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Madison County ILGenWeb Coordinator - Beverly Bauser

 

HAAG, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1901
Fosterburg News - Another of our old citizens has passed to the great beyond. Mr. John Haag died at his residence Saturday evening at nine o'clock at the ripe old age of 78 years. He had been in very poor health for the past six or eight weeks, and his death was not unexpected. Mr. Haag was one of our best known citizens, having lived in this township many years. He was a good neighbor respected by all who knew him, and was a member of the German M. E. church and was a stanch Republican. He leaves three sons and three daughters, besides a large circle of friends to mourn his death. The funeral took place from the residence Monday, Aug. 12 at 2 p.m., the services being conducted by Rev. M. Neutzmann of Brighton, assisted by Rev. John Meery of Fosterburg. There was a large attendance of sorrowing relatives, friends and old citizens. A number of beautiful floral pieces attested the feelings of friends more strongly than if spoken by words. The sons and daughters have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire vicinity.

 

HAAGEN, CHARLES D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 16, 1915
Former Alton Business Man Dies
The death of Charles D. Haagen Wednesday afternoon was a great surprise to his many friends in Alton and vicinity. There were few who knew the condition of his health was so bad as to warrant any fear of its fatal termination at the present time. He had come from Chicago about five weeks ago, while suffering from a reoccurrence of a malady that had been troubling him for some time. He remained at his home on State street most of the time, and it was not generally known that he was seriously ill. Yesterday, he became very much worse and his death occurred shortly after four o'clock Wednesday afternoon, mention of which was made in the Telegraph that evening. Mr. Haagen was born in Alton and lived almost all the forty-one years of his life here. For many years he was the head of the Haagen Dry Goods Company, and retired from that business at the time it was sold to its successors, the Gates-Clark Dry Goods Company. Mr. Haagen at that time had been suffering from declining health for a long time, but it was believed he had recovered his strength and he engaged in business in Chicago with his brother-in-law, with whom he remained until the time of his death. The death of Charles Haagen is a sad blow to a large number of Alton people who had known him intimately during his long period of residence in Alton, and who had learned to love him for his many admirable qualities. He possessed a beautiful baritone voice of which he was never known to refuse to any cause or person who desired the favor of his appearance for a musical program. His sweet singing was in great demand in both religious and social gatherings, and wherever he went. It was the perfect willingness of Mr. Haagen to participate in any way he could that made him many friends and admirers in Alton. He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Louis Haagen, both deceased, and he is survived by two sisters, Misses Louise and Emily; and one brother, E. C. Haagen of Alton. The funeral will be Saturday morning at nine o'clock from St. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

HAAGEN, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 18, 1905
Mrs. Ellen Haagen, widow of Louis Haagen, died Saturday morning at 6 o'clock after an illness since Tuesday night with acute gastritis, at the family residence, 617 State street. A few months ago she suffered from a rupture of a blood vessel in her stomach, and it was believed at that time that she would not recover, but her strength was well preserved and she rallied, however, and when the attack of gastritis set in her condition was such that she could not withstand it. Her malady had the appearance of being fatal from the outset, and on Thursday night her heart began to show symptoms of failing. She was completely prostrated and failed to rally again. The death of Mrs. Haagen is a sad shock to her family and also to her many friends in the community. There were few who knew that she was in a serious condition and even her family could not realize it until the end was very near. The last 36 hours of her life she was too weak to speak and was in a stupor, being kept alive by artificial means until her granddaughter, Mrs. Joseph M. Hyland of Chicago, could arrive. During her whole life she was devoted to her family's interests and was ever a loving mother. Her death leaves a vacancy in the family which cannot be filled, and a sorrow which time will be long in lifting. She was a woman of a remarkably sweet disposition, most gracious to all with whom she came in contact and ever a good adviser for members of her family. Her hand was never withheld when it could minister comfort to the sorrowing and afflicted ones outside of her family, and her generosity was known among those who had occasion to seek her help. Mrs. Haagen was born at Niagara Falls, Canada, and would have been 68 years of age next April 9. She was educated in a convent at New Orleans and the old Sacred Heart convent at St. Louis. She came to Alton in 1853 and was married the following year in Alton to Louis Haagen. Mr. Haagen died very suddenly in 1894, and since his death Mrs. Haagen had been called to mourn three others of her family, two sons and a daughter. Mrs. Haagen's religion was of the kind that enables its possessor to bear up under sorrow and affliction, and notwithstanding her own grief, she was sunny in disposition and a constant help to those around her who were bowed in sorrow with her. She was an intensely devout member of the Roman Catholic church. Her end was as peaceful as it could be desired. At the beginning of the week she was full of happiness and bright hope of the future. At the end of the week she slipped away shortly after daybreak, surrounded by the members of her family, Mrs. Caroline Smith of Chicago, Misses Emily and Louise, and Messrs. Charles and Emil Haagen, and her granddaughter, Mrs. Hyland. The funeral of Mrs. Haagen will be held Monday morning at 10 o'clock and services will be conducted in SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. [Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery]

 

HAAGEN, EMIL C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 1, 1916
Well Known Attorney, Former Assistant States Attorney Follows Brother in Death
Emil C. Haagen, former assistant state's attorney, died Sunday morning at 6 o'clock at the family residence, Seventh and State streets, after a long illness. He continued to express confidence up to the last that he would get well, and it was only about 20 minutes before the end came that he told his sisters that he did not expect to be much longer with them. His death followed in a little over three months after the death of his brother, Charles D. Haagen. The family has had an unusual experience in deaths among its members, occurring in pairs. There were ten children, eight of whom have died, and in the cases of six of them, the deaths were in pairs three months apart. Emil Haagen was paired with his brother, Charles. Another coincidence is that all of the deaths but two have occurred at a time when the decedents were in the neighborhood of forty years. Emil C. Haagen would have been forty years of age in November. He was born in Alton and lived here all of his life. He attended the public schools, and later he graduated from the St. Louis Law School. He possessed a mind that was quick to learn and he made rapid progress with his studies. He graduated with a good record from the St. Louis Law School and opened an office to practice law in the city. He was deeply interested in politics and took an active part in almost every campaign from the time he became a voter. He was a candidate at one time for the Democratic nomination for the legislature, and he was also a candidate for city attorney. He was appointed by the present state's attorney to the position of assistant state's attorney for Alton in 1912, but gave up the position over a year ago. The complete break down of his health occurred about six months ago, and from the time of the death of his brother, Charles, he was out of the house seldom. In his boyhood and young manhood he was known as a brilliant student and those who knew him best regarded him as having a bright future before him. He leaves two sisters, Misses Emily and Louise Haagen, the last of the family. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. [May 2, 1916 - Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery]

 

HAAS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1901
John Haas of Alton died on Monday at the county hospital, Edwardsville.

 

HABBEGGER, ELIZABETH/Source: Troy Weekly Call, December 15, 1906 - Submitted by Marsha Ensminger
Mrs. Elizabeth Habbegger, a resident of Highland since 1852, died at St. Joseph's hospital Tuesday at the age of 76 years.

 

HACK, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1908
Edward Hack, aged 33, died Wednesday afternoon at 5 o'clock at the family home, 812 east Second street, after a long illness with pulmonary troubles. The young man's condition was regarded as very grave one year ago when he came home from Colorado to attend the funeral of his father, who was buried January 6, 1907. It was thought then he might die in a short time, but he rallied, and it was not until recently that it began to be certain that the disease was telling rapidly on his strength and that the end would come soon. He was a well known young glassblower and belonged to a prominent east end family. He leaves beside his mother, Mrs. Pauline Hack, two sisters, Mrs. Walter Cobeck and Miss Lena Hack, and two brothers, Harry and Fred Hack. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller of the German Evangelical church.

 

HACK, UNKNOWN WIFE OF PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1901
Mrs. Peter Hack died at her home on Oak street Sunday night at 11 o'clock after a long illness. She was 77 years of age and had lived in the city many years, being one of the best known residents of the East End. She leaves three sons, William and Fred of Alton, and Charles Hack of Edwardsville. The funeral will take place Tuesday afternoon and services will be conducted by Rev. Theodore Oberhellman at 1:30 o'clock at the home.

 

HACK, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1915
William Hack, aged 67, one of the old time residents of Alton, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Vernardos, at 3 o'clock this afternoon from poisoning from a cancer on his face. Mr. Hack leaves two sons, William and Fred, both of Alton, and two daughters, Miss Mamie Hack and Mrs. John Venardos, with whom he resided. Mr. Hack is well known in Alton and was up to a few years ago active and following some occupation. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

 

HACKETHAL, GEORGE/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, February 15, 1893
George Hackethal, who is said to have been the oldest resident of the American Bottom, died Friday [Feb. 10] at Madison, at the home of Mrs. Lizzie Troeckler, in the 81st year of his age. The funeral took place Saturday at Mitchell. Father Sauer delivered the funeral sermon. The pallbearers were Barney Meinerling, Frank Troeckler, August Zellermann, Anton Relleke, Joseph Grolmes and Gottlieb Techlenburg. Mr. Hackethal was born in Germany and came to this country in 1861 and settled in this county shortly after. He leaves surviving three sons, Joseph, who resides in Denver, Colorado; peter and Christ of Mitchell; one daughter, Mrs. Lizzie Troeckler, wife of Mike Troeckler, and eleven grandchildren. The next oldest resident of the Bottom is Benjamin Wood, who is closely followed by Dr. T. J. Irish.

 

HACKETHAL, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 31, 1912
A telegram has been received announcing the death of Mrs. Mary Hackethal at Belt, Montana, where she was living with her daughter, Mrs. Alcide Fischer. She was 65 years of age. Mrs. Hackethal was born and raised in Alton, but lived at Brighton many years. Her husband is buried in Alton. The body will arrive here tomorrow or next day. Mrs. Hackethal leaves three sisters here, Mrs. J. R. Lampert, Mrs. Caroline Atland, and Miss Sophia Gottlob, all of Alton.

 

HADEN, ELMER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1906
Elmer Haden, aged 23, died at a boarding house conducted by Mrs. Edward Mills at 117 east Second street, next door to the post office, Wednesday evening. The young man's death resulted from a complication of measles and pneumonia, and low spirits due to brooding over his being jilted by a young woman who is known as "Eveline." He was out of money when he arrived in Alton and seemed to have been traveling around the country. His home was at Roanoke, Virginia, and he has parents, a brother and other relatives there, and an uncle at Charlotte, Va....He carried with him a gold watch which was doubtless one of the gifts he had made to his fiance and which she returned to him. He would not part with it until he had exhausted every resource and was facing starvation with no place of shelter. He was silent and would not talk about himself, and it was only after his death, when Deputy Coroner Keiser was going through his papers to find out what he could about the young man, that the love story was revealed, together with his disappointments....Deputy Coroner Keiser took charge of the body and all the property of the young man. His trunk was still roped up when he died, and was not opened until a search was made to find something about the stranger. It was said that the young man spent much of his time crying, and he expressed a desire once that his mother could know of his condition, but he would not tell where she could be found so that word could be sent to her. From the brother's letters it was learned that the young man had been a wanderer ever since the unfortunate outcome of his love affair. In his watch Haden carried the picture of a young woman, which he would not give up, although the girl had proved faithless to him. Relatives of the young man were notified of his death and this morning a telegram was received by Deputy Coroner Keiser instructing him to embalm and ship the body at once to Roanoke, Va., and all expenses would be guaranteed.

 

HADFIELD, ELIZABETH/Source: Collinsville Herald, April 13, 1917
Mrs. Elizabeth Hadfield, aged 55 years, 5 months and 15 days, died Thursday, April 12 at 9:30 a.m. of chronic hepatitis. She was widow of George Hadfield, and is survived by 3 daughters: Miss Ruth Hadfield of Collinsville, Mrs. Elmer Neidringhaus of Granite City, and Mrs. H. F. Ramsdale of Decatur, Ill.; 3 grandchildren and 3 sisters survive. Sympathy and consolation are extended by a host of friends. Funeral will be held Sunday from the Presbyterian church with interment at Glenwood Cemetery.

 

HADFIELD, JOHN JAMES/Source: Collinsville Herald, June 19, 1914
John James Hadfield, age 33, died on Tuesday after lingering for only a few days duration brought on by excessive heat. Mr. Hadfield was very heavy, weighing over 300 pounds, and for the past several summers the excessive hot periods have been distressing to him. Mr. Hadfield has conducted a grocery store on Elm Street for a number of years. The deceased was a son of John Hadfield, and a stepson of William Fletcher, president of the First National Bank. Arthur Fletcher, the Giant's shortstop, is a half-brother to him, while Mrs. Dave Jones is a full sister. Deceased was married 12 years ago to Clara Albrecht, daughter of Ernest Albrecht, who with three children, survive. Services were held Thursday from the home to Christ Episcopal Church, with interment in Glenwood Cemetery.

 

HADLEY, MARY [nee WEST]/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, May 4, 1918 - Submitted by Jane Denny
Mrs. W. F. L. Hadley Passes Away at Her Home in This City Last Night
Quietly as she had lived, Mrs. W. F. L. Hadley, one of Edwardsville's best known and best beloved residents last night slipped away into the endless rest that is promised to those whose labors are accepted. For several months she had been ailing. Early last year she went to Florida with some friends. The health of all of them except Mrs. Hadley showed improvement. Something about the climate did not agree with her and she lost strength perceptibly. From the middle of July she was confined to her bed at her home in the West End. During August it seemed as if the parting might come at any moment. Indeed, there were two occasions on which the family believed that it had really come, so gently was the spirit wafted along. But each time there was a rally, and about the first of September she began gradually to improve. Yesterday it was seen her condition showed a sudden change and last night it was seen that the parting was imminent. At 10:10 it came and in the home whose center she had been, and surrounded by those who were near and dear, she fell asleep. Mary West Hadley was a native of Edwardsville, a daughter of Edward M. West and Julia Atwater West. Her father was a Virginian whose family located at Belleville. Her mother came of sturdy Massachusetts stock. There were nine children in the West family, most of whom died in infancy. Mary West was born October 8, 1853. She attended the Edwardsville public schools and was one of the early graduates, although at that time there was no commencement such as at present typifies the completion of school work. She then went to Monticello Seminary at Godfrey and graduated therefrom, following this with a postgraduate course of one year. She was married on June 15, 1875 to William Flavius L. Hadley, a young attorney, the ceremony taking place on his birthday anniversary. They built a home directly across the street from the West homeplace, and went to housekeeping. Seven children blessed their home of whom one, Nora, died. The surviving children are W. Lester, West, Douglas M., Julia, wife of R. D. Griffin; Winifred and Flavia. Besides survives one sister, Mrs. Nora West Taylor, wife of Oscar L. Taylor of St. Paul, Minn. Mrs. Hadley's life was one of consecration. She was devoted to her family, to her community and to her ideals. She and her husband were greatly attached to each other, and when death cut short his career, April 25, 1902, after his ability had been recognized and he had become a successful attorney and banker and a member of Congress, it ended one of the happiest of romances. Thereafter she lived for her children and likewise lavished much of her time and substance upon those who were in need, whether for material or spiritual comforts. She was a Lady Bountiful who dispensed her at long; she went right down into the hovels and the homes of sickness and mourning; sat with those who were lonely, read to those whose eyes had failed and personally took consolation and cheer to those whose hearts were sorrowful. Against her protest she was honored for years with its presidency. Added to the clean-up feature was later the planting of tress, shrubs and vines and the giving of prizes for those especially among the children who cultivated the best gardens or kept the neatest lawns and shrubbery. For years she served on the board of the Public Library of which she was an organizer and patron. The public schools enlisted her interest and there were no worthy public measure which did not find in her an interested and enthusiastic supporter. One of these earlier day clubs was the West End Geographical Club. She also belonged to the Monday Club and its various branches. Some years ago, she became interested in Christian Science, and united with the First church of Christ Scientist at Boston, Mass., the mother church of that faith. She assisted in founding the local Science Society, and was a faithful attendant upon services. She was liberal in her views and while she was pleased that most of the members of her family embraced this faith, she was not displeased that some did not, holding that in matters of religious belief the individual conscience should govern. Art, music and literature were her delight. She was an omnivorous reader, familiar with several languages, a natural social leader, and yet with all her attainments and with her assured position, an unaffected friend at all times. Her life was ordered according to the rules of the Good Book. The cup of cold water given in His name was to her a constant admonition, and she gave of herself as well as of her substance. In her benevolences there was no ostentation, in fact but few of them became known. For years she had hot dinner taken from a local hotel every day to an unfortunate woman. Several ministers have been helped through financial. Her passing has left a void which it will be difficult to fill. Arrangements for the funeral are being made today by members of the family. Messages were sent last night to a sister at St. Paul and the hour of the service will not be set until an answer is received. The funeral will be either Sunday or Monday afternoon. Burial will be at Woodlawn cemetery.

 

HADLEY, WILLIAM FLAVIUS L. (HON.)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 26, 1901
Death of Judge W. F. L. Hadley
News reached the Telegraph on Thursday evening of the death of Hon. W. F. L. Hadley of Edwardsville, at Riverside, California, on the morning of that day. Mr. Hadley and his family left their home in Edwardsville last December for California in hopes of a betterment for his health. Intelligence received from him was to the effect that the improvement hoped for did not take place. Consumption, induced by his long illness in 1896, was the cause of his death. The body, accompanied by the family, will arrive in Edwardsville on Monday evening, and the funeral will take place from the Hadley home on Tuesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Mr. Hadley was born on a farm near Collinsville, June 15, 1847. His education was obtained in the public schools and Lebanon College. His law course was taken in University of Michigan, graduating therefrom in 1871. He began the practice of law at once in Edwardsville, and in 1874 he formed a law partnership with Judge William H. Krome. Two years later this partnership was dissolved. Mr. Krome was elected County Judge. Mr. Hadley's next partner was C. H. Burton, which partnership continued until two years ago, when he became President and Manager of the Bank of Edwardsville. In 1886 he was nominated by the Republicans for State Senator and was elected over W. R. Prickett, Democrat, by 1100 majority. He was renominated in 1890, but declined. In 1895 he was nominated for Congressman to succeed Frederick Reman, who died in June of that year. Mr. Hadley was elected by a majority of 3300, although the district in 1892 was Democratic by 3000. He was renominated in 1896, but owing to his long illness that year and his absence in Colorado, his Democratic competitor, Thomas M. Jett, was successful by 1700 majority. Mr. Hadley was one of the best and most experienced lawyers in Madison county, and was successful in his practice of the profession. Although an undemonstrative man, he held the confidence of the public to a high degree. He had many attainments, refined in manner, and pleasant in his dealing with all who met him. He was the only Congressman Madison county has had in nearly fifty years.

 

HAEBERLE, FREDERICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 28, 1915
Frederick Haeberle, aged 86, died this noon at 12:55 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Henry Loarts, on Central avenue. Mr. Haeberle had been an invalid for a period of three years, during which time he was able to get about in an invalid's chair. He was an old time resident of Alton. Mr. Haeberle leaves one son, George Haeberle, of Los Angeles, Cal., and three daughters, Mrs. Loarts, Mrs. John Volz of Alton and Miss Louise Haeberle of Rockport, Mass., who arrived Friday night in time to see her father alive.

 

HAFF, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 30, 1906
Prominent Alton Criminal Dies From Blood Poisoning .... Or Did He?
A startling report was brought to Alton last night by Frank Haff, one of Alton's citizens celebrated in its criminal annals, that his brother, Edward Haff, who is even a more prominent character than Frank, has gone to the happy hunting grounds, and will no more disturb the peace and serenity of the Alton police. The story was the Ed Haff died from blood poisoning, but the story is not credited by the police. They believe that no poisons would have any effect on Ed Haff, as the badness in him would constitute an antidote that would effectually kill any other poison that might be injected into his system. They believe that Haff will go on living like the wandering Jew, and maybe never died, and they also believe that perhaps Haff has decided to bury Ed Haff as a name, and live under another name in some place where he will not be recognized, and where there would be no danger of connection the record of the notorious Ed Haff with that of the mild mannered, smooth spoken, inoffensive man that he appears to be. Haff has in him talents, which if turned in the right direction, would make him wealth and honor, but as he turned them to criminal uses, he became Alton's most celebrated criminal. He has been pursued many times by the police, sometimes with bloodhounds, has served several terms in the penitentiary, and has always proved a bad prisoner. He has been like some of the elusive wild western desperadoes who could camp on the trail of pursuers, within gunshot of them, and never be caught, and he enjoyed most of all the writing of mocking letters and postal cards to them mailing them first in one town, then in another, and always keeping his pursuers guessing as to where he was or where he would turn up next. He would tempt fate by getting into Alton under the very nose of officers, and then get away without being caught. He was sentenced to the penitentiary, and commitment was stayed on condition that he exile himself from the state for good. Haff may be dead, but the statement is doubted, and no doubt the police will soon receive a letter from him if he is still alive, and stilll possessed of his ability to write letters.

 

HAFF, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 7, 1900
John Haff, an aged resident of this city, died at the county hospital at Edwardsville Saturday. For years he had suffered from paralysis of the lower limbs, and was for several years at St. Joseph's Hospital prior to living at the county hospital. He had lived in Alton since the close of the Civil War, and was a carpenter by trade. Haff was prominently connected in the East, one of his brothers being a well known lawyer of New York State. It is also said that Captain Hank Haff, the famous skipper who won so many victories for the American yachts, is a relative. Haff was about 75 years of age and was for years a well known character about Alton. His wife and several children survive him.

 

(See also Hagen, Haagen)

HAGAN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 3, 1911
John Hagan, aged 79, died at 1 o'clock Monday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Mollie Carr, on Newstead avenue in St. Louis, after a brief illness. Mr. Hagen lived in Alton fifty years, and was engaged at the trade of bricklaying. He was a well known contractor for many years, and resided at Eighteenth and Market streets. He left Alton four years ago to live in St. Louis. He is survived by three sons, James Hagan of Alton, John and Henry of St. Louis, and two daughters, Mrs. Carr of St. Louis and Mrs. Annie Dougherty of Philadelphia. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning about 9:30 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

HAGAN, MILDRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 26, 1904
Mildred, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Hagan, died Tuesday morning after an illness with summer complaint. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

HAGAN, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1902
Thomas Hagan, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Hagan, died Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock after a long illness at the family home, 1804 Market street. He was 33 years of age and had lived in Alton all his life. His health has been failing for a year, but he was not considered seriously ill until about three weeks ago when his friends began to be alarmed. He was a bricklayer by trade and was well known among the building tradesmen. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock, and services will be conducted at the Cathedral.

 

HAGELSTEIN, PETER/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, February 24, 1893
Peter Hagelstein, who lost his foot under a Bluff Line train on the morning of February 1, died at St. Joseph's hospital at 5:25 last evening. His remains were taken to St. Louis this morning at 9:15 for burial. When the accident occurred it was thought that he would survive, and at first he seemed to be getting along nicely, but later on blood poisoning and eruptions set in which caused him to gradually sink away and his sufferings were finally ended by death.

 

HAGEN, ELLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1907
Miss Ellie Hagen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Hagen, died yesterday afternoon at the family home, 3136 ___ranter Place, St. Louis, and the body will be brought to Alton tomorrow and taken to the Cathedral, where a requiem mass will be celebrated at 9 a.m. The Hagen family moved from Alton only a few months ago, and deceased, who was about 40 years of age, was a life-long resident of Alton. Besides the parents, two sisters, Mrs. Mollie Carr and Mrs. William Dougherty, and three brothers, James, John and Henry Hagen survive.

 

HAGEN, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 25, 1903
The 8 months old child of Mr. and Mrs. James Hagen, Harry, died this morning at 3 o'clock at the family home after an illness with whooping cough. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

 HAGERMAN, FRED SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1901
Fred Hagerman Sr. died this morning at his home on Alby street, after a sickness with la grippe and other troubles. He was about 67 years of age and resided in Alton for many years. He was an expert potter and in early years followed his grade. He leaves a widow, two daughters and three sons: Fred Jr., William and Yerkes.

 

HAHENKAMP, IDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 20, 1905
Mrs. Ida Hahenkamp, wife of Henry Hahenkamp, died at her home at 5th and Ridge streets at 10:45 o'clock this morning. The young woman suffered from stomach trouble which finally caused her death. She leaves a husband.

 

HAHN, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 20, 1915
The funeral of Charles Hahn, whose death occurred at his home on Choteau avenue Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock, will be held from the home tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in the City Cemetery. Mr. Hahn was born in Wittenburg, Germany, and came to this country when he was 18 years of age. He has resided in the North Side district for thirty years. He was a hard working man, a careful horticulturist, and a good citizen. He leaves besides his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Charles Oulson of Godfrey. Rev. S. D. McKenny will have charge of the service.

 

HAHNENKAMP, THEDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1918
Mrs. Theda Hahenkamp, aged 67, wife of George Hahenkamp, died Tuesday evening at 6:45 o'clock at the family home a mile north of Upper Alton. Mrs. Hahenkamp was taken ill three weeks ago with what appeared to be the grip, but her condition did not cause alarm until last Saturday when she took a sudden turn for the worse. Mrs. Hahenkamp was born in Holden, Ostfriesland, Germany, December 31, 1850, and came to America at the age of seven years. The family settled in the vicinity of Alton when they arrived in this country sixty years ago. Mrs. Hahenkamp was a well known woman throughout the country near her home. She is survived by her husband, George Hahenkamp; five sons, Henry of Upper Alton, William and Edward of Nokomis, George and Frank, residing at home, and two daughters, Mrs. Anna Jones of Upper Alton and Miss Bertha. One sister, Mrs. George Johnson of Dorsey, and three grandchildren all are left.

 

HAIGHT, EDWARD A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 4, 1918
Edward A. Haight, for ten years superintendent of the Alton public schools, died at St. John's Park, Fla., Sunday night at 8 o'clock after long being an invalid. His death was due to a general breaking down from old age. For over a year he had been in a dying condition, and it was well known to his only brother, R. A. Haight, that the end might be expected at any time. He made his home in Alton with his brother for some time prior to going to Florida. The news of the death of his brother was received by Supt. R. A. Haight by telegram, at a time when he was recovering from a serious illness himself. He had progressed so far toward recovery that the tidings of his brother's death could be broken to him without any ill effects. Edward A. Haight was well known to Alton people who lived here years ago. He was superintendent of schools here ten years, leaving Alton about 39 years ago. During his incumbency his brother, R. A. Haight, came to Alton as a teacher and after serving 4 1/2 years in the Alton schools R. A. Haight was appointed by the school board to succeed his brother. R. A. Haight is thus in his thirty-ninth year as superintendent of schools of Alton. Edward A. Haight enlisted in the Union army for the Civil War. In the first battle in which he participated, the Battle of Antietam, he was sabered across the forehead and received a ghastly wound. It was two years before he recovered from the effects of the wound. For a long time he was unable to see, and during that time he learned to knit and did knitting for all the family. Eventually he was cured, but to his dying day he carried a great scar on his forehead where the Confederate saber had cut him. He leaves his widow and one brother, Supt. Haight, now being the last of the family. It was said that arrangements had been made for burial of the former superintendent of schools at the place where he died.

 

HAIGHT, ELIZABETH A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1901
Mrs. Elizabeth A. Haight, mother of Mr. R. A. Haight, superintendent of the Alton schools, and Col. E. A. Haight of the Kirkwood Military Academy, died Saturday evening at the home of her son on Warren street, after an illness of a few hours. Mrs. Haight had been suffering from the intense heat and remained at home Saturday afternoon while the remaining members of the family went to the Congregational picnic. She was taken ill and summoned Dr. L. F. Schussler, who found her suffering from angina pectoris, super-induced by the hot weather. Her condition soon became alarming, and during the evening she began to sink steadily. Death came at 10 o'clock. Mrs. Haight was the widow of Alonzo Haight, and was 73 years of age. She was born in Vermont, and when a young girl she went with her family to Michigan, where she lived until a few years ago. She came to Alton to make her home with her son's family, and there she has always been an honored member of the family. She was a devoted member of the Baptist church and was connected with the first church of this city. The funeral took place this morning at 10 o'clock and services were conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing.

 

HAIGHT, ROBERT JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1918
Robert, the 31 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Haight, died at the family home on Warren street Sunday noon, after an illness with pneumonia, from which he had been suffering for a week. The young man showed remarkable vitality as, under circumstances which appeared to be certainly fatal in a few hours, he lived several days and attending physicians were surprised at the length of time he fought the disease before he succumbed. The funeral will be held in privacy tomorrow afternoon from the home. For nineteen years he stayed at Beverly Farm. Dr. W. H. C. Smith said this tribute to him, which the boy's mother was much pleased with: "He was the happiest person I ever knew, and the most unselfish. He was the one bit of leaven that kept everyone sweet at Beverly Farm. He was an inspiration to me in the 19 years he lived with me."

 

HAIGHT, ROBERT LEWIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 26, 1920
Robert Lewis, son of Lewis S. Haight, member of the faculty of the Theodore Roosevelt High School, died at noon today at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Haight, 1129 Warren street. "Bobby" Haight, as he was known, became ill a week ago. It was then decided to keep him home from school. At that time Lewis Haight, his father, was in Kansas City, Kan., where he had taken his daughter, Ruth, who is at the home of a cousin. The boy had recently recovered from an attack of whooping cough. The boy is survived by two sisters, Gertrude and Ruth. He was born June 8, 1912, at Blue Mound, Ill. Lewis Haight is director of athletics at the high school, and is among the leading athletic authorities of southern Illinois. The death of the son of Lewis Haight occurred about a year after the death of Mrs. Loretta Haight Turner, in Idaho. Robert Haight, another son of Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Haight, died on October 6, 1918. A brother of R. A. Haight and two sisters of Mrs. Haight have died during the past two years. The funeral will be Sunday at 3 p.m. from the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Haight, 1129 Warren street, where services will be conducted by the Rev. C. C. Smith, pastor of the Congregational church. Interment will be in the City cemetery.

 

HAINES, LESTER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1918
Lester Haines, who went with an early contingent to France, is reported dead. His father, Captain Haines, has just received word that the son's death occurred on October 29th. There was no details of the death.

 

HAJECK, ANTONETTA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 11, 1902
Mrs. Antonetta Hajeck, widow of Vincent Hajeck, died Sunday morning after a long illness from the infirmities of old age, in her seventy-ninth year. She had been a resident of Alton over fifty years, and was very well known in the city. She lived at 1214 East Second street and the funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon from that place. Mrs. Hajeck leaves three daughters and one son.

 

HALDERMAN, SUSAN HENDERSON/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 21, 1836
Died, on Saturday morning, the 17th inst., Mrs. Susan Henderson Halderman, consort of Dr. John Ament Halderman of this place, in the 30th(?) year of her age, after a protracted paroxysm of gout - with all the severity and complicated forms, of that most distressing monster of human misery. She has left a numerous circle of relations and friends, among whom are an affectionate husband and four little children, to lament their sore bereavement. She retained her mental faculties unimpaired to the last - was conscious of her approaching dissolution, and gave to her companion and children the dying charge, to prepare for death, and meet her in a blessed immortality beyond the tomb. She exhibited, both in her life and death, the evidences and consolations of the religion of the Bible, which alone can "make a dying bed feel soft as downy pillows are," and thus enable the dying Christian to leave the world with all its endearing ties, in the triumph of gospel faith; and with the comfortable assurance of a happy immortality around the throne of God. The funeral sermon will be preached in the Methodist Episcopal Church in Upper Alton by the Rev. Simon Peter, on next Sabbath (Christmas) at 11 o'clock a.m. The "Pioneer" and "Observer" will confer a favor by giving the above an insertion in this week's paper.

 

HALE, ALLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, March 13, 1899
The hand of Death has been busy during the past few days in his grim harvest. At midnight last night, Death entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Hale on State street and claimed their sixteen years old son, Allie Hale. The young fellow was taken ill Thursday at noon with spinal meningitis and from the first he was unconscious. He recovered consciousness last evening and was seemingly better, but became worse in a short time and passed away. The funeral will be Wednesday at 9 a.m. from the Cathedral.

 

HALE, ETTA S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 10, 1910
Mrs. Etta S. Hale, wife of P. G. Hale, rural mail carrier out of Upper Alton, will be buried tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock from the family home in Upper Alton. Her body arrived from Jacksonville yesterday, where she died Saturday morning at 2 o'clock. She leaves her husband and three children. Mrs. Hale had been ill four years.

 

HALE, HENRY L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1900 Y
oung Grocery Man Dies - Daughter Born One Hour After His Death
Henry L. Hale, a young grocery man, died this morning shortly after 8 o'clock with an illness of eight weeks with congestion of the brain. The announcement of the death of Henry Hale was received with deep sorrow this morning in the circles where he was known and had been associated in business. It was known that he was very ill and that during the past week he was in a very serious condition, but few gave a thought to the probability that he would not recover. He was taken ill eight weeks ago and with good care he recovered until it was thought he was almost well. On the day of the Democratic primary he came downtown to attend the primary and was apparently almost well. From the exposure he suffered a relapse and his illness became dangerous. He passed away this morning after great suffering. Henry Hale was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Hale of State street. He was 25 years of age and had been married only 17 months. He has been conducting a grocery store at Sixteenth and Belle streets since his marriage, and had built up a prosperous business. He was well known in Alton, having been employed as a grocery clerk at Stanton & Yeakle's up to the time he took charge of the store on Belle street. Henry Hale was born January 28, 1875, and was married to Maria Flynn September 14, 1898. He leaves beside his wife, a little daughter, born one hour after the death of her father. The funeral will be Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

HALE, JOHN SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, February 10, 1908
John Hale Sr., a well known resident of Alton, died Sunday morning at St. Joseph's hospital following a surgical operation for the relief of a malady from which he had been a sufferer for years. He was 62 years old and spent practically all of his life in Alton. When the war broke out he enlisted and served faithfully and bravely to the close. He was a good man, a hard-working, honest, conscientious man and his death is regretted by all who knew him. He is survived by his wife and four children, William, John Jr., and Misses Mary and Julia Hale. A brother, Leo Hale, survives also. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

HALE, JOHN C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 6, 1905
John C. Hale, aged 55, died at St. Joseph's hospital Saturday evening at 9 o'clock from a complication of diseases. He leaves two children: George G. Hale and Mrs. Ollie Rohan. The funeral was held this afternoon at 2:30 p.m., Rev. M. H. Ewers officiating.

