rally from the operation. The young man was a son of John A. Cousley, and resided at his father's home, 533 Alby street. He leaves his wife and two children, a son and a daughter, aged 8 and 6 years. He leaves also five brothers and one sister. He was a lifelong resident of Alton and had many friends who have been deeply interested in his condition. He was injured by being caught between a freight car and a bumping post on the levee in the rear of the Stanard-Tilton mill, Wednesday morning about 11 o'clock. From the very first he realized that his injuries would probably be fatal, and he welcomed the end of his excruciating agony. The funeral will be held at 2:30 Saturday from the home of J. A. Cousley, at Sixth and Alby streets.

****************************************************

 

COUSLEY, JAMES/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 9, 1873

Died, James Cousley, second son of Ellen A. and James Cousley, on May 5, 1873, 11 o'clock, Alton. He was 11 years and 5 months old.

****************************************************

 

COUSLEY, JAMES WILSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 8, 1906

The funeral of James Wilson, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Cousley, was held this afternoon from the family home on Alby street, at 2 o'clock. Rev. A. G. Lane of the First Presbyterian church conducted the funeral services. There was a large attendance of friends and relatives of the family. Mrs. Lewis Carr sang two solos at the house, and a quartet from the Presbyterian choir sang at the grave. The pallbearers were four uncles of the little child.

**************************************************

 

COUSLEY, JOHN A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 17, 1916      Former Editor of Alton Telegraph Dies

John A. Cousley, former editor of the Alton Telegraph, died at his residence, 533 Alby street, at 8:15 o'clock this morning. He had been suffering for three years from arterial hardening. While attending a meeting of the state civil service board, in which he held membership over seven years, he was stricken with what appeared to be an acute illness of some kind, three years ago. He was taken to his room in a hotel at Springfield, and remained there a few days, then returned to Alton. The malady that had affected him made it necessary for him to resign his position on the State Civil Service Board, and a few months later, April 1, he retired from the position of managing editor of the Telegraph, in which he had been the chief owner for many years. Since that time, until about three months ago, he was at the office every day, continuing as long as he was able to assist in the work on the paper he had served for so many years. On November 9, while trying to make what was to be his last trip to the office, he fell, and while he was not seriously injured, he never was able again to be out of the house. A week ago he became much worse and was confined to his bed. His end came peacefully Thursday morning in his home. John A. Cousley was a native of Ireland. He was a member of a large family who came to Alton with their widowed mother in 1850, and Mr. Cousley had lived in Alton ever since that time. He was for years an officer in the First Presbyterian Church, a member of the Board of Elders, and he was Sabbath School Superintendent there for a long period. Of the original family none remain but an aged brother, James Cousley, who is in very poor health, at his home in Sedalia, Mo., and a sister, Mrs. Agnes Johnston, who is in Muskogee, Okla., and is suffering from an ailment similar to that which caused her brother's death. A month ago the youngest of the family, R. C. Cousley, died after a short illness. Mr. Cousley was never informed of his brother's death because of his own precarious health. In 1890 Mr. Cousley was one of a firm which took over the Telegraph on a lease, and at the end of the lease the paper was bought by them. In his position as editor, Mr. Cousley had high ideals as to the sacred character of the duty the editor owed to his constituents. He had come from a day when an editor, to take pecuniary compensation for services he rendered, in a public way, or to his party, was guilty of a breach of trust. Though many times the newspaper business in Alton was discouraging, Mr. Cousley adhered to his strictest rules of fidelity to his trust as he saw it. He endeavored to conduct a paper that would stand for the highest moral ethics. He conducted more than one campaign in behalf of civic righteousness, and in so doing he kept up with vigor the policy that had characterized the Telegraph from its beginning. He was known as a powerful writer, keen in his satire, and he always kept himself closely applied to his work. He never took a vacation, and this fact he charged with responsibility for his physical breakdown. In closing his connection with the Telegraph nearly three years ago, he said in his announcement he was going to take a long rest and enjoy himself, but the impairment of his health prevented a realization of his hopes. In a political way he participated in some of the hardest fought battles in Madison county, and in the city of Alton, and there was perhaps no one who had any stronger friends or better enemies as the result of the political feuds. He was ambitious to make of the Telegraph a better and bigger paper. Under his management it grew from a four page paper of five columns to an eight page paper of seven columns. He always believed in spending as much money as possible in giving a better paper. He frequently made additions and improvements to the paper which appeared to be ill-advised, yet he always said that somehow or other the public appreciated better service and that he always was gratified with success of any improvements he made. The paper grew in circulation under his management from less than 1,000 to more than 4,000 daily subscribers, a point that had been reached at the time of his retirement. He started to work on the Telegraph when he was a boy, and from the time he began on the paper he never was employed any place else, except for the services he rendered to the state. He was deeply interested in working for the betterment of Alton, morally and physically, and he always advocated enterprises that were for public improvement of the community. In his younger days there was no one who was more active, or more aggressive in working for the interests of the city. He believed a good newspaper was the best advertisement for a city, and he endeavored, at great expense to himself, to give the people of Alton that kind of a newspaper. The death of his wife, over eleven years ago, was a blow from which he did not recover. This followed by the accidental death of his son, Ben, just one year ago, had a depressing effect on him. Mr. Cousley is survived by one daughter, Mrs. W. G. Edgar of Eldorrado, Ark., and five sons: Alderman A. F. Cousley, P. B., John A. Jr., R. S. Cousley of Alton, and Gordon Cousley, now a member of the Coast Artillery service and in the Philippine Islands. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home. [Later: burial was in City Cemetery]

**********************************************************

 

COUSLEY, R. C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 29, 1915

R. C. Cousley, a brother of J. A. Cousley of the Telegraph, died this morning at his home at 210 East Second street after an illness of less than twenty-four hours. Mr. Cousley, who was 69 years of age, had been at work at the glass works up to yesterday morning when he became ill about 10 o'clock and came home. Soon after pneumonia set in and this morning he died as a result of this disease, his heart being affected. Mr. Cousley had resided in Alton all but four years of his life. He was born in Ireland and when a boy, four years of age, came to this country and to Alton with his parents. He was formerly employed a number of years as a post office clerk and for many years ran the hotel that was located on the corner of Third and Market streets where the Illini Hotel now stands. He left this place at the time the building was wrecked for the building of the Illini Hotel. Mr. Cousley leaves his wife and a son, Chester; one daughter, Mrs. Grace Green of Alton; two brothers, John A. Cousley of the Telegraph and James Cousley of Sedalia, Mo.; also a sister, Mrs. Agnes Johnston, who resides with her son, W. C. Johnston in St. Louis. The death of Mr. Cousley came as a surprise to the members of his family and to his friends. His illness was not considered serious and when the pneumonia set in it did its work hurriedly and death came before the seriousness of his illness was realized by his physicians. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon from the home, 210 East Second street.

*********************************************************

 

COUSLEY, ROBERT SIDNEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 2, 1918

Robert Sidney Cousley, aged 37, died Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at his residence, 616 East Sixteenth street, after an illness of more than a year. The fatal termination of his illness was no surprise to any of his relatives or friends. He was taken ill early in January 1917, with what began as an attack of the grippe. It developed into pneumonia and from that into an abscess on his lung. He submitted to surgical operations for relief, but he failed to gain his health and strength back. He was able to be up and around during the hot weather last summer, and for a while was able to make daily trips down town, but he suffered several backsets and since last fall had not been able to be out of the house. During his long illness he bore his affliction with great fortitude. He never manifested by word to any of those closest to him that he thought that his illness would result fatally. He maintained an appearance of good cheer and confidence that he would be better, and he was continually planning, in the presence of those he felt might be most anxious about him, as to what he intended to do when he got well. During the last week he was manifestly becoming weaker very fast and was confined entirely to his bed. Early Saturday morning he began sinking rapidly and members of his family were summoned. He died at 1:30 o'clock. Mr. Cousley was a son of the late John A. Cousley. He was born in Alton December 10, 1880, and had lived in Alton all of his life. He was married to Miss Pearl Holi, Thanksgiving Day, 1904. He leaves beside his wife, one daughter, Edith, and one sister, Mrs. W. G. Edgar of Eldorado, Ark., and four brothers, A. F. and P. B. Cousley of Alton, John A. Cousley of St. Louis and Thomas G. Cousley, who is serving his country and for the present is at Camp Fremont, Calif. Mr. Cousley was assistant cashier of the Citizens National Bank of Alton and had been employed in the bank for fifteen years. He was one of the best known men in Alton and had a very large circle of acquaintances. He had held the position of marriage license clerk for several years, and he served for six years as deputy to the special tax collector. He was a member of the Masonic order, the Elks lodge and the Knights of Pythias. He possessed a disposition that made for him many strong friends, and during his long illness his condition has been the cause of great solicitude on their part. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home.

 

COVENTRY, JOHN W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 18, 1899

John W. Coventry, one of the oldest residents of Madison county, died at his home in Edwardsville at 5 o'clock Friday evening, aged 90 years. The funeral will take place Sunday afternoon from St. John's M. E. church. Mr. Coventry was a puzzle to the doctors on account of his wonderful vitality. For two weeks previous to his death he lived absolutely without food, taking only a sip of water occasionally. He leaves two children, Sarah, and George W. Coventry, deputy county clerk.

***************************************************

 

COWLING, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1905           Well Known Business Man Succumbs to Pneumonia

Thomas Cowling, a resident of Alton and vicinity for thirty-three years, died Tuesday morning at his home, 121 west Fifteenth street, after an illness from pneumonia. He had not been in good health for six months, but the fatal illness began a few weeks ago. He was 59 years 3 months of age. Mr. Cowling was born in Bath, England, and was a member of a large family. Five brothers and three sisters, all residents of Bath, survive him. One year ago he made a trip back to England to visit his birthplace. He came to America when 21 years of age, and five years later he moved to North Alton where he engaged in the coal mining business, owning and operating several coal pits. He moved to Alton eighteen years later and engaged in the coal business in Alton. He was elected to the office of highway commissioner, and served very acceptably. Mr. Cowling held a license as a local preacher for the Methodist church, and he often conducted services in North Alton and across the river and at other places where no other religious services were being held. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Fanny Cowling, and two children, Mrs. Frederick Hummert and J. E. Cowling. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock from the family home, Rev. M. H. Ewers officiating. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

*********************************************

 

COX, HENRIETTA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 10, 1920

The death of Henrietta Cox occurred last night at the family home on Main street. Mrs. Cox was 77 years of age. She is survived by her husband, J. M. Cox. The body was shipped to Washington, Kan., this afternoon. The time of the funeral has not been set.

*************************************************

 

COX, JAMES C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 6, 1903                Veteran of Civil War Dies in Upper Alton - Gone to Grand Review

James C. Cox, one of the best known and respected old residents of Upper Alton, died Sunday morning and 3 o'clock at his home, after an illness of about one year's duration. Mr. Cox had been afflicted with Bright's disease and heart trouble for several years, but had not been disabled. The past three or four months his health declined rapidly and about one week ago he told his family that he would be dead in ten days. Mr. Cox passed into the great beyond without suffering pain, and with his large family of children at his side he breathed his last while sleeping. James C. Cox was born in Mecklenburg County, Virginia on April 12, 1830. He was in his 73rd year at the time of his death. In October 1852 he was married to Mary A. N______son, and last October he and his wife celebrated their gold wedding anniversary. When the Civil War broke out, Mr. and Mrs. Cox were living in Kentucky and were driven away from their property there because of Mr. Cox's Union views, when he came to Illinois, stopping at Virden. While there Mr. Cox enlisted in the army and served during the war with Company G, 122nd Illinois Volunteers. After the war, Mr. Cox resided at Virden until nineteen years ago, he moved his family to Upper Alton, and has since resided there. Mr. Cox was a man of excellent character, respected by all. His family are sorely afflicted by the loss of a kind father and husband. Beside his widow, he leaves seven children, all of whom are married. They are Frank, Clark and Eugene Cox of Chicago, and Mrs. W. T. Catheart of Upper Alton; Mrs. W. F. Sinks of Galconda, Ill.; Mrs. W. G. Boman of Chicago; and Mrs. Harold G. Powell of Salt Lake City, Utah. All the children have arrived here except Mrs. Powell, and she will arrive tomorrow morning. The funeral will take place at 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. Services will be conducted at the home and will be public. Interment will be at Oakwood Cemetery and will be private. The Alton Post of G. A. R. will attend the funeral and pallbearers will be selected from the post.

*******************************************************

 

COY, BELA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 19, 1901     Runaway Boy Dies at Hospital - 16 Years Old

Bela Coy, a 16 year old boy who has been staying at St. Joseph's hospital for a month, died this morning from typhoid fever. The boy left his home in Clinton, Iowa, and came to Alton. He said that he was not wanted at his home, and that his mother had sent him away with his clothes, telling him not to return. The boy arrived in Alton penniless and hungry. He was found one wet, cold day by Officer Spaet in a hut on the sandbar, into which he had been taken by a woman whose heart was in the right place, and who pitied the boy. He had been wandering through the willows seeking shelter when he was cared for by the woman. His relatives at Clinton, Iowa were notified that the boy is dead, and they have telegraphed for the body. It will be shipped to Clinton at once by Undertaker Bauer.

*******************************************************

 

COZATT, M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 10, 1917

M. Cozatt dropped dead this morning about 8 o'clock at his home in Wood River. Cozatt had been apparently in the best of health and was up and around this morning. Shortly before his death he complained of a pain in his heart, and those in the house placed him in bed and immediately sent for a physician. Before the physician arrived the stricken man was dead.

************************************************

 

CRADER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 19, 1905

John Crader, the aged Frenchman who was brought up from Mobile island last Monday after having suffered in a cabin boat for five days without any help, and five days longer with but scanty medical attention, died at St. Joseph's hospital from pneumonia this morning. Crader had a very bad case of pneumonia, which was aggravated by his long neglect in the cabin boat during the cold weather, which prevented anyone going to his assistance. He was hardly able to talk Monday when brought home. He has no relatives so far as known, and it is probable that his friends will be called upon to bury him. He was the club house keeper for a party of Alton men who maintained a hunter's lodge on Mobile island on lower Missouri point. Crader was familiarly known as "Frenchie." He had lived in Alton many years.

*********************************************

 

CRADER, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 19, 1903         Killed by Alton Switch Engine?

The mangled body of Louis Crader of North Alton was found lying on the Chicago and Alton railway tracks Friday evening about 11 o'clock. He had been dead for some time and it was supposed from the appearance that he was killed by the Chicago and Alton switch engine. The body was taken in charge by Coroner C. N. Streeper. Crader was employed at the North Alton brick plant. His brother, John Crader, lives in North Alton and he boarded with him. He had been in St. Louis and returned Friday evening. It is supposed he was walking up the railroad tracks on his way home when he was struck by the switch engine. Louis Crader was about 21 years of age. Relatives say he drew his pay at the brickyard yesterday afternoon, and that when he came downtown about 5 o'clock he had $38 with him. Only 25 cents was found in his pocket book, and relatives are inclined to believe he was doped and robbed or held up and slugged.