 

HALE, JOSEPH J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1903
The funeral of Joseph J. Hale was held this morning from the Cathedral where services were conducted by Rev. Fr. Fennessey and a large number of friends attended the obsequies. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery.

 

HALE, LEO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1913
Leo Hale, aged 74, died at 1 o'clock Saturday afternoon at his home, 1333 State street, after an illness of seven weeks from paralysis. Mr. Hale's death had been expected for several days before it occurred. Seven weeks ago he was seated with his wife in a lawn swing at his home, enjoying the company of Mrs. Hale, when he was suddenly paralyzed. A friend passing by happened to glance at Mr. Hale the moment that paralysis struck him, and seeing the change that had come over his face, was at his side in an instant, and even before Mrs. Hale realized that anything had happened to her husband. Since that time Mr. Hale had been in a very bad way. He was given the most careful attention by members of his family, and at times he appeared to be somewhat improved, but the improvement was of short duration. He leaves beside his wife, two daughters, Misses Crescentia and Josephine Hale, both of Alton. Mr. Hale was an old-time resident of Alton, having lived here since young manhood. He had a very large circle of friends who were deeply interested in his sickness. Mr. Hale was a native of Germany. He came to Alton about sixty years ago and had lived in Alton ever since. He is the last of his family, all his brothers and sisters having died. The funeral will be Monday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. He was a long time member of the Western Catholic Union, Cathedral Branch.

 

HALE, MARIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1900
Mrs. Marie Hale, widow of Henry Hale, whose death occurred last March, died this morning at 5 o'clock after a long illness with consumption. She was 25 years of age and leaves beside her mother, Mrs. Flynn, a child, eight months of age. Mrs. Hale never recovered from the shock caused by the death of her husband. They had been married only a year when he died, leaving her with an infant child a few days old. Since then her health has not been good, and she went into a decline. For some months she has been failing rapidly, and yesterday all hope for her recovery was abandoned. She passed away this morning shortly after five o'clock. The death of this young woman is a very sad one. She was much admired as a young girl by a large circle of friends, and the little home on Belle street was a happy one until death took the young husband and caused the mother to begin to fail. Mrs. Hale leaves a large circle of friends who will sincerely deplore her death. The funeral will take place Saturday morning at 9 o'clock, and services will be in the Cathedral.

 

HALEY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1913
Old Resident Dies - Built the Union Depot and Garfield Schoolhouse
John Haley, in his 79th year, died at his residence on Henry street in Alton Thursday night about 9 o'clock after an illness from cancer of the liver. Mr. Haley's death had been expected at any time during the last two weeks. His brother, James Haley of Flagstaff, Arizona, and his children had been attending him. In the last few weeks of his life Mr. Haley had been devoting himself to winding up his business affairs and though his interests were extensive, it is said that he left everything in good shape so there would be no trouble in winding up his affairs after his death. He had large real estate interests in Alton and St. Louis, but in recent years had disposed of much of his Alton holdings. He always maintained his home here. John Haley was born in New York City, August 7, 1834. He came to Alton in August 1855, and since then he regarded Alton as his home. He engaged in the trade of bricklayer in his young manhood, afterward doing general contracting. He built the Union Depot at Alton, also the Episcopal residence of the Alton diocese, now occupied by Bishop Ryan. The last building he erected was Garfield school house. He erected many of the more pretentious buildings in the city of Alton, and was known as a skillful and honest contractor. Among men who knew him best, no written agreements with Mr. Haley were necessary. As an evidence of this, it may be cited that when Fred S. Detrich died, Mr. Haley owed Detrich about $2,000, of which Detrich had made no memorandum, and there was no note or other evidence of indebtedness. After the death of Detrich, Mr. Haley called on the executors and inquired whether they had found any memorandum of any business transactions. He was told there was none, and great was the surprise of the executors when Mr. Haley informed them he owed the Detrich estate the money and would pay it, which he did. Many other people in Alton who had large financial transactions with him had the utmost confidence in his honesty, and they believe that Mr. Haley was invariably a man of honesty and integrity. He was devoted to his children, and before his death he made over to his children his property, reserving for himself a lifetime interest. He leaves a good estate to his children. He leaves, beside his brother, two sons, Robert and John Haley, and three daughters, Miss Mary E. Haley, Mrs. Gus Sneeringer, and Mrs. Alphonse Snyder. The funeral will be at 10 o'clock Monday morning from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

HALEY, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JOHN/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Friday, May 1, 1896 - Submitted by John Caskey
Mrs. John Haley died Sunday morning of stomach troubles. She was aged 53 years and 8 months. She was born and raised in Upper Alton, and was well known and loved in the community. A husband and six children morn her death. The funeral took place from the cathedral Tuesday morning services being conducted by Rev. Fr. Spalding and Rev. Frs. Healy and Cusick.

 

HALL, EMILY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 8, 1900
Emily, the seven years old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hall, died this morning at the family home on Cherry street, between Third and Fourth streets, after a three weeks' illness with scarlet fever. The funeral will take place Saturday afternoon, and services will be at the family home, and will be private.

 

HALL, HULDAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 10, 1907
After 18 weeks illness, Mrs. Huldah Hall died on Thursday at 4:45 p.m., at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. William T. Eaves, in Yager Park. She was in the 73d year of her age. She had been a resident of Alton and vicinity nearly all her life, and of Alton for twenty seven years. Four children survive her, Mrs. Eaves of Yager Park, Mrs. John Smith of Desare, Ma., James Hall and Edward Hall of Alton. The funeral will be held on Sunday at 2:30 p.m., and the services will be conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenny of Springfield, recently of Alton. Mrs. Hall also left eleven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

 

HALL, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 8, 1917
The funeral of John Hall will be held tomorrow morning from the St. Patrick's Church to the Greenwood Cemetery. The father of the young man, Peter Hall, arrived in Alton this morning from the east and took the charge of the body.

 

HALL, MARGARET (nee MORRIS)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 19, 1904
Mrs. Will Hall died Monday evening at her home on the Grafton road after a short illness. Besides her husband she leaves two children, one an infant, her mother, Mrs. B. Morris, a sister, Mrs. August Mayford of North Alton, and a brother, John Morris of Peoria. She was Miss Margaret Morris of North Alton, and was a genial, popular young woman, whose death will be regretted by all who knew her. She and Mr. Hall were married about two years ago. The funeral will be Wednesday at 10 a.m. from the home.

 

HALL, SARAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1911
Miss Sarah Hall died Saturday morning at her home in Upper Alton after an illness of three months from weakness of old age. She would have been 75 years of age next April 29. Miss Hall conducted a store in Yager Park for a long time, and later moved to the Priest addition, where she was keeping store at the time she died. She was born in Alton and lived in Alton and vicinity all her life. She was well known and for many years was connected with the Twelfth street Presbyterian church. She leaves two sisters, Misses Mary and Jennie Hall, who lived at 204 east Fourth street in Alton. The body will be taken to the home of the sisters, and the funeral will be from there Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Services will be conducted by Rev. J. A. Scarritt and G. L. Clark.

 

HALL, WILLIAM H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 30, 1917
 Former Mayor of Edwardsville
William H. Hall, former Mayor of Edwardsville, died at 3 o'clock yesterday at his home on Hillsboro avenue. When he went home from his office Wednesday evening, he walked out to the East End home with Attorney Charles E. Gueltig, president of the Board of Education, and observed to the latter: "I feel that I am not going to live very long." Gueltig laughed at the fancy, and cheeringly reassured him. Thursday morning Hall fell in a faint in the hall at his home, and physicians who were summoned pronounced him suffering from acute indigestion. Hall is the fifth ex-Mayor of Edwardsville to die in the past five years, Judge William H. Krome, one of the number, falling dead only two weeks ago. The others were John T. Crocker, N. E. Bosen and E. B. Glass.

 

HALLAM, JOHN W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1908
John W. Hallam, aged 61, dropped dead from heart disease Monday noon at 12:05 o'clock, while on his way from his work to his dinner. He fell at the corner of the glass works office, and was carried into the office by fellow workmen, but before he could be laid down inside the building he was dead. At the time of her husband's death Mrs. Hallam was away from home, having gone downtown for the purpose of doing some shopping. His two sons, Walter and Ray, were in St. Louis, where they were employed. Messengers were sent out to find Mrs. Hallam to break the news to her and after a long search she was found, almost two hours after her husband's death, by Rev. Walter H. Bradley, a neighbor, who broke the news to her. Mrs. Hallam said that her husband had been troubled with shortness of breath for some time, and he attributed it to asthma. He had expected to retire from glassblowing last year, but continued to work. He came here from St. Louis over 20 years ago and had been in the employ of the Illinois Glass Co. ever since. He was known as one of the steadiest, best employees of the company and in the community where he lived he was recognized as a fine citizen and a good neighbor. He was a member of the Baptist church. In his family his relations were perfect, neighbors saying that the father and his two sons being more like three boys when together, than that of parent and children. Mrs. Hallam, when informed of her husband's death, was stricken like one who had lost her very best possession. It was a great shock to the entire community when Mr. Hallam died, and among his fellow workmen there was profound grief. Coroner Streeper took charge of the body and will hold an inquest.

 

HALLER, HANNAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1902
Death of a East Alton Pioneer
Mrs. Hannah Haller, widow of Daniel Haller, died Saturday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George B. Harrison, near East Alton, after a long illness from Bright's disease. Mrs. Haller was among the oldest residents of the American Bottoms, having gone there in 1828. She was born in Pulaski county, Kentucky, and was in her 87th year. When she settled near East Alton, that country was comparatively unsettled, and Mrs. Haller, with her family, helped to develop it. She was known to nearly everyone in that vicinity, and because of her motherly ways and her kindly interest in the affairs of her friends and neighbors, she was lovingly referred to by the community as "Grandma" Haller. In 1840 she united with the Methodist church, but in 1846 she affiliated with the Bushy Grove Baptist church, which was convenient for her to attend, and she has since then been one of its most interested members. Her husband died in 1864, leaving her with a family of children. Mrs. Haller was the mother of eleven children, four of whom survive her: Mrs. George B. Harrison, at whose home she died; Albert, Thomas and Daniel Haller. She leaves 17 grandchildren and 23 great-grandchildren. The funeral was conducted Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Bushy Grove Baptist church.

 

HALLER, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1901
Joseph Haller, a well known resident of the American Bottom, died yesterday at Edwardsville, and the funeral was held this afternoon. Services were conducted at the home of George Harrison in Wood River township, and burial was at the Vaughn Cemetery.

 

HALLER, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1906
Robert, 14 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Al Haller, died last night at the home near East Alton from appendicitis. The funeral will be tomorrow afternoon.

 

HALLER, WARREN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 5, 1906
Muddy roads made it necessary to carry the casket containing the remains of Warren Haller a distance of a quarter of a mile to Vaughn cemetery near East Alton. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. C. Hall at the family home in East Alton, and there was a large attendance. The boy was only 14 years of age, yet he was 6 feet 1 inch in height and weighed 190 pounds and was said to be the biggest boy in Madison county. When the foot of the hill was reached, just before coming to Vaughn cemetery, the mud was found so deep as to be impassible for the hearse and carriages. The casket was taken from the hearse and carried on the shoulders of two sets of pallbearers, six in each set, it was borne to the grave in the cemetery a distance of over a quarter of a mile. The mourners followed through the mud, and after brief services at the grave returned to the carriages in the same way.

 

HALLETT, IONA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1906
Child Playing "Grown Up" Burns to Death
Iona Hallett, the 7 years old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Hallet, of 111 East Eleventh street, was fatally burned Thursday evening, dying Friday morning at 7 o'clock, by trailing a long skirt over a burning heap of rubbish, while playing "grown up" in the yard of a neighbor, Mrs. Mabel Haller, living next door. Mrs. Hallett was severely burned about the hands from her efforts to tear the burning garments off the child's body and is in a very serious condition from burns on her hands and nervous shock. The little girl had put on a long skirt and was walking around with it on, when she went too close to the burning rubbish in the Haller yard. When the flames in the dress began burning her, the child began to run and scream and members of the family and people nearby hearing her screams and seeing her run, ran after the child to catch her and put out the fire. The child, frenzied by freight and pain, ran the harder when pursued and although the injuries she would have suffered might have been slight enough in the beginning to have been of little consequence, when she was finally caught by a neighbor's boy, Charley Wilkinson, the child was burned deep and was beyond any hope of recovery. The mother, on the child being caught, attempting to tear off the burning garments and was burned deep about the hands. The child was carried into the house, after the flames were supposed to be out and laid on the bed, but smoldering fire in the garments set fire to the bed. Drs. Schussler and H. Davis were summoned and they gave her surgical attention, but she was beyond all hope. She lingered until morning, then died.

 

HALLEY, CATHERINE (nee MURRAY)/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 25, 1895
After much suffering, Mrs. Catherine Halley, wife of William Halley, passed peacefully away Wednesday morning at 2:30 o'clock at the age of 35 years, 5 months and 10 days. She had been a sufferer for years with some affliction of the stomach and for several months has been confined to her bed almost continually. Medical attendance seemed useless and the end came Wednesday. The funeral took place today at 10 o'clock from St. Mary's Catholic Church, where services were conducted by Rev Father C A O'Reilly. The body was interred in the Catholic Cemetery. The pall bearers were Thos. Kane, Wm McNeilly, John E. Burns and Patrick Green. Catherine Halley was born near this city August 13, 1858, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Murray. On November 4, 1879 she was married to William Halley. She leaves to mourn her death a husband and five children, the oldest of whom is 14 years of age and the youngest 2 years, also one sister Mrs. Mary Cowan of this city and a half brother Edward Murray, who resides in Missouri. She was a true Christian, ever ready to lend a helping hand to those in need and she will be sadly missed by all who had the pleasure
of knowing her.

 

HALLOWAY, MARY WAGGONER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 22, 1914
The death of Mrs. Mary Waggoner Halloway at Piasa, Ill. this morning marks the passing of one of the old time residents of Godfrey township. Many years ago the Scarritt and the Waggoner families were among the old time prominent families in the Godfrey neighborhood. Mrs. Halloway was the last of the Waggoners. She was born at Knoxville, Tenn. July 28, 1833, and was in her 82nd year. She was married to Robert Halloway at Godfrey, March 2, 1854. Three daughters survive her, Mrs. Hattie Mise of Collinsville, Ill.; Mrs. Lucy Hussong of Madison, Ill.; and Miss Mollie Halloway of Piasa, Ill. The funeral will be Monday and services will be in the Piasa M. E. Church at 10:30 o'clock. Mrs. Halloway was an aunt of Mrs. W. L. Sloan of Godfrey, who was there when her aunt died.

 

HALTON, UNKNOWN DAUGHTER OF HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 7, 1905
[Note: this obit was so hard to read that only these facts could be gleaned from it] The five year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Halton died at the family home in Upper Alton after an illness of several days from diabetes.

 

HAMER, UNKNOWN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 23, 1921
Mrs. William Hamer, aged 62, died at 1:30 o'clock this morning after an illness which extended over a period of several years, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Dietz, who resides on East Delmar Road, in Godfrey township. Death was due to a complication of diseases. Mrs. Hamer was one of Alton's best known residents, having been born and reared in this city. She was a good mother and a kind friend, and her death will be the cause of much sadness among her relatives and friends. She was a quiet, home-loving woman. Her maiden name was Boedy. She is survived by her husband, William Hamer, five children and six grandchildren. The children are: Mrs. Charles Dietz; I. C. Hamer; Clarence Hamer; Miss Ethel Hamer, all of Alton; and Walter Hamer of Towanda, Kansas. Walter Hamer arrived from the west last evening. The deceased is also survived by three sisters: Mrs. William Wood of Alton; Mrs. Lemuel Giles of Arkansas; Mrs. Elizabeth Fleming of Elmhurst, Ill,; and by three brothers: William and Dan Boedy of Dow; and Henry L. Boedy of Alton. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Dietz home, and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery. Services at the house will be conducted by the Rev. H. D. Johnson, pastor of the Elm Street Presbyterian church.

 

HAMILL, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 6, 1922
Alton's Oldest Business Man Dies
Joseph Hamill, perhaps Alton's oldest business man, died at 1:15 o'clock this afternoon at his residence, 810 Grove street, after a month's illness. The end came after several days of extreme prostration on the part of Mr. Hamill, and it was expected. His breakdown was due to weakness incident to his age. In the death of Mr. Hamill, there passes one of the oldest of old time business men here. For years he was associated with Samuel Pitts under the firm name of Pitts & Hamill. Mr. Pitts died many years ago, but out of regard for his late partner Mr. Hamill never changed the style of the firm name. Regularly, Mr. Hamill would go to his place of business and he devoted his entire attention to it. He kept this up until he was taken down with his last illness. He was courteous always and he was highly respected by everyone who knew him either socially or in a business way. Mr. Hamill was born in St. Louis and was 78 years of age. Last October 20 he was the guest of honor at a dinner party at the First Presbyterian church given in his honor by the superintendent, O. S. Stowell, the officers and other teachers of the Sunday School. He was apparently in the best of condition at that time. His mind was bright and he indulged in some neat witticisms during the course of a short talk he was called upon to make as the oldest of the Sunday School teachers present. There were grown men in the number of Sunday School teachers, 45 years of age, who had been there in Mr. Hamill's first Sunday School class in that Sunday School about 35 years before. In the First Presbyterian church he had been a valuable worker. He had served as elder for many years and continued in that office up to the time of his death. At the last annual meeting of the church, he was elected over his protest, expressing the desire to make room for a younger man, but the sentiment was then declared that one who had served as faithfully and long should be displaced by no one, and he was unanimously chosen, his protest being disregarded. He was so touched by this show of devotion on the part of the church members, that he continued to serve. Joseph Hamill was born in St. Louis and was in the iron business there under the firm name of Archer & Hamill, before coming to Alton. He was also traveling salesman for Hopping Bros. Fifty-two years ago he was married in Alton and two years ago the couple celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. Forty-five years ago, Mr. Hamill entered business with Samuel Pitts and he continued in business until his death. Beside his wife, Mr. Hamill leaves one daughter, Mrs. Carl Wuerker of Alton. He leaves also one brother, Samuel, of St. Louis, and one sister, Mrs. C. M. Harris of Log Angeles, Cal. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home. Friends are invited to attend the services at the home. Burial will be private. The family asks that there be no flowers.

 

HAMILTON, ALEXANDER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 26, 1917
Alexander Hamilton, colored man, aged 91 years, died at his home Christmas afternoon from old age, after having lived in Upper Alton for many years past, where he was well known. Hamilton died at his home at 2206 Locust street from old age. Hamilton was a widower, and is survived by six children, four boys and two girls. He has many friends, both among the colored and white people, who will regret his death. His funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the colored Methodist church. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

 

Photo of Benjamin Brown HamiltonHAMILTON, BENJAMIN BROWN/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, November 12, 1894
After an illness of six months from cancer of the stomach, Rev. Benjamin Brown Hamilton passed peacefully away at 9:45 o'clock Sunday evening at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. John Leverett, where he has made his home for a year past. Mr. Hamilton was born in Monroe County, Illinois, February 4, 1822. In 1831 his family moved to Greene (now Jersey) County, where in 1853 he was ordained to the Baptist ministry. After a residence of two years in Monroe County, Mr. Hamilton moved to Whitehall, where he resided until the autumn of 1893. Mr. Hamilton was in many respects a remarkable man. Of sturdy stock, endowed by nature with a stalwart constitution, he possessed an intellect worthy of its tenement. Although he filled at various periods, and successfully, the positions of merchant, justice of the peace, postmaster and school teacher, it was as a minister of the gospel that he accomplished his life work, and left the impress of his noble character and unswerving devotion to duty upon hundreds who now mourn his death as a personal loss. For nearly forty years he ministered in spiritual things to churches throughout the counties of Jersey, Green, Scott and Macoupin. Ever animated by the desire to do the most good possible to those most in need, he gave years of service to struggling churches, and was always ready to respond to a call for aid from many who would otherwise have hungered in vain for the bread of life. From October 1862 to March 1865, he served his God and his country as chaplain of the 61st Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Mr. Hamilton was married in December 1844 to Miss Mary A. Chandler, who survives him. Nine children were born to them, of whom five are living. Dr. J. B. Hamilton of Chicago, late Surgeon General of the United States Marine Hospital Service; Mrs. Dr. E. T. Casseli of Hastings, Nebraska; Mrs. John Leverett of Upper Alton; H. D. Hamilton, Esq., of New York City; and Frank C. Hamilton of Pueblo, Colorado. Mr. Hamilton will be laid to rest beside his parents in the old family burying ground at Otterville, Jersey County, on Wednesday.

 

HAMILTON, DOUGLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 10, 1908
Big Four [Railroad] Baggage Master
Douglas Hamilton, baggage master for the Big Four at Alton died at St. Joseph's hospital this noon after a brief illness. He was taken ill last night in the baggageroom at Union station and was moved to St. Joseph's hospital at daylight this morning when it was found that his condition was very grave. He had met all the trains on the Big Four yesterday, and it was not known he was unusually ill. He had not been in good health for some time. When Dr. L. M. Bowman was summoned to attend him he said that Hamilton was dying. He never regained consciousness. Douglas Hamilton was born at Canton, Mo., February 12, 1874. He was the son of Capt. John N. Hamilton of this city. He leaves also a brother, G. H. Hamilton, agent for the Big Four, and two sisters, Mrs. J. D. Smith of Macon, Mo., and Mrs. Beemis of St. Paul, Minn. He had filled the position of baggage master for the Big Four at Alton for many years. He spent his childhood days in Alton and was partially educated in the Alton public schools. The time of the funeral is not set.

 

HAMILTON, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1900
Frank Hamilton, son of Alexander Hamilton, died Saturday evening at his home in Upper Alton after a short illness with lockjaw. He was 38 years of age, and leaves a wife and two children, four brothers and two sisters. One week ago last Friday he stepped on a rusty nail at his home, but thought nothing of the injury and gave it no attention. Thursday he was taken ill, and a surgeon was summoned. Lockjaw set in and after great suffering he died. The funeral was held this afternoon, and services were conducted in the A. M. E. church of Upper Alton by the pastor, Rev. Jamieson, and Rev. Henry Depugh.

 

HAMILTON, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1902
Breaks Through Ice While Skating, Drowns in Water Works Pond
Harry Hamilton, 16, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hamilton of 512 State street, was drowned this afternoon about 2:15 o'clock while skating on the ice in the pond at the tanks of the water works on State street. A party of boys were skating on the pond, which is large and very deep. A short time ago a pipe leading from the water tanks broke, and all the water in one of the tanks ran into the pond, raising it considerably. On the ice formed over this water the boys had been skating, when the ice gave way beneath Harry Hamilton, and he, with a Carhart boy, were precipitated into the water. George Carhart escaped, climbing out of the water safely, but young Hamilton went under the ice and was drowned. The drowning was witnessed by many people, but no one could save the boy. A street car was passing at the time and was filled with passengers who helplessly watched the struggles of the drowning boy and of the Carhart boy, who was making his escape. A party of men began fishing for the body at once, but because of the ice the work was very difficult. The body was found by Officer James Young and was taken to the family home.

 

HAMILTON, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 29, 1910
11 Year Old Dies from Wounds
John Hamilton, the 11 year old boy who was shot by Willie Mains, another boy, four weeks ago, died at 4 o'clock Thursday morning at his home in East End place. The boy had been moved from the hospital when the doctors told the family his life could not be saved, as his parents wanted him to be at home when he died. Gangrene was the cause of death. The funeral will be Saturday at 10 a.m. from the family home. It will be recalled that the Mains boy shot the Hamilton boy because the Hamilton boy had broken a hole in the ice where the Mains boy was skating. Mains had a shotgun and told the Hamilton boy if he ran he would be shot. The Hamilton boy was mentally deficient, and became so terrified he ran, and Mains made good, emptying the barrel of his shotgun in the child's legs. Mains afterward claimed he tripped and accidentally discharged the gun. A coroner's inquest will be held. The Mains boy is in jail being unable to give a bond. He will probably be held without bail since the fatal termination of the shooting.

 

HAMILTON, LUCRETIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 29, 1922
The "Flag Lady," ... a true pioneering spirit who loved her country
Miss Lucretia Hamilton, aged 75, died this afternoon at the home of her niece, Mrs. Erwin A. Rytz, 1517 Rodgers avenue. Miss Hamilton had been very sick at the Odd Fellows Home at Mattoon, where she had been making her home, but she was determined to come back here for the G. A. R. state encampment, and she came, not knowing it to die here in her old home, where she loved to be. Miss Hamilton was prominent among the Rebekahs, and among the Women's Relief Corps. She was know for her intense patriotism. She was referred to often as "the lady of the flags," as Miss Hamilton thought there was no decoration so fitting as the American flag, for almost all occasions. When she would give a present, it would be a flag she would give, or something of a patriotic import. Patriotic occasions were important to her. She had just gotten out of the hospital at the home where she was staying when she came here to make the visit and had been here only a few days when she broke down. Miss Hamilton was one of the early day students at Monticello Seminary. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Baptist church and services will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing. Burial will be in the Mt. Olive cemetery. It is regarded as especially appropriate that Miss Hamilton should have died so soon before the coming of Memorial day, a day that was a great one in her life. She leaves one sister, Mrs. Mary K. Stahl, and two nieces, Mrs. Erwin Rutz and Miss Emily Stahl. The members of the Rebekah lodge will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the First Baptist church to attend the funeral of Miss Hamilton by order of the Noble Grand, Mrs. Lizzie Lengacher.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1922
Carrying a little flag in hand, and with a beautiful silk flag of her country in the casket with her, Miss Lucretia M. Hamiilton, the "flag lady," was laid to rest this afternoon in Mt. Olive cemetery, known as the Short cemetery. It had been her wish, as she sometimes expressed it, that when she went through the pearly gates there was nothing she would rather wave than an American flag, and she asked that she be allowed to take with her, for her long rest, a flag she treasured for many years. Twenty five years ago she had become possessed of a silk flag that came to her by way of a gift. Members of her family had forgotten just under what circumstances the flag came, but they remembered that Miss Hamilton had often said she wanted it buried in the casket with her. So, as she had wished, Miss Hamilton was carried into the First Baptist church this afternoon draped in the folds of that silk flag, and when the casket lid was sealed on her the flag was with her. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing of the First Baptist church. There was a large attendance of old friends of Miss Hamilton, including representatives of Odd Fellows, Rebekahs, Women's Relief corps, old friends and neighbors. For many years Miss Hamilton was a farmer. She owned and operated a farm east of Upper Alton, and many can recall her as she would come to town, riding a load of hay, or a load of wheat she had brought to town to sell. Old men used to say that when she was a girl she was one of the prettiest girls they knew, and her broad brimmed farmer hats and her simple costumes made her all the more attractive. Miss Hamilton never married. In her late years she used to hint at a little romance. She had been engaged to a young man who wanted to marry her, but interference by relatives broke it off, and she remained true to the lover of her early years. Not many years ago, she had a letter from that lover, and it was said that he was a widower and that he again wanted to marry Miss Hamilton, but she said that her days of romance were ended, and that she would continue a spinster to her end. The Rebekahs had charge of the burial services at the cemetery. The pallbearers were P. B. Cousley, Harry Russell, John Beanblossom, William Cartwright, John Cartwright and William Thomas.

 

HAMILTON, MARY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 23, 1909
Mrs. Mary Hamilton, wife of Alexander Hamilton, the well-known old colored blacksmith of Salu, dropped dead Thursday afternoon in her home on North Locust Street in Salu addition to Upper Alton. Mrs. Hamilton had been in her usual state of health up to that time. She complained to her daughter of a pain in her leg, and nothing serious being expected, not much attention was paid to it. In a few minutes afterwards, Mrs. Hamilton fell to the floor, and before assistance could be procured, she was dead. Mrs. Hamilton and her husband were among the first colored people to come to Upper Alton from the South, and they were the most highly respected colored residents of Upper Alton. They were the pillars of the A. M. E. Church, and the keeping up of that organization through the past years is largely due to their own faith in the cause, and their labor in supporting it. Mrs. Hamilton leaves besides her husband, six children, all of whom are grown. They are Joe Hamilton of St. Paul, Mrs. Jennie Howard, Mrs. Helen Howard, Philip Hamilton, Wilbur Hamilton, and William Hamilton, all of Upper Alton. A fortunate circumstance at Mrs. Hamilton’s death is that her oldest son, Joseph Hamilton, was here on a visit when his mother died. He had not been home in the last twenty years until just a few days ago, when he arrived here on a visit to his parents. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the A. M. E. Church.

 

HAMILTON, MARY ANN [nee CHANDLER]/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 24, 1914
Descendant of Myles Standish and John Alden, Wife of Rev. B. B. Hamilton, Dies
Just as the church bell was ringing for the weekly prayer meeting last evening, the gentle spirit of Mrs. Mary Hamilton left the frail body which had been its tenement for almost eighty-nine years. The end was not unexpected to the family, who have noted the gradual failing of the strength which has carried her through a long life of devotion to others. It is a notable coincidence that the summons to the prayer meeting which she loved, should for this time have become merged in a summons to an eternal period of heavenly communion. Mrs. Hamilton was of Puritan ancestry, her lineage being directly traced from both Myles Standish and John Alden. The strong patriotism which has marked her family history found expression in her own life. Mrs. Hamilton was the widow of Rev. B. B. Hamilton, for many years an honored minister of the Baptist church. His declining days were spent with his daughter, Mrs. John Leverett, and since his death in 1894 Mrs. Hamilton has resided with her. During these years, Mrs. Hamilton has won for herself a place in the affections of the community seldom acquired by one of her years. Her activities in church, temperance and patriotic societies, and in a thousand private acts of loving kindness to old and young, endeared her to all whose good fortune it was to cross her path or to walk with her along the way. Until the infirmities of advancing years prevented, Mrs. Hamilton was active in the work of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and especially in that of the Loyal Temperance League. For many years she has been a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and since the organization of Ninian Edwards Chapter in this city, has been its chaplain. Mrs. Hamilton is survived by one brother, Mr. Edwin Chandler of Syracuse, Kansas. He is the last of a large family of brothers and sisters, among whom were Mrs. S. V. White and Mrs. John Abbott Titcomb of Brooklyn, N. Y. Mrs. Hamilton leaves one daughter, Mrs. John Leverett, and two sons, Gen. Henry D. Hamilton of New York and Frank C. Hamilton of Mapimi, Dgo., Mexico. Among the children who have preceeded her to the other shore are Surgeon General John B. Hamilton, for many years at the head of the U. S. Marine Hospital service, and Mrs. Flora Hamilton Cassel, whose gospel hymns are sung the world over. Mrs. Hamilton's last illness was of short duration, and her passing from earth was as peaceful as a child's falling asleep. She retained consciousness and interest in those she loved, and those who loved her, until near the end, when she closed her eyes to earth to re-open them in heaven. The burial arrangements include a brief service at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday at the residence, No. 2020 (?) Leverett Street [Upper Alton], and burial beside her husband in Otterville, Ill., the same afternoon. The funeral party will leave the C. & A. depot in Jerseyville at 4:00 p.m.

 

HAMILTON, PHILIP CARTER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1919
Philip Carter Hamilton, colored, died Friday at his home at 2206 Locust street. Hamilton was a well known laboring man.

 

HAMILTON, ROBERT M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1915
Robert M. Hamilton, a well known glassblower who resided at 901 Washington avenue in Alton for many years, died suddenly Thursday morning as he was seated in a lawn swing at the home of his neighbor, Joseph Everson. Mr. Hamilton had been making a practice of going over to the place of Mr. Everson and would sit in the swing and chat with his friend and neighbor. This morning Mr. Everson was engaged in building a concrete walk, and Mr. Hamilton had seated himself in the swing and was talking and laughing with Mr. Everson. Then Mr. Hamilton became silent, and after a pause Mr. Everson spoke to him. Thinking that Mr. Hamilton had dropped off into sleep, Mr. Everson paid no attention to the failure to get an answer, but finally his suspicions were aroused by something about the position of the body at the swing. He investigated and found that Mr. Hamilton was dead. A doctor was called and he said that the death was due to some heart trouble. There was no alarm of any kind presaging the death. The passing was so quiet that it was not noticed. Mr. Hamilton had been in good health. His wife died August 3rd, after a long illness. Mr. Hamilton was born in St. Louis and was 55 years of age. He had worked as a glassblower at Alton until the past few years when he retired. He had been conducting a small store at his home. He was a long time resident of Alton, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was a consistent member of the Upper Alton Presbyterian Church. Three daughters survive Mr. Hamilton: Mrs. D. L. Carhart; Mrs. George Bierman; and Miss Ethel Hamilton. He leaves also a sister, Mrs. George Sanderson, and three brothers: Mark of Belleville, and George and Thomas of St. Louis.

 

HAMILTON, UNKNOWN CHILD OF JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 3, 1906
The seven months old child of Mr. and Mrs. John Hamilton of Nameoki died this morning after an illness with pneumonia. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon and burial will be in Milton cemetery.

 

HAMILTON, UNKNOWN MAN/Source: Alton Telegraph, January 1, 1842
Cooper Suicides by Hanging
We understand that a man named Hamilton hung himself in the Sand Ridge Prairie on the 10th ult. He was a cooper by trade, aged about 25 years, had been employed in the neighborhood about four weeks.

 

HAMILTON, UNKNOWN WIFE OF WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1915
Mrs. William Hamilton, colored, died at her home in Upper Alton yesterday. She was 36 years of age, and leaves a family of four children besides her husband. She was ill three days of pneumonia.

 

HAMLIN, JOSEPHINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 8, 1910
Mrs. Josephine Hamlin, widow of Warren Hamlin, died at the home of her brother, Dr. Jos. Pogue, in Edwardsville, at midnight Monday night. She had been in ill health for some time, and went to Jerseyville to visit her relatives. There she became ill, and Dr. Pogue removed her to his Edwardsville home where she died last night. Mrs. Hamlin was 80 years of age and had resided in Alton for over fifty years. She was the widow of Warren Hamlin, who died eleven years ago. Her husband with a civil war veteran. Mrs. Hamlin has made her home on Central avenue for many years, and was known as a kindly pleasant neighbor by those who resided near her. She lived alone in her home, and never complained of being afraid. Mrs. Hamlin's maiden name was Pogue. The Pogue family came to Alton in the early day and settled and made their home east of Henry street until the head of the family passed away. The remains will be brought to Alton tomorrow morning, and the funeral will be held from the Congregational church of which she was a member at 2:30 o'clock.

 

HAMLIN, WARREN J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Tuesday, March 7, 1899
"Taps" Sounds for an Old Soldier
Warren J. Hamlin died at 6 o'clock this morning at his home in Highland Park. His illness dates its beginning back many years, and has confined him to his home most of the time a confirmed invalid. His sufferings were the immediate result of his patriotic service as a volunteer during the War of the Rebellion [Civil War]. From wounds received, his health was broken down and many years ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis which rendered him almost helpless. He was able to move around only with the greatest difficulty, and was confined to his bed much of the time. Of late years, his health has been extremely poor and he seldom was able to be away from his home. Rheumatism and paralysis combined to make of his one time fine physique a perfect wreck. Later on constitutional trouble set in, and his health failed rapidly during the last few months. He was born in Rochester, N. Y., and was 61 years of age. He enlisted in New York State in the First Engineer Corps for a three years' service. He was disabled before the expiration of his enlistment. He came to Alton in 1879 and was married three years later for the first time. He leaves a wife, Mrs. Josephine Hamlin, nee Pogue, whose devotion to her helpless husband was ceaseless to the end. He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Marietta Robinson, of Chicago, and Miss Alice Hamlin, of St. Joseph, Mich. He lived in a cosy little home at Common and North streets, where he enjoyed a neat pension from the government which helped alleviate, with comforts of life, the suffering incidental to his shattered health. The funeral will be Thursday, at 2 p.m., from the home in Middletown.

 

HAMLUN, JOHN/Source: Alton Telegraph, October 12, 1836    Killed During Construction of New Baptist Church
It is our painful duty to record the occurrence during the past week, of one of the most distressing accidents which it has ever befallen our town to experience. As the workmen on the new church just erected for the Baptist society were completing the stone work on Saturday evening last, and were about removing the platforms, the main part of the gable end fell with a tremendous crash, carrying all before it, staging, joists, &c., with two men who were at work upon the staging, burying them amid the stone and rubbish beneath, and literally crushing them to death. They did not breathe after access was had to them, and it is supposed they were instantaneously killed. One of the men was a German by the name of John Hamlun, and the other had but a few days previous arrived here from Missouri, whose name, we learn, was Gwynn. How true the language of Holy Writ, that "In the midst of life we are in death." We know not where the blame of the accident should rest, if indeed blame is attributable to anyone; but we are credibly informed, that from the eves of the building to the peak of the gable end, the work lacked at least five inches of being plumb.

NOTES: The Baptists in Alton first met in Lyceum Hall, on the northeast corner of Broadway and Alby Streets. In 1834 they erected a small church building at the corner of Third and Alby. They used this building for a short time, then sold it to the Methodists. In 1836 they decided to erect a new church building at the southeast corner of Broadway and Easton Street. It was during the construction of this church that the above accident occurred, killing two men. The Baptists used this building until 1860, when the church was destroyed by fire. The remains of the building were torn down, and the Kendall Cracker Factory was erected on the property in 1864. The factory building still stands. In 1861, the Baptists built a new church at the southeast corner of Market and E. 5th Streets. They used this building until 1900, when they erected  a larger church on the same property. That building still stands, and is used by the congregation of the St. John’s Missionary Baptist Church.

 

HAMM, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1919
Mrs. Elizabeth Hamm died yesterday of pneumonia. She was 39 years of age and was ill a short time with pneumonia. The funeral will be held from the Sheldon home in Milton Heights, but arrangements for same have not been complete.

 

HAMMERS, JESSE/Source: Collinsville Herald, January 5, 1917
Jesse Hammers, son of Mr. & Mrs. E. S. Hammers of 911 Hesperia Street, died Sunday of spasms. Funeral was held from the home Tuesday, with interment at Glenwood Cemetery.

 

HANAHAN, JOHN J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 5, 1913
John Hanahan, aged 56, died Thursday evening at 8 o'clock at his home, 707 Langdon street, from stomach trouble of ten years standing. He had been confined to his home only a few days. Up to Saturday night he worked at his trade of carpentry, and on Monday was in the Labor Day parade, but that was his last time out of the house. He was a native of Gas City, Ind., but moved to Bunker Hill when he was ten years of age and lived there until ten years ago when he moved to Alton, and had lived here ever since. He was known as a good workman, and was a good citizen. He is survived by his wife and three children, Harry Hannahan, and Misses Katheryn and Marguerite Hanahan. He leaves also a brother, William, in Bunker Hill; and a sister, Mrs. John Kachrofske of Flora, Ill. He was a member of the Royal Areanum, also of the Alton Mutual Society. The funeral will be Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

HANAUER, KATHERINE (MOTHER M. AUGUSTINE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1919
Well Known Nun Dies at Local Convent
Mother M. Augustine, aged 72, died at the Ursuline Convent at 11:50 o'clock last evening after an illness which extended over a period of months. She was taken suddenly worse last Sunday and sank rapidly until death released her from her sufferings. No near relatives survive. Mother Augustine was in her 58th year of profession, having celebrated her golden jubilee eight years ago. She was born in Dayton, Ohio, her worldly name being Katherine Hanauer. She spent many years in missions out of the Alton convent, but for the past number of years has been located at the local convent. She was a well known music teacher. There were two Mother Augustines in the Ursuline convent, the better known being Mother Augustine Curran, who is in charge of the Business Department of the school. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from the Convent Chapel. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

HANBAUM, CORA RUSSELL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 15, 1900
Mrs. Cora Russell, wife of Henry Hanbaum, died last night at 7:40 o'clock at her home on East Second street, leaving an infant only a few days old. She was 20 years of age, and before her marriage resided in Moro. The body will be taken to Moro tomorrow, where the funeral will take place about noon.

 

HANCOCK, HAZELTINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1903
Mrs. Hazeltine Hancock, wife of Leonard Hancock, died very suddenly at the family home, 428 East Third street, after a short illness Monday shortly after noon. The funeral was conducted at the home this afternoon and was private. Mrs. Hancock was 82 years and 5 months old. She was born in Concord, N. H., March 12, 1821. Many years ago she came to Alton with her husband to make her home, and was known to many of the old residents. She was married to Leonard Hancock at Lowell, Mass., March 21, 1843. She leaves her husband and five children, Henry A., Harriet Ellen, Mary, Martha and Emily Hancock. Burial was in City Cemetery this afternoon at 3 o'clock. The pallbearers were as following: Messrs. Charles and Emil Koch, William and Julius Agne, John and Frank Hancock.

 

HANCOCK, HENRY A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1905
Henry A. Hancock, night watchman at the Alton National Bank, was found dead in his room at his residence, 611 Alby street, Tuesday noon by Mrs. Hancock, when she went to call her husband to dinner. Mr. Hancock was feeling in his usual good health Tuesday morning when he returned home from his work and went to bed to sleep for the day. It was his custom to rise at noon time and eat dinner, and when he did not appear downstairs as usual, Mrs. Hancock went upstairs to call him, thinking he had overslept. The wife was horrified to find her husband lying on the bed where he had fallen after getting up and partially dressing himself. His suspenders were over one shoulder, and he was probably in the act of putting the other side on his other shoulder when he was stricken with a pain in his heart and fell over on the bed unconscious. When Mrs. Hancock arrived in the room her husband was dead. The wife was so shocked by her discovery that she fell to the floor in a faint, and a young woman who stays in the house hearing her scream ran upstairs to see what was the trouble and found Mrs. Hancock unconscious. Members of the family and Dr. L. M. Bowman were summoned. Dr. Bowman made an examination and pronounced the malady to be paralysis of the heart, and said that death was instant. Mr. Hancock had not complained of feeling unwell and his death was a great shock to his family. He was born at Lowell, Mass., January 31, 1844. He came to Alton when a young boy and lived here all the remainder of his life. He was married to Amelia Agne January 3, 1868. His aged father, Leonard Hancock, is still living at 438 East Third street. Mr. Hancock leaves, beside his wife, three sons, John, Frank and William. He was an industrious man and was strictly honest and a good citizen. He was well known in Alton.

 

HANCOCK, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 20, 1920
Merchant, Inventory and Promoter Dies ... Was Talented Musician
John Hancock, for years a well known business man here, inventor and promoter of successful enterprises, died at the home of his mother, Mrs. Amelia Hancock, 611 Alby street. His death was very unexpected. He had not been in good health, but there had been no serious apprehension on the part of relatives. He suffered a hemorrhage Wednesday evening that was the forerunner of the fatal attack. Mr. Hancock is remembered by many as having conducted a China store here for a number of years. Later he conducted a music shop. He was possessed of the ability to play almost any instrument. He gave up business to follow up some inventions he made. One of his best inventions was a safety pin, which really was better adapted for other purposes and later on a similar idea was adapted for use in filing papers. For a long time he was the successful manager of a concern in which he was the chief owner, that manufactured a hair tonic and had wide vogue in the barber shops in the southwest. He was possessed of a mind that demanded to be constantly at work and those who knew him well were of the opinion that there were few men here who had so many and so good ideas that could be capitalized as John Hancock. He was the oldest son of his parents. He was born and reared in Alton in the family home on Alby street, where his aged mother resides. He leaves two brothers, Frank Hancock and William Hancock. Mr. Hancock was 52 years of age, and is survived by his wife and four small children, nine, seven, five and one year of age. While Hancock was staying in Alton, Mrs. Hancock and children have been living with relatives in Arkansas. Mrs. Hancock has sent word that she would be here for the funeral. Besides his wife and children, the deceased is survived by his mother, Mrs. Amelia Hancock, and two brothers, William of Alton and Frank of Wood River. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock from the home of Mrs. Amelia Hancock, 611 Alby street. Rev. Robert Morris, pastor of the First Methodist church, will officiate.

 

Leonard HancockHANCOCK, LEONARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1915
Leonard Hancock, known to almost everyone in Alton as a man who sawed wood correctly and knew how to keep yards in condition, died at 8 o'clock Friday evening at his home on East Third street. Mr. Hancock came home and laid down and a few minutes later expired. He had not been ill, and suffered no pain, the human machinery just quit and he died a peaceful death. Several days ago Mr. Hancock had called upon Mrs. Clarkson, the 96 year grand old lady of Alton, and they had talked of old times. He had been about his duties as usual, and seemed in apparently good health. Just eleven years ago Henry Hancock of Alby street, a son of Leonard Hancock, died in the same manner. He had been serving as a night watchman, and came home from his work and lay down, and a few hours later was found dead in bed. He had suffered no illness. The funeral of Mr. Hancock was held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home. Three daughters, Martha, Elen and Emma, survive the aged man. Leonard Hancock was born in Franklin, N. H., March 28th, 1825. He came West with his uncle, Stephen Sandborn in 1847. His uncle was a stockman who fed cattle for the southern trade. He located at Bunker Hill, from where he made yearly shipments of cattle by boat to New Orleans. These shipments were placed in the hands of his nephew, Leonard Hancock. The uncle at length made arrangements to open barns in New Orleans to feed stock shipped on that market, and desired his nephew to take charge of them. But Mr. Hancock hated slavery with all his strength of a New England repugnance; he would not bind himself to live where he would be compelled to use slave labor, and the uncle and nephew parted. It was an instance where opportunity knocked upon his door, and where principle standing door keeper chased the scantily clothed figure with scorn from the door. The uncle would have made the young man's fortune. He came to Alton in 1864, and this has been his home without intermission since that date. When he first came to Alton there was used wood as fuel by many of the residents. It was the easiest fuel to be had; and the forests of timber along the creek bottoms and the neighboring hills made it also a cheap fuel. He took up the occupation of wood sawyer during the fall and winter months. It was a work he liked, and the art he employed soon spread his fame as the most noted sawyer of Alton. He held a record of sawing 7 cords of wood in one day. This was a prodigious day's work and stands alone.

 

HAND, LILLIAN MAY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 12, 1901
Moro News - Lillian May, beloved wife of John W. Hand and only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Hudson, died at the home of her parents after an illness of sixteen weeks, on Wednesday, September 4. She was in her 24th year. Until October 11th 1899, the most of her life had been spent at Moro. At that time she was married to Mr. Hand and they settled on a farm near Bunker Hill, where they resided happily together. Last May she was stricken down and her trouble soon developed into quick consumption. For eight weeks at her home on the farm all was done for her that loving hands could do, but to no avail. She was brought to her old home in hope that the change might bring to her new life and strength, but alas! the dread disease only fastened its clutches more tightly upon her, and after a visit, as it were, of only eight short weeks, surrounded by those who loved her best, she passed away. Lillie, for this was her name as her friends knew her, was a member of the Moro Presbyterian church and Christian Endeavor Society, and was long a regular attendant upon the Sunday school. The funeral services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. Edwin Harris, Friday morning, and the remains were interred in the Moro cemetery. The large attendance at the service bespeaks the high esteem in which she was held by all who knew her.

 

HANDY, EMMA C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 24, 1908
Mrs. Emma C. Handy, a resident of Alton for thirty years and for many years a well known nurse, died this morning at 6:20 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. L. T. Jones on Easton street. She was a native of Virginia, being born in Prince William county in 1846. Beside her daughter she leaves two grandchildren, Cordelia and Connie Jones, in Alton. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, and services will be conducted by Rev. Mason.

 

HANEI or HANEL, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 12, 1903
 Death Follows Wedding
Yesterday the Telegraph noted the marriage of Miss Mary Hanel, daughter of Frank Hanel of Yager Park, to William Lerche. Last night about 1:30 o'clock, the father of the bride, Frank Hanei, fell down the cellar steps to a granitoid floor, his head striking the floor and causing concussion of the brain. Mr. H. became unconscious from which condition he did not recover, and died about 12:30 today. Mr. Hanei leaves a wife and five children, including the daughter married yesterday. He was 43 years of age. The accident occurred about 1:30 o'clock this morning. The family and friends were celebrating the marriage of the oldest daughter, which occurred early in the afternoon. Mr. Hanei attempted to go to the cellar. Someone called him, when he turned and at the same time took a step down. He fell and struck his head on a granitoid floor, falling three or four steps. The family and guests did not suppose he was seriously injured and did not call the doctor until some time later. When Dr. Bowman arrived he found him unconscious, suffering from hemorrhage of the brain. Mr. Hanei was a mold maker at the glass works, and of most exemplary life and habits, one of the best of men. It was a sad ending of what should have been a joyous occasion, and has plunged the family and all their friends in the deepest sorrow.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 14, 1903
 Late Franz Hanei Was an Inventor and Mechanic of Ability
Intimates of Franz Hanei, the unfortunate gentlemen killed as a result of a fall at his home the night of his daughter's marriage, say that he was a marvel in the matter of mechanics and mechanical construction, and was continually planning, inventing and constructing curious and useful machines of various kinds. His house in Yager Park is said to be equipped with one of the most perfect electrical alarm systems in the country, planned and built by himself. With the opening of a gate, notice is given in the house that someone is entering the yard, and when the visitor's foot touches the first step leading to the front or rear porch, the alarm sounds again. The progress of the visitors up the steps is not only given by an alarm, but the time is registered by the electrical mechanism in the house, which includes a clock. If the party should go only two steps or any number of steps and then turn back, the electrical device notes that fact and it can be easily told just how many steps were taken from the ground before the visitor turned back. At the glassworks his services were greatly prized, and when a bad break occurred in the molds it neither puzzled or bothered him to make it as good as new. His ability, his industry and his habits make his sad taking off infinitely sadder, and great is the sympathy expressed for his sorrowing family.

 

HANKE, DAISY/Source: Troy Star, December 6, 1894
Miss Daisy Hanke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hanke, of this city, died this morning at 3 o'clock, at the age of 19 years and 12 days. She had been ill for some weeks with typhoid fever. It is a hard blow to her relatives to see her pass away in the prime of life. She was a lovable young lady and a willing worker. The funeral will take place from the family residence to the M. E. church, Saturday morning, at nine o'clock.

 

HANKHAUS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 23, 1901
John Hankhaus, a well known resident and retired farmer, died this morning at 2 o'clock at his home on Union street near Spring street after a short illness. He was about 70 years of age and leaves a widow and one son. The funeral will be Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

 

HANKINSON, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 19, 1905
The funeral of James Hankinson was held this afternoon from the home of Mrs. Samuel Leigh in Yager park, and was attended by many friends of the family of deceased. Burial was in the City Cemetery.

 

HANKS, NANCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 19, 1901
Mrs. Nancy Hanks died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning after a short illness. She was 75 years of age, and is said to have relatives but their home is not known. Undertaker Streeper has taken charge of the body and will hold it for the relatives to claim it.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1901
The relatives of Mrs. Nancy Hanks, who died at the Old Ladies home in Alton, will have her buried at the Milton cemetery tomorrow afternoon.

 

HANLON, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1902
After a lingering and painful illness which he bore patiently, Edward Hanlon, a well known young man very popular with all who knew him, passed away this morning at the home of his mother, Mrs. Mary Hanlon, 1309 State street. Besides his mother he leaves two brothers, John of Bluff street, and James P. of Vine street, and one sister, Mrs. Mary Dixon, wife of Street Commissioner Dixon. "Ned" Hanlon was possessed of many genial qualities that endeared him to acquaintances and he will be greatly missed. The funeral will be Friday morning at 10 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

HANLON, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 14, 1920
Dies on 90th Birthday
Mrs. Mary Hanlon, wife of John Hanlon, deceased, died at the home of her son, James Hanlon, at 915 Highland avenue at 9:20 a.m. this morning after a long illness of the infirmities of old age. Mrs. Hanlon, had she lived through the day today, would have celebrated her 90th birthday. She came to this country from Ireland 75 years ago today, and she has resided in Alton most of this time, making her one of the oldest residents in the city. Known as "Grandma" Hanlon in the vicinity where she lived and to the many acquaintances she had, she was known as a kind and loving mother and a good neighbor. Her husband died about 30 years ago, and Mrs. Hanlon has been living with her son, James Hanlon, the Highland avenue grocer, for many years. Mrs. Hanlon is survived by one sister, Miss Katherine Ryan of Riverside, Calif., and two sons, John of St. Louis and James of Alton, with whom she made her home. She also leaves 22 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Mrs. Hanlon was a member of the St. Patrick's church and her funeral service will be conducted at that church Monday morning at 9 o'clock. Burial will be in the Greenwood cemetery. Mrs. Hanlon was one of the oldest citizens of Alton and could tell much of the early times in the city when Alton was struggling to become a city and had great hopes the same as the boosters have today. Very few of the friends she knew in her childhood are still living, most all of them having passed to the great beyond many years ago. Until the last few years, Mrs. Hanlon had enjoyed good health.

 

HANNA, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 2, 1905
James Hanna, aged 67, died Friday night, ten minutes before midnight, at his residence in Euclid place after a long illness with diabetes and Bright's disease. His death was due to uraemia. Mr. Hanna's condition of health had been very poor for several years and recently he suffered several acute attacks which threatened to prove fatal. He had wonderful recuperative powers in his strong physique, and he rallied several times when it was believed that he could not survive many hours. He was out on the streets whenever he was able to get downtown, but for the last two weeks he was too ill to get out of the house and was confined to his bed most of the time. He was taken suddenly worse Friday noon and the attack developed into the worst he had ever suffered. Physicians were summoned to attend him and late Friday night a consultation was held by three doctors at his bedside with the result that it was decided that nothing more could be done for him. He died while in an unconscious state from uraemic poisoning. Mr. Hanna was born at Glasgow, Scotland, 67 years ago. His life was filled with stirring events and in recounting his experiences he was very interesting. He left his home in Scotland when a young boy and came to America after he was 18 years of age. He was auditor of the Detroit and Milwaukee railroad at Detroit for several years, and about 28 years ago he took a position as auditor of the St. Louis Terminal association. He held the position twenty-four years, and a few years ago retired because of his failing health. Mr. Hanna was a man whom it was a pleasure to know personally. He was an entertaining conversationalist and a man of great ability in his own line of work. He was recognized as a capable man in the position of auditor, as was shown by the fact that he held the office so many years. He leaves beside his wife, six children. They are Mrs. John Haskell, Misses Agnes, Margaret and Dorothy Hanna, and Robert and Jamie Hanna. Owing to the absence of two of his daughters in the east, the funeral arrangements have not been decided upon. The funeral will probably be held Monday and the services will be in private at the family residence in Euclid place.

 

HANNEHAN, JAMES/Source: Alton Telegraph, Friday, January 9, 1874
An old man named James Hannehan, who formerly lived in this city [Alton], was killed yesterday near Milton by being run over by a train on the Chicago & Alton road. The body was badly disfigured. The deceased left a family. We have been unable to obtain particulars as to the manner in which the accident took place.

 

HANNIGAN, BRIDGET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 30, 1904
The funeral of Mrs. Bridget Hannigan took place this morning from the Cathedral, where a requiem Mass was said by Rev. Fr. Fennessey. Mrs. Hannigan came to Alton from Ireland with her husband, James Hannigan, about 50 years ago, and she lived here ever since. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery.

 

HANSAKER/HANDSAKER, THOMAS/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 18, 1880
Thomas Handsaker was the only surviving son of William and Mary Handsaker, and was born in the city of Derby, England, February 2, 1837. His father emigrated to this country in the spring of 1844, and settled near Alton in this State. He was married to Miss Amanda A. Clifton at Pekin, Ill., October 4, 1855. Eight children were born to them, of whom four daughters are now living. Thomas learned the printing business in the office of the Alton Telegraph, under Judge Bailhache, Lawson A. Parks, and S. R. Dolbee. He entered the office when he was but eleven years of age, and served a regular apprenticeship receiving no compensation for his services excepting the knowledge of the business he acquired. When he left Alton, he went to Carlinville in this State, where, in addition to the regular work of the office, he edited and published a little paper of his own, devoted to the interests of The Cadets of Temperance, of which order he was then a member. He worked for a short time at Atlanta, Ill., but followed his occupation principally at Pekin, Peoria and Washington [Illinois]. At Pekin, he worked on the Tazewell Register. At Peoria he bought and carried on for a while a job office, which he transferred to this place in the early part of the summer of 1868. He published the first number of the Washington Herald, July 12, 1868, and continued to be its editor and publisher until his death. He was a skillful printer, and was noted as one of the most rapid compositors in this part of the country. He attended closely to business, and we have no doubt brought injury upon himself by often working beyond his strength. We think we speak the prevailing opinion when we say that he conducted his paper with remarkably good judgment. Under his control these columns gave their influence uniformly in favor of pure morality and the best interests of the community; by his vigilance they were kept remarkably free from vulgar and unpleasant personalities. The public had learned to rely with great satisfaction upon his good taste and judgment. In all his relations to the public, to his subordinates in the office, and to his family, he was generous and kind. We have been in his employ for seven years, and never did we receive from him one unkind word. That he had faults we have no disposition to deny - but the universal grief at his sad and too early death, tells how readily and tenderly the mantle of charity has been thrown over them all. About a year ago he had a slight stroke of paralysis. Two weeks ago from last Saturday he was smitten with a severe stroke which completely paralyzed the whole left side of his body. A devoted wife and affectionate daughters ministered at his bedside and skillful physicians attended on him, but all was without avail. He quietly passed away about 3 o'clock on Thursday morning, the 4th instant, a little over a week from the time that the second stroke came upon him. We are happy to say that his father and one of his sisters, Mrs. Cheney, arrived from Alton on Wednesday, and had the satisfaction of receiving his affectionate recognition and of ministering to the comfort of his last hours. Mr. Cheney and another sister, Mrs. William Jones, reached this place the day after his death. Mrs. Handsaker had the presence and assistance of her sisters, Mrs. McGrew and Mrs. Robinson, in her affliction. Mr. Handsaker was visited in his sickness by his pastor, Rev. I. A. Cornelison, and by other ministers of the place, among whom Rev. M. L. Fuller was especially kind in his attentions. To them, he expressed very distinctly, his sorrow for his sins, and his trust in the mercy of God, through the Lord Jesus Christ, for forgiveness. The funeral services were held in the Presbyterian church, of which church he had been a member for nearly two years, Rev. I. A. Cornelison preaching the sermon, and Rev. Messrs. Fuller of the Baptist church, Spriggs of the Christian church, and Cromer of the English Lutheran church assisting in the services. Remembering his many kindnesses to us, and his many services to the public, we bespeak the tender sympathy of all for the afflicted family and bereaved relatives.

 

HANSAKER, WILLISM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 21, 1900
William Hansaker, one of the oldest residents of Alton, died this morning at the residence of Mr. George Emery at Ninth and Langdon streets. He was born at Hatton, Derbyshire, England, January 11, 1814, and came to Alton with his family April 2, 1844. Mr. Hansaker was among the best known of the older residents of the city, having been engaged in business in this city many years, and having lived in Alton and vicinity all the time since he first came here. For many years he was in the wagon building business on State Street, and subsequently he lived on the Grafton road on a farm and followed his trade. He leaves three children, Mrs. H. A. Cheney of South Haven, Michigan, Mrs. Mary Jones of Beardstown, Illinois; and Mrs. George Emery of this city. Several brothers, also of advanced years, survive him. Mr. Hansaker had been confined to the residence of his daughter several months, where he has been making his home most of the time of recent years. His death was expected, and he passed peacefully away at an early hour. The funeral will be Friday at 2 p.m. from the Emery home.

 

HANSELL, BENJAMIN R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 11, 1919
Benjamin R. Hansell died shortly after 3 o'clock this morning at the family home on Alby street, after a long illness with complications of diseases. The family came to Alton from Elsah 10 years ago, and is very well known. Hansell was born near Manchester, Ind., October 18, 1851. He is survived by his wife, two daughters, Laura and Blanche, one son, Myron. A sister, Mrs. Sara Knowlton, of Aztec, New Mexico, also survives. The funeral will be held at 11 o'clock Saturday morning from the M. E. church in Elsah. Services will be conducted by Rev. Edward L. Gibson of the First Presbyterian church in Alton.

 

HANSELMANN, JOHN FREDERICH/Source: The Trenton Times(?), 1905 - Submitted by R. J. Smith
After a lingering illness, John Frederich Hanselmann died at his home in St. Morgan, Illinois at 8:00 p.m., Thursday last, at the age of 58 years, 2 months, 26 days. Mr. Hanselmann had long been a sufferer with stomach trouble and some months since underwent treatment in St. Louis. No permanent benefit was derived and the afflicted man was brought home to spend the last remaining days. Funeral services were conducted at the family home Sunday at noon, and the remains were interred in the Trenton Cemetery. Mr. Hanselmann was born in Unterscheffach Koeingreich, Wuerteniburg, Germany on December 12, 1846. After attending school at his native place he took up the trade of blacksmith, which occupation he followed until declining health compelled him to retire. In 1867 he enlisted in the German Army and served through the Franco-German War from 1870-1871. He received a wound in battle that affected him during the remainder of his life. In the fall of 1871 he came to America locating in St. Morgan which has ever since has been his home. In 1873 he was united in marriage with Miss Katharine Barbara Klenk who survives. To the union were born 12 children, of whom proceeded the father in death. Those living are: Ernest, Emil, Fred, Otto, William, Oscar, Katharine, Mrs. Lena Toerper, Emma and Louisa. Besides wife and children, deceased leaves two brothers and two sisters in Germany, One sister, Mrs. Fred Neumann of this city, and four grandchildren. Mr. Hanselmann in earlier years conducted the only blacksmith shop for miles around, and while in business formed a wide acquaintance. His popularity was due to his genial disposition and upright character. The largely attended funeral attested to the esteem in which he was held by neighbors and friends.

 

(see also HANSON)

HANSEN, CATHARINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 10, 1905
The funeral of Catharine, 11 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hansen of Washington street, took place Sunday afternoon from St. Patrick's church to Greenwood cemetery.

 

HANSEN, LOUISA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 5, 1900
Louisa Hansen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Hansen, aged 4 years, died this morning at the family home in Bozzatown. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

 

HANSEN, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 9, 1900
Peter Hansen died this morning at his home on Shields street after an illness of only a few days with brain fever. He was 30 years of age today. A few days ago a child of Mr. Hansen died, and he was taken ill a short time after. He leaves a wife.

 

HANSER, FREDERICK/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, December 30, 1891
Note: this obit was very hard to read
Frederick Hanser, an old and respected citizen, died at his home on North Main street, in the first ward, Monday morning [Dec. 28] at 6:30 o'clock. He had been sick, two weeks, suffering with abscess of the lungs. The funeral took place this afternoon from the family residence. Rev. Carl Kunzmann conducted services. The remains were interred in Woodlawn cemetery. The funeral was under the auspices of the Druids and Odd Fellows lodges, of which he was an honored member. The Maenneresor sang a long at the grave. The pallbearers were, Argalius Stubbs, T. W. McCune, F. G. Bernius, Frank [unreadable], George Ziegler and Barney Schwarzkopf. A large concourse of sorrowful relatives and sympathizing friends followed the remains to their final resting place. He was born at Wolfen______, Germany, December 16, 1833, and came to this country, landing at New Orleans, Dec. 16, 1856, afterwards settling at Highland. He came to this city, July 5, 1858, and has resided here since. He married Miss Elizabeth Betzold, April 7, 1861. Of this union seven children were born, all of whom survive. They are, in order of age, Mrs. Mary Abenbrink, Lizzie and Fred Hanser, Mrs. T. McCune, Emma, Julia, and George Hanser. His wife, mother, Mrs. L. ____ of Highland and four brothers, Jacob of this city, William of Bellevue, Christ and August of Anquilla, Miss., also survive. His mother, Mrs. D_____ and husband, Mrs. Christ Yann and Will Hanser of Highland; Mrs. Barbara Zopf of Lockwood, Mo., sister of Mrs. Hanser; Ed Betzold of ____, Adam Betzold of Nokomis, and Adam Betzold of St. Louis were in attendance of the funeral. His wife and son, Fra__ are sick, the former with pneumonia and the latter with inflamatory rheumatism. They were unable to attend the funeral.

 

HANSON, M. E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 6, 1908
Wife of Nathaniel Hanson Dies in Chicago
S. F. Connor and Mrs. J. N. Drummond today received messages telling them of the death of Mrs. M. E. Hanson, Sunday, at the home of her son-in-law, Charles Randle, Drexel Boulevard, Chicago. She was 84 years of age. Mrs. Hanson was the widow of Nathaniel Hanson, who was the owner of the Alton Agricultural Works in its palmy days when Alton was a great distributing center for agricultural supplies. Mr. Hanson died in Alton when his business was at its best, and he was buried in City Cemetery. The messages received did not say whether the interment would be in Alton, beside the body of Mrs. Hanson's husband.

 

HANSON, NATHANIEL/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 5, 1864
Founder of Alton Agricultural Works (N. Hanson & Co.)
Our citizens met with a great loss in the death of Mr. Nathaniel Hanson, one of our oldest and most enterprising citizens, who departed this life about nine o'clock of Saturday evening last (July 30, 1864). He was well known as the senior partner in the firm of N. Hanson & Co., manufacturers of Pitts Threshing machines. He came from the east and settled here more than twenty-five years ago, and has ever since been engaged in active business, which has abundantly rewarded his labor and industry. He was amiable in social life, benevolent and philanthropic, and public spirited as a citizen, and will not only be greatly missed by his wife and children, but by the community at large. [Hanson is buried in the old section of the Alton City Cemetery. Hiram Pitts, co-inventor of the Pitts machine which Hanson sold, was Hanson's brother-in-law, Pitts lived in Alton from July 1848 until late 1851.]

 

HAPGOOD, CHARLES H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1917
Founder of Hapgood Plow Company and Father of Literary Sons Dies
Word came to Alton this morning that Charles H. Hapgood, founder of the Hapgood Plow Co., and formerly a resident of Alton, had died in Washington D. C., after a long period of failing health. The news of the death of Mr. Hapgood was a surprise to most of his old acquaintances in Alton. He was an occasional visitor here, coming here to look after business interests. Mr. Hapgood was in business in Chicago at the time of the Chicago fire. Then he opened a plant in St. Louis, but after a time he accepted a bonus that was offered by Alton citizens and came here with his factory. He conducted the plow factory for a number of years before selling out his stock to the present majority owner, H. L. Black. Mr. Hapgood was the father of some sons who distinguished themselves in the literary world. He leaves also his wife. Mr. Hapgood was 81 years of age. He had been suffering for a year from general weakness and his death was due to old age. His sons are Norman Hapgood, William Hapgood, and Hutchins Hapgood. Regarding the place of burial, nothing was known today. The only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hapgood, Ruth, died and was buried in Alton City Cemetery, but it was not known what the plans of the family are regarding his burial place. H. L. Black said today that Mr. Hapgood came to Alton about 1874, and that he gave up his home here in 1908. Prior to that time he had been in Alton but little of the time, but he maintained his legal residence in this city. For years the family lived in the house now occupied by W. T. Louden on Liberty street. Mr. Hapgood was a man of letters, a much traveled gentleman, and entertained himself in his years of retirement by studying the peoples of the globe. His son, Norman, is now in France as a writer for a syndicate. Hutchins is in Newark, N. J., and William is a manufacturer in Indianapolis.

 

HAPGOOD, FANNY POWERS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 28, 1922
Widow of C. H. Hapgood - Founder of Hapgood Plow Company
News of the death of Mrs. Fanny Powers Hapgood, widow of C. H. Hapgood, was received today by the Telegraph, from William P. Hapgood. She died today at Indianapolis and the body will be taken to Greenwood cemetery, New York City, for burial. Mrs. Hapgood was for years a resident of Alton and it was here that she reared her family. Her husband was the founder of the Hapgood Plow Co. at Alton, and continued his interest in that institution for a long time. The family resided at Fifteenth and Liberty streets. Until recent years, she occasionally visited her old friends in Alton, in company with Mr. Hapgood. She leaves three sons, Norman Hapgood and Hutchins Hapgood, both writers of much fame, and William P. Hapgood, who is in business in Indianapolis. News of the death of Mrs. Hapgood was received with much surprise by some of her old friends and neighbors in Alton.