*********************************************

 

CRAFTON, ADA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 13, 1920

Miss Ada Crafton, aged 15 years, died this morning at twenty minutes to eleven at St. Joseph's Hospital, where she underwent an operation for the relief of appendicitis a week ago last Wednesday. Her death was not unexpected, as she has been very ill since she was operated upon. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Crafton of 1109 State street. She was 15 years of age on the 24th of May. Her parents, three sisters, Miss Nellie Crafton of Alton; Mrs. Margaret Davis of Hot Springs, Ark.; and Mrs. Ida Park of St. Louis; also three brothers, Aubrey of St. Louis; James and Howard of Alton, survive. The family has resided in Alton for four years, coming here from Carrollton. The many friends sympathize with them in their bereavement. No funeral arrangements have been made, awaiting the arrival of a brother-in-law of the deceased from Hot Springs.

**********************************************

 

CRAFTON, JAMES L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 25, 1922               Traffic Policeman Dies Suddenly in Alton Home

James L. Crafton, traffic policeman at Broadway and Piasa streets, died unexpectedly this morning at his home, 1109 State street, from heart trouble. He was 69 years of age. Mr. Crafton was taken suddenly ill last Friday. He had been in a state of health that had given him no cause for anxiety, and those of his family believed that he was a perfectly well man. Last Friday evening he was stricken in his home with a fainting spell and from that time he had been unable to leave the house. He was much better yesterday and was up and around the place, rendering little services to his wife, and there was no thought he would die so soon. Last night he became worse and did not rally, and the end came this morning at 5:40 o'clock. Mr. Crafton came here from Carrolton five years ago. He had spent all of his life there. He was a member of the Carrolton Methodist church. He was appointed during last year as a member of the traffic police squad and he served at Broadway and Piasa streets. He had been off that post of duty for a while at the time he was taken sick. A few days ago when he was to have been the city's main witness in a case in the City court, in a charge of violating traffic rules, the court was told that Mr. Crafton was too sick to undergo the excitement of being on the witness stand and the case was therefore continued until Mr. Crafton would be better. Besides his wife, Mr. Crafton leaves three sons, Aubrey of St. Louis; James of East Alton and Howard of Alton; also three daughters, Miss Nellie, teacher at Milton schools; Mrs. D. M. Davis of Hot Springs, Ark., and Mrs. Fred Parks of Alton. The setting of the time for the funeral was deferred until all the absent children could be heard from. Crafton was born in Franklin, Ky., but has been a resident of Illinois for a number of years. Besides his immediate family, Crafton is survived by two brothers, Neil of Springfield, Ill., and George of Franklin, Ky., and a sister, Mrs. Sallie Brooks of Portland, Tenn.  Two years ago a daughter, Ada, died at the age of 16 years.

*************************************************

 

CRAIG, ESTHER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 12, 1907

Miss Esther Craig, the 19 year old daughter of John Craig, living near Fosterburg, died from dropsy this morning after a long illness. The time of the funeral is not announced.

**********************************************

 

CRAIG, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 14, 1902

Fred Craig, the young man who was shot several days ago by Fred Breitwiser, a companion who was hunting with him on the farm of Miss Randolph near Delhi, died Monday night from the effect of the wound. The young man leaves a widow and two children, one of the latter being only three months old. Will Craig, a brother, was in town this morning for an undertaker. Will Craig stated that his brother was getting along splendidly and improving perceptibly until Monday evening, when he was seized by a violent fit of coughing which resulted in the rupturing of a large artery in the wounded limb, and the unfortunate young man bled to death before experienced help could reach him. He died too without seeing his wife, who had gone to her own home. She arrived shortly after his death. Fred Breitwiser, the young man who fired the fatal shot, is almost frantic, although it was all clearly an accident. He and Fred Craig were very warm friends and it is said that Breitwiser is engaged to marry Mrs. Craig's sister. Deceased has many friends in this part of Illinois who will be greatly pained to hear of the sad ending of that unfortunate day's hunt, and their grief is mixed with pity for the innocent heart-broken cause.

*******************************************

 

CRAIG, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1905

George Craig, a track laborer employed by J. G. White & Co., general contractors for the interurban electric line of the Alton, Granite & St. Louis Traction Company, was instantly killed Saturday morning by being struck by an electric car at Edwardsville Crossing. Craig was hit on the back of the head by the edge of the car as it passed him. He had been working on the track, surfacing it up, when the car approached. He stepped off the track and must have become confused. He did not step far enough away from the rail to avoid being hit by the car. Mr. J. F. Porter, when notified of the accident, went to Edwardsville Crossing at once and took charge of the body and had it brought to Alton, where it was taken to the undertaking establishment of Streeper & Wheeler. Mr. Porter said that the body would be held until investigation could be made as to where the man's home is. He has been working for J. G. White & Co. for some time, but nothing was known as to where his relatives could be found. He wore a button indicating that he is a member of the fraternal society, Woodmen of the World. The man had been a cook, but was employed as a laborer on the electric railway.  Conductor James Hart and Motorman Baker Ash were in charge of the car when the man was killed.

********************************************

 

CRAIG, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 31, 1907

James Craig, colored, aged 33 years, died Wednesday morning at 5 o'clock at the home, 1903 Gross street, from stomach trouble from which he had been a sufferer for some time. He is survived by his mother, two sisters, and three brothers. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon from the A. M. E. church, and burial will be in City Cemetery.

**********************************************

 

CRAIG, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1900

Mrs. Martha Craig, after an illness of one week, died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Martha Sparling, in St. Louis, today at 1:30 p.m.  Mrs. Craig went to St. Louis some time ago to visit her daughter and to recuperate her health, having been ill with the grip at her home in this city. After going to St. Louis she was taken ill with heart trouble, which resulted fatally as above stated. Mrs. Craig was in her 70th year. She has lived in Alton for more than forty years. Her husband died some fifteen years ago or more. For many years she had been following the nurse's profession, and all who have enjoyed her ministrations, as well as a large circle of friends and acquaintances, will sincerely regret her death. She was a most excellent woman, a faithful and sincere Christian lady, constant in the duties of that profession in every day life with her fellow creatures. No truer friend; no more faithful or tender mother to a family could be found. In all the duties of life she was a true woman and excellent neighbor. Of her family three children survive her: Mrs. Rachel Brown and Mrs. Florence Holder of Alton, and Mrs. Martha Sparling of St. Louis. Mrs. E. J. Montgomery and Mrs. Jane Nisbett, both of this city, are sisters of the deceased lady. The date of the funeral has not been fixed as yet.

************************************************

 

CRAIG, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 31, 1921              Three Die Enroute to Hospital

While enroute to St. Elizabeth's Hospital to attend her daughter, who was to undergo an operation for appendicitis, Mrs. Mary Keaton, 28, wife of Martin Keaton, 2214 Bryan Avenue, Granite City, with Mrs. Mary Craig, 45, wife of Clement Craig, 2223 Missouri Avenue, Granite City, was instantly killed when the Craig automobile was struck by the Wabash fast passenger train at Granite City at 7 o'clock today. William Bausman, a son of Mrs. Craig by a former marriage, who was injured, died an hour later in St. Elizabeth's Hospital. Mrs. Keaton's daughter was on the operating table and the anesthetic was about to be administered, when her mother was killed. The operation was postponed. The daughter has not been told of her mother's tragic death. The bodies of the three dead have been taken in charge by Coroner Edward Mercer, who will conduct an inquest. The automobile was driven by Mrs. Craig. Information at the office of the coroner was that the automobile was going at a moderate rate of speed. Just as it reached the tracks, it was said, Mrs. Craig saw the speeding train and made an effort to throw the engine into reverse. This action failed to get the machine off the track and the speeding train crashed into it. The two women were instantly killed. The boy was rushed to the hospital, and every effort made to save his life, but failed. Clement Craig, husband of the woman driving the automobile, is mess sergeant at Jefferson Barracks. Keaton is a craneman at the Commonwealth Steel Co. At almost the same instant that the fatal accident at Granite City occurred, a Wabash train crashed into the rear end of a Chicago and Alton passenger train at Madison. The last coach of the Alton train was thrown from the tracks when the rails spread, and demolished. No one was in the rear car when the Wabash train crashed into it. Presence in the car would probably have meant certain death.

*************************************************

 

CRAIG, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 6, 1904        After 25 Years of Blindness, Old Soldier Sees Eternal Light

William Craig, a veteran of the Civil War who resided many years in Alton, died Monday morning at the Soldiers' Home in Quincy after a short illness. He was born in England in 1832 and came to America in 1847. He came to Alton in 1850 and with the exception of a few years spent by him in England, has lived here since until last October, when he went to Quincy.  His wife, who was Miss T. Dixon, died in 1871 and was a sister of Ralph Dixon Sr.  Two children survive this marriage, Joshua J. and Thomas Craig. His second wife was a Miss Levi, who died in 1883 leaving four children, Edward, John, Calvin and James Craig. The sons left for Quincy last evening, and the funeral will probably occur there, as deceased had expressed a wish to be buried in the old Soldiers' cemetery. Mr. Craig had been blind for twenty-five years. He served all through the war and was respected by all who knew him. He drew one of the largest pensions paid anyone living in Alton.

*******************************************

 

CRAMER, EMMA KEMPER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1902

Death in its saddest form came this morning to the home of Mr. Henry F. Cramer, former township collector.  Mrs. Emma Kemper Cramer, his wife, to whom he was married less than two years ago, died after a short illness. On January 2 she gave birth to a child, and her condition was considered favorable until yesterday morning when she became worse. She was afflicted with inflammatory rheumatism, but her death is said to have been caused by sudden heart failure and was very unexpected. She was 33 years of age and came here from Fosterburg to make her home after her marriage to Mr. Cramer. Since coming here she made many friends by her uniformly sweet disposition, and her death is mourned sincerely by many who had known her but a comparatively short time, who join with her relatives and older friends in their grief. She leaves her husband, many relatives living near Fosterburg. Her death was a sad shock to her parents, as they had not heard that her condition had become worse until this morning when they received the news of her death.

****************************************

 

CRAMER, HELEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 17, 1906

Death claimed the little child of Henry F. Cramer, former township collector, this morning after a brief illness at the home of George Dick, Fifth and Ridge street. The little girl, Helen, was born five years ago last New Year's day.  At the birth of the child her mother died, leaving the little girl to be reared by the father. The devotion between the two was touching, and the death of the little girl is a sad blow to the father. Funeral will take place at 2 p.m. Tuesday. Interment in City Cemetery.  Rev. Theo Oberhellman will officiate.

********************************************

 

CRANDALL, ANDREW/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 22, 1919

Andrew Crandall, in his 78th year, died Tuesday afternoon at 4:15 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ivy Lancaster, from paralysis and old age. Mr. Crandall had been in feeble health since he was stricken with paralysis three years ago. His case had been serious the past three weeks. Mr. Crandall was born in Richland County, Ohio, January 23, 1842. He moved to Lincoln, Ill. when a young man, and for 25 years was a contractor there. Then he moved to Bunker Hill where he was in business 18 years. He moved to East Alton and started up in the lumber and hardware business, and when Wood River was founded he opened the first business house in Wood River. He was a member of the Odd Fellows' order for forty-five years, holding his membership at Lincoln, Ill., his old home. Mr. Crandall's wife died nine years ago at Los Angeles, Cal. He leaves two children, Mrs. Lancaster and Fred Crandall. The funeral will be tomorrow from the home of Mrs. Lancaster at 8 a.m., and will be conducted by Rev. Webb. The body will be taken to Lincoln for burial. Services there will be conducted in the Methodist Church and the burial will be under the auspices of the Odd Fellows' order.

**********************************************

 

CRANE, EDWARD G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1900

Edward G. Crane, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. G. B. Crane, died Saturday at Mt. Dorn, Fla., where he had gone for his health. He was 36 years old, and had been at different times proprietor of a drugstore and manager of the Leland Hotel. He was also an artist of some ability. The body arrived Wednesday morning, and the funeral took place that afternoon. Mr. Crane leaves a little daughter, his wife having died two years ago.

************************************************

 

CRANE, GEORGE B./Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, June 12, 1913/Submitted by Jane Denny

George W. Meyer received a telegram this morning at 5 o'clock telling of the death of George B. Crane a former resident and business man of this city, at his home in Chicago last night at 11 o'clock. No particulars of death were given but as he had been sick from some time, it is generally understood that death was due to a complication of ailments resulting from old age. Mr. Crane was born in Senca [sic] county, New York in 1832 and spent the first 16 years of his life on a farm there. In April 1854 he came to Madison county and settled in Edwardsville and in connection with his father-in-law, A. O. French, opened a store on the site of the present Model store building, covering the same territory that is occupied by the present building. At that time the building on the corner of Main and Purcell streets which is being razed at present, had not been built. He continued in business here in partnership until the year 1882 when he purchased his father-in-law's share of the stock and managed the store alone, until July, 1891, when he sold out to the Edwardsville Dry Goods Company, and removed from this city to California. Returning several years later he built a beautiful home on St. Louis street, and resided there for a few years before he removed to Chicago. Mr. Crane was first married on August 1, 1863 to Miss Isabel O. French. As result of this union three children were born, Edward Ottis, George B. Jrn., and Charles A. The former have both died and Charles practices in Canton, Ohio. Mrs. Crane died in December 1901. Mr. Crane was married the second time to Mrs. Hugh Bayle, also a former resident of this city, and since that marriage about eleven years ago, they have been making their home in Chicago. Besides his wife and son, one grand daughter survives. Miss Isabel Crane, a daughter of Edward Crane, who is now in California, [survives] where she has expressed her decision to enter a convent.  No definite funeral arrangements have been made as yet, but it is understood the body will be shipped here for burial toward the end of the week.

 

Edwardsville Intelligencer, June 1913

The church remained open until 1 o'clock when the services took place. The body was accompanied to Edwardsville by the widow, and the only surviving son, Dr. Charles A. Crane, of Canton, Ohio. The pall bears were selected by Geo. W. Meyer of this city a life long friend of Mr. Crane and were composed entire of old friends of Mr. Crane. They were Judge B. R. Burroughs, Henry C. Barnsback, A. L. Brown, B. H. Richards, O. D. Finch and W. D. Harniat. The cortege left the church at 2:30 and services at the cemetery were conducted at 3 o'clock. Dr. Charles A. Crane returned on Saturday evening to his home in Canton, Ohio, where he has a large practice. Mrs. Crane was entertained during her stay here by Mrs. C. N. Travous but she left for her home in Chicago Sunday afternoon where she will make her home in the future as in the past.
*****************************************************

 

CRANE, HENRY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 7, 1901

After an illness dating from Saturday, Henry J. Crane, one of the best known residents of Alton, died Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Death was due to an attack of grip, which preceded the last illness and from which he was thought to have recovered. He suffered a relapse, and on Tuesday his condition became alarming. His friends had feared the worst during the last two days, and his death is no surprise. To his family Mr. Crane's death is a heavy loss. To his friends his death will be a personal bereavement, as he was universally liked by all who knew him. Courteous in manner and true to the last, he won and retained as friends all who came in contact with him. He was modest and unassuming and one of the most industrious of men, strongly attached to his family and never murmuring when duties were most heavily weighing upon him. Mr. Crane came to Alton in 1856, and accepted the position of clerk in the office of the Alton Daily Courier, which he held until the suspension of the paper in 1860. Shortly after he was one of the clerks in the Illinois Mutual Insurance Company. Afterwards he was appointed Deputy Internal Revenue Collector, for this district, which included nearly all of Southern Illinois with headquarters at Alton. He remained in this position until 1885, when he was succeeded by a Democrat. Mr. Crane removed to Wichita, Kan., but after a few years residence there returned to Alton and entered the employ of the Alton National bank. Mr. Crane has been for many years a Director and Secretary and Treasurer of the Alton City Cemetery Association. It is largely owing to his unremitting and untiring oversight that our cemetery is now the beautiful spot it is. Mr. Crane was twice married. His frist wife died a few years after their marriage. Mr. Crane married Miss Carrie Pierce, daughter of the late Dr. W. C. Pierce, in 1872, who with three children, two sons and a daughter, William, Byron and Lucretia Crane, survive. He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Charlotte Lee, wife of M. I. Lee of Topeka, Kansas, and Mrs. Carrie Winchell of Great Barrington, neither of whom will come to the funeral on account of their age and health. Mr. Crane was one of those who grew upon his friends the more he was known. A frank, honest, upright and truthful man, he was appreciated by all his acquaintances and was never found wanting in any duty that might fall to his lot. He was in the 67th year of his age. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock, and services will be conducted at the Unitarian church by Rev. George Gebauer.