 

HAPGOOD, HARRIET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 6, 1915
When Mrs. George Miller Sr. of Madison avenue went to pay her morning call on Mrs. Harriet Hapgood of Madison avenue, the latter did not answer her knock, and Mrs. Miller left again without bothering her. Returning a little later she found Mrs. Hapgood in an unconscious state, and quickly telephoned for a doctor. When the doctor arrived, he pronounced Mrs. Hapgood dead, saying that she must have passed off in her sleep, and that she had been dead some hours. Mrs. Hapgood was a resident of Madison avenue for some years and was loved and venerated by all who came in contact with her, on account of her loving and sweet disposition. She was the sister of Mrs. Hayden, who died some time ago. For a number of years she and another sister lived together, but two years ago death separated them and since that time she has lived with Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Meyers, and was nursed carefully by Mrs. George Miller. Mrs. Hapgood was in her 85th year. For several years she had been very feeble and two years ago fell and broke her hip and the injury never healed. Since that time she has been bedfast. During all her illness she was always patient and was very much beloved by those who cared for her. Mrs. Hapgood was married twice. After the death of her first husband, Mr. Hapgood, she married a man named Wallace, and after his death she resumed the name of her former husband and drew a pension as his widow. The aged lady lost her only son a few years ago, and her estate must go to distant relatives. The funeral will be tomorrow morning at 10:30 o'clock from the home, and Rev. Arthur Goodget will conduct the services.

 

HAPGOOD, HARRIET E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 26, 1901
The death of Mrs. Harriet E. Hapgood, a former resident of Alton, occurred Saturday in Chicago. Her husband, L. H. Hapgood, and daughter Anna K. Hapgood, preceded her to the spirit land and are buried here. She is at rest beside them in the City Cemetery, the body arriving this afternoon and the funeral taking place from the Union depot. Deceased was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and services were conducted by Rev. G. W. Shepherd. Mrs. Hapgood was a cousin of Mrs. W. E. Pierce.

 

HAPGOOD, RUTH/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, March 31, 1890
Daughter of Charles H. Hapgood [Founder of Hapgood Plow Co.] Dies of Diphtheria
The very many friends and acquaintances of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Hapgood were shocked yesterday morning to hear of the death of their little daughter, Ruth, which occurred the night before, about 10 o'clock. Ruth was taken ill with diphtheria about two weeks ago, and at one time her condition was considered quite serious, but for the last week she was able to take considerable nourishment, and was thought to be convalescing. But the disease had left the child in so exhausted a condition that death ensued from heart failure. This result was not anticipated by anyone of the family until a short time before it actually took place. Ruth was a beautiful child with a sweet and lovely disposition, the joy and light of the household, and the dearest of companions to her circle of little friends. The sympathies of the community will be freely extended to the stricken parents and family in this sad affliction. The funeral took place this morning at 11 o'clock. The services, at the cemetery, were conducted by Rev. Dr. Snyder of St. Louis, who read a selection from the Scripture and made brief remarks, closing with prayer. The pallbearers were Dr. W. A. Haskell, William Eliot Smith, F. H. Ferguson, and E. W. Pattison of St. Louis. The death of little Ruth, following so closely two similar afflictions in other families, has caused a profound feeling of depression throughout the city. The event is inexpressibly sad, and words of sympathy seem at best but "a well-meant alms of breath."

 

HARFORD, H. L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 7, 1917
H. L. Harford, one of the best known men in Alton, died very suddenly at his home, 321 East Fifth street, at 12:50 o'clock Wednesday morning from apoplexy. Mr. Harford had been feeling unwell for three or four weeks but nothing serious was thought of it. About midnight Tuesday, he began to suffer intensely with pains in his head and shoulder, and with Mrs. Harford he walked down the street to the home of Dr. Enos, a neighbor. Immediately after they returned to the home, Mr. Harford fell over unconscious and he was dead within a few minutes. The end had come before there was any chance to call for help. Mr. Harford was born in New York City, December 10, 1863, and came to Alton in 1895. He engaged in the coal business here and afterward was engaged in other lines. His last business venture in Alton was in the sale of tombstones. He then went to Texas in the interests of a company organized to build mausoleums, but the war caused such a change in conditions he gave that up and came back home September 16, and had been here ever since. He had been suffering from violent headaches from time to time, but this seemed to be of only a trifling character. He comes of a big family, and besides his wife and two sons, Harold and Lysle, he leaves eight brothers and one sister in Middletown, N. Y. Mr. Harford was prominent in several lines in Alton, among them being lodge work, and in the work of the First Baptist Church. He was a very entertaining man, and he had a large number of friends. At social gatherings in the church, especially those given by the Bible class of the Sunday School, he was one of the leaders, and both in the church and the lodge to which he belonged he was much relied upon to manage important features of entertainments. He was a member of Franklin lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Upper Alton. One son, Lysle, is in Canada where he was sent to look after some agricultural work. The son has been notified and is expected to come home to the funeral. The funeral arrangements will not be made until it can be known when the son will arrive.

 

HARLAN, CHARLES H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 19, 1921
Charles H. Harlan, aged 73, died Saturday night after a long illness which culminated in a complete breakdown recently. Mr. Harlan was a brother of the late E. M. Harlan, whose disappearance from his home in Upper Alton caused much anxiety for a time, and whose body was finally found where it had been lying for more than a week just outside Rock Spring park. The disappearance of his brother weighed heavily on him and soon after the body of E. M. Harlan was found, the breakdown of Charles H. Harlan became complete. He was employed for 26 years by the street car company, serving in the car barns after he became too old to do outside work. His kindly disposition caused him to be held in the deepest affection by the men with whom he worked, and there was general sorrow among them when it became necessary for him to give up his work because of impaired health. He came to Alton 28 years ago. Mr. Harlan is survived by his wife and four children: Clarence M., Lawrence W., Addie R. Harlan and Mrs. Jennie Howard. Mr. Harlan enlisted in the army near the close of the Civil War and after the war was over, he served in the army of reconstruction in the southern states as a regular. The funeral will be held at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon from the home, 905 Belle Street, and services will be conducted by Rev. C. Shumard. Burial will be in the Oakwood cemetery.

 

HARLAN, E. W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1921
Old Soldier Found Dead in Hedge Fence at Rock Spring Park
E. W. Harlan, aged 75, the old soldier who has been missing since one week ago last Wednesday, was found dead under a hedge at the northwest corner of Rock Spring park. There was every indication to believe that the old man died from natural causes, probably a stroke of apoplexy which proved fatal instantly. The position of his body led Deputy Coroner Streeper to form the conclusion that as the aged man was walking along through the country as he loved to do, he was suddenly stricken, collapsed, and falling in a heap, never moved again. His hat was on his head, in his hand was still a stick he had used for a cane, and his limbs were crumpled up in such a position as to indicate a collapse. The full amount of money, $94, he had with him, was found intact in his pocket. There was no indication of any external violence. The body was in a bad state of decomposition. The discovery was made by Ray Howard, a nephew of Mr. Harlan, who had been pressing a ceaseless search for the old man. The vicinity where the body was found had been searched over, but the particular corner where Harlan had fallen must have been omitted in the search until this morning. Chief of Police Lind said today that he had covered the vicinity himself, and must have passed near by the body several times. He was especially gratified at the indication that there had been no foul play, as a theory was being worked upon that the old man might have been done away with for what he had on him. Deputy Coroner C. N. Streeper took charge of the body and made a careful examination before announcing his conclusion that death was undoubtedly due to natural causes.

 

HARLAN, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 24, 1903
Edward Harlan, a former resident of Alton, died suddenly at his home in Madison Saturday evening. He was 53 years of age and leaves a wife and five children. The body was brought to Alton this afternoon and buried in the City Cemetery. Services were conducted by Rev. O. L. Peterson. Messrs. Charles and E. W. Harlan are brothers of the deceased.

 

HARLOW, W. E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 7, 1918
Rep. of International Correspondence School Dies of Influenza
W. E. Harlow, one of the best known men about Alton, died from influenza today at his home, 1319 State Street, aged 36. The death of Mr. Harlow was a great surprise to his family and his neighbors. He had been sick with the disease for a week, but it was believed he was recovering. He took a relapse and last night he became very much worse. His whole family had been sick in the house with him. The oldest son, Thomas, had been the first to recover, and while the remainder of the family was down with influenza, the boy had been taking care of the others, with the assistance of such of the intimate friends who braved the danger of the disease and entered the house. Mrs. Harlow herself had just been able to get up after being very sick with the disease when her husband collapsed. The wife and mother is in a weak condition as the result of her own experience with the malady. Mr. Harlow came to Alton about five years ago to make his home. He had been a frequent visitor here and transacted business in Alton. He decided to move to the city and very soon afterward he began to take an active part in many different lines of work. He was possessed of a disposition that made him hosts of friends. There was no one who knew him but trusted him and put every reliance in his word. His kindly thoughtfulness for others was one of his distinguishing traits of character. He was known among his friends as being a man who would render friendly assistance to any of those he knew to be in need of such assistance, and his death has left a large number of friends of himself and his family who are heart sick over his untimely end. He was a native of Tennessee, but he lived in Jacksonville, Ill., and in St. Louis, before coming to Alton. Mr. Harlow had made a great success of the line of work he had undertaken and he had opportunity of going elsewhere, but he preferred to remain in Alton. He was very deeply interested in the poultry shows and the Alton Poultry Association's work in Alton. He was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. Beside his wife, Mr. Harlow leaves three young sons, Thomas, Robert and Lee. Beside his wife and three sons, Mr. Harlow leaves a brother, L. H. Harlow of Little Rock, Ark., and two sisters, Mrs. Norman Wagner of Los Angeles, Miss Frances Harlow of Berkeley, Cal., and his mother, Mrs. J. B. Harlow of the same city. The time of the funeral will not be set until the arrival of a sister of Mrs. Harlow.

 

HARMON, HARRIET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 15, 1901
Mrs. Harriet Harmon died this morning at the residence of Mrs. Rice in Godfrey, after a three days illness, aged 63. The funeral will take place at 1 o'clock Saturday afternoon from the Rice home.

 

HARMS, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 26, 1916
Henry Harms, aged 67, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Fred Schelle, 1008 East Sixth street, at 6 o'clock Wednesday evening after an illness of one week. He was taken suddenly ill a week ago, and his condition has continued to grow worse steadily until last evening. Mr. Harms was a tailor. He has lived in Alton for many years and was very well known here, especially in the eastern part of the city. He is survived by three children, two sons, George and Henry, and one daughter, Mrs. Schelle. He also leaves two brothers and a sister, all of St. Louis. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the home to the City Cemetery. The services will be conducted by the Rev. Theo Oberhellmann.

 

HARMS, WEYE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 1, 1904
Weye Harms, a well known bartender, died at his home on Henry street Wednesday afternoon about 4 o'clock after a short illness with pneumonia. He was 34 years of age and leaves a wife and one child. A brother living in Gillespie and another brother and his mother of Gillespie also survive. Mr. Harms was one of the judges of election in the Fifth ward at the recent election, and his all-night work that night wore him out and in addition caused him to catch cold which developed into pneumonia Sunday night. Both brothers are here making funeral arrangements, and the body will be shipped to Gillespie Friday morning for burial. The funeral services will be held this evening at 7:30 o'clock at the family home, and will be conducted by Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann. The funeral party will leave in the morning for Gillespie where the body will be buried.

 

HARNEY, EMMA STEWART/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 13, 1910
Grief Over Children Broke Health
Mrs. Emma Stewart Harney, wife of Paul Harney, died at midnight Sunday night after an illness of several years from tuberculosis of the lungs, at the family home on Mill street. Mrs. Harney's death was due to the same disease that took three of her children in 14 months, and left her childless. Her children's death bore heavily upon her, and soon after the death of her last child, Mrs. Estelle Hauskins, she became ill herself. Her other two children who died were Howard and Paul Harney, and there was just 14 months time between the first and the last. Mrs. Harney's death had been expected for several months. She was able to speak up to the last and enjoyed callers. All that medical science could do was done for her, and toward the last she had no medical attention, as she realized it was no use. She was born in Baltimore, Md., October 7, 1852. She was married in St. Louis to Paul Harney in 1877, and after living there seven years she came to Alton with her husband and two children. The family had lived in Alton and Upper Alton ever since. It was by her request that the men who served as pallbearers for her three children should serve also for her, and until they are heard from the time of the funeral will not be set.

 

HARNEY, HOWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1907
Howard Harney, the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Harney, died Friday at San Antonio, Texas, where he was staying for the benefit of his health. The young man was attended by his mother and sister, who left here a week ago to be with him. Howard left Alton a month ago for the south, in the hope of improving his health in the southern climate. He had been in ill health for some time, but had manifestly continued to follow his usual vocation. At the time of his departure for Texas he was day clerk at the Madison hotel, and he had served as a clerk at the Chautauqua hotel. Shortly after he went to San Antonio he began making reports of improvement in his condition, and there was general surprise when the news of his death there came Friday night. His brother, Paul, who went south under similar circumstances, died in the same way, and this, the second bereavement of the family in a period of eighteen months, is a doubly hard affliction for the mother, father and sister. The body will be brought back to Alton for burial, but the time of the funeral is not set.

 

Painting of Paul HarneyHARNEY, PAUL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 27, 1915
Well Known Alton Artist Dies in St. Louis - Moving Picture Show Partly Founded On His Work
Paul Harney, artist, died Saturday morning at 2 o'clock at a hospital in St. Louis, where he had been staying for some time. His death was due to a malady which had necessitated two surgical operations. Of his whole family, there is none left. Mr. Harney was 66 years of age. He was a painter of great talent and he often expressed the opinion that after he was dead his pictures, which poorly repaid him, would be "worth something," but that he would not be there to see it. His judgment will no doubt be justified. He had been in failing health for some time. He had suffered afflictions such as few people are called upon to undergo. One after another the children, of whom he was very fond, passed away, and his wife, too, died. After that he took up hotel life. His sorrows had broken him, and at last he left Alton to be away from the scenes that had been associated in his mind with so much that was sad. He devoted his time to painting. Chicken pictures and monk's heads were his favorites, and there was always a demand for the pictures. He was devoid of any business instincts, and never did take advantage of opportunity he had to insist upon better prices for his work. Most of his pictures were bought by his friends, who now that he is dead, will treasure the paintings highly. Mr. Harney was born in New Orleans. He came to Alton from St. Louis about thirty-three years ago. He lived here until a few years ago when he went back to St. Louis. Wherever he was he was always welcome. He was filled with wit and humor, and he was a story teller of talent. He had artistic sense that was strong in many lines other than painting. A few years ago he was called to New York to do some work on some pictures that were being painted by A. J. Conant, a painter, who formerly lived in Upper Alton, and who was trying, when a very old man, to continue his work. Nearly blind, his hand no longer possessed of the cunning it once had, Conant was making a miserable failure of his work, and Harney was called in by a daughter of the old painter. Mr. Harney finished the pictures, and Conant's name was put on them. On this story was founded a moving picture show which appeared in Alton later, but Mr. Harney did not know of it until the picture had been exhibited. He was a member of the Masonic order and a Knight Templar. He was also a member of the Artists Guild of St. Louis. The funeral will be Monday morning at 10 o'clock from the Artists Guild. His sister, Mrs. Mary Walker, lives at 1202 East Second street. Outside of his granddaughter, Miss Paula Harney, Mrs. Walker is the only living relative. She said today that her brother's wife and children are buried in Oakwood cemetery, but she was not informed as to the plan for the burial. [Note: Google his name for more info!]

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 3, 1907
Paul Harney has completed a handsome picture of Illini Island for W. H. Wiseman, which is one of the very best things this artist has ever done. The picture was made to fit a place in the studio of Mr. Wiseman, over a mantel. It is 5 feet long and 30 inches in width. The view is looking up the river and across from the Illinois shore. The picture has been much admired.

 

HARNEY, PAUL JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1906
Paul Harney, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Harney, died suddenly yesterday at Austin, Texas, where he was staying for the benefit of his health. The news of the death came as a sad shock to the parents, brother and sister. Three weeks ago he left home to spend an indefinite time in Texas for the benefit of his health. When he left he was filled with high hope that he would recover, and he said as he left on the train that he was going on a sketching trip in Texas and Arizona, and he was expecting to have a good time in the warmer, dry climate of the south. He was a young artist of great promise, and his talent was such that, had he lived, he would have been an artist of renown some day, his friends believed. From his childhood he had evinced a fondness for works of art and designing. His parents recall how when playing with blocks in his infancy he manifested unusual talent in making designs with them on the floor which would attract the attention of even the most casual observer. In recent years he took up painting, being taught by his father in the principles of art, and he has made some pictures which are today highly prized by those who have them in keeping. He was able to make sketches which were faithful to life, and his friends sought his pictures eagerly. The boy had been in ill health for several years. His devotion to art probably assisted in weakening his constitution, but he was quiet and uncomplaining and few knew until the ultimate breakdown came that he was in such a dangerous condition. At last he was persuaded to make the trip to the southland in the hope that he would be benefited. He went first to Austin, Texas, three weeks ago, and only yesterday a letter came to the mother that he was gaining in health, and his letter was exceedingly bright and cheerful. He had several hemorrhages from the lungs before he left home, and while no details of the cause of his death have been received, it is supposed that he suffered another hemorrhage and that it proved fatal. A telegram was received by Mr. Paul Harney Sr. this morning in St. Louis, announcing the death of his son, and it came as a great surprise. The news was communicated to the mother in Alton, who lives at 612 Alby street. Nothing is known as to when the body will arrive in Alton. Instructions were sent that it be sent here for burial, and on its arrival it will be taken to the family home on Alby street. The death of Paul Harney cast a shadow over the spirits of his friends that is dark indeed. The young man was 23 years of age January 19. He was liked by all who knew him well and had many friends.

 

HARNISCH, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1911
Fred Harnisch, aged 65, died at his home, 318 Ridge street, Sunday noon from gangrene, after undergoing two surgical operations in the hope that the gangrene that had affected his right foot might be arrested. Harnisch, who was janitor at the Alton Banking & Trust Co. building, dropped a lump of coal on his right foot and injured his great toe. The injury did not heal, and finally gangrene set in. The toe was amputated, and recently his foot had to be cut off. On Saturday he was moved from the hospital to his home, as it was known that he would die, and he desired to die at home. He lived less than 24 hours thereafter. Harnisch leaves his wife. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from his home.

 

HARR, HALLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 16, 1917
Killed When Auto Turns Over....Pinned Under Car
Hallie Harr, aged 29, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Harr of Spaulding avenue, Upper Alton, was killed, and Miss Margaret Dawson, daughter of Thomas Dawson, was badly cut and bruised, when the Chandler auto in which they were riding left the road and tipped over near the Culp School house, 6 o'clock Sunday evening. Pearl and Loretta Tone and Fred Oertel who were in the back seat of the big car, escaped without a scratch. A narrow road, a mud hole and high grass along side the road were the causes of the accident. According to the version as given by Fred Oertel, the young people had been out riding in the car during the afternoon. They had visited relatives of the Tone girls, north of Bethalto, and were returning home. Harr had been traveling on the left side of the road because it was much better than the right side. As he neared the spot where the fatal accident occurred, he turned from the left to the right side to get out of the way of a mud hole. Harr evidently lost control of the car. The sight of one of his eyes was gone, and he might have been misled by the high weeds at the side of the road into not seeing the embankment. The next moment the machine shot over the 10 foot embankment and turned completely over with the four wheels extending into the air. The front seat caught Harr's head, crushing it, and the steering wheel caught his chest. Miss Margaret Dawson, who was riding in the front seat with Harr at the time, was also caught under the car. Oertel said: "A moment after the accident I found a small hole where the three of us in the back seat could crawl out. I looked for Harr and saw him crushed under the machine. He must have been killed instantly, for he never spoke a word or made a move. Miss Dawson was caught under the machine. After sending the two girls who were in the back seat for help, I succeeded, by using a pole for a lever, in getting her from under the car, and she was in a hysterical condition. After that I tried to get Harr from under the car and failed. Then I went for help and soon a gang of twenty-four men gathered and together we lifted the big car bodily off him. The body was under the car in all about 45 minutes." Both of the young men were employed at the Laclede Steel Works. Oertel formerly lived in Brighton, but has been working here for some time. Although Harr had owned the Chandler auto but a month, he was an experienced driver. Only yesterday afternoon when asked if he could make a certain strip of road he replied: "I am game enough to go anywhere that four wheels can get through."

 

HARRIS, ADA B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1920
Miss Ada H. B. Harris, for seventy years a resident in one home on 11th street between Langdon and Henry streets, died at St. Joseph's hospital Sunday morning at 3 o'clock, from paralysis. She had been in the hospital thirteen months. A year ago last September 12, she was stricken with paralysis and was disabled. A week before she died she was stricken for the last time and was unconscious almost all of the time from then until the end came. Miss Harris was born in Belleville, Ill., September 30, 1844, and was in her 70th year. She came to Alton when she was about six years of age, and with her parents settled in the house where she had lived up to the time she was taken to the hospital after she became disabled. She was a member of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church, and for many years was a deeply interested worker in that church. Miss Harris is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Mary Beall of Alton; Mrs. Abbie Greenwood of Edwardsville; Mrs. Anna Weld of Alton; and one brother, B. B. Harris of Detroit. Her brother has been with her in the last week of her sickness. The funeral of Miss Harris will be held at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon from the home of Mrs. Mary Beall, on Twelfth street, and services will be conducted by Rev. C. E. Combrink of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church. Burial will be in City cemetery. Six nephews of Miss Harris - Harris Weld, Roy and E. H. Beall, Harry and Mont Malcolm and Berry Harris, will serve as pallbearers.

 

HARRIS, CHARLES W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 18, 1918
Charles W. Harris died at noon Wednesday after a long illness. Mr. Harris was prostrated last March and never regained his health. He was 62 years of age on August 26. Mr. Harris was born in Alton in the house where his family resided at the time of his death, and he had spent practically all of his life in Alton. He was a well known carpenter and contractor in Alton for many years, but for the last few years has been unable to attend to that kind of work. He leaves four children: Charles W. Jr.; Berry B.; Margaret F.; and Malcolm B. Harris. Berry Harris is in France in the army, and Malcolm is at Camp Meade, Md. Mr. Harris leaves also one brother, B. B. Harris of Jeffersonville, Ind.; four sisters, Mrs. Edmond Beall, Mrs. Abbie Greenwood of Edwardsville, Miss Ada B. Harris and Mrs. Anna Weld of Alton. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon from the home, 523 East Eleventh street.

 

HARRIS, CLARICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1916
Mrs. Clarice Harris, wife of George W. Harris, died yesterday at her home on Rock street from pneumonia, after a short illness. She is survived by her husband and baby child. Her mother also survives. Mrs. Harris was but 19 years of age, and her death was a shock to her family and to her friends of whom she had many. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

 

HARRIS, JOHN LUTHER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 13, 1905
John Luther Harris, aged 34, died Sunday at St. Joseph's hospital after a weeks illness from appendicitis. He was a brother of Alderman Thomas A. Harris, and he leaves his wife and two children, Nathan A., aged 13, and Charles, aged 10. He leaves also his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James M. Harris of Pittsburg, Pa., and two other brothers, George F. and James M, both of Pittsburg. The parents arrived today, having been notified of their son's death. Mr. Harris was at work in the glass works just a week ago Saturday. On Monday he became very ill and was taken to the hospital where an operation was performed, and it was found that a large abscess had formed in his abdomen from the malady with which he was suffering. Mr. Harris was a glass blower by occupation and a man of most exemplary character. He was a member of the Cherry street Baptist church, and was much interested in that organization. He was also a member of the order of the Maccabbees, and the funeral will be under the auspices of that society.

 

HARRIS, LOUIS T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 20, 1902
Civil War Veteran Dies
Louis T. Harris, aged 69 [or 60], died Tuesday morning at 1:30 o'clock at his home on Ninth street between Langdon and George streets, after a long illness from stomach trouble. He was born in Alton and lived here all his life. He was a veteran of the Civil War, serving in the 37th Illinois regiment. He leaves his wife and eight children, three of whom are of adult age: Louis T. Harris Jr., Oliver Harris, and Maud Harris. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock, and services at the family home will be conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenny of the Cherry street Baptist chapel. Friends of the family are invited to attend the services at the City Cemetery.

 

HARRIS, LOUISA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1917
Mrs. Louisa Harris, widow of William Harris, died this morning at 4 o'clock at the Harris homestead on the Fosterburg road, east of Upper Alton. Mrs. Harris was 80 years, 11 months, and 10 days old. She had been a resident of this vicinity a long number of years. Mrs. Harris was born at Patterson in Greene county, and was the daughter of Thomas Groce. She was married in Wood River township to William Harris on November 30, 1854. To this union were born nine children, four of whom are living. The children who survive are: Nathan Harris, who resides on the homestead; Frank Harris of Liberty, Mo.; Mrs. Nancy Golike of West Alton; and Mrs. Rilla Welling of Foster township. The funeral will be held at 11 o'clock Monday morning at the home, and interment will be in Short cemetery.

 

HARRIS, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1910
Mrs. Margaret Harris, widow of B. B. Harris, died Monday afternoon at 3:20 o'clock after a long illness resulting from her great age. She was 88 years old, and almost all of her life was spent in Alton. She is survived by five daughters and two sons, Mrs. S. H. Malcom; Mrs. E. R. Greenwood; Mrs. Edmond Beall; Mrs. John Weld; Miss Ada Harris; Charles and Benjamin B. Harris. Mrs. Greenwood lives at Edwardsville, and B. B. Harris at Memphis. All of the children were here at the time of the mother's death. Mrs. Harris had been ill a year. Until recently there was hope of her recovery, but several weeks ago she suffered a backset and from that time her decline was steady. She was married to B. B. Harris when very young and shortly after her marriage came to Alton, where she continued to reside. Mrs. Harris raised a large family of children. She was a Christian woman, a good mother, and a good neighbor. In her long illness she has received many attentions not only from her family, but from her neighbors and friends.

 

HARRIS, MARIE (nee CULP)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 29, 1921
Widow of Nathan Harris Dies
Mrs. Marie Harris, widow of Nathan Harris, died Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock at the Harris homestead, east of Upper Alton on the Fosterburg road. Mrs. Harris' death followed a stroke of paralysis that came upon her three days before. She was 79 years old and was born and spent her life in that neighborhood. Last Wednesday Mrs. Harris' children and a number of grandchildren and three great-grandchildren spent the day with her. It was a family reunion and the day was a very happy one for all who attended and especially so to the aged woman. Only a few hours had passed after the children had left for their homes when Mrs. Harris suffered a stroke of paralysis. Her condition was known to be serious from the start, and as the hours passed she declined steadily until at 3 o'clock, Saturday afternoon, the end came. Mrs. Harris was a member of the Culp family, and of that family only two members survive her - Tine Culp of Upper Alton, the only brother, and Mrs. Mollie Crawford, formerly of Upper Alton but now of Salem, Oregon. She was born in the Fosterburg-Bethalto neighborhood, ad had spent life in that immediate vicinity. She had lived over fifty years on the home place where her death occurred. Her husband died about ten years ago. Mrs. Harris was born May 9, 1842, and was 79 years old. She leaves a family of eight children. They are: William of Brooks, Oregon; Jess and Sam of Upper Alton; John of Dixon, Ill.; Mrs. T. P. Dooling; Mrs. Fanny Campbell; Mrs. Ben Budde; and Mrs. Clara Titchenal, of the Upper Alton neighborhood. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock at the Mt. Olive Baptist Church. Burial will be in the Short Cemetery.

 

HARRIS, MARY V./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1912
Mrs. Mary V. Harris, aged 75, died this morning at 7:45 o'clock at her home on Sixth street between Henry and Liberty after an illness of twenty-six hours. Her death was very unexpected. Mrs. Harris had been apparently in good condition until Thursday morning when she became very ill about 6 o'clock. She had been out calling the day before, but had been suffering slightly from what was diagnosed as malaria. She became very ill Thursday morning and did not show any signs of improvement, although she was conscious to the end. Mrs. Harris was born in Yonkeers, N. Y., September 27, 1826. She came to Alton about fifty years ago and had lived here ever since. She was the widow of B. W. Harris, who died many years ago. She leaves three daughters, Miss Emma Harris who is principal of Garfield School in Alton; Mrs. R. D. Nixon and Mrs. Finis Logan. She leaves also a sister, Mrs. D. Moody of Bethany, Ill., and a brother, R. B. Crossman of Clayton, Mo. Mrs. Harris recently celebrated her 75th birthday and was one of the happiest at the family gathering in her honor. She received a 75 page letter written by a niece in Texas, in honor of the birthday anniversary. In all her long years of residence in Alton, Mrs. Harris merited the name of being a beautiful character, a loving mother, a kind neighbor, and a woman whom it was pleasant to know. She leaves a host of friends who will sincerely mourn her sudden death. The body will be taken at 4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon to the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. E. Logan, 1709 Liberty street, where funeral services will be held Sunday morning at 9:30 o'clock, Rev. D. R. Martin and Rev. G. L. Clark officiating.

 

HARRIS, MILDRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 21, 1904
The funeral of Mildred, 5 year old daughter of Mrs. L. T. Harris, will take place Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home, 430 East Tenth street. Services will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing.

 

HARRIS, MOSES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 2, 1910
The funeral of the late Moses Harris took place at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the home on Bozza street. REv. C. L. Peterson of Marissa, formerly pastor of the Washington M. E. church, conducted the services. A large number of the friends of the old resident attended the funeral service. Among those who attended from out of the city were Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Harris of Kansas City, George Pebbet of Springfield, Ill., Messrs. C. Forsyth, William Robinson and A. R. Daniels, Mrs. C. Forsythe and Miss Minnie Robinson, of Carlinville, C. L. Sparkman and son, Earl of Litchfield, Miss Emma Broker of Divernon, Ill., and Mrs. I. M. Story of Brighton.

 

HARRIS, ROLAND/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1910
Seven Year Old Boy Dies After Being Run Over by Heavy Wagon
Roland, the 7 year old son of Roland P. Harris, was fatally injured Thursday evening about 5:30 o'clock by being run over by a heavy wagon belonging to the Alton Feed Co. at Fourth and Market street. The laughing little boy was out enjoying coasting down Fourth street hill from Alby to Market, on the sidewalk along his home place. With him was his brother, Louis, and a party of other boys about his age. The coasting track was on the south sidewalk, and just before reaching Market street an old frame building obstructed the view to the south of any approaching vehicles. There was no snow on Market streets, and the sleds could not go far on the paving, but the sled carrying the little boy who was killed went just far enough to result in a fatal accident. Harry Russell, who was driving the wagon, could not see the boy coasting down the hill and before he knew it the sled with its little passenger was under the wagon and a wheel had passed over the child's body. After being hurt, the little boy got up to his feet and fell. Dr. Frank Hopkins was close by, and he carried the child to his home a block away, where surgeons were summoned. Death followed a half hour later. The driver of the wagon accompanied the child to the home, and then left his name. No blame was attached to him, as the accident seemed to have been one that could not be prevented. The death of the child is a very sad one. His mother died at his birth, leaving the little fellow to be given a mother's care by his two aunts and father. He was a bright, happy little fellow, and was loved by all the neighbors and others who knew him. The sad tragedy cast a gloom over the entire neighborhood, and in their grief the family has the sympathy of everyone. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock from St. Peter & Paul's Cathedral.

 

HARRIS, THOMAS NATHANIEL 'NATHAN'/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 20, 1911
Foster Township Farmer Dies - Lived There Over Fifty Years
Nathan Harris, aged 77, died Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock, one day after his birthday. He had been in failing health for some time in consequence of his great age. He had a fine farm in Foster township and daily he made trips to Upper Alton with milk. His family desired that he forego the trips and leave the work to someone else, but the old man insisted, and until seven weeks ago he made his trips regularly. He became ill then and did not recover. He leaves beside his widow, eight children, four sons and four daughters. The children are William Harris of Vancouver, Wash., John of Portland, Oregon, and Samuel of Fosterburg, twins, and Jesse of Fosterburg. The daughters are Mrs. William Titchenal of Fosterburg, Mrs. T. P. [Thomas Paul] Dooling of Alton, Mrs. J. C. [Jesse] Campbell of Wood River, and Mrs. Ben Budde of Fosterburg. Mr. Harris lived in Foster township, just across the line from Wood River township. He was known as a man of splendid character, a substantial business man and farmer, and he was highly respected by his neighbors who knew him best.

 

HARRIS, UNKNOWN WIFE OF WILLIAM/Source: Alton Telegraph, February 28, 1878
Mrs. William Harris, an esteemed widow lady, living at Newbern, died 20th inst., aged 60 years. Her disease was lung fever.

 

HARRIS, VIRGINIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 20, 1903
The funeral of Mrs. Virginia, wife of Roland P. Harris, took place this morning from the Cathedral where a Requiem High Mass was celebrated by Rev. T. E. Cusack, assisted by Rev. Fathers Spalding and Fennessey. There was a very large attendance and special music. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery under a heavy covering of beautiful floral offerings of mourning friends. The pallbearers were Messrs. George Winbegler, Robert Curdie Jr., David Street, Frank Reedy, Ollie Harris, and Dr. A. C. Barr.

 

HARRIS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 24, 1902
The funeral of William Harris was held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home on Market street to SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. There was a large attendance of young men at the funeral and the casket was borne by young men of the Cathedral society, to which he belonged. Burial was at Greenwood cemetery.

 

HARRIS, WILLIAM L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 23, 1908
William L. Harris, in his 76th year, died at his home in Fosterburg Saturday evening from paralysis. The funeral was held Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the Mt. Olive church near Fosterburg. Mr. Harris was one of the wealthiest residents of Fosterburg. He was born in Champaign county, Ohio, November 26, 1832. He enlisted in the Union army in 1861 and served through the entire war. He leaves his wife, two sons and three daughters.

 

HARRIS, WILLIAM R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 11, 1919
William R. Harris of 1226 East Fifth street, who died at Jacksonville today, was buried Wednesday afternoon from the home in Alton, Rev. S. D. McKenny officiating. He had been in bad health for five years. He leaves his wife and four children.

 

HARRISON, ANN/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 23, 1837
Died, on Saturday last, at Upper Alton, Mrs. Ann Harrison, widow of the late Mr. _______ Harrison.

 

HARRISON, ELISABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 21, 1907
Miss Elizabeth Harrison, who lived many years as housekeeper for her brother in law, William Atkinson, at Ninth and Belle streets, died very unexpectedly Sunday morning at St. Joseph's hospital, where she was taken Saturday night from her room in the Cousley hotel. She was a native of England and was born in England 71 years ago last June 10. She lived in Alton about 33 years, but for the past few years she has been making her home at Lakeland, Florida, where she went for the benefit of her health. Miss Harrison was the beneficiary of the will of her brother in law, who left her his entire estate. She sold much of her Alton property and invested in other real estate at Lakeland, where she intended to make her home. She came to Alton about four weeks ago to visit old friends, and to make Alton her headquarters for a tour of visiting in the neighborhood. She returned from Vandalia one week ago last Saturday, where she was the guest of some nieces and nephews, and the same day was taken very ill while in the store of A. J. Howell. She was taken to her room in the hotel and she did not get well, although the illness was not supposed to be serious. She was able to walk from her room to the stairs and was helped down the stairs and carried to the ambulance. She died Sunday morning at 3 o'clock. Miss Harrison's death was due to heart trouble brought on by a weakened condition of her lungs. Her relatives at Vandalia were not known, and it was impossible to notify them of her death. A careful search of Miss Harrison's effects failed to disclose the addresses of any of her family. The body will be taken to Piasa tomorrow for burial unless relatives arrive and take charge of the body. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from the Methodist church at Piasa, Rev. A. A. Tanner of Alton officiating. Burial will be in the Piasa cemetery.

 

HARRISON, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 5, 1916
Mrs. Ellen Harrison, widow of George Harrison, died at 2:15 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. A. Groshan, in Upper Alton, from paralysis. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Groshan and Mrs. Alex Taggart, and one son, Zeph Harrison. The funeral arrangements will be announced later. Mrs. Harrison was a long time resident in Upper Alton and vicinity. About twenty years ago her husband was murdered on the road between Upper Alton and his home, and the horse brought the lifeless body home in the buggy to the family. The mystery was never solved.

 

HARRISON, GEORGE B./Source: Alton Telegraph, August 6, 1847
Died in Alton on Saturday last, George B., infant son of George W. Harrison, Esq., late of Galena.

 

HARRISON, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1904
Mrs. Mary Harrison, aged 73, died Sunday evening after a long illness at the home of Mrs. Lena O. Budde, 612 Belle street. All of her life was spent in this vicinity, and her husband, who died many years ago, was a member of the well known Harrison family of Wood River township. She, however, was entirely alone in the world, and made her home with Mrs. Budde. Fate was very hard with Mrs. Harrison, but through it all she was cheerful, courageous and hopeful and patient. She believed firmly that "God doeth all things well," and that in His own good time would right everything. The funeral will be Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Budde home on Belle street. Services will be conducted by Rev. Dr. Bushnell of the C. P. church.

 

HARRISON, RICHARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 6, 1900
Richard Harrison, aged 52 years, died last night at the home of his aunt, Miss Elizabeth Harrison, on Main street. He was a well-known farmer living in the vicinity of Piasa. Last September he took a heavy cold, which developed into quick consumption and rapidly grew worse. For several days before the end of the year his death seemed imminent and his one desire was to live until the new years. He was unmarried, and his only relative was his aunt. The funeral will be Sunday morning and the services will be in the Methodist church at Piasa at 10 o'clock.

 

HARRISON, THOMAS/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 27, 1837
A man named Thomas Harrison was accidentally killed on the 19th inst., while working at the culvert on Piasa creek, by the falling in of a quantity of earth from above. He was a native of Ireland, and had been in this city only a few days, when he was thus unexpectedly hurried into the world of spirits. We understand that he was about thirty years of age, and has relations living in Philadelphia.

 

HARSZY, PHILIP L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1917
Philip L. Harszy, aged 48, foreman of the annealing department at the plant of the Western Cartridge Co., died suddenly in his automobile while on his way with his son, Nicholas, to go to work. The two had left home in the family auto, and were but a short distance from their Yager Park home when Mr. Harszy slumped over on his son. The son, trying to rouse the father, failed, and then he put all the speed possible into his automobile and rushed him to the home of Dr. W. H. Enos. There an examination was made by Dr. Enos and it was decided that he must have died instantly from heart disease. Mr. Harszy had been in his usual state of health. He was born in Belleville and was reared there, but he had been employed at the Western Cartridge Co. plant a long time. He leaves his wife and two sons, Philip, aged 12, and Nicholas, aged 18. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church. Burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

HART, B. K. (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 2, 1864
We regret to convey the painful intelligence of the death of Dr. B. K. Hart to our readers in our present issue. He died yesterday afternoon about five o’clock, at the residence of his brother in Adrian, Michigan. His corpse will probably be brought to this city for interment, but we are not yet informed as to when it will arrive. We have not the time at present to write such a notice of him as he deserves, but will simply say now, that he was not only one of the oldest, most influential and useful citizens, but that he was also one of our very best citizens. His loss will be a great calamity, not only to his family and personal friends, but to the citizens of Alton, generally.

 

HART, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 9, 1920
The funeral of Miss Caroline Hart was held at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon from the home of her nephew, Hart Chalk, on Langdon street. The services were conducted by Rev. Frederick D. Butler of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, in which she had held membership from girlhood. There was a large attendance at the funeral services, among those present being many who had known Miss Hart for many years, also members of the order of Eastern Star in which she held membership. The burial services at the grave in City Cemetery were under the auspices of the Eastern Star. Mrs. J. T. McClure gave the funeral oration and she was assisted by her husband, J. T. McClure. The pallbearers were C. W. Huskinson, C. A. Harnett, Daniel Carhart, George Nicholson, Joseph Runzie and U. S. Nixon.

 

HART, HARRY E. (LIEUT. COLONEL)/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 1, 1862
We mentioned a day or two since that Lt. Col. Harry E. Hart, of the 22d Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, had returned home sick. We have the painful duty to perform today of announcing his death. He died this morning of camp fever, at the residence of his brother-in-law, Mr. A. H. Pl__, of Alton. Col. Hart was raised in Alton, and has always enjoyed the confidence and esteem of his fellow-citizens in a high degree. He was active and public-spirited, and was always ready to aid his public enterprises of Alton, state or country. He was with the army in Mexico during our late war with the Republic [Mexican-American War], and when troops were called for to defend our cherished government against the affairs of the Rebels, he inter____ himself immediately in getting up a company in Alton. When the company was organized, he was elected to take command of it. In the organization of the 22d R egiment, he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, which position he held up to the time of his death. He, however, acted much of the time in the capacity of Colonel, owing to a severe wound which Col. Dougherty received at Belmont, which disabled him for a long time from performing the active duties of his command. The 22d Regiment was in the battle of Belmont, New Madrid, which it distinguished itself for bravery and did credit to its commanders.

The death of Col. Hart at this time is a great loss to his regiment, as he had the confidence and affection of all the subordinate officers and men. We have understood that he will be buried with military honors on Monday afternoon next, at 4 o’clock, to take place from the residence of Mr. Plait on State Street, and will be attended by the battalion of U. S. Infantry stationed in Alton.

 

HART, HENRY W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 11, 1903
Henry W. Hart died on Friday evening at quarter to five, after a few days illness produced by paralysis. Mr. Hart was stricken with paralysis on Sunday evening, April 6, while standing in a store on Belle street. He was conscious during the entire period of his illness, and up to a few minutes before the final event. He could converse slowly during all his illness. Henry W. Hart came to Alton 71 years ago [abt. 1832], and has been a resident of the city ever since, where he has been in business until a few years ago. He was 74 years of age last month. Mr. Hart was one of the large number who went to California in the early days of the gold excitement there, where he spent some time and endured great hardships. On his return to Alton, he opened a livery and sale stable in which he continued until weight of years compelled him to retire. He was a highly esteemed citizen of Alton and universally respected. He married Miss ____ Smith, daughter of Utten Smith, who was the mother of four children, viz: Henry W. Hart and Harrison E. Hart, both of Chicago; Mrs. Harry Chalk and Miss Carrie Hart, of this city, all of whom survive their parents. Mrs. Hart died some ten years ago. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Paul's Episcopal church. The Masonic order will attend in a body, and will conduct the services at the cemetery.

 

HARTIG, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1911
Hand in Hand With Death Many Times ... 4-Foot Fall Kills Him
George Hartig of East Alton, who was killed by a fall of only four feet from the doorway of the engine room of the Alton Box Board and Paper Company, had two thrilling escapes from death, and it is a singular fact that such a trivial thing as a four foot fall should have killed him. He was 64 years of age, and "bached" in the Job building on the levee in East Alton. He amused East Altonians by telling them stories of his adventures. His parents were driven from Prussia and settled in Cincinnati, Ohio. While traveling overland during the gold fever excitement of '49 to California, his party was attacked by Indians and all but he were killed by the Indians. He escaped by having been covered up in a pile of hay in the bottom of the wagon, and was afterwards found by other travelers who sent him back to his uncles in Prussia. In the Franco-Prussian War he used to tell, his two cousins were killed beside him, and he alone returned to America and became a scout and was near the place where General Custer was killed at the time of the defeat of his army. Ten years ago he sold a farm at Jefferson Barracks, near St. Louis, for $800, and coming to St. Louis after dark was waylaid and shot in the back of the head. The bullet passed through his forehead and he was thrown unconscious into the river. But according to his story, he clung to a bunch of willows and kept such a "death grip" on the willows as to keep himself above the water until he regained consciousness and could save himself. He was subject to fainting spells due to the injury caused by the bullet passing through his head, and this is believed to be what made him fall yesterday. He was quite well educated, having been taught Latin by his father. He would always write the words in chalk in Latin "Memento mori" meaning "remember that you must die" on the head of his bed every time he became sick. He often referred to the manner in which he was living with sorrow, saying he had seen better days. He was generally liked by his associates, and many persons who knew him counted him as his friend. As he once married, but no one knows where his wife is since he is separated from her, and as he leaves no known relatives, it is not decided what disposition will be made of his body. Coroner Streeper will hold an inquest on him tonight to decide how he came to his death. A post-mortem examination of the body last night by Dr. O. O. Giberson revealed that slight contusion on the right side of his forehead had probably caused his death. His left ankle was dislocated, both injuries were probably being caused by a fall.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 8, 1911 Coroner Buries Body After Keeping Him Six Months
Coroner Streeper yesterday buried the body of George Hartig after keeping him six months. He died January 20 from a fall, which fractured his neck. Hartig, it was claimed by himself, had passed through all kinds of hairbreadth escapes from violent death, murder included, and had even barely escaped with his life when everybody but him had been captured by Indians. He died from the effects of falling a few inches at the strawboard plant east of the city, and so slight had been the fall it was almost incredible that it could have caused his death. Coroner Streeper determined to find some relative of the dead man, but failed. He embalmed the body and held it in his morgue almost a full six months, but at last gave up hope of discovering anyone who was interested in taking charge of Hartig's funeral, and so he decided to bury him.

 

HARTIGAN, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1907
Mrs. Catherine Hartigan, aged seventy-five years, died last night at St. Joseph's hospital where she was taken several days ago suffering from ailments superinduced by old age. The body was removed today to her home, 406 east Seventh street, and the funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. She is survived by two sons, Timothy and John Hartigan, and one niece, Miss Elizabeth McCarl, who lived at the Hartigan home.

 

HARTIGAN, UNKNOWN THREE YEAR OLD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph February 7, 1899
The three years old son of Tim Hartigan, night watchman on the bridge, died at 3 o'clock this morning, at the home, Seventeenth and Belle streets, from injuries received Tuesday afternoon caused by its clothes catching on fire. The boy, in company with other children, was playing in the yard, where they had a fire. While standing near the fire, the child's clothes were ignited. Rushing into the house, the little fellow jumped into a bed, where Mr. George Timmermeier tore the burning clothes from its body. It was thought at first the burns were not serious, but after suffering great pain the victim died early this morning. The accident is a very sad one, and the parents have much sympathy in the terrible bereavement that has come upon them. Coroner Bailey held an inquest, with a verdict similar to the first mentioned accident. The funeral will be tomorrow at 2 p.m. from the Cathedral.

 

HARTLEY, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 10, 1906
Victim of Whisky and Railroad Car Wheels
The body of Charles Hartley, which was found Sunday morning at the approach to the Alton bridge, was taken to the morgue of Deputy Coroner Keiser. He was struck some time Saturday night and his body dropped down between the ties of the trestle approach and lay in a pocket where the embankment under the trestle had sunk. Officer Edward Burjes went to the place when the body was reported and directed the work of getting it out. It was necessary, it was thought, to dig out a part of the embankment to get the body out, but owing to the fact that the men had no proper tools for the purpose they abandoned that plan and finally raised the body in an upright position through the opening between two ties. The body was horribly mutilated but was identified by letters, one written by his wife from Winchester, in which she said that the reason she left him was that he loved whiskey better than he did her, and she could not stay longer with him. This letter recalled the fact that when Mrs. Hartley left home, at the suggestion of her brother, Joe Christisson, Hartley resented his brother-in-law's interference and attacked him, whereupon Christisson stabbed Hartley in the neck with a knife. Hartley recovered from the wound. During the time he was laid up the letter was written. Subsequently, his wife returned to him, but he continued drinking, and on Saturday was drunk all afternoon. He was reported as having been on the levee near the Bluff Line freight depot in the afternoon, but the police learned he had gone home, walking down the railroad tracks. He probably tarried along the way and was hit by a train late in the afternoon and carried but on the bridge approach.

 

HARTLEY, MAMIE ALICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1906
Mamie Alice Hartley, aged 11 years, died last night from diphtheria, and the funeral was held this afternoon from the family home, 1005 east Second street. The family were in a pitiable plight today when visited by Mrs. S. Demuth. The Alton police matron found the mother very ill with erysipelas in the room adjoining where her child died. There was little or no help for the remaining members of the family. Mrs. Demuth herself took charge of laying out the body of the dead child and made arrangements for the funeral. The family intended to hold the funeral tomorrow, but were notified they must have it forthwith because of the malignant character of the fatal disease. The mother was hardly able to move because of her own serious illness, but insisted upon going twice to look upon the face of her dead daughter before she would consent to it being buried this afternoon.

 

HARTMAN, ALICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1906
Mrs. Alice Hartman, aged 42, died this afternoon at 2:40 p.m. at St. Joseph's hospital, after an illness of four months. Mrs. Hartman was moved from her home, 419 Alby street, last Sunday, to the hospital, in the hope the change would be beneficial, but it was no use. Mrs. Hartman leaves her husband, Charles Hartman, and five children, Ray, Edward, Charles, Elsie, and ____ [Glenn?] Hartman.

 

HARTMAN, JULIA KATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 3, 1914
Julia Katherine, the eleven months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Hartman, died at the home, 1229 State street, at 11 o'clock last night. The little girl had whooping cough, and it developed bronchial pneumonia which caused death. The funeral will be held from the home at 2:30 tomorrow afternoon.

 

HARTMAN, RAY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 8, 1909
Fell To His Death At Federal Lead Plant
Coroner Streeper held an inquest this afternoon over Ray Hartman, the young man killed Wednesday evening by falling at the Federal Lead plant. The evidence given to the coroner's jury indicated that the young man met his death through trying to accommodate and surprise his foreman. It was the duty of the foreman to turn the damper which Hartman was trying to turn when he fell. When the whistle was blown as a signal to turn the damper, a very important piece of work, Hartman ran up a ladder taking a shortcut to the place where the damper was. The foreman was on his way up by a longer route, by a flight of stairs. Hartman, being unused to the work, had difficulty in throwing the damper and bracing his feet against the stack he pulled with all his strength. The damper yielded, and the young man's feet being off the place where they should have been, he pitched over backward and fell headlong to the floor, striking on a rail. He intended to have the damper turned and give the foreman a "laugh" when he arrived. The intended joke proved fatal. The funeral will be held Saturday morning from the home on Danforth street at 10 o'clock.

 

HARTMANN, BARTHOLOMEW (REV. FR.)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 12, 1903
Rev. Fr. Bartholomew Hartmann, who for years has been chaplain of St. Joseph's hospital and was formerly an assistant in St. Mary's church, died this morning at 2:30 o'clock after a long illness. He had been an invalid for years, and was forced for that reason to give up active duties. He was able to be around the streets until a month ago, but has been an inmate of various hospitals, including one at Ft. Wayne and one in Alton. His condition became alarming a few weeks ago, and he was moved from St. Joseph's hospital to his home on Union street, where he had expressed a preference to pass away. Fr. Hartmann was 52 years of age, and leaves in Alton a sister, Lizzie Hartmann, and a brother, Jacob Hartmann. He also has a half brother and sister, John Cruse and Mrs. Frank Heidrich. The funeral will be Monday at 10 a.m. from St. Mary's church.

 

HARTMANN, JACOB J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 6, 1906
Prominent Business Man of Alton Dies
Jacob J. Hartmann, a resident of Alton for fifty years, died Friday evening at his residence on Second Street, after a long and tedious illness. He passed the fiftieth anniversary of his coming to Alton on January 2. He was a native of Canton Basel, Switzerland, and was born September 16, 1831. He came to America in 1854 and to Alton in 1856. He was a member of the Alton City council for two years, 1868-70. He conducted a wagon making shop in Alton for a number of years and afterward engaged in the mercantile business, and carried on a hardware business on Second street for many years. The past ten years he lived in retirement from business duties. The funeral will be held under the auspices of the German Benevolent society, of which he was a long time member. He was married twice. His first wife died about 36 years ago. He was married to his surviving wife thirty-three years ago. His children are L. J. Hartmann, Mrs. Louisa Kummer, Miss Julia Hartmann, Mrs. E. A. Seek, Misses Bertha and Emma Hartmann of Alton. A sad feature of the death is that it has afflicted the family of his son, L. J. Hartmann, doubly this week. Mrs. Magdalina Seibold, mother of Mrs. Hartmann, was buried this afternoon, and Mr. Hartmann's father will be buried tomorrow. Mr. Hartmann was one of the most highly respected of the old residents of Alton. During his long career in the city he was ever looked upon as an honest, upright citizen, and he endeavored to do his own part in maintaining the rule of law and order. Hill illness was a long one, but he bore his suffering with patience and fortitude that was admirable. During the past month he has been lingering and wasting away, while he knew that it was a question of time and that there was no help for him. He dies generally regretted by a very large number of people and Alton has lost one of her best citizens. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 3:15 o'clock and the family requests that flowers be omitted.

 

HARTMANN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1902
John Hartmann, son of Peter Hartmann, died at the family home east of Alton Friday noon after a short illness from tetanus. The result of injuries inflicted to one foot by a rusty nail upon which he stepped while walking in the barnyard at his home. The nail went through his shoe and penetrated his foot. The injury was thought to be of little consequence and until yesterday there was no alarm felt by his parents. When lockjaw set in it was too late to do anything for the young man. His death was attended by the usual agony of that disease.

 

HARTMANN, LAWRENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 1, 1901
Lawrence Hartman, a well known resident, after an illness of five weeks with dropsy of the heart, died last evening at his home, 819 Union street. He leaves a widow and seven children, besides numerous other relatives. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock from St. Mary's church to St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

HARTMANN, NICHOLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1921
Man Kills Himself With Gun In Bed - Flash From Shot Catches Starts Fire
Smoke coming from the home of Nicholas Hartmann at Wood River today caused an investigation which revealed the fact that Hartmann, formerly a saloon keeper and later proprietor of a soft drink establishment, had killed himself in his bed. It is supposed that the flash from the gun he fired at close range set fire to the bedding, which smoldered until it began to burn briskly, and the discovery was made as a result, about 7:45 o'clock this morning. Hartmann had been living with his daughter, Stella, in the house where he killed himself. Next door lived his son, Joe, who had succeeded him in charge of the business the father had conducted. Miss Stella Hartmann had gone to St. Louis to make preparation for a wedding in the family, and had not been home over night. It is supposed that the father, gloomy over his daughter's absence and also over his changed business affairs, had determined to kill himself while alone in the house. The shot was heard by some of the neighbors, it was said, but it was exceedingly difficult to get any information from the neighbors, as the foreigners were unwilling to make statements which would bring them up as witnesses at an inquest. Deputy Coroner Streeper, when called to the house, found the place badly damaged by fire. The bed on which Hartmann lay was partially burned, and the body was scorched on the lower part. There was no way of ascertaining how Hartmann managed to pull the trigger of his shotgun. He had no shoes on and the supposition is that he set it off with his toe. He had been seen out in the yard a short time before, and it was supposed that he had been dead about 20 minutes when the smoke was discovered coming out of the house. Before he shot himself, Hartmann wrote a note on a paper bag which he tacked up in the room. It was written in his native tongue, and when translated was found to say that he had no one to keep house for him and that life was not worth living any longer. Acquaintances of Hartmann say that he had made threats many times in the past year that he would kill himself.

 

HARTNETT, ALICE F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 9, 1907
Alice F. Hartnett, 3 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Hartnett, died this morning from pneumonia and bronchitis at the home, 1213 old Elm street. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the Cathedral.

 

HARTWART, SAMUEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 24, 1920
Samuel Hartwart, aged 60, died last night at St. Joseph's hospital. He is survived by several children but none of them live in this country. The funeral will be held at two o'clock Sunday afternoon from the Evangelical church. Rev. O. W. Heggemeier will have charge of the services. Burial will be in the City cemetery.

 

HARTY, AGNES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 2, 1904
Agnes, the five months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August Harty died this morning at the home in Yager Park of summer complaint. The funeral will be Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 from St. Mary's church.

 

HARVEY, UNKNOWN WIFE OF ALLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 9, 1901
The funeral services of Mrs. Allen Harvey will be held at the home of her mother, Mrs. Mary Lohr, instead of at the East Alton Baptist church as was first intended. Services will be conducted at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon by Rev. W. H. Bradley. Burial at the Alton City cemetery.

 

HARVILLE, SARAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 28, 1918
Mrs. Sarah Harville, widow of Louis Harville, and for many years a resident of Alton, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ruth Embley, in the Enos apartments, Saturday morning at 6:30 o'clock after a long illness. Mrs. Harville has been in feeble health for a long time, and before coming to Alton had been ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mabel Baird at Danville. Coming here to visit her other daughters, she was taken ill again and death ensued. Mrs. Harville was born November 25, 1836 at Edwardsville, Ill., but almost all of her life she had spent in Alton. Her husband conducted a store for many years at Sixth and Alby streets, but he, a veteran of the Civil War, was physically incapacitated by his war experience and she had charge of the store most of the time. She was a very successful business woman while in the store. A number of years ago the family disposed of their store and Mrs. Harville resided at Fifth and Alby streets for years until her family became broken up. She had spent much of her time in recent years with Mrs. Baird in Danville. She leaves four daughters, Mrs. Annie Sims, Mrs. Ruth Embley, Mrs. Mattie Lemaster of Alton, and Mrs. Mabel Baird of Danville; also one son, John Harville, of Hannibal. The time of the funeral will be announced when it is learned whether a grandson, Newell Embley of Camp Travis, Tex., can come. Another grandson, Harville Embley, is on his way to France.

 

HARWOOD, L. M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1916
Carrollton Man End Life At Mineral Springs Hotel
L. M. Harwood, an implement dealer at Carrollton and Kane until a few years ago, and well known in Alton, took his own life in the bar room at the Mineral Springs Hotel Wednesday morning. In two notes he left he stated that he had tried to "come back" and had failed. He also intimated that there were some other reasons for ending his life, but he stated these were no one's business. Very little concerning his family connections are known at Alton. He had visited here from time to time and came to Alton yesterday. He spent Tuesday night at the Mineral Springs Hotel. In the morning before leaving the hotel, he told the clerk, E. M. Reed, that he was not certain whether he would need a room for the night or not. He said, "I might want a room tonight, and if I do I'll be back for it." A little later a shot was fired in the bar. It was heard all over the hotel. There was a moaning sound for a few minutes and Harwood was dead. He had entered the bar room from the street and after seating himself in the first booth, had pulled a gun and some papers from his pocket. He placed the papers on the table and then put the gun to his breast and fired. Robert Spence, the bartender, was the only one who witnessed the shooting. William Banks, who was mopping out the bar room at the time, heard the shot but he did not see the man end his life. Harwood fell forward on his face and by the time people rushed from other parts of the hotel he was almost dead. He never spoke again. One of the notes he left contained the names of a list of friends in Alton. Some of these on the list stated that he was a man about 50 years of age, and that they had known him as being engaged in business in Carrollton and Kane up until a few years ago. He was said to have a wife and two children and some hinted that family troubles might have been part of the cause for his act. The note he left explaining the cause for his act read as follows: "To Patriot and Gazette (Newspapers at Carrollton): Just a Word. I have been sick for the greater part of the time for five years. I have tried to come back but I can't quite do it. Then why should I stick around in the way? You will say, "He was a coward." Just sit around contemplating something of the kind for a month or two at a time and see. If there are any other reasons for the act, it is no one's business. Yours truly, L. M. Harwood." The other piece of paper contained information that would help the Alton authorities get him identified. It read: "L. M. Harwood, Carrollton, Ill. Just to get out of my misery. Notify S. E. Simpson and Co., undertakers, Carrollton, Ill. People in Alton that can readily identify me are Dr. Bowman, Pink Bowman, Bird Ashlock, Jess Staples, barber, H. V. Green with Anheuser-Busch." The body was turned over at once to Deputy Coroner John Berner, and was taken to the C. J. Jacoby undertaking rooms where an inquest was held. An effort was made at once to get in touch with some of his relatives or friends at Carrollton. A telegram was sent to the wife this morning and she answered that she would come at once to take care of the body of the husband.

 

HASELTINE, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 22, 1909
Frank Haseltine, aged 80, died at 11:45 o'clock today at his home, 910 east Second street, from dropsy and other troubles due to his great age. He had lived in Alton about 35 years. Mr. Haseltine is survived by his wife and two sons, Bert and George of St. Louis, and one daughter, Mrs. H. N. Colebrook of Alton. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 10 o'clock, from the home, and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

 

Harriet Newell HaskellHASKELL, HARRIET NEWELL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 7, 1907
Principal of Monticello Seminary Forty Years Dies From Heart Failure
Miss Harriet Newell Haskell, principal of Monticello Seminary almost forty years, died Monday evening at 5:30 o'clock from heart failure in the institution she had rebuilt and which will be as much a monument to her memory as it is to that of its founder, Benjamin Godfrey. Miss Haskell's death was not unexpected, but it produced no less profound sorrow. Her illness had been such that her death was expected at any time the last three weeks. When she died no one at the seminary was informed of the fact except the teachers. The young ladies attending the school did not know of it until this morning. The funeral services were held at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon in the Seminary chapel, and were attended by all the students, teachers and some of Miss Haskell's Alton friends. They were conducted by Rev. A. G. Lane of the First Presbyterian church and Rev. H. M. Chittenden of the Episcopal church, both of whom were personal friends of Miss Haskell. The body will be taken to Waldoboro, Me., by Misses Leli and Elizabeth Haskell, leaving tonight, and burial will be there in the old family burial place beside the body of the father and other members of Miss Haskell's family. A memorial service will be held for her here two weeks later. Her brother, Lowell P. Haskell of Waldoborn, Me., was attending her until a few days ago when he went back home. Miss Haskell was born at Waldoboro, Me., and was 72 years of age last January 14. She attended school at Waldoboro until she was 12 years old, when she attended a school at Castleton, Vt., going there five years. She entered Mt. Holyoke then and graduated from that institution in 1855. In 1905 she celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of her graduation from Mt. Holyoke by attending the commencement exercises of that college, and while there she received the degree of doctor of letters, an honor she appreciated highly. It was while attending school at Mt. Holyoke she met Miss Emily G. Alden, who subsequently became her assistant and was still in that capacity up to the time of Miss Haskell's death. The two young ladies formed a friendship which lasted through life, and Miss Haskell herself said that during all the remaining fifty-five years of their friendship they had a common home and a common pocketbook. The two friends were inseparable, and the loss of her old friend is a sad affliction to Miss Alden. After graduating from Mt. Holyoke, Miss Haskell taught a year in Boston and a year at Waldoboro, going thence to her first alma mater, Castleton, where she became principal and remained as such until she came to Monticello in 1867. As a business woman, Miss Haskell's ability was no less than her skill as an educator. When Monticello was burned in 1888 there was only $70,000 insurance. The school must be rebuilt and Miss Haskell's influence accomplished such wonders that when the handsome pile of stone was finished as it stands, over $250,000 had been spent. Since then additions have been made to buildings and grounds which make the property worth close to $500,000, and not one dollar of debt is on it, all having been lifted by the careful management of Miss Haskell. She had the ability to interest wealthy men in the school. William H. Reid of Chicago has given immense sums of money to Monticello, in addition to building the handsome chapel as a memorial to his first wife. Miss Haskell was a woman of profound intellect and rare skill as an educator. Her pupils were taught to adorn the home rather than a career in life. Her exposition of the Bible when she would be conducting the devotional services in the school would do credit to a clergyman. Her reputation throughout the country was such that she gave Monticello a name that was really Miss Haskell's more than it was that of the school. Her death is a sad blow to Monticello, but as it was known for several years she was failing, it has given time for consideration both by Miss Haskell and the trustees as to who would receive her mantle. This matter, it is understood, has practically been decided upon, at the request of Miss Haskell, some time ago. Miss Haskell's illness began on the fortieth anniversary of the date of the extending of a call to her to take charge of Monticello Seminary.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1907
The farewell of the Monticello students to their principal, Miss Harriet N. Haskell, was a touching feature of the funeral service Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. The girls assisted in the service by singing one hymn, "In Heavenly Love Abiding," the chorus of 150 voices of the students rising in unison to sing their farewell to their teacher. When the services were ended, the visitors first took a farewell look at Miss Haskell, while the girls and faculty remained in their places. Afterward, the girls said silent farewell and then formed in a double line in the corridor, leading from the chapel door to the entrance to the building. All the girls, clad in pure white, stood silently as the casket was carried between the lines. The hearse was at the main entrance to the seminary, and there the girls gathered again in double lines, and with one line on either side escorted the body of their beloved principal to the northeast gate. The march was beneath the budding trees, over a campus coming forth in spring verdure in preparation for the day which was to have been another of Miss Haskell's days of triumph, Monticello's annual commencement. The birds were singing in the trees, the doves were giving forth their plaintive notes from overhead and everything was beautiful, but the sadness of the scene was not lightened by these beauties of nature. Shortly before the Seminary gate was reached, the hearse was stopped and the marching lines of girls advanced to the gate, massing themselves there in close order while the hearse was driven through the two white silent lines. A general sob broke forth as the gate was passed and the girls marched silently and sorrowfully back to the stricken seminary. It was an impressive scene and one to be remembered long by those who saw it. It was the passing of the spirit which had created Monticello on its present high plane, but there was hope and confidence that the institution which Miss Haskell had builded was so firmly impressed with her life and spirit that it would go on and continue to grow in respect and strength for years to come.

 

HASKELL, LUCY A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 6, 1899
Wife of Dr. William A. Haskell
Mrs. Lucy A. Haskell died at the home of Dr. W. A. Haskell on Henry Street last evening at 6 o'clock, after a two weeks illness with grippe and pneumonia. She was the widow of Dr. Abraham S. Haskell, and one of the prominent and highly respected women of Alton. She had been a resident of Alton for many years. She was the mother of Miss Helen Haskell, and the stepmother of Dr. W. A. Haskell. Mrs. Haskell was a lady of many excellent qualities of both mind and heart, and her friends prized her acquaintance highly. The funeral will take place Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock, from the family home, corner of Twelfth and Henry Streets.

 

HASKELL, LUCY J./Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, March 27, 1890
Only Daughter of Dr. and Mrs. W. A. Haskell Passed Away
The blow, long dreaded, has fallen at last, and little Lucy, only daughter of Dr. and Mrs. W. A. Haskell, has passed away. After a long struggle with that terrible foe of childhood, diphtheria, the little sufferer yielded up her sweet young life this afternoon and passed beyond the reach of loving arms and longing hearts. The whole community has for days watched with anxious solicitude for favorable news from the home, which the dread destroyer had invaded, and now that all the resources of skill and care and tenderest devotion have proved of no avail, they join in sympathy with the stricken parents, whose grief none can measure. The funeral services will be held at the cemetery tomorrow morning at 11 o'clock.

Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, March 28, 1890 Funeral of Lucy J. Haskell
The funeral of little Lucy, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. W. A. Haskell, took place this morning. Owing to the nature of the disease which proved fatal in this case, no services were held at the house, but the gathering at the cemetery was a notably large one in spite of the inclement weather. The services at the grave were conducted by Rev. Dr. Wolff, and were of a simple and touching character, opening with the words of the great Teacher, "Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven" - and followed by other selections fitting the sorrowful occasion. At the close of the service, the mound was covered with beautiful flowers, rich in perfume and fruitful in suggestions of the lovely human flower which in its brief life on earth had exhaled only fragrance and sweetness. Little Lucy was a child of unusual promise, gifted with rare intelligence and childish charms added to a winning and loving disposition. She was the idol of the now desolate home and a favorite with her young associates. Her bright and happy childhood promised to blossom into a womanhood of wide usefulness, a blessing to her parents and friends. But the fond hopes which were centered in her young life are withered and fled, and there remains to the afflicted parents only the consolation that in her earthly home she tasted none but the sweetness and joy of existence, and is now forever sheltered from the storms and sorrows which those who reach mature years never escape. Yet none of these things can still the longing of the parental heart for the living presence of the loved ones who have passed beyond the shadows - and, doubtless, to many who gathered around that open grave this morning, with hearts full of sympathy and sorrow, there came thoughts of how often "the beloved physician" had brought comfort and help into stricken households, and of how many were the homes whose family circles were unbroken today because of his skill and watch care. To such it seemed a cruel mockery that when the clouds gathered over his own home, those who were so greatly debtors to him in time of trouble were powerless to return availing aid.

[Note: Three days following the death of Lucy, Ruth Hapgood, daughter of Charles H. Hapgood, founder of the Hapgood Plow Company of Alton, died also of diphtheria, . Dr. William A. Haskell was one of the pallbearers.]

Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, July 13, 1891
Dr. and Mrs. William A. Haskell have given to the Directors of the Library Association in this city [Alton] $500, to be known as the "Lucy J. Haskell Memorial Fund," the interest of which is to be used for the purchase of books for the use of children, in connection with the Library Association. This fund is a memorial to the sweet little daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Haskell, who died about fifteen months ago, and is one that is not only very appropriate, but will be of permanent value to the children.