****************************************************

 

CRANE, WILLIAM P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 23, 1916

William P. Crane, aged _8, a well known Alton plumber, died at the home of Mrs. J. P. Nisbett on Court street Saturday night after a long illness from a complication of diseases. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Crane, his father having died many years ago, and his mother died recently in Kansas City and her body was brought to Alton for burial. His condition had been very bad for a few weeks, and his sister, Miss Lucretia Crane, was here recently attending him, but was obliged to return to her home. Mrs. Caroline Crane and daughter came here from Palmyra, Mo. two weeks ago, and the declining days of Mr. Crane were brightened by the presence of his daughter and her mother, whose presence he had requested.  The funeral was held this afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home of P. L. Betts, at Twelfth and Alton streets. The services were conducted by Rev. John Day of St. Louis, and burial was in City Cemetery. The pallbearers were Fred and Ben Sawyer, W. H. Wiseman, W. T. Norton, W. R. Gillham, George Brunner, Robert Arnold and Percy Smith. The brother, W. B. Crane and sister, Miss Lucretia Crane, came from Kansas City to attend the funeral.

*************************************************

 

CRAWFORD, ALEXANDER W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1921                 Killed Instantly by Train

Don A. Barrus, aged 45, of Alton, and Alexander W. Crawford, aged 60, of Hillsboro, were instantly killed this morning at 9:30 o'clock by a Chicago and Alton train, No. 32, on the crossing at Wood River. The Chandler Dispatch car in which they were riding was demolished. The body of Don Barrus was underneath the wrecked engine of the car, and that of A. W. Crawford was carried up the track about 150 feet and dropped. Evidently he was caught in the smashed top of the car, which was dropped by the engine a short distance from where the body of Mr. Crawford lay. A car driven by John J. Brenholt Jr. just missed being struck by the engine. Mr. Brenholt got over just in time, the engine missing him by a few inches, while the car in which Barrus and Crawford were riding was a few feet behind and ran on directly in front of the train, which was traveling at a high speed. According to the engineer on the train that struck the Crawford automobile, his train stopped in 150 feet beyond the crossing, but this statement is disputed by men who witnessed the accident and who say that the train ran more than 1,000 feet. The trainmen said that the Illinois Terminal railroad crossing was blocked by a freight train and before the crossing was cleared, a string of six or seven automobiles had lined up. When the Illinois Terminal crossing was cleared, the automobiles, led by the car driven by J. J. Brenholt Jr., moved forward. Only a few feet space separated the two tracks at that place and there was very little room for any observations to be made down the C. & A. track. Evidently no one heard the approaching C. & A. train. The engineer said that the car driven by Mr. Brenholt barely got over the track when the train reached the crossing and that the Crawford car following close behind was struck squarely by the train. The impact buried the automobile into the air and the engine dragged the shattered care about 150 feet. The only part left intact was the tires of the automobile. Mr. Barrus was pinned down by the smashed engine which had been stripped from the rest of the car. Mr. Crawford was carried up the track in the winter top that had enclosed the car. According to men at the Don A. Barrus garage, Mr. Barrus had sold three Packard cars and was going to St. Louis to get two of them for delivery. He found opportunity to make the trip with Mr. Crawford, an old friend, and the two started off from the Mineral Springs Hotel about 9 o'clock. The accident, destroying the lives of two men so well known as Mr. Crawford and Mr. Barrus, produced a great shock to the community. Mr. Crawford was born in Godfrey and had lived there much of his life, and he was widely known. He had served as a member of the Illinois State Board of Equalization and four years ago he was a candidate of the Democratic ticket for the office of Clerk of the Supreme Court, but was defeated. Last November he was an unsuccessful candidate for State Senator in the Macoupin County district, going down in the Republican landslide. For a number of years he had been interested in the purchase of coal rights in Macoupin County and had done much to get together large tracts of land which were sold to mining concerns. He had a prominent part in developing the coal business of Macoupin and Montgomery counties. He was twice married, his second wife surviving him. He leaves six children, Mrs. L. H. Maxfield, Miss Alice of Carlinville, and William of Delhi,, La., Jack, Sue and Elizabeth of Hillsboro. He leaves also one sister, Miss Jennie Crawford, and three brothers, William and Thomas Crawford and John Tolman. Mr. Crawford had spent the night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. L. H. Maxfield. Don A. Barrus had been a resident of Alton since he came here a number of years ago with the late B. L. Dorsey. He served as Mr. Dorsey's business manager for a long period. In recent years he had taken an interest in real estate and it was he who put over a big deal for the sale of a tract of land to the Empire Oil and Gas Co., and he had a prominent part in some other realty transactions here. When the Illinois Terminal remodeled the building at Front and Alby streets, Mr. Barrus took the first floor as a garage and salesroom, and there he was conducting a very prosperous business. His death came at a time when he had been making some good sales of cars. He had disposed of nine others in the past month. Following news of the accident, _____ of parties started out to Wood River to view the scene and look at the wrecked car. The trainmen had the bodies of the two men lifted to one side of the track and Deputy Coroner Streeper was notified to get them. They were later conveyed to the Streeper morgue in Upper Alton. The two victims of the accident were two of the best known men in this vicinity. Both of them were very popular socially and were prominent in business. While Mr. Crawford had not lived here for a long time, he was in and out of Alton frequently visiting his relatives at Godfrey and seeing some of his business associates. It is related that when he was on the State Board of Equalization, he gave quite as much attention to serving people from his old home district as he gave to those from the district he was representing. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him. Mr. Barrus shared in public esteem with Mr. Crawford. He always had a smile for everyone, and it was said by his friends that he was a man whose friendship was to be valued highly. In the car with John J. Brenholt was his sister, Mrs. Edith Jones and Mrs. Anton Reck. After they passed the crossing safely, they looked back and just as they did they saw the Crawford automobile hurled into the air. They immediately telephoned to Alton to give notice of their safety. Reports that they did not know of the accident were denied by Col. J. J. Brenholt, who said that he had a telephone message from members of his family immediately afterward. The railroad men declared that the crossing watchman was signaling to the automobilists to call attention to their danger. People at the crossing said that there was no signal given to the automobile drivers and that the train was running at a speed of about 50 miles an hour. No arrangements had been made this afternoon about the funeral of Mr. Crawford. Immediately upon the death of Don Barrus and his friend, Zan Crawford, this morning, a meeting was called of several of the most intimate friends and business associates of Barrus at the Elks club, and arrangements were made to take charge of the remains and await word from the family. A telegram was sent at once to the brother of Barrus, Ralph Barrus at Richfield Springs, New York, telling of the accident, how it occurred and of Barrus's death. Barrus has two brothers and two sisters who reside in Richfield Springs, N. Y. or near vicinity. After the inquest and the embalming of the body, the Elks will take charge of the remains and follow the instructions of the family.

****************************************************

 

CRAWFORD, CLARA MAY (nee MERITT)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 5, 1922

Mrs. Clara May Crawford, wife of Frank A. Crawford, died Saturday at Hop Hollow [Alton]. It was the verdict of the coroner's jury which conducted an inquest that death was due to heart trouble. She was 20 years old. She is survived by her husband, one child, 11 months old, parents, Mr. and Mrs. John G. Meritt, and a brother and one sister. Funeral services were conducted at 4 p.m. at the Bauer undertaking parlors today, by the Rev. C. D. Shumard, pastor of the First Methodist Church.

***************************************************

 

CRAWFORD, HAZEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 17, 1920

Miss Hazel Crawford, 14 years old, died this morning at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Crawford, 824 Logan street, two weeks after the death of her sister, Mrs. Vernon Ballard, who succumbed to influenza. The Crawford family has had far more than its share of misfortune. When Mrs. Ballard died, two weeks ago, Mrs. Crawford, her mother, was unable to attend the funeral because of the illness of Hazel. Mr. and Mrs. Crawford have lost two daughters in two weeks and a third is now very ill. Mrs. Charles Dickerson of Carrollton, is ill at her home and will be unable to attend the funeral of her sister. Miss Hazel Crawford is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Crawford; three sisters, Mrs. George Frenz, Miss Irene Crawford of Alton, and Mrs. Dickerson; three brothers, John, Walter and Robert Crawford, of Alton, and her grandmother, Mrs. Jane Crawford of Kane, Ill. Miss Crawford has been ill for some time. Notwithstanding her illness she remained cheerful and ever willing to please and help those about her. Her death causes general sorrow among all who knew her. She was a member of the First Methodist Church. The funeral will be tomorrow morning. After short services at the home on Logan street, which will be conducted by the Rev. Robert Morris, pastor of the First Methodist Church. The body will be taken to Kane. Interment will be in Kane Cemetery.

***********************************************

 

CRAWFORD, J. B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1916

J. B. Crawford, aged 83, died at 10 o'clock this morning in St. Joseph's hospital, where he had lived the past two years. Death was due to old age. He leaves two sons, W. W. Crawford of Alton and H. C. Crawford of Peoria. The funeral will be held Thursday evening at 8 o'clock from the home of W. W. Crawford, 906 Belle street, and burial will be at Elsah, Friday.

*********************************************

 

CRAWFORD, JANE R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 12, 1906             Death of Old Resident of North Alton

Mrs. Jane R. Crawford, widow of the late David Crawford, died at her home 1 1/4 miles east of North Alton, at 9:15 o'clock Friday evening after a lingering illness. She was born in Dalry, Scotland, May 27, 1830, and was in the 76th year of her age. With her parents she came to America when 11 years of age, and resided in Alton and vicinity for 65 years. She leaves three children, John, Janet and William, all of the place; also a niece, Mrs. A. C. Patterson of Liberty Prairie, besides other relatives. The funeral will be held on Sabbath afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

*******************************************

 

CRAWFORD, JESSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1916            Prominent Godfrey Woman Dies at Her Home

The death of Miss Jessie Crawford occurred at 9:45 o'clock Saturday morning at her home in Godfrey township. She had been very ill for about ten days, but after the first few days of the sickness she began to mend and she was apparently much better. She had been considered desperately ill immediately after she was taken down, and at the time it was believed there was little chance of her recovery, but when she began to improve high hopes were entertained by her family and friends that she would recover. She suffered a relapse Friday and she sank rapidly. Miss Crawford was born in Godfrey township, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Crawford. She lived there all of her life. She was engaged as a school teacher for a few years in the Bethany school on the Brighton road. Later she engaged in the real estate business. She had a natural ability in selling real estate, and she made quite a success of it. She had decided to retire from active work and had done so a few days before she was taken down with her last illness. She was a woman of the purest, best character, and she was highly esteemed by all who knew her. She had a very wide acquaintance and there was widespread interest in the community where she was well known over her condition. The fact was not generally known that she had suffered a relapse until it became known that she had died. She had much ability as a business woman which contributed to her success in the business in which she was engaged. She leaves one half brother, John Tolman, and three brothers, W. F. Crawford of Godfrey, T. A. Crawford of Collinsville, and A. W. Crawford of Hillsboro. She leaves one sister, Miss Jennie M. Crawford of Godfrey. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home at Godfrey.

***************************************************

 

CRAWFORD, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1916          Fire Victim Dies From His Burns - Fire at Equitable Powder Plant In East Alton

John Crawford, aged 60, died Sunday morning at 2 o'clock in St. Joseph's Hospital as a result of being burned in the fire in the sodium nitrate mill at the Equitable Powder plant Saturday about noon. Crawford had been an employee of the powder mill for the past twenty years since its establishment in East Alton. He worked in the sodium nitrate mill alone, and was engaged in the business of mixing the sodium nitrate, charcoal and sulphur. In some unexplained manner, the mixture caught fire while he was getting it ready to be put into the wheel mill for the making of powder. He was burned in the flash, and it is supposed that he inhaled the flames. The building was set afire and Crawford stumbled and fell to the floor in trying to get out. He was picked up and carried out unconscious by fellow employees. He was not thought to have been so seriously injured at first, but towards evening it developed that he was much worse hurt, and he was rushed to St. Joseph's Hospital where he died. Crawford had been a resident of East Alton for many years. He was a steady worker, and drew a good salary for the work he was engaged in. He met with but few accidents. Several years ago his foot was burned in a small fire at the sodium nitrate mill, but he quickly recovered and went back to work. He leaves his wife and five children: Harry Crawford, George Crawford, and Misses Fanny, Nellie and Mary Crawford, all of East Alton. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1 o'clock at the East Alton Baptist Church. The Rev. D. C. Blunt will officiate.

************************************************

 

CRAWFORD, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 15, 1906

Miss Mary Crawford, daughter of the late Robert W. Crawford, principal of the Godfrey public schools and one of the most popular and successful public school teachers in Madison county, passed away Monday morning at 8 o'clock at the home of her brother, Will, in Godfrey. She became ill eight weeks ago with typhoid fever and had apparently passed the danger point in the disease. A relapse set in, however, and her death has been expected during the past few days. She was about 36 years of age, and is survived by three brothers: A. W. Crawford, mayor of Girard, Illinois; Will of Godfrey; Thomas of East St. Louis; a half brother, John Tallman; and two sisters, Misses Jennie and Jessie Crawford of Alton. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to Godfrey cemetery. Services will be conducted by the Rev. H. M. Chittenden.

**********************************************

 

CRAWFORD, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 22, 1922

Mrs. Mary Crawford, aged 73, widow of George Crawford, who died a quarter of a century ago, passes away at 6:30 o'clock this morning at her home in East Alton. She was a native of Madison county, being before her marriage Mary J. Pigue. Mr. and Mrs. Crawford farmed land near the present site of the Alton State Hospital for many years, but after her husband's death Mrs. Crawford sold out, the widow moving to East Alton. She was a member of the Baptist church and took an active interest in church work, being a kindly, good Christian woman. She is survived by five children, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. The children are Jesse, George, Peter Crawford, and Mrs. John Farris of East Alton, and Mrs. George Henderson of DeWitt, Mo. She also leaves a sister, Mrs. Lizzie Philbrick. No funeral arrangements have been completed, awaiting the arrival of relatives from distant points.