 

HASKELL, LUCY A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 6, 1899
Step-Mother of Dr. William A. Haskell
Mrs. Lucy A. Haskell died at the home of Dr. W. A. Haskell on Henry street last evening at 6 o'clock after a two weeks illness with grippe and pneumonia. She was the widow of Dr. Abraham S. Haskell, and one of the prominent and highly respected women of Alton. She had been a resident of Alton for many years. She was the mother of Miss Helen Haskell and the stepmother of Dr. W. A. Haskell. Mrs. Haskell was a lady of many excellent qualities of both mind and heart, and her friends prized her acquaintance highly. The funeral will take place Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock, from the family home, corner of Twelfth and Henry Streets.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 7, 1899
The funeral of Mrs. Lucy A. Haskell was held at 2 p.m. today from the home of Dr. W. A. Haskell at Twelfth and Henry Streets. Services were conducted by Rev. George R. Gebauer, of the Unitarian Church. There was a large attendance at the services at the house of old friends of Mrs. Haskell, and the esteem in which she was held by her friends was never more strikingly shown. Interment was in the City Cemetery.

 

HASKELL, UNKNOWN BABY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 21, 1900
Baby Dies in Squalor
Deputy Coroner Bauer was called last night to hold an inquest over the body of a month old baby girl that was found dead in a bed in a miserable tent, 4x6 feet, which William Haskell and his wife called home. The family slept on rags on the ground and on a bundle of these the child was found. It was the most wretched spectacle the coroner's jury ever saw, and the jurors made haste to step outside after viewing the body. The family was filthy with dirt and disease, and the squalor was disgusting. The coroner's jury found a verdict of death from natural causes.

 

Photo of Doctor William A. HaskellHASKELL, WILLIAM A. (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 13, 1916
Prominent Alton Physician Passes Away
Dr. William A. Haskell, for many years one of the most successful medical practitioners in Southern Illinois, died at his residence in Alton shortly after 11 o'clock Friday morning. He had been unconscious all of Thursday night, and the members of his family realized that the long illness was nearing an end, but it was not generally known among friends of the family that he was in such a serious state. It was not until he became unconscious Wednesday evening that it was fully realized that there was grave danger that he would not rally. He was taken sick last Saturday with the attack that proved fatal. The illness of Dr. Haskell dates back about fifteen years. At the time he was stricken he was enjoying one of the best practices in the state. He had a wide reputation in medicine and he had served as a member of the State Board of Health, and had also contributed to medical literature. When he was taken seriously ill, at the beginning and later began to recover from what was then believed to be a fatal attack, he decided to discontinue the practice of medicine and he gave himself up to an effort to recover his strength. He spent much of his time in travel, and most of his winters he passed in climates where he could avoid the bad weather of an Alton winter. He had apparently made great progress toward recovery and was in a much improved condition. During his long illness, on several occasions, Dr. Haskell's medical knowledge alone saved him. It is related that at times he recognized the changes in his condition and was able to direct those attending him as to remedial measures, until some physician could be brought. At one time he was credited with directing the fight to save his own life until a specialist who was on his way from Chicago to take charge of him could reach his bedside and relieve the then dying doctor. It was after such experiences as this that he rallied, regained his strength, was able to make long journeys to Europe, Africa and the sunny islands of the south in the Atlantic. Dr. Haskell was a native of Hillsboro, Ill., and was born June 22, 1845. He was educated in Hillsboro Academy and the Franklin Military of Boston. He graduated in the classical department at Harvard in 1866. Three years later he graduated from the Harvard medical department. He began practice in Edwardsville, then moved to Alton where he was active in his profession for thirty years and attained great eminence as a doctor. He was a leader in whatever he undertook. He became interested in politics and for years was the dominating figure in Madison County politics. He relinquished his political interests at about the time his health broke down. For many years there was not a Republican convention or gathering in this part of the state that he was not present, and though he never took office himself, he was a powerful factor in determining who was to be nominated and elected to office. Politics was his pastime, but it was not allowed to interfere too much with the practice of medicine, in which he was the most deeply interested. He served as surgeon in charge of St. Joseph's Hospital for many years. He was married in July 17, 1877 to Florence Ellen Hayner, daughter of the late John E. Hayner. Beside his wife he leaves one son, John H. Haskell. For many years Dr. Haskell was prominent in Masonic circles and up to the time that ill health forced him to give up all other activities, he was a leader in the work of that fraternity in all its branches in Alton.

 

HASLINGER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10,1910
Teamster Commits Suicide In Room Back of Kopp's Saloon
John Haslinger, aged 51, a teamster whose home was at 1010 Staunton street, killed himself Sunday evening by drinking carbolic acid in the room back of the Kopp saloon at Fifth and Ridge streets. Haslinger had been in the employ of P. B. Robertson for four years, and was considered such a good workman he was under pay whether he worked or not. Sunday morning he received a letter from Louisiana, Mo., for Thomas Swift, and started out to find him about 10 a.m. He never returned home. When he was found to have taken the acid, an ambulance was sent to move him to the hospital, but before the ambulance reached him he had died, and Coroner Streeper was notified to get the body. Haslinger leaves a wife and two children. Mrs. Haslinger could not account for her husband's suicide, and believes that he did it while frenzied with drink. He had no troubles at home, and had not been out of work. Members of Haslinger's family say that he had been worrying for several weeks over his father and mother, whom he not seen in forty years, since he left his home in the old country. He had longed to take a trip back home, but the apparent impossibility of his ever going back to see his relatives caused him to become very despondent and this is the only reason that can be assigned for his successful attempt on his life.

 

HASSELBERG, EDELINE SCHYTTE BLIX/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 10, 1904
The many friends of Dr. and Mrs. William Hasselberg will deeply sympathize with them in the death of their little daughter, Edeline Schytte Blix, aged seven months and four days. The little one was taken ill on Saturday with meningitis and died at 3 o'clock this morning. The child was born in Christiana, Norway, and Mrs. Hasselberg brought her child with her to this country last summer. That it has been a delight to the fond parents and the comfort of their home their many friends well know. The funeral will be private and will take place from the home on Prospect street tomorrow afternoon.

 

HASSENBILLER, OTIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1910
Fatally Injured Under Cars .... Both Legs Severed
Otis Hassenbiller, aged 44, whose home is on Mounier street in North Side, was fatally injured this forenoon, shortly before 12 o'clock, by falling under a freight car at the foot of Spring street. The levee engine was hauling a string of cars loaded with wheat, and Hassenbiller was standing between two cars taking a ride. In some way he lost his hold and went down between the cars, and falling across the rail, the wheels of a car passed over his legs, cutting them off at the hips. Part of the lower end of the body was mangled also. Hassenbiller was believed to be dead, and a notice was sent to the coroner to get the body. However the spectators who gathered quickly found that he still had life in him, and an ambulance was called to haul him to the hospital. The surgeons at once found that he was fatally hurt, and said he could not live more than a few hours. He died at 2 o'clock. The marvel was that he was not instantly killed as he suffered injuries that ordinarily would have proved fatal at once. In his pocket was found a letter which identified him. His family were notified. One of his daughters works for the Central Union telephone company. He was a wife and seven children. One son, Richard, is at Monticello, Ill., a married daughter, Mrs. Claud Goodale of Villa Grove, Ill., Miss Lorene of the Bell telephone office, and four other children survive him. Hassenbiller had just returned from a trip in search of health. He was born and raised at Pana, Ill., and worked as weighmaster at a mine there until about four months ago when he moved to Alton. He was prostrated by heat at his place of employment (Duncan's Foundry), and had never been well since. He had been at Pana for a month trying to recuperate his health. It is supposed he was wandering about the railroad yards when he tried to climb on the moving train and met his death. His daughter at the telephone office first heard of her father's injury while helping to give a telephone connection so the police could inquire of Mrs. George Ott, whose name was mentioned in a letter Hassenbiller's wife had written him and which was found on his person.

 

HASSMANN, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1902
Mrs. Anna Hassmann, widow of Frederick Hassmann, died Friday morning at 3:30 o'clock at the family home two miles east of East Alton. She had been ill several months and a malady similar to pneumonia caused her death. She was 68 years of age and had been a resident near East Alton for many years. She leaves seven children, Messrs. George, Henry, Edward, Louis, Fred Hassmann, Mrs. Carrie Balster, and Mrs. Sophia Feldjes. Mrs. Hassmann was a member of the Evangelical church and the funeral will probably take place Sunday from the church in this city. Burial will be in the City Cemetery. A valuable estate is left the children.

 

HASTINGS, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1909
Miss Margaret Hastings, aged 36 years, died this afternoon at St. Joseph's hospital following a surgical operation for the removal of a tumor. She was a native of Alton and was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hastings. She leaves two brothers, Martin Hastings of Alton, and Thomas Hastings, an engineer, who has a passenger run on the Burlington between Chicago and Omaha. She is also survived by numerous other relatives, cousins, etc., in Alton. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

 

HASTINGS, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1918
Mrs. Mary Hastings died Monday morning at the family home at 1310 East Broadway, at the age of 72 years. Mrs. Hastings was the mother of Miss Mary Hastings, one of Alton's best known school teachers, employed at Humboldt school. She is also survived by two sons, John G. and Joseph H., both of this city. Mrs. Hastings was born in Ireland, but has resided in Alton since she was 14 years of age. She was the widow of Joseph H. Hastings, who died some time ago. Death occurred this morning at 8:45 o'clock. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church, and interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery. Friends are requested to omit flowers.

 

HASTINGS, UNKNOWN WIFE OF ALBERT H. SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 13, 1920
Alton Woman Falls to Death While Visiting Son at Palmyra, Missouri
The startling news of the death of Mrs. A. H. Hastings, at Palmyra, Mo., was received this morning by W. D. W. Barnard, her brother. The message to Mr. Barnard stated that Mrs. Hastings had suffered a fall down stairs and was dead. The time of the accident was not stated in the message, but it is taken for granted that it occurred last night. Mr. and Mrs. Hastings had been visiting the past month with their son, Albert H. Hastings Jr., on his farm at Palmyra, Mo., which is across the river from Quincy. About a year ago, Mrs. Hastings Jr. met a tragic death on the farm when a team of horses she was holding in the field for her husband ran away. Since that time the father and mother of the young man had been spending as much time as possible with him. In June, A. H. Hastings Sr. was very ill at the home on College avenue, and when he was in a low condition his son came from Palmyra and visited him. The father improved and was again able to go to his son's home for a visit. Besides her husband, Mrs. Hastings leaves three sons, Dr. J. B. Hastings of Alton; A. H. Hastings of Palmyra, Mo.; and Charles Hastings of St. Louis. She also leaves one brother, W. D. W. Barnard, and three sisters: Miss Vena Barnard and Mrs. Lulu Gere of Alton; and Mrs. George Dietiker, who lives in Georgia. Relatives here today knew nothing of any funeral arrangements that might have been made.

 

HATCH, HENRY BARRETT/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 12, 1842
Died, in this city [Alton], on the 5th inst., after a short illness, to the great grief of his afflicted parents, Henry Barrett, son of Mr. John Hatch, aged 3 years and 5 months.

 

HATHEWAY, HARRIET A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 6, 1908
With little warning that their mother was ill, and that coming only a short time before the later sadder news came, the family of Mrs. Harriet A. Hathaway of 548 east Twelfth street were apprised last evening of her death at Nashville, Tenn., while accompanying her brother, Albert Wade, and her sister, Mrs. E. L. Drury, home from a trip to Florida. The two sisters went with their brother for a month's stay in Florida for the benefit of Mr. Wade's health. No news of Mrs. Hatheway being in ill health was received by the family until late Thursday afternoon when a telephone message came announcing that she was very ill at Nashville, Tenn., and requesting that her children go to her. The party were expected to arrive home Friday morning from their southern trip. A short time after the first news came of Mrs. Hatheway being ill, a second telegram came to her brother, Edward P. Wade, announcing her death, and this message was later confirmed by a telephone message from Albert Wade, who was with her at Nashville. The information that came was that she was taken with a very sudden bilious attack, and that she was ill less than 24 hours....She was born in Alton and had lived in the city all her life. Coming of a family that was prominent from the early days of the city, Mrs. Hatheway had always held a high place in the community where she lived. Her husband was prominent in municipal affairs, for many years filling the position of member of the city council, and was a leading factor in the conduct of city affairs. Her husband also was the owner of the horse railway system in Alton, and after his death she became the controlling owner. She was a member of the Congregational church at Sixth and Henry street from its organization, and was always among its most active supporters. She leaves beside her sister, Mrs. Drury, and her two brothers, E. P. Wade and Albert Wade, four daughters, Mrs. S. C. Farley, Mrs. J. E. Whitney, Miss Louise Hatheway of Alton, and Mrs. J. B. Edwards of St. Louis.

 

HAUCK, LIZZIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1916
Mystery Surrounds Death
The mystery which surrounded the death of Lizzie Hauck, who was found dead six months ago with a note in her pocket declaring she was tired of life and leaving instructions for the distribution of her estate, was deepened today. At the time of her death a shroud of mystery was laid on the case by those who were closest in the circle of ones who should know about it. Inquiries at the house where she died elicited very little information about anything. It was chiefly from outsiders that any information could be got. In the note which was found in her pocket was a request that all her property be given to W. J. Helming of St. Louis. This might have been used as a will, but it bore the names of no witnesses, naturally enough, as it was the note of a suicide. So Helming could not get the money, the residue of $700 found on her person when she killed herself. Recently, Mrs. J. J. Kreyling, who claimed she was a relative and the next of kin, filed a petition in the Probate Court that there be appointed an administrator of the estate. She asked that John Berner be named as administrator and this was done. Funeral bills were paid and there is a balance in the estate which has not been paid to anyone. Now comes the deepening mystery. Today E. A. Kroener of Detroit, Mich. arrived in the city of Alton. He was making an investigation. He wanted full particulars of the death of Miss Hauck. He did not believe she had any relatives at all. Kroener declared that he raised Miss Hauck and that six years ago he gave her about $3,000. He was surprised that only $700 was possessed by her when she died, and thinks there should be more. Kroener said that Miss Hauck had no relatives he knew of, and he seemed certain that Mrs. Kreyling of Alton is not related to the dead woman. Mr. Kroener was less interested in the estate the woman left than in the manner of her death and wanted full details. He was informed she was supposed to have chloroformed herself to death. Today he conferred with John Berner, who conducted the inquest and who was appointed administrator after the court did not pay the money to Helming of St. Louis.

 

HAUERKIN, LOUIS W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 4, 1906
Louis W. Hauerkin died at his home at 1115 East Fifty street last night after an illness of several weeks from fever. The young man was 23 years of age, and leaves besides his parents several brothers and sisters. The funeral will be held from the home Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. Rev. Theo Oberhellmann and S. D. McKenny will conduct the funeral service.

 

HAUK, FREDERICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 16, 1900
Frederick Hauk, one of the oldest residents of Alton, died Sunday morning at the home of his niece, Mrs. William H. Loehr, on State street. He was 85 years of age and had been in Alton more than a half century. The funeral will take place Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and services will be in the Evangelical church, of which he has been a member for many years.

 

HAUREKEN, FRIEDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 18, 1903
Frieda, the two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Haureken of 1113 east Fifth street, died Sunday evening at 8 o'clock after an illness with bronchitis and brain fever. The funeral will be Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, and services will be conducted by Rev. T. Oberhellman.

 

HAUSAN (or HAUSEN), JOHN G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1920
The death of John G. Hausen (71) occurred this morning at 9:30 o'clock at the family home, 1520 Market street. He is survived by his wife, three daughters and one son. The body will be shipped to St. Charles, Mo., for burial, probably on Monday.

 

HAUSKINS, ESTELLE HARNEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 14, 1907
Mrs. Estelle Harney Hauskins, wife of Chester E. Hauskins, and the last remaining child of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Harney, died Wednesday evening at 6:30 o'clock at the home of the Harneys on Mill street. She was 21 years of age and leaves a little daughter, Paula, who is not two years old. Mrs. Harney's death was expected, as she had been very ill for a long time. The same dread malady which claimed her two brothers, Paul and Howard, within 21 months, claimed her after a comparatively brief struggle. Her illness began with the mental anxiety attending the sudden death of her two brothers, in which she was one of the strongest supporters of her grief stricken parents. It was a heavy blow to her when her two brothers died within a short time, and from the death of her brother Howard her decline was rapid. She was beautiful as a girl, and her marriage to Chester Hauskins less than three years ago was a very happy event in her life. During her illness she was attended by her husband, and her grief stricken parents, all of whom had already borne heavy burdens laid on their shoulders by deaths of members of their families outside of the immediate family circle. Mr. Hauskins had lost his father, and Mrs. Harney and her husband had lost other near relatives whose deaths came as severe shocks.

 

HAUTY, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 27, 1909
Mrs. Mary Hauty, wife of August P. Hauty of 1721 Feldwisch avenue, died this morning at her home after a long illness. The immediate cause of her death was weakness from loss of blood, due to the rupture of blood vessels in her head. Mrs. Hauty had been a sufferer from dropsical troubles for a long time and would frequently be very ill. A nervous malady developed and about two weeks ago, while suffering from the nerve disorder, her nose began bleeding and surgeons were unable to stop it. It was decided to take her to the hospital for treatment, but she was so weak it was impossible to move her. The bleeding at the nose could not be checked during the remainder of the time she lived, and she passed away from collapse after the loss of a large amount of blood. She was 41 years of age, and leaves besides her husband, three sons and four daughters. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Patrick's church, and burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

HAUVEISBURK, ROSS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 9, 1917
Young Man Killed in Explosion at Western Plant - Body Filled with Primer Caps
Ross Haureisburg [sic], ages 21, of Bunker Hill, was mangled and the vacuum room in which he was working was blown to shreds at the Western Cartridge Co. plant, twenty-five minutes before quitting time, Thursday evening, when a half million primers exploded. He was alone in the vacuum room at the time, and the cause of the explosion may never be known as he was dead before he could tell anyone what had happened. His duty was to get the primers from the girls in the inspecting department and carry them to the vacuum room where they were put in a large boiler, about ten feet high and ten feet in diameter, to dry. After they are dry the young man put them in sacks so they could be used in the machines. The primers are charged with fulminate of mercury, one of the highest explosives, and one that is easily set off. The vacuum room was a frame building, 15 by 30 feet, adjoining the primer building. It was wrecked by the force of the explosion and the pieces of wood fell at different parts of the plant. There was a small panic amongst the girls in the priming room adjoining the vacuum room. This is a large brick building and was not injured by the force of the explosion. Many of the employees, especially the newer ones, rushed out of the building at the sound of the explosion. They were quickly quieted, however, and the work resumed. Orders were given not to allow any of the girls to see the body of the man who had been killed. Thousands of the little caps from the primers struck Haurisburg and these caused his death. The force of some of these were so great that his right leg was cut from his body. All of his clothing, with the exception of that at his waist, was torn from the body, and the body filled with the caps. With his body as badly mangled as it was, there is no doubt what he died instantly. Haurisburg came to East Alton from Bunker Hill a year ago, and has been working at the Western Cartridge Company since and boarding in East Alton. He is single. He was well known at the Cartridge plant and had a large number of friends there on account of his sunny disposition. A surgeon was called after the accident, but the man was dead long before he could arrive. The body was turned over to Deputy Coroner William H. Bauer last evening. The inquest will be held at 7:30 o'clock this evening at the Bauer Undertaking rooms. There seems to be no chance of finding out the cause of the explosion. Any one of a hundred little things might have been the cause. The boy is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Haureisburk [sic] of Bunker Hill. The father and mother, three brothers and four sisters survive. The parents of the boy arrived in Alton this afternoon. The body will be taken back to Bunker Hill for burial.

 

HAVEN, MARGARET SHEA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1920
One of Alton's Oldest Settlers Dies
Mrs. Margaret Shea Haven, widow of Lawrence Haven, died this morning at 8 o'clock at the family home, 1208 West Ninth street. Although Mrs. Haven has been in ill health for many months, her death was not expected and she died while asleep. Coming to this country when 14 years of age, Mrs. Haven located on Main street, now West Ninth street, and never resided in any other port of the city. She and her husband were among the very old settlers in the West Side of town, and were among the best known families. The family lived at Main and State street until 20 years ago, when the home was destroyed by fire. After the fire the family moved down to 1208 Main street, where they have since resided. Mrs. Haven was born in Kerry county, Ireland. Her husband died 16 years ago. She leaves three sons, John, Joseph and Alfred; two daughters, Miss Mary Haven and Mrs. Lucy Linnan, and one grandson, Norbet James Haven. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral, Rev. M. T. Harrant officiating. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

HAVEN, MICHAEL ALFRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1920
Dies 48 Hours After Funeral of Mother
Michael Alfred Haven, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Haven, died at the family home at 1208 West Ninth street Sunday evening at 5:30 o'clock, less than 48 hours after the funeral of his mother, Mrs. Margaret Shea Haven. Fred Haven, as he was best known, has not been in the best of health for the past few years, but his condition was not thought to be serious. About a week ago he left his employment as cooper at the Schaepperkotter Cooperage for a rest, planning to go back to work again shortly. He helped care for his mother during her last illness and attended the funeral Saturday morning. He did not go into the Cathedral, as he was coughing and did not wish to interrupt the services. He attended the burial at Greenwood cemetery, however. About four o'clock Saturday afternoon he was taken very ill and his death was expected, but he rallied. All day Sunday he was in fairly good condition but death came very suddenly at 5:30 o'clock. Pneumonia, coupled with heart trouble, was the cause of death. Very few knew of his illness and his death came as a shock to many friends. The deceased was born on West Ninth street, formerly Main street, on August 28, 1878, and would have been 42 his next birthday. For years he has worked at his trade, that of a cooper, and was well known throughout the city. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Haven, and leaves two brothers, John and Joseph Haven and two sisters, Miss Mary Haven and Mrs. Lucy Linnan. Also one nephew, Norbett Haven. He was single. He and his brother, John, were constantly together and the death comes as a great sorrow to the surviving brother. The funeral of Haven will be held at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning from the Cathedral to Greenwood Cemetery.

 

HAVENS, LAWRENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 2, 1904
Lawrence Havens, a long time resident of Alton, died last night at his home on Main street after an illness of four months duration from a complication of diseases. He was 67 years of age and leaves a wife and six children, John, Joseph and Fred; and three daughters, Mrs. Lucy Oldacre, and Misses Ellen and Mary Havens, all of Alton. The funeral will be Friday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

HAWES, G. W./Source: Alton Telegraph, January 11, 1840
Died, in the town of Upper Alton, on Tuesday morning last, of the consumption, Mr. G. W. Hawes, aged about 35 years.

 

HAWKINS, ELIZABETH J./Source: Alton Telegraph, November 6, 1863
Died at Locust Grove, six miles from Alton, Elizabeth J. Hawkins, wife of James A. Hawkins, aged 25 years and five months. She leaves an afflicted husband and many friends to mourn her early death.

 

HAWKINS, GEORGINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 9, 1904
Mrs. Georgina Hawkins, aged 68, died from a complication of pneumonia and stomach troubles at her home on Highland avenue this morning at 7 o'clock. She had been in poor health two years, but on Christmas day was stricken with a fatal illness with pneumonia. Her condition was alarming almost from the beginning. Saturday morning she seemed brighter within a half hour before death occurred, but shortly before 7 o'clock she suddenly collapsed after a violent attack of the malady, and her death followed a short time afterward. Mrs. Hawkins had been a resident of Alton about 65 years. She was born in London, England, but came to Alton when a child. She was twice married. She leaves a sister, Mrs. Frank Reed of Jacksonville, Ill., and Mr. William Ellis Smith of Upper Alton. She leaves also five children: Mrs. J. F. Bunn of Springfield; William J. Nixon of St. Louis; Utten S. and R. D. Nixon; Miss May Hawkins and Rose Hawkins of Alton. Mrs. Hawkins was a member of the Episcopal church. She was highly respected by all who knew her and a good mother to her family. Her death is a sad blow to her relatives and friends.

 

HAWKINS, JEMIMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 19, 1919
Mrs. Jemima Hawkins, wife of Philip Hawkins and one of the best known colored residents of Godfrey township, died this morning at the Peoples Hospital, St. Louis. She was 63 years old, and besides her husband leaves 8 children. The body will be brought to Alton this evening. Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Union Baptist Church, and the burial will be in the Godfrey Cemetery.

 

HAWKINS, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1909
Mrs. Mary Hawkins, wife of Walter Hawkins, colored, died Saturday night from pneumonia, aged 26. She leaves her husband and two children. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning from the Union Baptist church.

 

HAWKINS, R. H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 16, 1918
Long Buried Body Exhumed to Move to Sedalia, Missouri
Forty-three years ago (abt. 1875), R. H. Hawkins, a former business man in Alton and partner of C. S. Leech Sr., was buried in City Cemetery. Recently his widow died and was buried at Sedalia, Mo., and it was decided by the son to exhume the remains of his father and bury the body beside the body of Mrs. Hawkins, as had been the wish of Mrs. Hawkins. Friday, Mr. Leech, with four others, undertook to exhume the body. They dug down, expecting to find nothing left of the casket or the body, but great was their surprise to encounter an old fashioned iron casket of great weight. It was hoisted from the ground with great difficulty, and when brought to the surface was opened slightly. Mr. Leech, who had known Mr. Hawkins well, took a look at his old business associate and he discovered, to his amazement, that notwithstanding the long period that had elapsed since the death of Mr. Hawkins, the body was in a perfect state of preservation. The features were just as natural to Mr. Leech as if it had been but yesterday he had seen his old business partner. The casket was in fine condition too, the paint still being on it just as it was when buried. A large wooden box had been provided in which the casket was placed to be shipped to Sedalia for burial. The son was here over a week ago to make arrangements for disinterring the body of his father, but did not come here to assist in making the removal. Mr. Leech plans to write to the son and tell him of the remarkable fact that the body had been perfectly kept, though the science of embalming was not in extensive practice then.

 

HAWLEY, DANIEL WEBSTER/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 2, 1838
Died, on Saturday last, Daniel Webster, infant son of H. Hawley, Esq. of this city, aged three weeks.

 

HAWLEY, GEORGE E. (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 3, 1913
Old Time Steamboat Captain Dies
Capt. George E. Hawley of St. Louis, a former steamboat _______, working in the vicinity of Alton, died at his home this morning from old age. The old captain who was very well known in Alton, especially by the older generation, was 96 years of age. He was captain of steamboats on the Mississippi from 1840 until 1875. During that time he was in charge of the steamers Reindeer, City of Alton, and the Altona. When the late King Edward VII of England visited the United States in the fifties as the Prince of Wales he was taken from Alton down the Mississippi River in a boat under the charge of Capt. Hawley. The old man felt highly honored on the occasion and retold the story of that trip many times. The funeral arrangements have not been made, but it has been decided to bury him in Alton.

 

HAWLEY, HELEN M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 27, 1912
Mrs. Helen M. Hawley, widow of Andrew T. Hawley, aged 72, died Friday afternoon at 5 o'clock at her home on the Grafton road from uraemia, after a week's illness. Mrs. Hawley's condition was recognized as a dangerous one, but on the day her death occurred she seemed much improved and manifested interest in what was going on about the place. A short time before death occurred she relapsed into unconsciousness and did not revive. Mrs. Hawley was the widow of a former well known Alton business man, and the family lived in Alton until 27 years ago, when they moved to the farm where she died. Her husband was in the retail business and also engaged in the sale and manufacture of agricultural implements in Alton. Mrs. Hawley was born in Rockford, Ill., but came here when a child and was married in Alton. She is survived by two children, Andrew T. Hawley and Miss Nina Hawley. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 10 o'clock and services will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing. Burial will be in the City cemetery at Alton about noon.

 

HAWLEY, THOMAS G./Source: Alton Telegraph, October 3, 1862
Died, Thursday, October 2nd, Thomas G., infant son of George F. and Julia F. Hawley, aged one year and one day.

 

HAYDEN, ACHSAH L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1900
Mrs. Achsah L. Hayden, wife of Frederick Hayden, died Friday evening at the family home, 201 Madison street, after an illness of three years with paralysis. She was 73 years of age last October, and had lived in Alton most of the time since 1866, when she came to Alton with her husband. Three years ago she was taken with incipient paralysis, which first affected her feet. The paralysis gradually extended, and during the past five months her condition became most alarming. In the hope that the sunny south would be beneficial to her health, last fall she left with her husband to spend the winter in the orange groves near Tampa, where the aged couple had a beautiful home. Mrs. Hayden thought she would recover at once when she would be in her home there, and she kept up her courage to the last. The paralysis became general while she was in Florida, and she was almost helpless. One week ago she was brought to her home in Alton, and she became much worse. Death came as the paralysis slowly crept upward, benumbing her brain and rendering her unconscious. Mrs. Hayden was born in Westboro, Mass., and was united in marriage to Frederick Hayden when she was 20 years of age. In 1866 she came to Alton with her husband, who established a fruit farm and erected the residence on Madison street that has been their home in Alton. She leaves no children, and only her aged partner of more than a half century of married life, together with a sister, Mrs. Sara M. Forbush, who lived with her, are the only immediate relatives left. The funeral will be Sunday at 2 p.m., and services will be in the home. Rev. George Gebauer officiating.

 

HAYDEN, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 24, 1903
Charles Hayden is doubtless in the Mississippi river. Thursday E. H. Webb found Hayden's hat and an oar of the skiff where they had been floated by the current. The hat was lodged on some willows below the lower end of Bayless Island. The oar was washed up on the island about one mile below the mouth of Alton slough. There were no traces of the missing man in the vicinity, and all hope of him being found alive has been abandoned. Wednesday afternoon at 6 o'clock Hayden was seen in the skiff just inside of Alton slough, above the Missouri end of the Alton bridge. That was the last seen of him alive. It is believed he was drowned in the Mississippi and not in the slough, as his hat and the oar were found on the river side of the island. A son of the missing man is at home very ill with appendicitis. When informed of the nature of his son's malady, Hayden became very despondent. Captain Webb went down the river today in his launch, Transit, to make search for his missing boat, which is supposed to have been picked up by a fisherman to be held until called for. Friends of Charles Hayden say that he was doubtless suffering from a recurrence of the attack of mental troubles from which he suffered least [sic] summer.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 12, 1903
The body of Charles Hayden, the well known glassblower who disappeared from his home twenty days ago, was found Tuesday morning, the 20th day since he was drowned, floating in the Mississippi near the place where the oars of his boat were found two days after his disappearance. The oars were found at the diamond board on Bayliss Island. William Thomas and John McCarthy have been making a persistent search for the body of the drowned man. A reward of $150 was offered by Mrs. Hayden and the Glass Bottle Blowers Association, branch No. 2. Thomas and McCarthy went down the river Tuesday morning and shortly after they began looking for the body they were attracted toward an object floating on the surface of the water. It proved to be the body of the missing man. McCarthy came back to Alton to make report, and Undertaker Will H. Bauer, who was authorized by Mrs. Hayden to pursue a search for her husband's body, went down the river in Capt. W. D. Fluent's boat to bring the body back. The funeral of Charles Hayden will be held Wednesday morning at nine o'clock, and services will be conducted at the family home on east Fifth street. Deputy Coroner Streeper will hold an inquest over the remains this evening. [Burial was in City Cemetery]

 

HAYDEN, FREDERICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 27, 1906
Frederick Hayden, aged 80 years, 6 months, died at his home in this city this morning, after a protracted illness. He had been a sufferer from Brights disease for many years and frequently in the past few years he had attacks of uraemic poisoning, so that on several occasions it was believed that he would die, but he would rally and be able to get out again. His last illness began a short time ago and his condition became very serious from the beginning. Mr. Hayden was a native of Massachusetts, but came to Alton shortly after the close of the Civil War. He bought a fine place on the outskirts of the city and he developed it into a fine fruit farm. He was an expert at fruit culture, and beside the place he conducted in Alton, he devoted a number of years to the culture of oranges in Florida. Mrs. Hayden died in this city six years ago. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the residence on Madison avenue.

 

HAYDEN, GEORGE D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 26, 1912
Proprietor of Hayden Machine Shop in Alton
George D. Hayden, one of Alton's best known residents, died at his home on Summit street at 2:30 o'clock Friday morning after an illness of one month. Mr. Hayden's death had been expected for some time. He was taken ill a month ago, and at no time did he show any power to rally from the sickness. His age was against him and his relatives and friends had no hope of his recovery. The death of Mr. Hayden removes from Alton a man who for many years has been prominent in business, and always interested in the city. He was a master of his trade, an expert machinist, and a mechanic in whose judgment and ability the most implicit reliance was placed by those who knew him. He was a plain spoken man, but a man who made warm friendships. Those who met him when he was out on hunting trips knew him at his very best. He was a great lover of nature, and was happy when he could take time from his work to go hunting. A few years ago he found that his condition of health would forbid him making any more trips, as he was obliged to stay near home, and this was one of his great sorrows. George D. Hayden was born in Alton October 7, 1836, on the site now occupied by the Alton post office at Third and Alby streets. He was married to Sarah H. Shelly at Davenport, Iowa, December 24, 1857, and she survives him. He leaves beside his wife, two brothers, William H. Hayden of Springfield, Ill., and Rev. Charles A. Hayden of Buffalo, N. Y. Mr. Hayden was a man who was known for his honesty and his truthfulness. While he never made any show of these virtues, his friends had learned that what he said he knew to be absolutely true and his word might be relied upon implicitly. He was engaged in the machinist occupation at Alton for forty years or more, and he had made a reputation for skillfulness and a wide, comparative knowledge of the business that made his services extremely valuable to all in Alton who had machinery needing the attention of an expert. The funeral will be held Sunday morning at 9 o'clock from the home, 615 Summit street.

 

HAYDEN, LEO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 3, 1921
Leo Hayden, 16, son of Marion H. Hayden of Collinsville, died yesterday in St. Mary's hospital, East St. Louis, of a gunshot wound received in an accident while hunting Thursday. He was hunting with a cousin when the latter's gun was accidentally discharged. He was taken to the hospital at East St. Louis but it is thought the loss of blood during the trip made his chances of recovery slight.