*************************************************

 

CRAWFORD, NOAH H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 12, 1910

Noah H. Crawford, aged 56, died Wednesday morning at 2 o'clock from pneumonia at his home, 609 east Third street, after an illness since Saturday. His is the third death in the family within a year, the first being about a year ago when the wife and mother died. The son, Peter, grieved a great deal over the death of his mother, and to add to his troubles, a young lady with whom he was said to have been in love married another, and a short time afterwards the young man committed suicide. The father never ceased to grieve over the death of his son, and his constitution had been undermined anyway from sorrow at the loss of his wife, so that when attacked by pneumonia he was not in physical shape to make a good fight against the attack of the disease. He had been employed at the Hapgood Plow Works for more than twenty-five years as a grinder, and he always had a  job waiting for him there. Two sons, John D. and Harry Crawford, survive. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, where services will be conducted by Rev. G. L. Clark of the Twelfth street Presbyterian church. Burial will be in City cemetery.

*************************************************

 

CRAWFORD, ROBERT WILSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 24, 1905              Former Sheriff of Madison County and Prominent Politician Dies

Robert Wilson Crawford, former sheriff of Madison County, and at one time an invincible power in Madison county politics, died Saturday morning at 5:40 o'clock after a long illness from Brights disease. He was born in Donegal county, Ireland, and had he lived until October 22, he would have been 80 years of age. He left Ireland at the age of 14 years and went to South America, where he remained at Valparaiso for a while, coming afterward to America and making his home for a few years at Blairsville, Pa., where he had some relatives. He went south to work building levees in Louisiana, then went to work building the Nashville and Chattanooga railroad. He laid the first gas pipes in the city of Nashville, Tennessee, and afterward went to Indiana where he worked on railroads for a few years. He came to Alton, and in 1852 he engaged in the work of raising the Chicago and Alton track 18 inches. The railroad then known as the Alton and Sangamon river, was laid down in the mud without much pretense at building a road-bed. The entire road-bed was elevated 18 inches from Alton to Springfield, and there the Alton made its first step toward having a good, substantial track. Mr. Crawford worked under William Huskinson, who had charge of the construction work. He was Mr. Huskinson's assistant, and during the years 1868-69, he was acting road master while Mr. Huskinson was absent in England. It is said that his superior officer often said that Mr. Crawford was one of the best railroad men he ever knew. For a number of years Mr. Crawford was engaged in furnishing railroad ties for the Alton, and in one year he sold the railroad 20,000 ties. Early in the 1870s, Mr. Crawford entered politics and he was elected sheriff of Madison county for one term, 1871-72. He was county commissioner two years, and during his term of office the law was changed and the office was abolished. In those days the business affairs of the county were administered by three commissioners instead of by a board of supervisors, as at present. Mr. Crawford was elected supervisor of Godfrey township for four terms and served about eight years in that capacity. During his political career he was considered invincible, and had his own way in the Democratic party, then the dominant party in county politics. Mr. Crawford was twice married, the first time to a Miss Meldrum. He leaves one stepson, John Tolman, and six children: A. W. Crawford, mayor of Girard; Misses Jennie N., Mary Y., Jessie B. Crawford, and William S. and Thomas K. Crawford. About ten years ago he moved to Alton to make his home, and he was a well known figure on the streets. Although advancing age enfeebled him somewhat, his mind was clear and he could recall accurately events of the early days in and around Alton. He had lived in this vicinity nearly 55 years. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from the home of Mr. Crawford's children, 720 Alby street, and services will be conducted by Rev. H. M. Chittenden. Burial will be in the Godfrey Cemetery.

**************************************************

 

CRAWFORD, ROSEANN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 20, 1915

Mrs. Roseann Crawford, widow of Alexander Crawford, died this morning at 1:30 o'clock at the home of her sons on Crawford avenue in Upper Alton. Mrs. Crawford was the mother of Robert, Steven and Ray Crawford, Alton business men. Mrs. Crawford's final illness was but of one week's duration. She had been a sufferer from rheumatism a number of years, which partially disabled her at times, but she was always able to be about her home. The last illness commenced a week ago last Saturday, and seemed to come on as a spell of weakness from old age and brought on by her suffering from rheumatism. She rode out in her son's automobile on Labor Day, two weeks ago today, and attended some of the exercise at Rock Spring park, and that was the last time she was out. Her illness commenced on the following Saturday and her strength gradually faded from that time on until death came shortly after midnight. Mrs. Crawford was born in County Donegal, Ireland. She was married in her home country to Alexander Crawford in 1864. Four years later she came with her husband to America and located on a small farm at Godfrey, which the family still owns. She has been a resident of this vicinity ever since. She was born June 20, 1841, and was 74 years old. About 15 years ago Mr. and Mrs. Crawford retired from farming and came to Upper Alton to make their home with their children. In February 1907, the husband's death occurred. Five children were born to the couple, four of whom survive, one son having died at the age of fourteen years. The surviving children are Robert, S. G. B., and Raymond Crawford, and Miss Ann E. Crawford. The death of Mrs. Crawford is a very sad shock to her children. The family had stayed together through a long period of years, and the taking away of the mother to whom the children were so devoted is a sad blow to them. She was a good woman, a neighbor loved by all and her demise is a sad occurrence not only for her family but to the neighborhood. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home on Crawford avenue. Burial will be at Bethany cemetery on the Brighton road in the family burying ground.

*****************************************************

 

CRAWFORD, WILLIAM J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1917            Alton Township Supervisor Dies

Supervisor William J. Crawford died at 3:15 o'clock at his home, 3015 College avenue, Monday morning, after an illness with a cerebral tumor, which began soon after he took the office of supervisor of Alton township, to which he was elected last April. He would have been 68 years of age next December 12. He is survived by his wife and five children, Mrs. Wayne Henry and Frank Crawford of Salem, Oregon; Philo F. Crawford of Chicago; Miss Marie Crawford who is teaching school at Minonk, Ill.; and Miss Joyce Crawford, who resides at home in Upper Alton.  The election of Mr. Crawford to the office of supervisor of Alton township was one of the great surprises of the election held on the first Tuesday of last April. He had announced his candidacy for the office, and then proceeded to make a gum shoe campaign, going from house to house. He aroused much interest in a quiet way in his campaign, and he succeeded in getting out a very large vote for himself on election day, defeating William Fries, a former supervisor. Soon after he was elected he began to show the effects of the malady that caused his death. He was confined to his home from the third week in June, and was unable to leave his bed the last six weeks of his life. He turned the duties of his office over to Assistant Supervisor F. C. Bailey, who gave very efficient service. It was realized soon after the sickness began that Mr. Crawford was probably in his last sickness. He had been a very successful man in business. He had also been a clergyman and a school teacher. William J. Crawford was born in Macoupin county December 12, 1849. He was a farmer boy, and from the farm he came to Shurtleff College, working his way through school. He graduated from the theological school. He was ordained a minister during the time he was a divinity student in 1875. He was married to Mary D. Culp June 21, 1877. The year following he went to Oregon as a Baptist Missionary, and was assigned to a mission church at Albany, Oregon. Three years later he came back here, remaining here 16 months, then going back to Oregon, remaining there 31 years longer. Four years ago he returned to Alton to live. A remarkable fact is that he died as pastor of a church at Spring Valley, Oregon. When he left the west and came to Alton, the people in the church were reluctant to fill the vacancy, and they have continued to regard him as their pastor, filling the pulpit with supply preachers. For twenty-five years when he was in the west, Mr. Crawford taught school at Albany and Salem. For seven years he was professor of mathematics in McMinville College at McMinville, Oregon. Thirteen years ago he retired from educational work to attend to farming on a place he had owned for many years. The funeral of Sylvester [sic] Crawford will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and services there will be conducted by Rev. D. G. Ray, assisted by Rev. Simeon Hussey. The body will be taken to Salem, Oregon for burial, the funeral party leaving Thursday evening. Mr. Crawford was a member of Franklin lodge, A. F. & A. M.

*********************************************************

 

CREAGEN, EDWARD L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1908

Edward L. Creagen, a former well known resident of Alton, died Friday evening at his home in East St. Louis, and the body will arrive on the Big Four Flyer tomorrow at 11:30. The funeral will take place immediately from the Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood cemetery beside the grave of the father, John Creagen, one of the old settlers of Alton. Mr. Creagen was a relative of the Co___ Bros., and is survived by them and a wife and four children. His aged mother also survives. He was ____ years old.

*****************************************************

 

CREELS, ADA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 18, 1902

Ada Creels, a colored girl about 28 years of age, died this morning at St. Joseph's Hospital after several weeks illness. Her parents died when she was a child, and when six to eight years of age she went to live in the family of Hon. J. H. Yager, where her faithfulness and fidelity to the family won a place in the hearts of each member, that produces the sincerest sorrow. Ada was faithful to all members of the family, but her devotion to the mother was a touching feature of her life. Ada has some relatives living in Alton, and two sisters in or near Indianapolis. Mrs. Scott, living on Seventeenth street, is her grandmother. There could not be a more fitting sentiment expressed of Ada than "faithful unto death." The funeral will be private. The hour has not yet been set.

**********************************************

 

CREIGHTON, KATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 8, 1905

Mrs. Katherine Creighton, aged 81, died at the Woman's Home today after an illness of five weeks from debility of old age. Mrs. Creighton's closing days were sad, and would have been much worse but for the fact that the ladies who conduct the Woman's Home took her in charge and gave her a place where she could be comfortable and pass her declining days. She has two children, a son at Kansas City and a daughter at Quincy. Neither would do anything for her, and it was said they were unable to give her any assistance. She was an inmate of St. Joseph's Hospital at the time the Woman's Home was opened eight years ago last April, and she was taken from there and given quarters in the then new home. She remained there until her death. The funeral will be arranged by the Woman's Home committee.

*************************************************

 

CREMEN, PATRICK/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 21, 1912

Patrick Cremen, aged 72, died Wednesday morning at his home, 450 east Second street, after being ill for nearly two years. Mr. Cremen fell at his home one year ago last summer and tumbled down a flight of stairs, sustaining injuries from which he never recovered. His condition had been very bad some time and his death had been expected for a week. Mr. Cremen was a native of the county of Cork, Ireland. He had lived in Alton 30 years. He leaves six children, Mrs. Harry Jenkins, Mrs. Ross Jenkins, Miss Maggie Cremen, William, Edward and Leon Cremen. The funeral will be Friday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

******************************************************

 

CREMENS, NORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1910

Mrs. Nora Cremens, wife of Patrick Cremens, died last night at her home, 450 east Second street, after a long illness from a complication of troubles. She and her husband were long time residents of Alton and their family members are well known and highly respected. She is survived by her husband and six children, three daughters, Mrs. Harry Jenkins, Misses Margaret and Alice Cremens, and three sons, Edward, William and Leo, All of Alton. Mrs. Cremens was a kindly disposed, charitable woman, and her death will be sincerely regretted by all who know her. She was 65 years of age and had spent 45 of these years in Alton. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

***************************************************

 

CRESSE, ARNOLD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1911

Arnold Cresse, aged 61, died very suddenly last night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Carl Buck, on Vandalia road. He leaves another daughter, Mrs. William Hancock of Alby street. Mr. Cresse had been in apparently good health and the attending physician said that he died from organic heart trouble. The body will be taken to Brighton tomorrow morning for burial, and service will be conducted by Rev. S. C. Pierce of Cowden, who will officiate for Rev. S. D. McKenny, at 8:30 a.m. at the home. Mr. Cresse had long been a member of Bluff City Court of Honor, and a delegation from that lodge will accompany the funeral to Brighton. Mr. Cresse was a harness maker, but because of his health did not work at the trade steadily. He was employed by the Alton, Granite and St. Louis Traction Company for twelve or fourteen years as a track man. In the winter time, he usually worked at harness making when the weather was too bad for outside labor.

*****************************************************

 

CRESSWELL, CLYDE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 26, 1917

Clyde Cresswell of Upper Alton died this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the family home after a long illness. It will be recalled that recently a son, Egbert Cresswell, was brought home a corpse after an aviation accident at Davenport, Iowa. He had been home just a week before seeing his brother who was very sick, and was known to be in a hopeless state. This second death in such a short space of time makes the affliction a much harder one.

*****************************************************

 

CRESSWELL, EGBERT BROWN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 10, 1917            Alton Boy Falls to Death From Airplane

Egbert Brown Cresswell, oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Cresswell of Upper Alton, was fatally injured by falling from an airplane at Davenport, Iowa, Sunday afternoon. He died Monday morning in Mercy Hospital where he was taken after the accident. According to the story that came from Davenport by the United Press, Cresswell, who was manager of aviation school at Davenport, fell 600 feet. He was riding an airplane with Louis Boeder, an aviator. Cresswell himself, passenger with the regular man, was being taught to operate a machine, and according to the story he lost control, and before the aviator could get control the machine fell to the ground. Bert Cresswell, as he was best known here, was an extremely popular young man. He never lost interest in his home city. The Telegraph has received many letters from him, and when he would come back home for a visit he would renew his acquaintance in the office. He had been endeavoring to get an airplane factory located in Alton. He had been at Lockport, N. Y., and was connected with an airplane factory there before the war. The war boomed the business, and the company was thinking of branching out, with Alton as a possible location for the plant. He left that company and took up his work with another. He was named manager of the aviation school at Davenport, where he was to meet his end. The young man had been at the home in Upper Alton the past week on account of the illness of his brother, Floyd Cresswell. He left here Friday night, and was to have returned next Sunday. He had for a number of years been a salesman for an airplane company at Lockport, New York, but some time ago the company opened a plant at Davenport to commence the manufacturing of machines to be used in the European war. The news of the accident came last night about 9 o'clock, when word was telephoned to the home that the Western Union had a message for Miss Hazel Cresswell. The young lady called up the telegraph company and received a message from Bert Cresswell's wife, saying she was seriously ill and wanted Miss Hazel Cresswell to take the first train for Davenport. It was supposed Mrs. Cresswell was afraid to telegraph the true word, on account of the illness of her husband's mother and also his brother. A few minutes later another telegram came from the airplane company telling of the accident and stating that Bert Cresswell was dead. From the message it was taken for granted that the accident occurred about 4 o'clock Sunday afternoon. The news of his death was a crushing blow to the family. The mother recently underwent a surgical operation in the hospital and had been very ill. The serious condition of the son, Floyd Cresswell, who was recently brought home from Kansas City, was very trying to the mother as well as the rest of the family, and the sudden shock brought Sunday night by the death of Bert was hard to bear. While talking with a Telegraph reporter Friday afternoon just before leaving Alton, Bert Cresswell said he was very sorry to be compelled to leave just at this time, but business affairs demanded him to be at Davenport Sunday on account of an exhibition of machines that was to be given. He said he would be back again in a week. He did not mention the fact that he would ride as a passenger in one, and he did not tell members of the family. It is supposed he did not want them to feel uneasy about him and therefore he said nothing of it. On the other hand, he might not have had any intention of going up until the time came. He said the plant was getting well under way and was very busy. A thousand planes for "bombers" had been ordered by Uncle Sam, Mr. Cresswell stated. The young man was 38 years old and leaves his wife, but no children. The couple lived in Upper Alton a number of years after their marriage, when Mr. Cresswell was working at the glass trade. Besides his wife, he leaves his parents and four brothers and two sisters, namely: Floyd, Carroll, Ray and Robert Cresswell; and Misses Bessie and Hazel Cresswell. The body will arrive at East Alton tomorrow morning about 6:30 o'clock, and will be taken to the Cresswell home on Seminary street. The funeral will be held there in the afternoon.