 

HAYDEN, WILLIAM (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 24, 1918
Civil War Veteran - Brother of George D. Hayden
Captain William H. Hayden, aged 93, died in the Soldiers' Home at Quincy Tuesday morning at 7 o'clock. Capt. Hayden was a brother of George D. Hayden, for many years an Alton business man, and he was a frequent visitor in Alton during his brother's lifetime. Capt. Hayden served in the Quartermasters corps during the Civil War. He was born in Boston, Mass., and came to Illinois with his father in 1831. He resided in Springfield for many years. He leaves one child, Mrs. H. Wilson, of Springfield. He was a member of the Odd Fellows and the Presbyterian Church. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning in Springfield from St. Paul's Church at 10:30 o'clock.

 

HAYES, ANNA BISHOP/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 9, 1921
Mrs. Anna Bishop Hayes, wife of Charles W. Hayes, passed away Thursday, July 7, at 7:50 p.m. at the family home, 512 Vine street, after an illness which extended over a period of several months. Mrs. Hayes was born in Shuyler County, November 11, 1870. Her marriage to Charles W. Hayes took place December 23, 1890. To them four children were born, one daughter dying in infancy. The three who survive to mourn her death, besides the sorrowing husband and aged mother, are: Charles A., aged 26; Walter V., aged 22, and Lillian, aged 18, all at home. She also leaves the following brothers and sisters: William Bishop of East Moline, George Bishop of Pekin, John Bishop of Blue Island, Okla., Mrs. Mary E. Good of Blue Island, Ill., and Mrs. Emaline Smith of Oklahoma City, Okla. She became a member of the Christian Church at an early age, and since coming to Alton about seven years ago, has been a devoted member and tireless worker in the Cherry Street Baptist Church. She was a charter member of the Auxiliary, B. F. L. and E, and the Carpenters' Auxiliary No. 29, and held the office of Grand Past President in the former. Last November she developed a severe case of influenza from which she never fully recovered. Several months later complications set in which resulted in death. Everything that loving hands could administer was done to relieve her long suffering. She bore her affliction with loving patience and passed peacefully to rest as if in sleep. Her presence will be sorely missed by a host of friends to whom she had endeared herself through her loving personality and tender devotion to her family. Funeral services will be held from the home, 512 Vine street, at 2:30 p.m., Sunday, July 10. Rev. S. D. McKenny of the Cherry Street Baptist Church will officiate. Interment will be in City Cemetery. All friends and neighbors are invited to attend.

 

HAYES, NORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 16, 1914
The funeral of Mrs. Nora Hayes, who died Friday at her home, 4_9 east Fifteenth street, aged 36, was held yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Mrs. Hayes was born at Mowequa in Shelby County, Ill., and was first married to James Fulk in 1898. Four children were born of this marriage - Cecil, Ethel, Flossie, and Dollie. Her first husband died in 1910 and she married Simon D. Hayes June 1, 1912.

 

HAYES, SIMON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 17, 1919
The grim reaper paid a second visit early this morning at the Hayes home at 10 East Fifth street. Simon Hayes was buried from the family home Sunday afternoon, the funeral services being conducted by Rev. Theodore Cates, pastor of the Wesley M. E. Chapel, and the interment being in the City Cemetery. His daughter and her husband, Edward Hosey, came down from Grafton, to be at the services. They brought their 3 year old daughter, Mary Rene, with them. The little one was taken with an attack of peritonitis Sunday, and at 9:30 this morning passed away. The parents returned to Grafton on the afternoon train and took the body of the little one with them. Funeral services will be held tomorrow at Grafton.

 

HAYES, THERESA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 4, 1909
Mrs. Theresa Hayes, wife of John Hayes, night engineer at the pumping station of the Alton Water Co., died very suddenly Friday evening at the family home over Starr & Struiff's store on Second street. Mrs. Hayes had not been feeling well for about a week or ten days, and believed she was suffering from malaria. She had been complaining of heart trouble for some time, and on the night of the fire in J. H. Booth's store, near her home, she became so nervous and her heart action was so bad it was necessary to remove her from the house so she could not see it. Friday evening she had just told her husband goodbye as he left to go to work, and was not any worse than usual. A few minutes later she died on the floor, and before medical attention could be procured, had passed away. She was 46 years of age and had been married 21 years. She had no children. Coroner Streeper held an inquest this morning and a verdict of death from heart trouble following chronic nephritis was found. The funeral will take place at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the family home, 120 west Second street, Rev. M. W. Twing officiating.

 

HAYNER, JENNIE/Source: Alton Telegraph, July 29, 1864
Died in Alton on the 24th instant, Jennie, infant daughter of John E. and Jennie C. Hayner.

 

Photo of Jennie D. HaynerHAYNER, JENNIE D./Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, February 25, 1888
Wife of John E. Hayner
The dread angel death has again entered a happy home and left it desolate; bereft of the gracious presence that for many years diffused peace and happiness about its fireside. And the shadow over that darkened home is not limited to its walls, but extends far and wide, for when so pure and beautiful and self-sacrificing a life goes out, the community shares in the bereavement and mourns with those most deeply afflicted. The sad message that went forth yesterday afternoon of the death of Mrs. Hayner carried grief not alone to relatives, friends and associates, but to the homes of want and suffering, scattered over our city, where during her residence in Alton, she had ever been a "ministering angel" of mercy, relieving the distressed and bringing comfort to the suffering. We would not obtrude on the sacredness of private grief, but in view of a common sorrow there are some tributes that can hardly be left unspoken. Mrs. Hayner was a type of "the perfect woman nobly planned," living for others and not for self, given to works and benevolence and good will, using the large opportunities in her hands with wisdom and discretion. Like the Lady Bountiful of ancient story, no good cause ever appealed to her in vain, and no case of suffering known to her was left unrelieved. Her sympathies were broad and catholic. They were not limited to sentiment, but found expression in deeds that will leave tender recollections behind them. Her mental attainments and social accomplishments made her the ornament of every circle in which she moved, and her natural gifts were broadened and cultivated by extended foreign travel and observation, and familiarity with historic scenes and places. But change of scene and place never weakened her attachment to home or old-time friends, and her devotion to these was strong and enduring. Born at Highgate, Vermont, January 2, 1837, she came of the good old New England stock, whose virtues she ever exemplified and whose austerities she changed into graces. Her maiden name was Miss Jennie Drury. Her early life was passed in the quiet precincts of the New England village, and on the 8th of October, 1862, she was married to Mr. John E. Hayner, and removed to this city, which has since been her home, and where a union of twenty-six years of married life blessed by mutual devotion has just been brought to so untimely a close. Mrs. Hayner was a member of the Presbyterian church, connecting herself therewith soon after her residence in Alton began. She was also for many years a teacher in the Sunday school, and notwithstanding continued ill health, was active in all the social and benevolent work of the church. She was, likewise, for many years a director of the Alton Library Association, and did her full part in furthering the work of that organization. She will be missed in the social circle which she elevated and brightened; she will be missed in the church whose work she did so much to uphold and sustain; missed in the dwelling places of the poor and needy, whose burdens she so often lightened, and missed, unspeakably, in the beautiful home where the light has gone out and the husband is left companionless. Her life was a benediction in the sweet influences clustering about it; her example an inspiration to right-living, and though now closed to earthly activities, the work begun and the affections awakened here will continue to flow on in the broadening current of blessed memories. Besides her husband and her step-daughter, Mrs. W. A. Haskell, Mrs. Hayner leaves two sisters, Mrs. W. B. Pierce of Alton, and Mrs. Heath of Oakland, Florida, a brother, Mr. F. W. Drury of St. Louis, and a large circle of relatives. The funeral will take place Monday morning at 10 o'clock from the family residence. Dr. Gordon of Middletown, N. Y., her former pastor, has been telegraphed to and is expected to be present and assist Dr. Wolff at the services. [Burial was in the Alton City Cemetery.]

 

Photo of John E. HaynerHAYNER, JOHN E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 19, 1903
Well Known Alton Banker and Philanthropist [Builder of Alton Hayner Library] Dies.
John E. Hayner, former president of the Alton Savings Bank, and one of the best known financiers in southern Illinois, died at his home on State street Thursday morning at 9 o'clock Sunday evening. Mr. Hayner was stricken with uraemic coma, a phase of chronic nephritis, while in his home, and he never regained consciousness. Paralysis on the right side was produced by the malady. Mr. Hayner never showed the least indication of recovering from the stroke, and the specialist from Chicago, who attended him, could hold out no hope to the family that the patient would ever regain consciousness. The last two days he was reported to be steadily sinking, and it was given out the end might come at any minute. During the last night the decline was very rapid and a man with a less robust constitution could not have withstood the progress of the malady so long.

Mr. Hayner was a self-made man. He came to Alton fifty-five years ago, and his success in a business way probably eclipsed that of any other person ever in Alton who made a similar start. Almost penniless, he arrived in the city and the first work he ever did was for the late P. B. Whipple. Industry and an abnormal business capacity counted heavily in his favor, and success seemed to crown his every venture for many years. He was in the hardware business under the firm name of Nelson & Hayner, and the business house is remembered by many old residents of Alton. Mr. Hayner was a director of the old St. Louis, Kansas City and Chicago Railroad, the present Chicago and Alton [Railroad], and as a member of the first board of directors was associated with the late John J. Mitchell in the building of the railroad. In many other early day enterprises, Mr. Hayner was intimately connected with the prominent developers of the country. He was one of the best known financiers in Southern Illinois, and was heavily interested in many financial ventures in Alton, St. Louis, Chicago, and other cities. Mr. Hayner was president of the Alton Savings Bank from its organization until last July, when he retired from active business pursuits. He was also vice-president of the Alton National Bank and the heaviest individual stockholder in that institution. After the death of D. D. Ryrie, Mr. Hayner was elected to succeed him as cashier of the First National Bank of Alton, and continued in that position until the bank was consolidated with the Alton National Bank in 1881.

Probably the best known of Mr. Hayner's philanthropic investments is the Jennie D. Hayner Memorial Library, which he gave as a free library to the citizens of Alton. For years the Alton library had been maintained by an association of which Mrs. Jennie D. Hayner, his second wife, was an interested member. After Mrs. Hayner's death, her husband decided to erect a permanent memorial to his wife and built the library building at Fourth and State streets, the finest building of its size in Alton. This library the ladies continued to maintain through their own efforts largely, and through gifts of Mr. Hayner, until a few years ago. Mr. Hayner then announced that he had decided to make the library free to all the Alton people, and to that end he endowed the institution. The library will be a monument to him as well as to the lady to whose memory it was erected. The library gift differs from the Carnegie libraries in that it is distinctly a free institution and maintained without any expense for taxes, etc., to the people to whom it was given. Mr. Hayner leaves his wife and one daughter, Mrs. W. A. Haskell, who is now with her husband in the Bermuda Islands, accompanying him in his quest of health.

Mr. Hayner, the aggressive, pushing, persistent and successful business man and money-getter, had another side to his character, and one that many in Alton will deeply feel in his loss - a tender, sympathetic heart, and an open hand and pocketbook. Many a widow, many a poor family, will miss his benefactions, which were given freely and evidently with keen relish on his part. Columns might be written of this feature - a feature of which the Apostle Paul in his panegyric wrote: "Now abideth Faith, Hope and Charity, these three; but the greatest is Charity." A few instances will suffice to show the chiefest Grace had a permanent and large place in his heart. Years ago, a cold winter prevailed. One of the severest nights - with the thermometer recording much below zero, and a wild storm prevailing - Mr. Hayner called to mind a widow and daughter. About 10 o'clock his sympathies were strongly stirred, and saying to his friends in his palatial home: "Mrs. _____ may be suffering in this dreadful storm. I must assist her." Suiting the action to the words, he rolled up a bundle of bedding, as much as he could carry, and started for the home of the widow through a blinding storm of sleet and snow. When he arrived at the home of the widow, he found her and her daughter hovering over a small stove, with a handful of coals in it. He said: "Why don't you put in more wood and keep warm?" The old lady pointed to an armful of wood in the corner, and said in pitiful tones: "This is all we have, and we are trying to make it last through the dreadful night." Mr. Hayner told the unfortunate woman to burn all the wood necessary to warm the room and then go to bed and cover up with the clothing he had carried them, and he would have more wood at their home before time to get up the next morning.

The writer of this paragraph was treasurer a number of years ago of a fund for charitable purposes. One of the distributors of the fund called on him one day for ten dollars to supply the pressing needs of some poor people he had discovered. The distributor returned in about two hours and laid two ten dollar bills on the treasurer's desk. "Put that in the fund," said the distributor. "Where did it come from?" asked the treasurer. "After I had made my purchases, I met Mr. Hayner and he inquired what I was doing. I told him. He asked where the money came from, and with very tender voice and much feeling he handed me these two bills saying to put them in the fund to be used for similar purposes, and when they are used to come and get more."

As said above, these instances are simply illustrations of what was constantly being done with the aid of the deceased citizen. To multiply them would be needless, and might be burdensome. Mr. Hayner was born in Orleans county, New York, March 29, 1827, and would have been 76 years of age the 29th day of this month. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from the family home on State street.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 21, 1903
The funeral of John E. Hayner was held this morning at 10 o'clock. Services were conducted in the family home on State street by Rev. Dr. Thomas Gordon, D. D., of Washington, D. C., and Rev. H. K. Sanborne of the First Presbyterian church. Dr. Gordon's part in the services was an eloquent and touchingly tender tribute of an intimate, personal friend of the deceased who had known him many years better than most people had known Mr. Hayner. The residence was filled with friends and business associates of Mr. Hayner, and there was a large attendance of Alton business men who had business relations with him in his long period of business activity in Alton. The cortege that followed the body to City Cemetery to see the remains laid away in the family burying ground was one of the longest ever known in Alton. Six of the business associates and old friends of Mr. Hayner (E. P. Wade, H. Watson, J. W. Cary, G. W. Hill, Levi Davis and W. T. Norton) served as an escort of honor, and six others (C. A. Caldwell, H. B. Sparks, James Duncan, C. A. Cannell, Edmond Beall, and C. W. Milnor), served as active pallbearers.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1903
A Tribute of Respect - To those of us who have known Mr. Hayner through our connection with the library, his loss is irreparable. We shall miss his kindly interest in the management; he was never obtrusive and always patient. Back in the "seventies" [1870s] when the library was allowed to occupy space in the City Hall, he gave evidence of his appreciation of the work the ladies of Alton had undertaken to carry on. There were others who helped and approved, but he was never second in those early days. Did we show any weariness we were cheered in our efforts by words of encouragement and substantial assistance. This instance is worthy of mention:

Some years ago one of the directors stepped into the bank; when she was about to leave he said: "How is the library doing?" She answered: "We gain in the number of books, but not as many of the kind we would like to have. We have to buy the books that are called for most, and it is the readers of light literature that give the largest subscriptions. You known a wagon load of books of fiction could be bought for twenty-five dollars, but the standard works and those that give tone to a library are not so easily obtained." He excused himself and passed into the adjoining room. When he came back, he handed her a check saying, "That will help to get some of the books you speak of." Many times have the needs of the book committee been anticipated in this modest way, with a kindly remark: "You need not thank me. Don't speak of it."

In 1890 he purchased the site and commenced the "Hayner Memorial" building, and on May 21, 1891, the finished and furnished building was presented to the association. May 22 it was opened to the public. It is with gratitude that we record we were spared attending to many troublesome details that should have fallen to us. More than three years ago he decided to give a free library to Alton. Preparations went on quietly, and July 1, 1900, the Jennie D. Hayner free library was established. There are some things that makes the Hayner library stand almost alone in towns of the population of Alton. One is there is no tax upon the people. We could wish he had lived to carry out his plans for enlarging it, but He who governs the affairs of men has ordered otherwise, and we bow in submission. Mr. Hayner seemed to have adopted a quiet prosecution of a course which fulfilled means that "every man has a mission from God to help his fellow beings." The Library Directors.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 30, 1903
From Edwardsville Intelligencer - County Clerk Edward Feutz yesterday took an affidavit at a distance of 300 miles by means of the long distance telephone. The heirs of the late John E. Hayner appealed to the county court for speedy action upon the business affairs of the estate. They represented that a large amount of money was coming in, and no one legally authorized to handle it. The will was filed in court March 31, but had not been probated, and the executors named had not qualified. That they should do so at once was desirable. The executrices are the widow, Mary Caroline Hayner, and the daughter, Florence E. Haskell, wife of Dr. W. A. Haskell. Mrs. Haskell has been in New York and is now in Chicago. The relatives wired to her and arranged an appointment with the county clerk over the long distance phone. At the appointed hour she called up. The clerk directed her to raise her right hand, and repeat the oath of executrix after him, which she did. Mrs. Haskell was thereupon declared qualified as executrix. The estate of John E. Hayner is the largest that ever passed into the county court. It is estimated at $2,000,000 and may exceed that figure. The will is dated August 3, 1901, and was witnessed by Charles A. Cannell, Levi Davis, and Oliver S. Stowell. After providing for funeral expenses, the testator bequeaths to his wife, Mary Caroline Hayner, absolutely the homestead in Alton and $60,000; to his daughter, Florence E. Haskell, $100,000, these sums to be a lien upon the real estate if the personal proves insufficient. He then gives his son-in-law, Dr. W. A. Haskell, $25,000; to his sister, Henrietta A. Fletcher, $6,000; to his nieces, Laura and Linda Fletcher, each $2,000; to his nieces, Ella Fletcher Taylor and Emma Fletcher Didlake, each $1,000; to his niece, Mary Fuller Sayers, $3,000. In the event of his sister's death before he dies, the $6,000 is given to her four daughters, Laura and Linda each $2,000, and Ella and Emma each $1,000. The remainder of the estate is divided as follows: To his wife, one-fourth of personal and one-eighth of real estate; to his daughter, one-fourth of personal and three-eighths of real estate; the other one-half of real and personal estate is given in trust to his daughter, Florence E. Haskell, who is directed to invest it judiciously and pay the net income annually to her son, John A. Haskell, and when he becomes 25 years of age to convey to him one third and when he is 29 and 33 years old, to convey the other parts respectively. If he dies before attaining the age of 33 and without issue, the estate goes to his mother, otherwise such portion as has not been conveyed to him shall go to his child or children. In the event of the death of Florence E. Haskell before carrying out this trust, Dr. W. A. Haskell, O. S. Stowell and J. J. Mitchell and the survivor of them are appointed in her place, none of whom shall be required to give bond. Should his daughter, Florence E. Haskell, died before her son, and he dies before reaching the age of 33, or without issue, the property remaining in hands of trustees is to be divided as follows: One-fourth to testator's wife, two tenths to Dr. W. A. Haskell, one-tenth each to Mary Fuller Sayers, Ella Fletcher Taylor, and Emma Fletcher Didlake, and five-twentieths each to Linda and Laura Fletcher or to their heirs. Mary Carolina Hayner and Florence E. Haskell are appointed executrices without bond, but are required to file inventory according to law and settle up the estate as soon as it can be legally done. The testator requests that in settling the estate and managing the trust property, his wife and daughter shall consult with Dr. W. A. Haskell and his friends, O. S. Stowell of Alton and John J. Mitchell of Chicago.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 25, 1903
From the Edwardsville Intelligencer: The John E. Hayner estate Saturday paid to County Treasurer G. M. McCormick the largest inheritance tax collected in Madison county since the law became effective. It is the first estate subject to the tax to come under the administration of Judge Hiliskotter. The court appointed Charles W. Milnor of Alton as appraiser, and he reported the value of the estate $1,601,188.67 [Note: this is equal to $40,892,697.32 in 2013, according to the Inflation Calculator.] Of this amount, bequests of $94,000 are exempt, leaving $1,507,188.67 to be taxed 1 percent for the benefit of the state. The tax amounted to $15,071.88, from which a deduction of 5 percent, or $753.50, is allowed if paid within 60 days. This is the eighth estate to pay an inheritance tax in Madison county. The others were Henry Esslinger $164.10; Anna Squire $221.25; Rev. Peter Peters $83.19; Fred S. Detrich $94.34; F. J. Bauer $89.83; Robert Kelsey $890.50; Henry C. Priest $3,000; the total collected from these being $4,043.21.

 

HAYNER, MARY CAROLINE 'KATE' (nee KEITH)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1917
Wife of JOhn E. Hayner - Known for Philanthropic Acts in Alton
Mrs. Mary Caroline Hayner, widow of John E. Hayner, deceased president of the Alton Savings Bank, died at her residence, 1248 State street, Friday afternoon at 5:20 o'clock after a long illness. The funeral will be from St. Paul's Episcopal Church Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Mrs. Hayner was born in Sheldon, Vt., March 28, 1846. While she was not baptized Kate, that was the name by which she was known. Among her friends, none knew her by her baptismal name, Mary Caroline. Her maiden name was Keith, and she was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Keith. She received her early education at Mrs. Newton's school for young ladies at St. Albans, Vt., and at a private school in New York City. She taught in a private school in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Boston and Providence, R. I., and during that period she made several trips abroad. She was married to Mr. Hayner at Pittsburg, Pa., December 14, 1892, and since that time Alton had been her home. Mrs. Hayner was an active agency for spreading good cheer, comfort and good will where sorrow and misery had been. During her period of residence in Alton she was the exemplification of what a true Christian should be. Her hand was ever ready to render aid where it was needed, and her sweet, kindly disposition made the recipients feel that they were merely getting a little help from a good friend. There was never any feeling that any help she rendered was mere charity. It came from the goodness of her heart. Those she knew, she always remembered if there was any unusual event in the family circle, sorrow or joy, with some token of recognition accompanied by a graceful note. One of her oldest and best friends today best summed up her character as that of "the ideal Christian gentle woman," and there are dozens in Alton who can testify that the tribute is exactly and justly given. She was a devoted member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, was a liberal giver to the church, and with both moral and financial aid she has made many improvements possible there. She assisted in the beautifying of the church, and the building of the parish house of St. Paul's was largely due to her efforts. She was also interested in the Hayner Library. "No worthy cause ever appealed to Mrs. Hayner in vain but were sure to have her loving sympathy and generous support," was another sentiment expressed by a friend who knew her best and was acquainted with many of her benefactions, through a long standing intimacy of their families. She made in Alton for herself a very large number of loving friends. Her bearing was one of dignity, and grace, with a never failing kindness to those she might learn were in need of special sympathy or help of a more practical character. Her long illness has been watched with deep interest by those who knew her, and there is general regret in the community that her earthly life has closed. The immediate relatives are: Mrs. Florence E. Haskell of Alton, a step-daughter; Mrs. Shelton Bissell of Boise, Idaho; Mrs. Walter Lindsay of Montclair, N. J.; Mrs. W. H. Durice of Turner's Falls, Mass.; Miss Elizabeth Keith of Pittsburg, Pa., all nieces; and Albert Shelton Keith of Pittsburg, a nephew.

 

HAYNES, MINNIE W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 8, 1918
The death of Mrs. Minnie W. Haynes, wife of M. V. Haynes, occurred this morning at 8:30 o'clock at the home of her son-in-law, Frank Trout, on Grove street, following a stroke of apoplexy. Mrs. Haynes had been ill for three weeks, but was not stricken with apoplexy until Sunday. Mrs. Haynes is survived by her only daughter, Mrs. Frank Trout, and three sisters, Mrs. B. B. Elliott, Kemper; Mrs. George Ryan, Medora; and Mrs. Edward Kenworthy of Kemper. Mrs. Haynes for many years was a member of the Summerville Baptist Church, two and one-half miles out of Medora, and funeral services will be held from there Thursday morning at 11 o'clock. Short services will be held at the Trout home on Grove street at 8 o'clock Thursday morning, before the body is shipped away. The services in Alton will be conducted by Rev. Gibson of the First Presbyterian Church. The Haynes family are newcomers to Alton. Mr. Haynes is the senior member of the firm of Haynes & Trout, in business at Broadway and Henry streets.

 

HAYS, GEORGE W./Edwardsville Intelligencer, November 9, 1892
Grandfather and Father killed by Indians
George W. Hays, one of the oldest residents of St. Jacob Township, died at his home Friday morning at 3 o'clock, of pneumonia, after an illness of several weeks, aged 82 years, 3 months and 22 days. He was born July 10, 1810 in Jackson County, Indiana, being the first white male child born in that county. He grew up there and continued to reside there until 1859, when he moved to Jonesville, Indiana, thence to Morton County, and in 1874 came to Madison County, Illinois, locating at St. Jacob. His parents were pioneers of Indiana, and his grandparents were natives of New York state, where they were captured by the Indians and carried in captivity to Indiana, and kept so for a year, when they escaped, and after many days of privation formed a white settlement. When his father was one year old, his grandfather was killed by Indians, and when George W. Hays was three years old, his father also fell under the tomahawk of the savage. The grandfather served in the Revolutionary War, the father in the War of 1812, and George served in the Civil War as Lieutenant of the 53rd Regiment of Indiana.

When reaching the threshold of manhood, George taught school several years, then followed the mercantile business and also practiced law. Since his residence in this community in 1874, he has been one of the most highly respected citizens. He was elected assessor of St. Jacob Township for five successive years, the first time in the spring of 1885 and the last time in 1890. In the spring of 1891 he was elected as a member of the village council. He also held the office of Justice of the Peace and served as postmaster. He became an Odd Fellow in 1851, and a Mason in 1853. He was married twice, had seven children by his first marriage, five sons and two daughters, and seven by the second, six daughters and one son. Of the fourteen children, five are living, all of whom are married. He was buried Sunday morning by Fraternal Lodge 592, I. O. O. F., of St. Jacob, assisted by Neilson Lodge No. 25 of Troy; Madison Lodge No. 43 of Collinsville, and Madison Lodge No. 28, U. O. T. B., of St. Jacob. The body was taken from the house to the M. E. Church, where Rev. Nelson Sweeney officiated. John R. Miller, of Caseyville, grand secretary of the I. O. O. F., also spoke. He was laid to rest in the Keystone Cemetery in St. Jacob Township. He had been a member of the Christian church for 50 years. The community lost a good man.

 

HAYS, HENRY HARRISON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, June 5, 1899
Henry Harrison Hays, one of the oldest residents of Upper Alton, died Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock at his home on East Brown street. Mr. Hays had been confined to his home since last November, and for the past few weeks his condition was known to be serious, yet his death came as a sad surprise. Until a few years ago, Mr. Hays was employed in H. M. Schweppe's clothing store where he became widely acquainted. He was obliged by failing health to give up his duties in the store and retired to his home in Upper Alton to care for his health. He was stricken with locomotor ataxia shortly after and was soon a physical wreck. He bore his suffering with a Christian fortitude that excited the admiration of all who called on him. Blindness darkened his last few weeks of life and death was a happy relief. Mr. Hays had spent most of his life in Upper Alton, and was widely known in this vicinity. He was known without exception as a Christian and a man of many admirable and attractive traits of character. He was born in Coles county, Missouri, 58 years ago. During the Civil War he served as a private in Company C, 124th Illinois Infantry, and was seriously wounded in the battle of Champion Hills in 1863. For 42 years he had been a member and active worker in the Methodist church. In 1878 he was elected Superintendent of the Sunday school, which office he held without interruption until two years ago. In August 1871 he married Sara E. Fartiett, who survives him. He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. M. M. Greene, of Upper Alton, Mrs. F. J. Clark, of Mattoon, and a brother, Stephen Hayes, of Gayoso, Missouri. The funeral took place this afternoon at 3 o'clock from the M. E. church.

 

HAYS, ISABELLE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 10, 1922
Mrs. Isabelle Hays, widow of Samuel B. Hays, for many years head of the Alton Fire Department, died this morning at 4:15 o'clock at the home of her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Conley, of 1121 State street. Mrs. Hays was removed to the Conley home from her residence at 310 Carroll street three weeks ago, the family feeling that the change might be beneficial to the ailing woman. Mrs. Hays had an attack of influenza two years ago and since that time has been ill the greater part of the time. She has had several very severe attacks of illness and on many times her life was despaired of, but she would rally. Her fatal illness began three months ago. She was born in Upper Alton and spent her entire life in this city. Her maiden name was Isabelle Tindall. She is survived by five children, Mrs. E. J. Conley of Alton, Mrs. J. F. Springate of Hollywood, Calif., Mrs. E. L. Gans of St. Louis, Mrs. A. H. Von Gruenigen of East St. Louis and John Hays of Alton. She also leaves one grandson, Nellis Berg Conley. Mrs. Hays was a good mother and friend, and her long illness has been watched with great attention by all who knew and loved her. She was a member of the First Baptist Church, and of the Maccabees. Until illness confined her to her home, Mrs. Hays was very active in church and club work and was well known throughout the city. She was 66 years of age. No funeral arrangements have been completed, awaiting word from Mrs. Springate in Hollywood. The funeral will be held from the Conley home on State street.

 

HAYS, MAMIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 20, 1908
Woman Shot and Murdered by Husband - Had Been Abused and Neglected
After a debauch which had lasted a week, during which he had been arrested for assaulting his wife and refusing to provide for her and her children, Clarence Hays shot and killed his wife, Mamie Hays, in their room at 1228 east Second street. The only witness of the tragedy was their six years old son, Clarence, who was standing so close to his mother that the flash from the revolver in his father's hands burned the child's forehead, and the concussion of the shock gave him a violent headache from which the little fellow cried for a long time. The child tells the story in such a way as to leave no doubt of the guilt of the father, and the story would bar any hopes he might have of continuing his defense that his wife committed suicide. The boy says that on Saturday evening his father came to their room, and that he appeared very angry. He drew a revolver and pointing at his mother, the boy says, shot her, and the mother fell to the floor. The bullet entered the back of her neck near the spine and went straight in, which would disprove the story of suicide told by the husband. After he had shot his wife, Hays somewhat sobered by seeing the effects of his drunken work, went into a paroxysm of grief. He told his little boy to run for help, and while the boy was gone, he said, he tried to shoot himself and claims the revolver would not go off. There was still in the revolver three undischarged cartridges. The boy ran down stairs to the home of Mrs. Mary Carmelia and burst into the room just as the family were sitting down at the supper table. He said his father wanted help upstairs, and Mrs. Carmelia and Mrs. Laura Schmidt ran up to see what was the trouble. They had not heard the shot. As they entered the room they asked what was the trouble, seeing Mrs. Hays on the floor, and the husband pointed to the revolver and then said, "I did it." He made no effort to conceal his guilt then, and asked the woman to get a doctor and to help him lift his wife's dying form up to the bed beside which she had fallen. They helped lift her, and then Hays fell on her and kissing her again and again, he pleaded with her to open her eyes and to speak to him and to forgive him for what he had done. Mrs. Hays never spoke, and it is believed she knew nothing of what was going on around her. When Dr. Squire arrived she was dead. The shooting was the culmination of some troubles between husband and wife which had been aggravated, the wife told Mrs. Demuth Saturday morning, by gossip. The woman told a pitiful story Saturday morning before appearing against her husband in the police court on a charge of assaulting her. He had met her on the street and when she pleaded with him to provide food for her two little children, he had practically abandoned and who had not had food that day, he struck her in the face. Afterward he told that if he had been armed he would have killed her then. In the police court he promised to be good, cried when being reprimanded, and said he would support his wife and children. The trouble culminated over a brass bracelet set with glass jewels, which Hays supposed was gold and diamonds. Knowing his wife could not afford to buy such a piece of jewelry, he supposed someone had given it to her, and Friday afternoon he smashed it in her presence on the curbstone where the trouble occurred. He did not know until after he had killed his wife that the bracelet was a cheap trifle she had bought herself. Their eight year old daughter said she was with her mother when the purchase was made. Officer Ebbler and Officer Rotsch were the first police at the scene of the tragedy. After the woman was pronounced dead, they put Hays under arrest. He had made no effort to leave, but seemed dazed by the tragedy. He pleaded with Officer Ebbler to shoot him, saying that he would "have no chance" locked up. At police headquarters Hays steadfastly denied he had done anything and was very hysterical. He was locked in a cell to await the coroner's inquest. Mrs. Demuth, who was summoned, took charge of the children, and also set about getting some garments in which to dress the body of the dead woman. So poverty stricken was she, that it was necessary to buy clothes. The husband had paid out all but $11 out of $70 he had Friday afternoon, carousing in a saloon while his family were starving. The dead woman is a daughter of Louis Hamilton of Little Washington, Pa. She has a sister, Mrs. G. A. Simons of Guthrie, Okla., and a brother, Thomas S. Hamilton of San Francisco. Both have been notified of the tragedy. Several years ago Thomas Hamilton avenged Hays' cruelty to Mrs. Hays by kicking the brutal husband down stairs in this city. The couple had been married nine years. The husband is 30 and the wife 28. Mrs. Hays had been dragged about the country by her husband and had not been suitably provided for. Too proud to appeal to her relatives, she would not accept charity either, except as it might be necessary to keep her little children from starving. She hoped her brutal husband would reform and return to his family, but slanderous tongues cut this last thread of hope, at least she said so, and no doubt death was a happy relief. coroner Streeper will conduct the inquest tonight. He has evidence that Hays secured the revolver Saturday evening at 6 o'clock, and on his way to his wife's room he told a man he intended to kill her. The evidence of Mrs. Mary Carmelia and Mrs. Laura Smith, with that of the six years old boy who saw the killing, is believed to be conclusive. Hays was a machine glassblower who had a job that was worth $6 or $7 a day. The glassblowers' union members had decided to give toward a fund to bury the victim of the tragedy decently, in case her family did not decide to take charge of the funeral. They will give no assistance to Hays and condemnation of his conduct is general. It is considered that there is not a single extenuating circumstance, and lawyers approached to take his case have refused so far. Hays has broken down completely under the nervous strain from remorse since the killing, and was in such a bad condition this morning it was necessary to summon Dr. J. P. Squire, who gave him an opiate to quiet him. He has not eaten anything and is very ill. Deputy Sheriff Crowe took him to Edwardsville this afternoon. Telegrams were received this morning from the father at Little Washington, Pa., saying his daughter was coming, and from G. A. Simons of Sapulpa, Okla., saying his wife, a sister of Mrs. Hays, was on the way. Both messages said that they would take charge of the body.

[Clarence Hays was convicted of murder, and sent to the penitentiary for 12 years. Strangely enough, his daughter, in 1918, wrote letters to officials trying to get her father pardoned, blaming the murder on the alcohol. I could not find whether or not he was pardoned.]

 

HAYS, SAMUEL M. (MAJOR)/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 8, 1862
Died on _____ last, at the residence of B. Webster, Esq., Godfrey, Illinois, Major Samuel M. Hays, of the 10th Illinois Regiment, in the 35th year of his age.