*********************************************************

 

CRESSWELL, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1910               Murdered by Ira Holmes, Then Holmes Commits Suicide

Ira Holmes killed Miss Elizabeth Creswell, then shot himself at a house on Grand avenue in Yager park, on the Fourth of July morning. The motive is not fully known, as the witnesses of the tragedy say there was no quarrel, and very few words spoken before the killing. The murder and suicide occurred in a house in Yager Park, where some couples were living without license of law. Holmes had rented the house and bought the furniture. In the house at the time of the killing was Arthur Kremer, William Allred, Maggie Allred, his wife, and Maggie Seago. The Cresswell woman had been living there too with Holmes. Monday morning, according to statements made by the witnesses who had been there all night, Holmes returned to the house after being out all night. The Creswell woman had been up, but went back to bed and was lying across the bed when Holmes entered shortly before 10 o'clock. Allred and his wife, and the Seago woman, were in an adjoining room with a door open between, and Kremer was in the yard. Holmes closed the open door, and the witnesses claim there was no sound of quarreling, and the first they knew of trouble was when shots were heard. Three shots were fired, then there was an interval, during which the Creswell woman was heard pleading for water. The inmates of the house ran out in the yard. Holmes went into the kitchen, got a dipper of water for the woman, gave her a drink, then shot her in the head. She had three bullet holes in her breast and one in her head. Then Holmes barred the door and windows, and lying down on the floor with his head pillowed on the arm of the woman, he shot himself through the head. Everyone thought he was in the room, alive and armed, ready to defend himself. Dr. Taphorn was called but could not get in the room. Deputy Sheriff Crowe arrived later, and when told that Holmes was believed to be standing guard armed in the room, he attempted to enter. He got an axe and assisted by Constable Dailey, who wielded the axe on the door after Crowe had failed to force the door, Crowe went to the outside window, tore the slats off the shutters and smashed a pane of glass, while at the same instant Dailey broke the door open. This move was to prevent the man inside doing any harm, as both officers were ready to shoot. However, the first glance in the room told them there was no feed for fear, as both were dead. Coroner Streeper took charge of the bodies and held an inquest Monday night. A verdict of murder and suicide was found. The body of Holmes was shipped today to Greenfield, Ill. for burial. The funeral of Elizabeth Creswell will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home of her father, George Creswell, in Upper Alton.

*********************************************************

 

CRESWICK, JANE ANNE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1922          Death of Brother Believed to be Cause of Her Death

Grief over the death of her brother is believed to have caused the death last night, at 10:35 p.m., of Miss Jane Anne Creswick, at her home, 2230 West Brown street. Her brother, J. E. Creswick, died Tuesday at 2 a.m. Until recently, Miss Creswick was in good health. She was actively engaged in church work to which she gave a great part of her time. The illness and death of her brother, to whom she was devotedly attached, came as a severe shock, and when she became ill, largely because of her sorrow at his loss, was unable to fight off death, the shock being too great for one of her years. Miss Creswick was born in London on September 7, 1839, and was in her eighty-third year. She came to America 18 years ago to make her home with her brother. She was an excellent student of French, and a talented musician. Up to the time of her trip to America, she was a governess. In America, she taught music. Miss Creswick was a member of the Wesley Methodist church, and a leader in the activities of that congregation. She was an excellent Bible student, and taught one of the Sunday school classes of the church. A devout Christian, she was interested in all the work of her church. Whenever called upon for service, she responded willingly. It was only recently that she gave up her great church work. She is survived by a niece, Mrs. Daisy Creswick Rice, inspector of hygiene in the public schools, and a nephew, Edward L. Creswick, also of this city, the only direct descendants of the Creswick family, originally of London. Funeral services will be conducted at the home on Brown street Sunday at 3 p.m. by the Rev. Theodore Cates, pastor of the Wesley Methodist church. Friends are asked to omit flowers.

******************************************************

 

CRESWICK, JOHN E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1922               Master Engraver Puts Down His Tools

John E. Creswick, in his eighty-eighth year, died this morning at 2 o'clock at his home 2230 West Brown street. His death was due to pneumonia and followed an illness which began last Thursday. He had been working up to last Thursday at the J. H. Booth Jewelry Store, where he had been engaged as an engraver. His sickness developed into pneumonia and the end came quickly. Mr. Creswick was one of the most talented engravers in America. He had wide experience, and he left many works of art which he made in the long course of his career as an artist-engraver, which will become more valuable now that the master hand that made them is stilled. He was born in London, England, July 8, 1834. When he was sixteen years old, he began his apprenticeship as an engraver and he completed that period five years later. He came to this country a few years afterward and remained in Philadelphia for two years. At the time of the Civil War, he returned to England and remained there until the close of the war, after which he returned to America. He worked at engraving in Cincinnati, Chicago and at Elgin, and from there he went to St. Louis. He took a position as engraver for Mermod and Jaccard in that city, and remained with the firm forty five years, resigning the position after he had passed eighty years of age. He took one year's rest and then, being unwilling to be idle, he began doing work for Alton jewelers, continuing at that work until he was stricken with his last sickness. He was married in St. Louis September 16, 1874 to Isabel McClellan Bice. He leaves three children, Mrs. Nelson McReynolds, Mrs. Daisy Rice and Edward Creswick. He leaves also one sister, Miss Jane Creswick, who is a few years his junior. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home, and will be conducted by Rev. Theo Cates of the Wesley Methodist church. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery. Mr. Creswick had few equals in the art of high grade engraving on metal. His hand was also skillful with the brush and he painted many pictures in water colors and in oil. But perhaps the highest expression of his artistic tastes was in his engraving on metals. His skill was frequently called for when some expensive piece of work was desired. One of the finest works he did was the engraving of a portrait of Wayman Crow on a silver plate, which was put up year after year and held by the student at the Wayman Crow school in St. Louis, who made the best achievement in art. This plate is now one of the treasures of Washington University. Always Mr. Creswick kept up his studies, even when he was long past his four score years. He was ever trying to improve his work and acquire new technique. He was an artist in the highest sense, but never ceased to be an art student, as he believed there was always something new to be learned. Seldom was he idle. When not engaged in his chosen profession, he would be busy with the pen or the brush, sketching or painting some beautiful picture. He was head engraver at Mermod and Jaccards when he resigned after he was eighty years of age. His work is scattered all over the United States, and it was the opinion of connoisseurs, that there was no one so skillful in engraving as Mr. Creswick. He was a true gentleman, a kindly benevolent man, and his personality was one that was much admired by all who came in contact with him.

***********************************************

 

CRESWICK, UNKNOWN WIFE OF J. E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 16, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. J. E. Creswick was held Sunday afternoon at the residence on Brown street, and there was a very large attendance of old friends of the family from Alton and from numerous places who came to be present at the last rites. The funeral was postponed Saturday afternoon on account of the bad weather. The weather was beautiful Sunday afternoon - just the kind of weather Mrs. Creswick had wished to have when her funeral should be held. Rev. C. C. Hall, former pastor of the Upper Alton Methodist Church, was here to take a part in the service Saturday afternoon, but when the service was postponed he was unable to return to Alton again Sunday. Rev. Theodore Cates, the present pastor of the church, conducted the service yesterday, and his words were very consoling to the bereaved family. The flowers sent by friends were very beautiful. Sergeant William Rice of Camp Funston, a grandson of Mrs. Creswick, arrived Saturday to attend the funeral and he served as a pallbearer. Burial took place at Oakwood cemetery. The pallbearers were two grandsons, Sergt. William Rice of Camp Funston, and Hubert C. McReynolds of Upper Alton; a nephew, Charles McClellen of St. Louis; O. L. Dorsey of Gillespie; George Dixon of Alton; and G. W. Dudley of St. Louis, an old resident of Alton. Among those who came to attend the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Harold G. Powell of St. Louis, Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Dorsey and Mrs. Joseph Carroll of Gillespie. Others from St. Louis were Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stevens, Miss Mary Walters, Charles L. Beall, Robert Miller, Charles McClellen, Mrs. Eva G. Hillister and Miss Ida McClellen. Also two granddaughters of Mrs. Creswick, Mrs. Barnard Brogan and Miss Margaret Rice of St. Louis.

***********************************************

 

CRIVELLO, ANGELO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1900

Angelo Crivello, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Crivello, died last night at Galena, Kansas, after an illness of eight days with stomach trouble. The family was surprised to receive a message last week notifying them of the serious illness of Angelo in a hotel at Galena, and his mother and father left for Galena at once. Since then they have been in constant attendance at his bedside and were with him when he died. A few days ago an apparent change for the better set in, and it was thought here Angelo was getting along nicely until last night a message was received here stating that he was dying. The remaining members of the family left for Galena last night. Angelo was a bright young man, and his death will cause profound sorrow in the large circle of friends to whom he was known. He has been in the employ of the Post Dispatch as a traveling representative, and was one of the most successful and highly esteemed of the traveling men of that paper. In Alton, where he spent most of his life, he was liked by everyone who knew him. The body will arrive this evening, and the funeral will take place tomorrow morning.

*********************************************

 

CROCKER, CHARLOTTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1921         One of the First Converts To a Faith in the Phenomena of Spirit Return

Mrs. Charlotte H. Crocker died at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. M. Schweppe, who, with her sister, Mrs. William Tindall of Washington D.C., are the only survivors in her immediate family. Her grandchildren include Mrs. Eben Rodgers and Nelson Schweppe of this city, and four children of Mrs. Tindall. Mrs. Crocker was one of the first converts in this country to a faith in the phenomena of spirit return, which came of Orono, Me., jointly, as the result of very persistent and thorough experimentations with spirit mediums, both at their own home and in various cities. She was born in Milford, Mass., August 15, 1827. Funeral services will be held at her daughter's residence, 200 Prospect street, Friday at two o'clock. They will be conducted in accordance with her lifelong faith. Friends are invited. Interment private. Omission of flowers is requested. Mrs. Crocker was deeply interested in public affairs. It was to her, among the first, that Alton is indebted for the city having River View Park. She offered, with Mrs. Schweppe, to advance the money to buy the property and hold it until the city could take it over, and it was due to her suggestion that the city finally acquired the park. She maintained her interest in all social affairs until the last few years. She was known as delightful company even after she had passed ninety years of age.

*********************************************

 

CROCKER, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1906

George Crocker, a member of one of the well known families of Edwardsville, died suddenly at his home in that city this morning. Last night he was well and hearty, apparently, but during the night he was taken ill and died at five o'clock this morning. The young man had been married only a short time, and the young wife is in danger as a result of nervous prostration from the shock.

*******************************************

 

CROCKER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 10, 1910              Old "Popcorn Man" At Chautauqua Dies

William Crocker, the aged "popcorn man" at Piasa Chautauqua, died Sunday afternoon at St. Joseph's hospital where he had been given care for nearly a year. Mr. Crocker had been at Chautauqua selling popcorn for many years. He broke down in health a year ago last summer, and came to the hospital at Alton. Then he got better and went away. Later, he had to be brought back again, this time from Grafton. Some of his friends looked after him and he was kept in comfort until he died. He has no known relatives.

*******************************************

 

CROCKETT, NELLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1906      Woman Over 100 Year of Age Dies

Mrs. Nellie Crockett died at her home on Hampton street yesterday afternoon, and is said to be over 100 year of age. Those who knew her say she was the oldest person they ever saw. She was thin and emaciated in appearance and was so weak that she was hardly able to move for a long time. Her death was due to weakness of old age. According to those who knew the woman, she must have been over 100 years of age. Her third son died two years ago, and he was said to be 80 years old at the time of his death. She has a grandson who is 49 years of age. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the A. M. E. church in Alton.

*******************************************

 

CROFTON, CATHERINE (nee SHAFFREY)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 6, 1900

Mrs. Catherine Crofton, wife of J. E. Crofton of Upper Alton, died this morning at 10:15 o'clock. Mrs. Crofton had been sick for the past three weeks. Her death was unexpected. The cause of death was paralysis of the heart, and no one was in the house with her but the oldest daughter. Mrs. Crofton was Catherine Shaffrey. She was born in St. Louis 46 years ago. She has been a life-long resident of Alton. Besides her husband, five children survive her, viz: Harry A., May E., James E Jr., Willie L. and Kittie May, and two grandchildren. Notice of the funeral will be given.

*******************************************

 

CROFTON, EDWIN J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1901

Edwin J., the three year and seven months old son of Harry A. Crofton, died Sunday morning at 3:15 o'clock at the residence of his grandfather, Mr. James Crofton, in Upper Alton, after an illness of three days. The funeral will take place from the home on Merchant street on Tuesday at 2 p.m. to St. Patrick's church. Interment in Greenwood cemetery.

******************************************

 

CROFTON, IRENE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1906

Mrs. Irene Crofton, wife of Peter Crofton, died Saturday evening after a long illness at her home. The immediate cause of her death is given as erysipelas, but she has been in ill health for about 7 years, or since she was shocked by lightning in her millinery store on east Second street. She was born in Alton in 1870, but all of her immediate relatives preceded her to the grave. She was married twelve years ago to Peter Crofton, who survives her. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

*******************************************

 

CROFTON, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1902

John Crofton, aged 73, a resident of Alton for over fifty years, was fatally burned Tuesday evening by the explosion of a can of coal oil which he was using to start a fire in the kitchen range. Mr. Crofton was at home alone for a short time, and in the absence of his daughter, with whom he lived, he attempted to hasten the fire and the usual explosion occurred. Members of the family say that in all the years Mr. Crofton had been living, he had not used the coal oil to start fires, and they cannot account for him having used the fluid Tuesday evening. Mr. Crofton's clothes were set afire, and he ran from the house. Neighbors saw his plight and rushing to his assistance they wrapped bed clothes about the blazing form of the old man. Mr. Crofton was so badly burned that Dr. Fiegenbaum and Dr. Smith pronounced his case hopeless when they arrived in response to a summons. After suffering terrible pain, Mr. Crofton died a few hours after the accident. Mr. Crofton leaves a family of six children, Richard Crofton of St. Louis; P. J. Crofton and Mrs. Rose Foster, of Alton; John Crofton and Mrs. M. F. Kilerain of Chicago, and Mrs. Mary Lynch of East St. Louis. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock. Services in the Cathedral.

*******************************************

 

CROSS, BLAIR I./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 20, 1907

Blair I. Cross died at 11 o'clock Friday night at his home, 1129 Green street, from lead colic. He was 35 years old and leaves a wife and two children. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the A. M. E. church in East Fourth street to the City cemetery.

*******************************************

 

CROSS, JOHN D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 10, 1909

The funeral of John D. Cross was held this afternoon from his home on Bloomfield street, and was attending by many friends of deceased. Burial was in City Cemetery. Mr. Cross was a hard working, industrious man.

*******************************************

 

CROSS, ROY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 20, 1904

Roy Cross, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Cross of Bloomfield and Gold streets [Alton], died at St. Joseph's hospital at 8:30 o'clock Wednesday evening from the effects of the injuries he sustained Tuesday morning by being pinched between the bumpers of two freight cars in the glass works yards. The attending surgeon gave up all hope yesterday as the boy had suffered a complete collapse from the shock. Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer will hold an inquest this evening. The funeral of Roy Cross will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church, Rev. Fr. O'Reilly officiating.

********************************************

 

CROSS, UNKNOWN CHILD OF JOHN D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 25, 1907

An 8 months old child of John D. Cross of Hampton street died from whooping cough last night and will be buried tomorrow.

******************************************

 

CROSSMAN, EDWARD V./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 29, 1913          Organizer of Illinois Naval Reserves at Alton Dies

Edward V. Crossman, aged 43, died at the home of his father-in-law, H. T. McCrea, after a long illness Tuesday at 8 a.m. The death of Mr. Crossman was no surprise, yet it was sudden. He had been in a very bad condition for several years, and it was believed that his illness would be fatal, yet he continued to be about the streets and refused to give up, always maintaining that he had a good chance to get well....Mr. Crossman was formerly a business man in Alton, being engaged in the printing business. He was known as an artistic workman, and for a long time did a good business. He was one of the organizers of the Alton Division of the Illinois Naval Reserves, which was formed in Alton in 1896. Dr. G. E. Wilkinson was the first lieutenant commander, and Crossman was the second in rank. Later, he was elevated to the position of commander of the division, and held that place until his removal from Alton. He served in that capacity for nearly ten years. He was in charge at the time of the war with Spain, and drilled the division in preparation for departing for service in the United States Navy. He did not go himself, as there was no use for commissioned officers, the navy having plenty of them. He left Alton for Charleston, W. Va., to take a position in a government printing office, and while there his health broke down. When he came back to Alton, a shadow of his former robust self, one of the most painful experiences he suffered was to find that many of his old friends did not recognize him. Some time ago he took the position in charge of the armory of the naval reserves, to give himself something to do. He broke down completely a few weeks ago, and was take home, but he regained his strength and was able to get out again for a few days. Mr. Crossman is survived by his wife and one daughter, also three brothers and one sister. Mrs. Fruit, a sister, is expected from Timpson, Tex., and if she arrives the funeral will be Thursday morning from the home of H. T. McCrea at 10:30 o'clock. Burial will be at Edwardsville. A brother, S. V. Crossman, lives in Chicago, and William and Thomas Crossman live at Edwardsville.

*******************************************

 

CROSSMAN, THOMAS M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 25, 1919               Active in Political Circles 3 Decades - Postmaster 25 Years

Thomas M. Crossman, one of the best known residents of Madison county, died this morning at his home in Edwardsville with erysipelas. He has been in failing health for some time. Mr. Crossman was a native of Alton and 66 years old. His father was Samuel V. Crossman, who came to Alton from Cincinnati, Ohio in 1853. After coming to Alton, the elder Crossman was connected with the Alton Courier, and later with the Telegraph. The family moved to Edwardsville and founded the Edwardsville Republican in 1869. Until last year that paper was the property of the members of the family. Mr. Crossman was active in Masonic circles and for 25 years has served as the secretary of the blue lodge and chapter bodies in Edwardsville. He was also postmaster there for 25 years, and for three decades or more has been active in the councils of the Republican party in Madison county. At the time of his death Mr. Crossman was Probate Court bailiff.  Mr. Crossman is survived by his wife and 7 children. Two brothers also survive, Samuel V. Crossman of Chicago, and William R. Crossman of Edwardsville. The funeral arrangements have not been completed. Mr. Crossman was a man for many years prominent in Madison county politics. He had been one of the publishers of the Edwardsville Republican, but retired from that newspaper to take over the position of postmaster, which he held until the exigencies of party politics made it seem necessary for him to be replaced by a Democrat. He was a man of highest character and he leaves a large number of friends.

*******************************************

 

CROUCH, LETHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1907

Miss Letha Crouch, aged 22, died from consumption Saturday night in Job's row, Second and Henry streets. The body was sent to Louisiana, Mo., today for burial.

******************************************

 

CROW, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 15, 1920

The funeral of John Crow will be held at 10 o'clock tomorrow morning and burial will be in the City cemetery.

******************************************

 

CROW, WILHELMINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1917

Mrs. Wilhelmina Crow, aged 73, died at her home at 929 Union street last evening, after an illness of some time. Mrs. Crow is survived by five children. The funeral will be held at two o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the home to the City Cemetery.

******************************************

 

CROWDER, DELLA JANE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 8, 1918

Della Jane Crowder, wife of George Crowder, died last evening at her home in East Alton, after a short illness with influenza. Mrs. Crowder was 30 years of age. The body will be taken to Bethalto for burial.

******************************************

 

CROWE, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 23, 1900

Surrey Sharpe, who served a penitentiary term for killing Fred Crowe at the glassworks, and is now at liberty, has received his restoration to citizenship papers.

*****************************************

 

CROWSON, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1900        

Charles Crowson, one of the best known residents of Alton township, died at 10:15 o'clock this morning at his home on Henry street, after a long illness. He has been in a dying condition for one month, and his family have been attending at his bedside expecting at almost any time that the illness might terminate fatally. He was taken ill nine weeks ago with acute Bright's disease, which developed into dropsy. He was born in Wednesbury, Staffordshire, England, and was sixty-three years of age January 12. He came to America in 1855 and settled at North Alton, where he engaged in the coal mining business with William Watts, when coal mining was in its palmy days at the Coal Branch. He remained in the coal business 25 years and was one of the most respected men in Alton for honesty and industry. His word was guarantee for everything he said or did, and during his whole career in Alto he was upright and most highly esteemed. He was of the belief of the Latter Day Saints. He was twice married. His first wife died in 1881, and in 1884 he married Eliza Hunter of St. Louis, who is still living. He leaves seven children: Mrs. Joseph Betts of Belleville; Mrs. Nelson Reagan, Mrs. John Tonsor of Milwaukee; Mrs. Annie Potious of St. Louis; Mrs. Will Templeton of Marshalltown, Ia.; Messrs. George and Oswald Crowson of this city. The time of the funeral is not set. [Burial was in City Cemetery]

****************************************

 

CROWSON, EARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1908                    Child Dies After Being Hit By Train

Earl Crowson, the 9 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. George Crowson, died at St. Joseph's hospital Friday afternoon at 5 o'clock from the effects of the injuries he received under the street car on the Union street line. The child is said to have died from shock and loss of blood. He had lost a large quantity of blood and was very weak when taken to the hospital. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the home on Liberty street. The burial will be in the City cemetery. Coroner Streeper will probably hold the inquest on Monday night.

******************************************

 

CROXFORD, MARY A./Source: Alton Telegraph, June 5, 1913
Mrs. Mary A. Croxford, whose funeral was held from the family home at Elsah yesterday p.m., was born in Bedfordshire, England, September 4, 1831. Her maiden name was Mary A. Wheatley. She came to America when 18 years of age, landing at New Orleans Christmas Day, 1849. She came up the Mississippi River by boat to St. Louis, Mo., where several years later she became the wife of John B. Young. To this union five children were born. All excepting two of these, Mrs. Kizzie Yager of Ronneby, Minnesota, and Mrs. Emma Fountain of Collins, North Dakota, have preceded her to the grave years ago. John B. Young died shortly after the Civil War. She became the wife of John Croxford of Alton, Ill., in the year 1870. To this union four children were born, all of whom survive to mourn the loss of a good, kind mother. The children are Mrs. Mamie A. Foster of Jennings, Mo., Mrs. Ida M. Dougherty of Alton, John A. Croxford of Elsah, and Mrs. Addie Pinney of Independence, Mo. Mr. Croxford died 7 years ago at their home in Elsah from a fall from a tree. Since his death, she has made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Oscar Dougherty, of 230 West Thirteenth street. Mrs. Croxford leaves to mourn her death 6 children, 17 grandchildren, and 5 great-grandchildren, besides a host of friends. Mrs. Amos Maxiener and sister, Miss Emma, Mr. John Kennington, Mrs. Thomas Parker, Mrs. J. G. Hauck and daughter, Cecil, and Miss Annie Bivens, went to Elsah to attend the funeral of Mrs. Crawford.
********************************************

 

CULLEN, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 19, 1906

Frank Cullen, of 1009 east Third street, died yesterday afternoon from cerebral hemorrhage after a long illness. He was a sufferer from epilepsy as the result of an injury to his head he sustained many years ago. He has been unable to take any kind of employment for a long time. He was 48 years of age. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and as he was a member of Chesterfield Masonic lodge, it will be under Masonic auspices.

******************************************

 

CULP, JOHN S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 27, 1916            Foster Township Farmer Dies - Was Old Resident and Civil War Drummer Boy

John S. Culp, aged 73, a resident of Madison county all his life, died this afternoon about 2 o'clock at his home in Fosterburg township, from heart disease. Mr. Culp's death was sudden and unexpected. He had been failing in health for some time and had two attacks of heart trouble. This afternoon he was stricken again and a telephone message was sent to Alton for doctors, who hurried to attend Mr. Culp, but it was too late. Mr. Culp had been prominent in Madison county affairs, and especially in the Republican party, most of his life. He retired recently from the post he held on the State Board of Agriculture, which has managed the State Fair at Springfield. For many years he held that position. The great disappointment of Mr. Culp's life was when, it seemed, political exigencies demanded that he be eliminated as a candidate for chairman of the state board, a place he confidently expected to be given him. Mr. Culp it was stated at the time, though equipped by experience and long service, was not possessed of an essential qualification - he was not of the same political faith of the Governor, and he did not come from Chicago. He therefore, failed. It was a sad blow to him and from this he never fully recovered. After building for a long time the hope that he would be made the head of the state board, the disappointment was deep. Mr. Culp served the county as a member of the county board, and he had a very conspicuous part in public affairs. He was born in Madison county and lived here all his life close to where he died. He was very successful as a farmer and died leaving one of the finest estates consisting of fine farming land in the whole county. He leaves his widow and two sons, Frank E. and Herbert Culp. Owing to the lateness of the hour of his death, it was impossible to ascertain the time of his funeral. Mr. Culp served in the Civil War, enlisting as a drummer boy, and going clear through.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 28, 1916

The funeral of John S. Culp will be held at 1 o'clock Thursday from his residence in Fosterburg township, and services will be conducted by Rev. D. C. Blunt, assisted by President G. M. Potter of Shurtleff College. Burial will be in the Short cemetery. Further details of the death of Mr. Culp were given today by his two sons. They said their father had been feeling well as usual, Monday, and had been hard at work all day. The family had been killing hogs and Mr. Culp was engaged in turning the machine for grinding sausage. He planned to finish that job and go out plowing, and had just remarked what his plan was, when he collapsed and died instantly. The family had been informed that he might die just as he did, with no warning. Beside his widow and two sons, Mr. Culp leaves one brother, S. H. Culp, and two sisters, Mrs. T. N. Harris and Mrs. W. J. Crawford.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 1, 1916

One of the largest country funerals ever seen in Madison county was that held over the late John S. Culp on Thanksgiving day. The services were in the home on the farm six miles east of Upper Alton, between Bethalto and Fosterburg. The services were announced to commence at 1 o'clock, and many people from Alton, Edwardsville, Granite City, and many other places in Madison county and farther out omitted their Thanksgiving dinner in order to attend the funeral of Mr. Culp. The large assembly spoke for the high esteem in which the deceased state and county official was held. Over one hundred automobiles were parked in a field adjoining the residence on the east, and several hundred horse drawn vehicles were placed in a lot north of the house while those who had come from distant places attended the services at the house. Only a very small part of those attending could get into the large house, and hundreds of men stood out in the services were being held inside. Last spring when his wife was seriously ill, Mr. Culp made some plans for his own funeral. He believed at that time that his life partner could not recover, and as he had suffered several bad attacks of his trouble in the last year or two, he made some requests concerning his own funeral as he was expecting to be taken away at any time in just such a manner as his end did come last Monday afternoon. These requests were followed out yesterday in the conduct of his funeral. The services in the house were in charge of Rev. D. C. Blunt and President Geo. M. Potter of Shurtleff College. The Masons were in attendance, and the active pallbearers were from the Masonic lodge and the old soldiers from Fosterburg were honorary pallbearers as the deceased had requested. Rev. F. W. Stewart, pastor of the Upper Alton Baptist church, gave the opening prayer and the remarks were made by Rev. D. C. Blunt. The obituary and a brief review of the life of the departed were given by President G. M. Potter. A quartette sang two selections and Mrs. Stanley Castle sang a solo. An hour's time was taken for the men who stood outside to pass through the house to view the remains. The floral offerings were extensive and were very beautiful. In conveying the flowers to the cemetery, several rigs and automobiles were necessary. Among some of the floral pieces was an elegant one from the Illinois State Board of Agriculture of Springfield, another from the Madison County Fair Association of Highland, one from the G. A. R., Odd Fellows, Masons and another from the Farmers Institute of Madison county. Many other floral pieces from friends, relatives and organizations were also sent. Among the state officials and friends of Mr. Culp with whom he had been associated many years was Joab Goodall of Marion. Mr. Goodall was one of the state Board of Agriculture many years and he was an especially good friend of Mr. Culp, the two men working together on all issues that were up and each sought the advice of the other when questions of importance were brought up for serious consideration. Fred Baumberg of Reno, Bond county, who will in January, take the place on the State Board of Agriculture made vacant in September by Mr. Culp's retiring as a member, was also in attendance. Louis Latzer of Highland, another particular friend of the deceased was present. The committee from the Farmers Institute and the Domestic Science Committee of the Institute attended the services in a body. Masons from Alton and many other towns also attended. Mrs. Evlyn Lynch of Gillespie, Mrs. Lizzie Gill, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Gill and Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Gill of St. Louis attended the services. When the funeral cortege formed to leave the home for the cemetery, the automobiles were sent on ahead in order that those with machines, who wished to go to the cemetery, could park their cars in an adjoining field to prevent blocking the roadway for the funeral carriages. The funeral procession consisting of horse drawn vehicles along was a mile long. There was a large gathering of people at the cemetery to attend the final services than there was at the home. Owing to the distance from Alton to the home and of the early hour of the service at the home, many went to the cemetery later in the afternoon and were there when the procession arrived. The Masons took charge of the services at the grave. The extensive floral offerings were banked on the mound over the grave and were beautiful. The day was a beautiful one, and the roads were splendid for travel for the large number of people who went to the country to attend the funeral. The active pallbearers were H. T. McCrea, Judge Frank Gillham, John Klein, Alonzo Woods, Dan W. Stoeckel, Norman G. Flagg. The honorary pallbearers from the G. A. R. were Elias Pruitt, John and Moses Thompson, Frank Williams, Jasper Dillon and Valentine Pfaff.

******************************************

 

CULP, MINETTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 30, 1918

Mrs. Minette Culp, wife of John C. Culp, died Friday afternoon at 4:35 o'clock at the family home, 915 East Sixth street, after a long illness, dating back about two years. Besides her husband she leaves one son. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home, and will be private. Rev. C. E. Combrink, pastor of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian Church will officiate. The burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery. The body will lie in state and may be reviewed by friends Sunday morning between 9 and 11 o'clock. Mrs. Culp was 31 years old. She leaves her husband and one son, John Junior Culp. Mrs. Culp had been sick for more than a year and six weeks ago returned from the Open Air Colony at Springfield, Ill., where she had gone in the hope of regaining her health. Through her long illness Mrs. Culp's loving and cheerful disposition was very marked to her family and friends. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, and will be private.

******************************************

 

CUMMINGS, B. F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 24, 1911

B. F. Cummings died last night at his residence in Priest's addition [Upper Alton] after an illness of three days. The news of his death comes very suddenly, as many of his friends and even his immediate neighbors knew nothing of his sickness. He was taken ill last Thursday. The physician thought Mr. Cummings would be all right in a short time, but his death came this morning at an early hour, unexpectedly. Cummings was a very large man, weighing 275 pounds, and was very healthy in appearance. He leaves his wife and one adopted son. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon.

*****************************************

 

CUMMINGS, DANIEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 26, 1907

Daniel Cummings, for many years section foreman at Elsah for the Bluff Line, died Christmas eve at his home in east Second street after an illness from pneumonia of a few days duration. He was sixty five years old and leaves his wife and six children: John, Michael and Leon Cummings, Mrs. Hugh Kelley and Mrs. Edward Maguire of St. Louis and Miss Kate Cummings of Alton. He was related to the Maher families of Godfrey and Alton. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

****************************************

 

CUMMINGS, LEO W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 25, 1918

Leo W. Cummings died Monday morning at 7 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital after an illness of eleven weeks with typhoid fever and complications. He was 22 years, 10 months, 25 days of age. His mother is Mrs. Mary Cummings, and he was a son of the late Daniel Cummings. Beside his widowed mother, he leaves two brothers and two sisters. Mrs. E. N. Maguire and Michael Cummings of Alton, Mrs. Hugh J. Kelley and John J. Cummings of St. Louis. The young man was in the draft and might have been in the contingent departing for camp the day he died. He was taken to the hospital Sunday to undergo a surgical operation in the hope of savings his life, but it proved of no avail. He died before it could be performed. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

******************************************

 

CUNNINGHAM, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 17, 1912

Mrs. Catherine Cunningham, in her 80th year, died this morning at her residence on Belle street after a long illness from the debility of old age. Mrs. Cunningham was a native of Dublin, Ireland, and was born August 15, 1832. She married John Cunningham in 1847 and lived with him until his death fifteen years ago. She had been a resident of Alton sixty years. Mrs. Cunningham's death was expected long ago. At the time of the tragic death of her son, who was killed in a railroad wreck in Texas, she was not expected to live, and her son's death was kept from the mother because it was feared that the news of it might cause a complete collapse. At no time since then did the aged woman regain her health enough for the sad news to be imparted to her safely. She is survived by four sons, Frank and Henry of Alton, Aaron of St. Louis, and Joseph Cunningham of Chicago. Mrs. Cunningham was one of the best known residents of old plank road neighborhood of Alton. She had lived there since she was a young woman, and was the oldest resident there. She was known as a good neighbor and a kind, charitable woman, and as a good mother to her children. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral at 9 o'clock.

*****************************************

 

CUNNINGHAM, EDWARD J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 24, 1916

Edward J. Cunningham, for thirty years telegraph operator at the Wann tower, died suddenly Sunday night at his room at the Cunningham restaurant of heart trouble. He worked all day Sunday and came home in the evening in a jocular humor and ate his supper and went to bed feeling perfectly well. About 10 o'clock he was seized with a smothering spell caused by heart trouble. Mrs. Cunningham who was with him aroused Miss Margaret Simpson, one of the employees of the restaurant, and while Miss Simpson was doing what she could to relieve him, he passed away. Mrs. Cunningham had gone out to get a physician at the time and was not there when Mr. Cunningham died. A doctor came shortly afterwards and pronounced the patient dead. Mr. Cunningham was born in Alton fifty-six years ago. About thirty-five years ago he was married to Miss Peachy Baker, who survives him. Two children also survive, Edward Cunningham of New York City, who has been sent word to come because of his father's death, and Mrs. Harvey Coasts of East Alton. Five weeks ago another member of the family, Lee Cunningham, died in St. Joseph's Hospital of stomach trouble. The grief of the first loss has been preying on Mrs. Cunningham's mind ever since, and she has been in a state of nervous prostration. The second loss has tended considerably to aggravate her distress, and she is said to be almost inconsolable. Sunday night when Mr. Cunningham came home he began joking about his supper and remarked in a joking way that he thought he had earned it by his day's work. Nothing was thought of the remark as a good supper was spread for him, and he went to bed. He was apparently in the best of health when he retired. Several weeks ago when his son, Lee Cunningham, died, he made the remark that another member of the family would die in two weeks. He did not say he believed it was himself, but members of the family now took it to mean that he believed he would die and that he forecasted his own death. Mr. Cunningham began working for the Chicago and Alton when he was sixteen years old. Five years later his left arm was crushed by getting it caught between two cars. He was assigned to a switchman's job in Alton, learned telegraphy, and had been at that work ever since. Thirty years ago he took charge of the Wann tower when the levers were thrown by hand. When the new tower was built he stayed there and worked up to yesterday. He is the second oldest operator on the Chicago and Alton, and was probably its most regular and trusted employee. During the entire thirty years he laid off only twice, once several years ago because of an illness of grippe, and five weeks ago because of the death of his son, Lee Cunningham. His funeral will not be arranged for until after the arrival of his son, Edward Cunningham, who will probably arrive form New York some time tomorrow.

*******************************************

 

CUNNINGHAM, JAMES H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1915     Old Time Railway Engineer Dies at His Old Home

James H. Cunningham, member of a well known old time Alton family and a native of Alton, died Monday morning at the Cunningham homestead, 1911 Belle street, after an illness which became acute Thursday. He died from uraemic poisoning. Mr. Cunningham leaves two sons, Earl and George, both in San Francisco, and leaves also three brothers, Frank of Alton, Joseph of Chicago, and Aaron of St. Louis. He had been an old time railway engineer. He started to learn the engineer's trade at the old round house in Alton, and worked on the Chicago and Alton Railroad for years. Then he went to Texas and worked as an engineer on the Ft. Worth and Denver Railroad, and lived at Ft. Worth. He was forced to give up railroading five years ago on account of failing health, and he came to Alton to reside at the old homestead. His condition became very bad on Thursday, and during Saturday and Sunday it was known that he could not recover. After his death the body was taken to the home of his brother, Frank Cunningham, 1300 Belle street, and the funeral will be from there Wednesday morning. Services will be held in SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery. Mr. Cunningham was 66 years of age. He was well known in Alton and along the Chicago and Alton Railroad he is remembered by many of the old time railroad men. He formerly had his headquarters at Bloomington, In., while working on the C. & A.

*****************************************

 

CUNNINGHAM, JOHN H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 5, 1904

John H. Cunningham, aged 52, died at the home of his mother, Mrs. Catherine Cunningham, 1911 Belle street, after a long illness from consumption. He lived in Alton all his life and was a member of a large and well known family. The time of the funeral is not set.

****************************************

 

CUNNINGHAM, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1900

Miss Mary Cunningham, daughter of Mrs. Catherine Cunningham, died this morning at 11 o'clock at the family home, 1911 Belle street. She had been ill several months with abscess of the liver, and her death had been expected during the past week. She was born in Alton and was a member of a well known family of upper Belle street, and leaves many friends beside her relatives to mourn her death. The funeral will take place Friday morning at 9 o'clock, and services will be held in the Cathedral.

**************************************

 

CUNNINGHAM, TEACHIE or PEACHY (nee BAKER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 20, 1921

Mrs. Teachie Cunningham, aged sixty years, resident of East Alton, died Wednesday evening at 7:30 at the St. Mary's hospital in St. Louis, where she had been a patient for the past week. She is the widow of Ed Cunningham. About two weeks ago, Mrs. Cunningham went to St. Louis to visit with her son, Ed Cunningham Jr., and while there she was taken seriously ill and removed to the hospital where she died last night. She was an active member of the Court of Honor lodge in Upper Alton. Mrs. Cunningham was born and raised in Upper Alton, and at the age of twenty years she was united in marriage with Ed Cunningham. After their marriage they resided in East Alton and vicinity. Following the death of Mr. Cunningham, she resided with her daughter, Mrs. Harvey Coats of East Alton. Mrs. Cunningham's maiden name was Miss Teachie Baker. The deceased is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Harvey Coats of East Alton; one son, Ed Cunningham Jr. of St. Louis, and one brother, Charles Baker of Danville, Ill. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from Streeper's Undertaking Parlors. Interment will be in the Upper Alton cemetery.

************************************************

 

CUNNINGHAM, MARY VIRGINIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 19, 1900

Mary Virginia, youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. Scott Cunningham of Euclid Place, died at two o'clock Sunday afternoon after an illness of three days with congestion of the stomach. The child was three years old, a beautiful and lovable little girl, and her death keenly grieves the family and directs to them the sympathy of the community. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. The friends of the family are invited.

*******************************************
 

CURRAN, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 23, 1918               Will Probated ... Is Lengthy Document. Land To Stay In The Buckmaster Family

The will of Mrs. Catherine B. Curran was probated at Edwardsville today, disposing of property estimated to be worth about $50,000. One of the most valuable assets of the estate is the farm which was her homestead, and on which she was buried. A few years before her death she had caused to be exhumed in City Cemetery the remains of her husband, Gen. Curran, and she had them reburied on the premises in the rear of her home. It was her request that she be laid beside him. For that reason she has provided that the home place be kept in the family and not sold, as she had a sentiment against the property passing into the hands of strangers. Mrs. Curran had told friends that the reason for her entailing her property was it is the last of the property that belonged to the Nathaniel Buckmaster family, and she desired to keep it in the family so long as there was any family. Accordingly, she provided in the lengthy document that was filed as her last will, and which is estimated to contain about 15,000 words, that her sons should have it so long as they lived and that their surviving heirs should get it at their death and so on down, as long as there were any lineal descendants of the Nathaniel Buckmaster family. The will, which was drawn up by C. W. Leverett and was signed May 26, 1915, carries two codicils. Its length is so great that it has not bee read by the court, as yet. Mr. Leverett, who wrote the will, said that the reason it was so long was Mrs. Curran desired to entail her property and it became necessary to draw the will out to great length to get in all the conditions of the entailment.....[unreadable]....He recalled the request that they be buried on the place. He was under the impression that the Episcopal churches at Alton and Springfield, which are mentioned, are beneficiaries only in case the strain of Buckmaster blood carried in the veins of her sons died out. Mrs. Curran leaves two sons, Isaac and Singleton, both of them residents of Alton in their boyhood days, but both now nonresidents. Mrs. Curran was a devoted member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church.

***********************************************

 

CURDIE, BART/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 6, 1902

Bart Curdie, oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. John Curdie, died Thursday morning at 2:30 o'clock after a long illness. He was 24 years of age and his death at the time when he should have been just beginning his career in life is a sad bereavement to his family and to his many friends in Alton. Death in this case was a welcome relief to him from terrible suffering. Bart had been an invalid for a long time, and early in the summer he went to Mt. Clemen's, Michigan, in the hope that the baths there would prove helpful for his malady, which afterward developed itself into a form of almost complete paralysis. When he left Alton he was confident of ultimate restoration to health, but he had been at the health resort only a short time when he suddenly became helpless. He was brought home by his mother and father, who had hurried to their son on receiving news of the stroke of paralysis. Since his return to Alton he was at the Runzie home on Alby street, where the peace and quiet and healthful surroundings offered every advantage for nature to again build up the system that had been rendered helpless by paralysis. His friends were ever solicitous about his condition, and to all inquirers Bart returned the one unvarying answer that he would soon be out again. Even in the face of death he continued to bear a brave front, in order to spare the feelings of his parents, brothers and sisters. The young man exhibited an iron nerve and endured the intensest sufferings without a word of complaint, although he well knew there could be but one end to it all. Death intervened and ended his sufferings Thursday morning, and it was a real relief to the watchers at his bedside to see the end of the struggle that had lasted so many months. Bart's death will leave many hearts of boy friends filled with deep sorrow, as he was universally popular among them, and his company was sought by his acquaintances. He leaves beside his parents, two sisters and two brothers, and a host of warm personal friends who will miss him as much as his own relatives do. The funeral of Bart Curdie will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Runzie home on Alby street.

*********************************************

 

CURDIE, ROBERT SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 15, 1918              Business Man Dies - Prominent in Public Life

Robert Curdie Sr., died Saturday afternoon at St. Joseph's Hospital following an operation to relieve an internal abscess which had been giving him trouble for some time, but which began to show a fatal tendency Monday preceding his death. The fact that Mr. Curdie was seriously ill became known after he was stricken on Monday. He had been actively engaged in directing a saw mill, and while looking after that work he was taken with a chill on Monday. He continued to grow worse and finally a surgical operation was decided upon as a means of relieving his suffering. The operation was performed Friday night, but it was found that conditions were so bad there was no chance of his recovery. A remarkable fact of the last days of Mr. Curdie was that he was conscious to the very end of his life, and until he became too weak he devoted much of his time to advising members of his family as to his business affairs. Knowing that he was in a bad way, for several days preceding the surgical operation Mr. Curdie insisted upon informing his family on all details of his business matters so they would be able to handle them without trouble in case he did not recover. Members of his family said that he omitted nothing and would insist upon trying to get his business matters clear in his family's mind. Robert Curdie was born in Ayrshire, Scotland. He came to America when he was only six years of age. He was 71 years of age the 18th of last March. He lived in the North Side for many years, and in the days when Scotch coal miners predominated on the "coal branch." He was a good business man and had a breadth of mind and a mental activity that made him very successful in business. He was a very active man all of his life, and his interest in public matters led him to take a prominent part in all public affairs. He was for many years one of the leaders and chief counselors in the Republican party. In civic affairs he took an active part and he served the Third Ward as alderman with much ability. He had great confidence in Alton and was deeply interested in trying to help up build the city. He opened up several additions in Alton and engaged in the real estate business, disposing of many lots on which nice homes stand today. He also was engaged in the contracting business for years, and a number of public improvements in Alton were made by him. He carried out some large contracts in other places too, and was rated as a very successful contractor. He was always willing to devote his time to working for any cause for the upbuilding of Alton. One of the chief regrets he had in his last illness was that he would be unable to assist in carrying on the Liberty Loan campaign in Alton. There was never a moment of wavering in his loyalty to his home city and his home institutions, nor to his government. He served with credit in the Civil War, though he was very young when the war broke out. Mr. Curdie has been a member of Western Star Lodge, I. O. O. F., for 43 years, and was looking forward to receiving formal recognition from the order for his long period of devoted membership. He was also a deeply interested member in the Elks' Lodge, and of the First Presbyterian Bible Class. In the neighborhood where he lived Mr. Curdie was perhaps the most appreciated. It was there he had his best friends and by his family and his neighbors he is most sincerely mourned. Mr. Curdie leaves his wife and three children, Robert Curdie Jr., who is in California and unable to make the trip to Alton to attend the funeral; Mrs. Clay Stark, Miss Rhea Curdie and Harold Curdie. The funeral was held Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home, Fourth and Alby streets, to which the body was taken from the hospital. The services were conducted by Rev. Edward L. Gibson of the First Presbyterian Church, a close friend and neighbor of Mr. Curdie. The burial ritual of the Odd Fellows was used at the City Cemetery. In addition to the members of his immediate family, Mr. Curdie leaves two brothers, John of Alton, and James of Mt. Olive, and two sisters, Mrs. Thomas Cunningham of Edwardsville and Mrs. Sara Lloyd of Cantrell, Ill. The body was entombed in Grandview mausoleum. The pallbearers were B. F. Elfgen, C. B. Johnson, W. M. Sauvage, O. S. Stowell, R. P. Harris, William Westermann, John P. Bauer, Samuel Pile.

***********************************************

 

CURE, ALICE ANN ELIZA/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 6, 1847

Died on Monday morning last, Alice Ann Eliza, only daughter of Mr. N. F. Cure of Alton, aged 20 months and 29 days.

********************************************

 

CURRY, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 24, 1917

The funeral of Clarence Curry, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Curry of Milton Heights, was held Sunday afternoon from the Free Methodist church. Previous to the services at the church, services were held at the home. Curry had been sick for many months, following an operation last February for the relief of appendicitis. Burial was in Oakwood Cemetery under a blanket of handsome floral offerings. The pallbearers were all friends of the deceased, and included James Morris, Roy Leese, L. Burris, Arthur Timmons, James and Joseph Flippo.

**********************************************

 

CURRY, JEREMIAH 'JACK'/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 23, 1922                  Civil War Veteran Died

Jeremiah (Jack) Curry, aged Civil War veteran of Alton, died at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon at his home at 1819 Smith avenue. Mr. Curry was 77 years old, and had spent the most of his life in Alton. He is survived by a wife and seven children, J. Curry, Mrs. Lottie Magee, Mrs. Liza Deathridge, Mrs. Charles Pickering, Mrs. William Altus, Mrs. Michael Shen, Miss Lottie Curry of San Francisco, and fourteen grandchildren. He also leaves a half brother, John Girth, of Alton, and a brother in Decatur. The funeral will be held from the home Friday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial will be in Oakland cemetery.

************************************************

 

CURRY, UNKNOWN INFANT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, March 13, 1899

The three months old child of Mr. and Mrs. John Curry died this morning after a short illness with bronchitis. The funeral took place at 2 p.m. today. Services were conducted by Rev. M. Jameson.

*********************************************************

 

CURTIS, OSCAR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 8, 1901

Oscar Curtis, colored, aged 25, died last evening at the family home on Semple street. He had been ill eight months with brain trouble and was unconscious two weeks. He leaves his mother, one sister and five brothers. The funeral will be Sunday at 2 o'clock.

****************************************************

 

CUSHING, EDWARD H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 19, 1904

Edward H., son of Michael Cushing, died this morning at the family home, 633 Alby streets, this morning after an illness with pneumonia. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home.

*****************************************************

 

CUSTER, VIRGINIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 9, 1915

Mrs. Virginia Custer, aged 63, wife of Peter A. Custer of Wood River, died Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital after a long illness with liver trouble. All of the members of her immediate family were at her bedside except one son, Eugene Custer, who is traveling with his family in a covered wagon between Plainview, Neb. and a town in Minnesota, and cannot be communicated with for the purpose of informing him of his mother's death. The members of the family have no hope of being able to convey the news before Custer reaches his destination, which may be a month from now. Mrs. Custer was born August 27, sixty-three years ago, in West Virginia. She came to Illinois when sixteen years of age and married Peter A. Custer 43 years ago. The family formerly lived at Roodhouse, but have been living in Wood River for several years. She is survived by her husband, five sons and one daughter, Mrs. Eunice Hancock of Hardy, Ark., who is here. The sons are Frank of Whitehall, Eugene Custer, Lee Custer of Alton, and Earl and Chester, who live at home. Mrs. Custer was a member of the Methodist Church and of the Mutual Protective League and the Rebekah Lodges. She leaves also one brother, William Chapman of Lindsay, Okla., who is unable to come. The funeral has not been arranged, but the burial will probably be in Roodhouse.

*********************************************************

 

CUTHBERTSON, JOHN R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 31, 1910                           Ran Over by Railroad Car

The coroner's jury impaneled over a week ago to hold an inquest over John R. Cuthbertson, just finished its work Sunday, because of an inability of the train crew to get off at any other time. The jury heard testimony of the nerve of Cuthbertson that was wonderful. After he was fatally injured, it was testified Cuthbertson drew from his pocket a paper tobacco pounch, and on it he wrote the number of the Union tank line car which ran over him. He also aided in applying a bandana as a tourniquet to stay the bleeding, and with an iron he twisted the tourniquet with his own hand until it was tight enough to keep him from dying at once. The railroad men who were with him said that Cuthbertson had completed making the coupling and had also connected the air hose while the train was in motion, a dangerous piece of work, when he fell. Dr. J. M. Pfeiffenberger testified that Cuthbertson told him he was trying to open a knuckle of the automatic coupler, which would appear to contradict the statements of the train crew, who claim that the coupling was completed by Cuthbertson and that no man touched it and the train proceeded later to Edwardsville with the coupling remaining as Cuthbertson had made it.

******************************************************

 

CUTSAGEORGE, ADAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 1, 1922     Bootlegger Murdered Near Upper Alton

Murdered in his automobile and dragged to the roadside and hidden in a clump of weeds was the fate that befell Adam Cutsageorge on a lonely road, 1 1/2 miles north of Upper Alton, last night some time between 11 and 12 o'clock. Cutsageorge was known as a dealer in illicit booze. It is supposed that he was slain as the sequel of some quarrel over the liquor business. The killing was near the John Olmstead place, at the crossroad leading to Wood station. John Bean reported this morning the finding of a body, about 6:30 o'clock. Coming to town, he noticed a Ford car standing in the road and there was blood on both sides of it. There being no one in the car, Bean investigated and discovered a trail leading from the car to the clump of weeds at the roads side. In the clump of weeds he found the dead body of Cutsageorge. The right side of the head was battered in, the pockets of his clothes had been rifled, money and watch being taken. In the haste to take the watch, the murderer had broken the chain, leaving a fragment of the chain in the button hole to which it was attached. Strewn over the road were papers indicating whose the body was. There were cancelled checks and paid bills which evidently had been in the hat of the murdered man, and which probably fell out as the body was being dragged across the road. Similar papers were found in the car. Deputy Coroner Streeper said today after he had made an investigation that it appeared there had been two persons in the murder mystery. Leading away from the scene of the killing were footprints as of a man and a woman, walking toward Upper Alton. The indications were that Cutsageorge was sitting at the wheel of his car when someone sitting behind him struck him on the right side of the head with some heavy weapon, crushing in his skull and perhaps killing him instantly. Then the body was dragged to the roadside and robbed. The pockets in the clothes were inside out when the body was found. The murder is assumed to have been committed last night, not more than an hour before midnight. John Vonnahmen, going home along the road, reported having seen the empty automobile standing in the road as he went past. He arrived at his home about midnight. Between 10:30 p.m. and 11 p.m. Cutsageorge was seen riding around in his car with two foreigners and police were detailed to round up the two men. One of them, Nick Raises, was picked up at once. Later the wife of Raises was arrested. When arrested, Mrs. Raises at first denied she was out riding with Cutsageorge, but afterwards admitted it, saying that she with her husband had been riding around town with him, and that they went to Wood River, left him there and came on to Alton, while Cutsageorge went on his way. An element of robbery might have been mixed up in the murder. The partner of Cutsageorge, George Drakos, who was interested in a coffee house with the dead man, and they were erecting a new building on Bozza street, said that yesterday morning Cutsageorge had $300 in his possession and that he also cashed a check for $150, making about $350 in all he was carrying with him. When the Raises woman was taken to police headquarters the measure of her shoes was compared with the measure made of the footprint in the road near the scene of the killing, and it was found that they practically tallied. The Raises woman said she was home at the time of the killing, that she was wearing the same dress last evening she had on when arrested, and there was no blood on the dress. Both Raises and his wife denied any knowledge of the killing. Mayor Crawford engaged some man with what he claimed to be bloodhounds, to follow the tracks along the road and endeavor to trail down the murderer. In the killing of Cutsageorge, there is seen evidences of a breaking out of a vendetta among foreign residents of Alton. Some of the men who are engaged in the illicit whiskey business here are foreigners known for their willingness to engage in any desperate enterprise and violence is not repugnant to them. Cutsageorge himself was a daring fellow and ready to take any chances. When the bloodhound was brought to Alton by Russell Vierling this morning, he was taken to the scene of the murder and from there he trailed to the street car line where he seemed confused. He was taken from there to Broadway and Washington, and there he picked up a trail to the home of Nick Raises, and laid down in the house. From there he was taken to police headquarters where he was allowed to go where he pleased, and he ran down to the back of the city hall and stood in front of the cell door where Raises was locked up. Of course the fact that a dog trails a man is not accepted in court as evidence of guilt of an accused person. Search of Raises revealed that he had on his person $336. The first search brought to light $275, and another search brought up $61. Some witnesses have been found who say they saw Raises and his wife riding with Cutsageorge at 11:30 o'clock at night. Another story told was that Raises had been hard up lately.

 

Coroner Seeks Lone Traveler of Road by Night

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 2, 1922
A new angle of the killing of Adam Cutsageorge was being investigated this morning by Deputy Coroner C. N. Streeper, which may be important in clearing Nick Raises and his wife, Bertha, of blame for the death of the man found dead by the roadside a mile and a half north of Upper Alton. Indications were strong this morning that the slaying of Cutsageorge was the outcome of a rivalry among bootleggers. That a whiskey selling ring was involved seemed almost certain from scraps of evidence that could be secured. Further, it became more and more evident that the slayer of Cutsageorge was not attended by a woman. Two or three persons have now been found, all farmer boys who were going home late at night, who reported seeing a lone man walking the highway just before midnight. One man told of seeing the man walking along the road and that when approached, the man dodged into the weeds at the roadside and hid himself. A little further on the men report they passed the empty automobile standing on the road. Following up the reports he had received, Deputy Coroner Streeper went out this morning to interview the men who had reported having met the lone man on the road, and afterward he visited police headquarters to join in a quiz of Nick Raises and his wife, who were being held on suspicion. Some of the friends of the dead man suspected a Granite City man of complicity in the killing, and great was the astonishment of all when he turned up at police headquarters yesterday to make inquiries about the death of Cutsageorge. Charley Lucor, better known as Black Charley, was picked up by the police today and is being held for investigation. Black Charley was a rival of Cutsageorge in the bootlegging business, and the two men had a quarrel. They had not been good friends for a couple of months. Today Lucor told a Telegraph representative that he used to bootleg with Cutsageorge, but not for a long time, and that they were not good friends. Lucor was evidently very nervous when he was at police headquarters and lacked a great deal of being the self confident man he was when he was flying high in the bootlegging business. He said that the most he knew of the murder of Cutsageorge was that he had gone out with some bad men and had not come back. He said that he did not know whether Cutsageorge carried much money and pointing to some of the friends of Cutsageorge, he said they could tell more about his money carrying habits. There was great interest among the friends of the dead man, and there was strong conviction among them that one of Adam's enemies had killed him, partly for his money but more especially for revenge. Adam, it is said, always bootlegged independently and there was not the best feeling on account of that. He was not always sure to hold up prices and it was a disturbing element in the business to have Adam flying around with his auto loaded with booze which he would sell at a price under what others were getting. M. L. Peters of the police force said that he knew Cutsageorge to carry large sums of money with him everywhere, and that he was most generous in lending to anyone who needed it. A brother of the dead man came here from St. Louis and made arrangements for the shipment of the body there, to be buried.

 

Black Charley Faces Charges of Murder

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 5, 1922

The position of "Black Charley" Lukor, arrested Saturday on suspicion he might have had connection with the killing of Adam Cutsageorge, bootlegger who was found murdered by the roadside last week north of Upper Alton, became much more serious Sunday with the discovery of a bloodstained hammer which was traced to his possession. With the arrest of Lucor, the police turned loose Nick Raises and his wife, who had been out riding with Cutsageorge during the evening.....A party of foreigners who were searching the weeds in the vicinity of the scene of the tragedy found a heavy iron hammer. It bore the name Moore, and was supposed to have belonged to A. V. Moore. From him it was traced to another man, who when shown the hammer, declared that Black Charley had come to him with another hammer, not so heavy, and asked him to trade the other one for the heavy hammer found in the weeds. This occurred 4 hours before the murder. When faced by the man who said he had traded the hammer to him, Black Charley at first denied, then became unable to talk because of his nervous agitation. The hammer, when first found, had some fragment of scalp and hair on it, as well as stains that resemble blood.....It was found on a close examination of the body of the dead that the murderer had resorted to a peculiar method either to kill his victim or to make certain that he is dead. He had plunged a slim backed knife into the right ear seven times, close together. The wounds from the knife blade, which went in deep, would not have been noticede, perhaps, but for the fact that a slight slash was made in the opening of the ear, and investigation revealed the series of slashes made by the knife penetrating the ear. The supposition is that the murderer, riding in the seat in the auto with his victim, first inserted the knife in the ear of his victim, seeking a vital spot in the brain, or to inflict such pain that he would have a chance to swing his heavy hammer and inflict a fatal crushing blow. The hammer blow exposed the brain of the victim. Greeks in the city said that Black Charley is not a Greek, but is part Serb and part gypsy. His swarthy complexion would cause belief that he was of African blood.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 13, 1922

Judge Gillham today denied a new trial to Charles Lukor, convicted of killing Adam Cutsageorge north of Upper Alton, and given a life term in the penitentiary.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 14, 1925   (in copyright)

From Springfield, IL - Charles (Black Charley) Lucor filed an appeal in Supreme Court after being sentenced to life in prison for murdering Adam Cutsageorge in 1922.

***************************************************

 

CUTTER, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 14, 1912                    Oldest of C. & A. Engineers Dead

George Cutter, aged 80, died Sunday morning at 4 o'clock at his residence, Twelfth and Easton streets, after an illness of a week from hardening of the arteries. Mr. Cutter had been confined to his bed just one week when death came. He had been able to get around up to a few days before he became bedfast, and less than two weeks before he had attended the funeral of his old friend, Lorenz Stoehr. His death was expected from the time he was taken down in his last illness. Mr. Cutter was one of the old time engineers on the Chicago & Alton railroad. He took a position on that railroad on 1858, when he moved to Alton, and he worked for the C. & A. for forty years. During the later part of this period of service he was engineer on the pay car, and had only a short time each month on duty. It was considered the preferred run. He had been a courageous, expert engineer in the long years he was in the service, and by the old management of the C. & A. he was highly regarded. George Cutter was born at Hatfield, Mass., February 10, 1843. He was an engineer on a railroad in Michigan up to 1858, when he came to Alton to live and made his home here ever after. He was married in 1854 and is survived by his wife and two children, Roscoe Cutter of St. Louis and Mrs. L. A. Irwin of Springfield. The funeral will be Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home, and services will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing. Burial in City Cemetery will be under the auspices of Piasa Lodge, A. F. & A. M., in which lodge Mr. cutter held membership for many years. He was also a member of Belvidere commandery, Knights Templar, and in Oriental Consistory of Chicago, and Moolah Shrine in St. Louis.

 

 

Back to the top

Copyright Bev Bauser.  All rights reserved.