 

HAYS, UNKNOWN SON OF ABNER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 18, 1902
The eleven months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Abner Hayes died Saturday night at the home, 1214 Stanton street. The remains were sent to Eldorado, Ill., for burial.

 

HAYWARD, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 26, 1903
Harry Hayward, who died at St. Joseph's Hospital Sunday from the effects of a fall from the loft in a barn at the place of Edmond Beall, was buried this morning by Undertaker Bauer. Nothing could be learned as to where Hayward lived.

 

HAZELTON, JOHN HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1919
John Henry Hazelton died at his home on Grand Avenue in Yager Park Monday night at 9 o'clock after a three years illness with asthma. For a year he has not been able to work and his death had been expected for some time. The deceased was born in Ohio March 29, 1851, spending his early life in the East. He came to Alton in 1889 to take a position with the Illinois Glass Company, and was employed at the local plant as foreman. Hazelton is survived by his wife and six children, namely Mrs. Minnie Hazelton, wife, Benjamin R. Hazelton, Milwaukee, Wis., Mrs. George Nichols, St. Louis, Mrs. Chester Carleson, St. Louis, Hugh Herbert Hazelton, John R. Hazelton Jr., and Miss Susan Hazelton of Alton. Also by one brother, Benjamin J. Hazelton of Alton, and three sisters, Mrs. Henry Craig, Elkton, Md., Mrs. Samuel Slabaugh, Columbus, Ohio, and Miss Irene Hazelton, Newark, Ohio. No funeral arrangements have been made awaiting word from relatives in the East.

 

HAZELWOOD, RUSSELL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1918
Russell, the 15 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hazelwood, died this noon at the family home at ____ Central avenue.

 

HEAD, BERTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 25, 1908
Miss Bertha Head, daughter of Augustine Head, the prominent Wood River township land owner, died very unexpectedly at Ft. Worth, Texas, where she was visiting her sister, Mrs. Robert Gardiner. Miss Head went south when she was informed that her sister's child had died and that Mrs. Gardiner was needing her assistance, the mother being deeply affected by the loss of her little one. Miss Head left here a few weeks ago and the family were greatly surprised to receive a message Saturday saying she was ill, only to be worse alarmed by another message Saturday saying her condition was very grave. On Sunday morning the message came that Miss Head's illness had terminated fatally, and that the body would be sent to Alton for burial. The news of her death was a sad shock to her father and her family. She leaves two sisters, Mrs. Gardiner and Mrs. Joseph B. Steck of Alton, and a brother, J. Augustine Head. Miss Head was well known in Alton and vicinity and was loved by all who knew her. Her disposition was an exceedingly happy one, and she made many friends who will be deeply grieved to learn of her death. The body will be brought to Alton for burial. It is expected the funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon from the residence of J. B. Steck, 523 Summit street, and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery. Mrs. Gardiner, Miss Head's sister, is reported to have been overcome by this second affliction in such a short space of time, and she will probably not be able to come to Alton. Owing to the condition of Mrs. Gardiner, no definite news of the cause of the death of Miss Head has been received.

 

HEAD, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 6, 1900
From Virginia City, Nevada, Dec. 2, 1900:
The enclosed clippings are sent to you from the fact that the late Henry Head was at one time a resident of your section of the country, and probably has some relatives still living in that part of Illinois. His father was Biggar Head, and the old home was at Sand Ridge near the Salem Campground between Edwardsville and Alton. My reason for addressing you on this subject is to notify the relations, if there be, of the death. I was personally acquainted with the deceased, both at his old home and in this state. He leaves a wife and step-daughter in the small town where his death occurred. He was engaged in the business of a millwright, and the family lived in this city, which is about 12 miles from Empire City. I worked with him, and against his wishes wrote to his half-sister about 20 years ago, notifying her that he was in this locality. These clippings show the esteem in which he was held in the places where he resided. The longest article is from the "Territorial Enterprise," the leading journal of this State. He had, at one time, two uncles in this city, the Torrence brothers. I have no knowledge of their present whereabouts. Hoping you will through your widely circulated journal make a note of this communication and also state that any further information will be very cheerfully furnished in reply to any letter to my address, B. F. Denton.

The following clipping is from the Virginia City, Nevada Enterprise of Nov. 10, 1900:
The death of Eugene May at Empire a few days ago has brought to light a family estrangement lasting for over fifty years, and a man's bitter feeling which was carried to the grave. The dead man's right name was Henry Head. The story of his life as told by a resident of this city who knew him in his boyhood days in the East, and later worked for him in Empire, is as follows: About fifty years ago Henry Head left his father's prosperous home near Alton, Illinois, owing to being unable to get along with a stepmother, and came to the Pacific Coast, where he assumed the name of Eugene May. He took up his residence at Empire, where he was respected by all residents. After some years, his eastern relatives learned of his whereabouts, and a half-sister sent frequent letters addressed to him at Empire, but he refused to take them out of the Post office, and they were returned to the home in Illinois. When our informant once spoke to him about his family, he said if he ever wrote East about him (Head), they would never again be friends. When Head left his eastern home in the long ago, his father was wealthy, but it is not known whether any of his relatives are alive. Below is a clipping from the Carson, Nev. News, of December 1, 1900:

Died - In Empire, Nov. 28, 1900, E. A. May, aged 60 years, 7 months. Deceased was a native of Illinois and came to Empire in the early days, where he was long identified with the milling interests of that bustling little city. Some four years ago he received injuries in the mill, from which he never recovered. He leaves a wife and a daughter to mourn their loss. The funeral took place in Empire this afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. J. W. Durrance officiating.

 

HEAD, WILLIAM W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 29, 1916
William W. Head, aged 74, a prominent farmer of Ft. Russell township, died Thursday morning at his home after a brief illness. He had been very low for several days and members of his family had been attending him. He was one of the best known members of the Republican party in Madison county, and had for years served as a member of the county central committee of the party. He was a candidate at one time for the Republican nomination for sheriff of Madison county. He was widely known and highly esteemed. Mr. Head was born on the old Head place, now known as the Charles Vaughn farm, and he had lived all of his life in that vicinity. He enlisted in Co. F, 117th Illinois Volunteers for service during the Civil War, and he served for three years. He was a member of the Odd Fellows and Woodmen orders. Beside his wife he leaves two sons, Charles of St. Louis and Robert of Bethalto; and one daughter, Mrs. Julia Isaacs of New Douglas. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon from the family home at 2 o'clock and burial will be in the Short cemetery. The death of Mr. Head was due to a general breaking down from old age. He had been confined to his home about one month. During his illness he was attended by his brother, J. A. Head of Alton, and his sister, Mrs. Emma Wood of Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

HEAFNER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1910
There were three more deaths of little children at Melville Thursday night, all from the same dread disease that had already claimed five little folks, and had a score or more of them very ill. The families which were bereaved by death last night were those of Jacob St. Peters, Oliver St. Peters, brothers, and John Heafner. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob St. Peters lost a 20 months old boy, the second within a week. Mr. and Mrs. Oliver St. Peters lost a two year old boy. Neither of the St. Peters families now have any children, as the result of the scourge.

 

HEATH, MARTHA JANE/Source: Alton Telegraph, July 2, 1847
Died in Upper Alton on Monday evening last, of the measles, Martha Jane, eldest daughter of Mr. Jesse W. Heath, aged 8 years and 10 months. She was a very interesting and promising child, the delight of her bereaved pare4nts, and much beloved by all who knew her.

 

HEBNER, CHRISTINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 27, 1911
Mrs. Christina Hebner, widow of the late Phillip Hebner, died Sunday morning at 5:20 o'clock at the family residence on West Edwards street. Her husband's death occurred three months ago today, August 26th, and the day of his death was also Sunday, the end coming at 5:10 in the evening. The aged lady had been in poor health for some time, and the death of her husband was a severe blow to her from which she never recovered, and she worried all the time about him. She was 83 years old on the 19th day of October, and had lived in Upper Alton fifty-two years. Mrs. Hebner and her husband were both natives of Brenchbach, Germany, and came to this country about the same time. They were married in Alton fifty-four years ago, and went to Macoupin county where they lived two years. After they came to Upper Alton and engaged in the gardening business, and they continued in this work until age stopped them a year ago. They had been very hard working people and were very successful. They raised five children, three of whom are dead, and leave two sons, George and Fred Hebner. The funeral will be held on the same day as that of her husband, on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, and Rev. Chas. N. McManis will conduct the services.

 

HEBNER, MELVIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 15, 1920
The funeral of Melvin Hebner was held at two o'clock this afternoon from the home on Edwards street. Rev. S. D. McKenny had charge of the services. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

 

HECHLER, ADAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1900
Adam Hechler died this morning at his home on Second street, after an illness of six months, aged 58 years. He had been a resident of Alton since 1864, and kept a shoe store here many years, but last conducted a grocery store. Several years ago he retired from business to live on the pension he received for his service during the Civil War. He was a member of Alton Post G. A. R. and the members of the Post will assist at the funeral services. He leaves his wife and six children, Julius and John Hechler of Troy, Mo.; Edward, Frank and Miss Lillie Hechler and Mrs. L. F. Stiritz. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family residence on West Second Street.

 

HECK, CONRAD/Source: Troy Call, January 25, 1918
Conrad Heck Sr., one of the old and well known citizens of Troy, passed away Wednesday morning [Jan. 23] at 9 o'clock at his home in the south end. Death was due to cancer of the stomach from which he had been a suffer for some time. His condition was critical for the past several weeks and the end was not unexpected. His age was 66 years, 1 month and 8 days. The funeral is being held this afternoon from the residence to the Presbyterian church and will be conducted by Rev. F. L. Eversull. Interment will be in the Troy cemetery. Mr. Heck was one of the first miners in Troy, coming here when the old Brookside mine was sunk by William Frendenau. He followed this vocation until a few years ago when advancing age compelled him to retire. He is survived by his wife, three sons and two daughters who are: William of Troy, Conrad of Duquoin, Henry of Peotone, Mrs. Joseph Becker of Collinsville, and Miss Katie of Troy. Charles Heck of Glen Carbon is a brother. The obituary could not be obtained for this issue and has been deferred until next.

Troy Call, February 1, 1918
The funeral of Conrad Heck Sr., whose death on Wednesday of last week was chronicled in The Call, took place last Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence to the Presbyterian church and was largely attended. Rev. J. Dippel, pastor of the German Evangelical church, preached a funeral sermon in German and Rev. F. L. Eversull of the Presbyterian church spoke in English. Interment was made in the Troy cemetery. Deceased was born in St. Louis, Mo., on December 15, 1851, and was a small boy when his parents moved to Indiana. He was only twelve years of age when he began working in a coal mine and followed that occupation all of his life. His marriage to Miss Philippena Moebus, who survives him, took place at Collinsville on October 5, 1873, and ten years later they came to Troy to reside. Seven children were born to them; five of whom with the wife and mother survive. They are three sons and two daughters who are: William of Troy; Conrad of Duquoin; Henry of Peotone; Miss Catherine of Troy, and Mrs. Joseph Becker of Collinsville. There are also nine grandchildren and two brothers, the latter being Charles Heck of Glen Carbon and John Heck of Belleville. Mr. Heck's health began to fail last July but he continued to follow his daily avocation until he took to his bed six weeks ago. His last illness caused him much suffering which he endured bravely to the end. Two weeks ago his children were summoned to his bedside and were with him when the end came. Mr. Heck was 66 years, 1 month and 8 days of age at the time of his death and had been a resident of Troy for 34 years. He was known as an industrious man and a good citizen, and aside from being sadly missed by his family he will be long remembered by his host of friends.

 

HECK, RAYMOND/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 20, 1919
Raymond Heck, the 12 year old son of William Heck of Troy, died at Collinsville this morning from an accidentally inflicted wound with a rifle. The Heck boy was using a target rifle and William Thompson, another boy of the same age, got hold of it and shot the Heck boy fatally.

 

HECTOR, ARLINGTON E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 20, 1915
Arlington E. Hector, the eight year old son of Mr. and Mrs. William Hector of 1718 Belle street, died this morning at 12:30 at St. Joseph's Hospital, following an operation for appendicitis. The child became ill about a week ago, and yesterday it was decided to operate, but the operation proved unsuccessful. Funeral arrangements are incomplete, but the body will be taken to Kaviel, Ky. for burial.

 

HEDDEHEIMER, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 16, 1922
Dies of Smallpox
Joseph Heddeheimer, aged 59, died this morning at 9:30 o'clock at his home on Lorena avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, in Wood River. He was taken ill a week ago with smallpox, and from the first his condition was very serious. He is survived by his wife and two daughters, Mrs. Lawrence Regus of Wood River and Mrs. John Bohrman of Alton. The body was buried this afternoon. Mrs. Heddeheimer suffered a stroke of paralysis some time ago and as a result is in very poor health. Her husband's illness and death has made her condition more serious. There have been several cases of smallpox in Wood River this summer, but the patients are said to be improving. In addition to his wife and two daughters, Heddeheimer leaves three sisters, Mrs. Kate Hagemann of California, Mrs. Margaret Beck and Mrs. Elizabeth Beck of Chicago, and a brother, William Hedesheimer of Chicago. He was born at Mascoutah, Illinois, and came to Wood River about eleven years ago. He had been employed all that time in the Wood River refinery and had become foreman of the machine shop, a position he filled with the highest efficiency.

 

HEEREN, FRED H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 19, 1922
Fred H. Hereen, a retired farmer of the Bethalto neighborhood, died this morning at St. Joseph's hospital, following a vain attempt to give him relief by means of a surgical operation. He had been suffering for two years from a malady which defied all treatment, and the nature of which was not fully understood until the surgical operation was performed yesterday morning. It developed that the sickness of Mr. Heeren was due to a cancerous growth in his abdomen, and there appeared to be very little chance of his rallying from the operation, which was of the gravest character. Mr. Heeren was born in Germany, but came to America when he was only six years of age with his parents. The family settled in Fort Russell Township, and in that neighborhood Mr. Heeren spent all of his remaining life. He was 78 years of age. He was married when he was 26 years of age to Katherine Neunaber, and immediately engaged in farming, an occupation he continued to follow until it became necessary for him to retire, in 1905. He remained on the old home place eight years with his son, then moved to Bethalto with his wife, and they spent the remainder of his life there. His sickness became so serious recently that it was decided to perform the surgical operation as a last desperate measure to give him some relief from the suffering he was undergoing. Mr. Heeren was a successful farmer, and he was also a highly prized neighbor. His death removes from his neighborhood a man who was esteemed by everyone who knew him and who was a fine father and husband. His wife survives him. Mr. Heeren leaves beside his wife, seven children, Mrs. Fred Sanders of Liberty Prairie, Herman of Alton, George, William, Henry and Edward of Bethalto, and Fred of Moro. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to the Bethalto Lutheran Church where services will be conducted by the pastor, Rev. W. F. Brueggeman. Burial will be in the Lutheran Church cemetery.

 

HEEREN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 11, 1904
John Heeren, one of Bethalto's oldest and best known citizens, died on Wednesday night, August 10th, at 9 o'clock, aged 62 years five months and twenty-four days. He was born in Hanover, Germany, February 16, 1842. The funeral will take place from his late residence on Friday, August 12, at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

HEEREN, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 2, 1909 - Submitted by Marsha Ensminger
The funeral of William Heeren, who died at Bethalto Thursday, will take place Sunday afternoon at two o'clock from the German Lutheran church at Bethalto. Services will be conducted by Rev. P. McFedderson, and the interment will be in the German Lutheran cemetery. The pallbearers will be Harry Heeren, John Suessen, Edward Bruns, Fred Helmkamp, John Neunaber and Fred Klopmeyer. Will Heeren was 22 years old. He leaves his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George R. Heeren, one brother, George, and two sisters, Anna and Louise. A sad fact in connection with the untimely death of the young man is that he was to have been married, early this spring to an estimable young lady of the community.

 

HEFFNER, ADELAIDE G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 29, 1901
Adelaide G. Heffner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Heffner, died Sunday morning, aged nine months, after an illness from cholera infantum. The funeral will be tomorrow from St. Mary's church.

 

HEFNER, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 18, 1903
Injuries to Well Known Painter Prove Fatal
Joseph Hefner, who fell from a porch he was painting at the residence of Richard Galbally, May 7th, died Monday morning at 11:30 o'clock at his home, 1210 East Second street. Mr. Hefner was improving steadily until Sunday evening. A blood vessel in his spine was ruptured by the fall, and a large clot of blood formed which caused him much trouble at first. Dr. H. R. Lemen, the attending physician, said that the condition of Mr. Hefner was satisfactory, but that yesterday some unforeseen complication set in which produced death within twelve hours afterward. A son of Mr. Hefner, Joseph Hefner Jr., came to see his father and after his father's death was taken very ill. Medical attention was given him and it is believed he will recover.

 

HEFNER, JOSEPHINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 5, 1922
Mrs. Josephine Hefner, widow of Joseph Hefner, formerly a well-known painter here, died Saturday at her home, 1222 East Broadway. She was 70 years old. Mrs. Hefner was born in Lucerne, Switzerland, January 1, 1852. She leaves six children and six grandchildren. The children are Joseph of Indiana, William of San Francisco, Leo of Milwaukee, and Henry, Emil and Mrs. Anna Purcell of Alton, Ill. Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday at 9 a.m., at St. Patrick's Church, where Requiem Mass will be celebrated, and interment will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

 

HEIDE, FRANCES J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1907
Mrs. Frances J. Heide, wife of Otto Heide, died Sunday morning at the family home on east Third street after a painful illness from heart disease. Her death was expected for several days before it occurred. Mrs. Heide was a daughter of John Gaiser, and all her life had been spent in Alton. She was 38 years of age. The funeral was held this afternoon from the home where services were conducted by the Rev. Mr. Eitelgeorge, pastor of the German Methodist church, and were attended by a very large gathering of the friends and neighbors of the family. Floral offerings were numerous and beautiful, and burial was in City Cemetery.

 

HEIDE, HERMINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1914
Mrs. Hermina Heide, an aged member of the German Methodist church, a resident of Alton for over 60 years, and mother of a large family, died from old age this noon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Annie Jungeblut, 821 east Sixteenth street. She had been an invalid for over ten years. Mrs. Heide's death was not unexpected, as she had been declining rapidly the last few weeks of life. Mrs. Heide was a native of Lippe-Detmold, Germany, and came to Alton when about twelve years of age. She was married to Henry Heide in St. Louis, and came to Alton immediately afterward in 1853. She has lived here ever since. She was affiliated with the German Methodist church since that institution was organized, and was one of its best and most consistent members. When her death occurred the church bell was tolled in her memory. She became a widow five years ago at the death of her husband, Henry Heide. She leaves one brother, Dr. H. C. Fuess at Topeka, Kan., and seven children: A. F. Heide of San Francisco; Mrs. George Bremer of Seattle, Wash.; Mrs. F. Fahrenhotz of Ravenna, Kan.; Mrs. Annie Jungeblut; Mrs. George Colonius; Otto C. and William Heide of Alton. She leaves also 21 grandchildren and two great grandchildren. The funeral will be held from the German Methodist church Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock and burial will be in the City cemetery.

 

HEILE, UNKNOWN WIFE OF PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 17, 1903
The funeral of Mrs. Peter Heile took place this morning from the home on Vandalia road to St. Mary's church, where a requiem mass was said by Rev. Joseph Meckel. There was a large attendance of friends and neighbors, and many floral offerings. Interment was in St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

HEIN, LEONARD or LENHARDT, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 26, 1916
Old Soldier Killed by Fall
Henry Lenhardt, aged 70, died while in the ambulance on the way to St. Joseph's Hospital this afternoon, as the result of a fall he suffered while returning to his home under the Jones grocery store at Seventh and Belle streets this afternoon. He fell a distance of not over 6 feet and struck on his head. The skull was fractured and he lived but a short time. Lenhardt was an old soldier. He and his wife had lived together from his pension money and had repeatedly refused to leave their little basement home. Recently, the wife died and the old man had been living by himself. Today he fell while going down the steps to his home and his head struck the concrete floor.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1916
For years the man who died after falling down a flight of stairs at his basement home on Belle street Tuesday had been known as Henry Leonard. When he was injured and when he died he was designated as Henry Leonard...Afterward the old man's pension papers were found and he turned out to be Leonard Hein. It is supposed that the surname was taken for an abbreviation of the German form of the word Henry, and that his last name was transposed into his first and the first into the last. In that way, the old man was about to be buried as the wrong party, and there might have been endless confusion in pension records.

 

HEINNEMAN, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 28, 1911
Mrs. Mary Heinneman, wife of John Heinneman, died at 12:55 o'clock today at her home on Lawton street. She was afflicted with Bright's disease and had been ill for three weeks. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Mrs. Heinneman was 35 years of age.

 

HEINTZ, VICTOR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1914
Victor Heintz, aged 64 years, died Saturday night after a long illness from a complication of diseases, at his home, 328 Dry street. He was a native of Alsace-Lorraine, and came to the United States 44 years ago. He spent five years in New Orleans and then located in Medora, where he conducted a shoe store for 24 years. He had resided in Alton about fifteen years. He was well known and highly respected wherever known. He is survived by his wife, two daughters and four sons. Mrs. Y. G. Lott, one of the daughters, lives in Jackson, Miss., and one son, Frank Heintz, lives there also. The other children, all of whom reside in Alton, are Miss Marie and Messrs. Charles, Victor, and Leo Heintz. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's Church. Burial will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

 

HEIPLE, ROBERT A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 20, 1914
Watchman Dies As Result of Burns
Robert A. Heiple, the watchman who was scalded by a bursting steam pipe at the plant of the Western Cartridge Co. last week, had a change for the worse at the hospital this morning and remained in a dying condition through the day, and the members of his family were called to his bedside at the request of the injured man who seemed to realize his condition. The burns were more severe than was at first believed, and the patient has been becoming weaker from day to day. At 3 o'clock he died, death coming as a relief to his intense suffering.

 

HELLMAN, AVIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1918
Mrs. Avis Hellman, aged 73 years, died today at the Alton State Hospital where she was a patient. Mrs. Hellman formerly resided in Trenton, Ill., and the funeral will be held there, the body to be shipped out of Alton Wednesday morning. Mrs. Hellman is the mother of Mrs. Frank Heilig of 609 Central avenue, this city.

 

HELLRUNG, CECILIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 4, 1901
Death did a cruel thing at noon today, in taking away from her little children, her stricken husband, and other relatives, a woman whose life was one of goodness, whose ways were those of sweetness and whose memory will long be green with all who knew her. To them must come the consciousness that all is well with her and that she who scattered all the joys in life she could has received her reward. After a sickness of four weeks, some of the time suffering the most excruciating pain yet always patient, Mrs. Lawrence W. Hellrung passed away at noon. She was Miss C. Schnelle before her marriage, and she leaves numerous close relatives to mourn her demise, besides her husband and three little children whose loss is irreparable. Funeral arrangements are not yet made.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 5, 1901
The funeral of the late Mrs. Cecilia Hellrung, wife of Mr. L. W. Hellrung, will take place Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

HELLRUNG, CLARA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 9, 1918
The funeral of Mrs. Clara Hellrung, wife of Henry F. Hellrung of 712 East Sixth street, was held this morning from St. Mary's Church on Henry street. The pastor, Rev. Joseph Meckle, officiated. The burial was in St. Joseph's Cemetery, where short services were conducted by Rev. J. J. Brune.

 

HELLRUNG, CHRISTOPHER P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1919
Christopher P. Hellrung died yesterday at 6:30 p.m. at the state hospital at Jacksonville following a long illness. He was 50 years old. His death followed soon after the departure from Jacksonville of his two brothers, L. W. Hellrung and J. H. Hellrung, who were called to Jacksonville by his illness. The two brothers started home yesterday, and it was believed that slight improvement was shown in the sick man's condition as he was resting easily. Before the brothers reached home however, news of the death was received. Christopher Hellrung had been at the Jacksonville hospital for 12 years. Three years ago he came home and then returned to the hospital of his own accord, saying he believed his condition would become worse. Mr. Hellrung was born in Alton and with the exception of a year spent in East St. Louis, he spent his entire life here until going to the hospital. He was married twice, his first wife and their infant child dying a month apart. His second wife, Mrs. Ida Hellrung, survives him. He is also survived by his mother, Mrs. Mary Hellrung, who resides at the Nazareth Home; his two brothers, L. W. Hellrung and J. H. Hellrung; and two sisters, Mrs. Joseph Wuellner of Union street, and Mrs. Therest Schenk, 600 Central avenue. One brother, L. W. Hellrung, is secretary of the Alton Retail Merchants' Association. Funeral services will be conducted at 3:45 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at St. Mary's Church, of which Mr. Hellrung was a member, by Rev. Fr. Joseph Meckle, the pastor. Interment will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery. The funeral will be held from Mr. Hellrung's old home on Central avenue.

 

HELLRUNG, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 29, 1907
Henry, the 6 months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hellrung, died Saturday afternoon from pneumonia and was buried Sunday afternoon from St. Mary's church at 1 o'clock.

 

HELLRUNG, HENRY/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 8, 1913
Henry Hellrung, aged 57, died Tuesday evening at 6 o'clock at his home, 1132 Cooper avenue, in Alton, from apoplexy. He had been ill for some time, under a doctor's care, but his death came very suddenly. He leaves his wife and five children, Mrs. Carl Steiner, Messrs. Henry, Joseph, John and Charles Hellrung. He leaves also twelve grandchildren. The funeral will be Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's Church.

 

HELLRUNG, JACOB JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1907
Jacob Hellrung Jr., aged 34 years, died Monday morning at his home 610 east Ninth street from heart disease. He was taken ill Sunday morning and from the first was in a serious condition. He leaves his father, three sisters and one brother. The funeral will be held Wednesday from St. Mary's church at 9 a.m.

 

HELLRUNG, LEO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1906
Leo, the 30 months old child of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Hellrung, died this morning at the family home, Sixteenth and Belle streets, after an illness from dysentery, the disease that has proved fatal to many young children lately. The funeral will be Friday at 3 p.m. from St. Mary's church.

 

HELLRUNG, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 30, 1922
Mrs. Mary Hellrung, in her 82nd year, died this morning at the Nazareth home where she has been staying a little more than three years. Her death was due to a general failing of her strength, due to her advanced age. Mrs. Hellrung was a remarkable woman for many reasons. She was a woman of strong character, and she succeeded admirably in rearing her family of five children with which she was left by the death of her husband fifty-one years ago. She never remarried, but devoted her life to rearing the family of three sons and two daughters. Another remarkable fact about this woman was the large size of her offspring. Perhaps there is no one woman in Alton who could among her descendants so many and at the same time such outstanding specimens or manhood as she. Not only did she bring forth to the world large sons, but the characteristic of large size carried on, as a rule, to her grandsons. Mrs. Hellrung was known as a good neighbor, a kind and thoughtful friend, and most of all a good mother to her flock of children, and afterward to her grandchildren and her great-grandchildren. She leaves two sons, John and Lawrence Hellrung, and two daughters, Mrs. J. J. Wuellner and Theresa Schenk. She leaves also 18 grandsons and 9 granddaughters, and 12 great-grandchildren. She was deeply devoted to all of her offspring and her death is sincerely mourned by all her descendants. Mrs. Hellrung's body will be taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. J. Wuellner, 1119 Union street, and kept there until Wednesday morning. It will then be taken to St. Mary's church, in which she became a member when the church was started, and in which she was married to Chris Hellrung in 1861, at the age of 21, four years after she came to Alton, from Westphalia, Germany, and in which all her descendants had been christened.

 

HELLRUNG, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1911
Peter Hellrung, aged 76, died Monday afternoon at his home, 710 east Seventh street, after an illness with paralysis. He was stricken last week while at his customary work. Hellrung was a dealer in junk and drove a wagon around town making purchases. At the home of W. J. Boals, he fell helpless and was taken to his home by Harry Collins, who happened to be near by with an express wagon. The paralysis extended over his left side. It is said that Mr. Hellrung was one of the most regular attendants at funerals at St. Mary's church. He had been a member there for many years, and whenever one of his friends passed away, he was sure to be at the funeral services. Although he was partially crippled, he would insist upon walking with the church society to which he belonged in any funeral procession the society attended. It is claimed that in fifty years he had missed very few funerals. Deceased had lived in Alton 45 years, and leaves four children, three daughters and a son. He was a member of St. Boniface branch No. 9 of the Western Catholic Union, also a member of St. Joseph's society of St. Mary's church, and the members of both societies will attend his funeral Thursday morning from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock. He was honest and charitably inclined where he thought charity was needed and deserved, and there are many good words to be heard of him since his death.

 

HELLRUNG, THERESA (nee PAPE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 21, 1919
Mrs. Theresa Hellrung, widow of Henry Hellrung, died this morning after a long illness at her home at 1432 Cooper Road. She was 62 years old. She was born in Gaeslanden, Germany and spent 61 years of her life here. Before marriage she was Miss Theresa Pape. She leaves four sons, Henry, Charles, Joseph, and John Hellrung, and one daughter, Mrs. Annie Steiner. She was a member of St. Mary's church.

 

HELLRUNG, UNKNOWN WIFE OF PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 27, 1903
Mrs. Peter Hellrung, aged 67 years, died shortly after midnight after a long illness with brain troubles. She leaves her husband and four children, two sons and two daughters. The funeral will be Tuesday morning from St. Mary's church.

 

HELMICH, WILHELMINA/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, April 18, 1919
Mrs. Wilhelmina Helmich, one of the highly respected ladies of Pin Oak township, and mother of Charles Helmich, elected supervisor of Pin Oak township on April 1, was buried this afternoon at the Troy Lutheran cemetery, following services conducted by Rev. C. Lange, pastor of the Lutheran church. The services were attended by many friends and acquaintances. The death of Mrs. Helmich Tuesday morning about 5 o'clock was due to a stroke of appoplexy, and came as a big shock to the neighborhood. Her death was very unexpected. The first attack came on Saturday and she failed rapidly. The second attack proved fatal. Mrs. Heilmich was born in Germany on January 22, 1854, and was 65 years 2 months and 24 days old at the time of her death. She came to America with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Hampe, as a young girl, and was married to William Helmich, many years a leading resident of Pin Oak, when 18 years old. Mr. and Mrs. Helmich lived in Troy a short time and then settled on a farm north of that place. Mrs. Helmich was a kind and gentle mother, and had a wide circle of friends and acquaintances who extend their sympathy in the bereavement of the family. She was the mother of eleven children. Four of them have died. Besides Supervisor Helmich, others who survive are Fred Helmich, Collinsville; William Helmich, St. Louis; Edward Helmich, Troy; Mrs. Henry Schulz, Mrs. John Bohnensteihl, Troy; and Mrs. L. P. Wetzel, Marine.

 

HELMKAMP, EDWARD M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 17, 1902
Edward M. Helmkamp of Prairietown, was killed two miles from his home Friday evening while hauling a load of lumber from Edwardsville. He fell from the wagon and the heavy wagon was rolled over his body, producing injuries which proved fatal at his home three hours later. Helmkamp was a very prominent family of Prairietown, and was 31 years of age. He leaves his widow and three children. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon.

 

HELMKAMP, G. FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 2, 1912
Omer, 5 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Helmkamp of Moro, 8 miles north of Edwardsville, had a narrow escape from death yesterday while attending the funeral of his grandfather, G. Fred Helmkamp. The boy was tossed from the rig in which he was riding, landing on the grounds between the wheels. The rear wheel ran across his neck, but did not injure him in the least. The carriage had turned into a side road leading to the church. It is thought a sudden jolt threw the boy out. He was carried into the home of Rev. A. H. Koerner, where he was revived without medical aid. At the close of the church services he was able to go to the cemetery. The funeral was one of the largest ever witnessed in Madison County. Services were conducted by Rev. Koerner of St. John's Evangelical church, and Rev. H. Rahn of Edwardsville. The pallbearers were: Frederick, John and Arthur Helmkamp of Fort Russell Township; Henry and Theodore Helmkamp of Moro; and William Grehler of St. Louis, grandchildren. Helmkamp is survived by twelve children, thirty-two grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

 

HELMKAMP, GEORGE H. (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 27, 1901
Dr. George Helmkamp, aged 28, died at the family home north of Moro, Sunday afternoon after a long, brave fight with consumption. He had been away from home for several months seeking health in climates more beneficial than this for lung troubles, but his quest was unsuccessful and he returned home about a month ago. He was a graduate of Shurtleff, and also was a graduated physician. Last summer he was an assistant at Enos Sanitarium in this city. He was a genial, talented young man, and leaves many friends who will sincerely mourn his untimely taking off. The funeral will be on Wednesday at 12 o'clock. Prof. Ray will deliver the funeral discourse.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1901
Moro News - Dr. George H. Helmkamp died at the home of his father, G. F. Helmkamp, on Sunday, May 26. Some fifteen years ago the Doctor entered the office of Dr. James Enos as office boy, and from there he went to the Enos Sanitarium at Alton, becoming interested more and more all the time in the study of medicine. He entered Shurtleff college and graduating from there he attended a medical school at Chicago from which he graduated a year ago. He at once entered into a heavy hospital practice, but ill health overtook him and he had to return home, where he improved, and being ambitious and determined to make his way in the world, he soon set out in the practice of his profession, going to southwest Missouri, but he soon found the climate did not bring him the desired relief, he sought other sections of the country but to no avail. A brother was sent to California where he was very low with hemorrhage of the lungs, some two months ago. Together they journeyed home only to associate together in this world for so short a time. He was highly esteemed and admired by all who knew him. The funeral services were conducted at the old home on Wednesday. The remains were interred in the family cemetery.

 

HELMKAMP, HERMAN H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 28, 1920
Herman H. Helmkamp died at his home, four miles from Moro, Sunday night, from old age. He was in his eighty-seventh year. Mr. Helmkamp had been in bed two weeks since his breakdown came. His end came so peacefully that those in the room with him believed he was merely asleep, death coming without any outward sign until all was over. He was a member of the county board of supervisors for three terms, and he served as justice of the peace for thirty-five years. He had lived in the Moro neighborhood for forty-five years. He leaves three children - Miss Emma Helmkamp, Mrs. Minnie Dalhaus, and Edward H. Helmkamp. His wife died many years ago. The funeral will be Wednesday from St. John's Evangelical Church.

 

HEMPHILL, ELVA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1901
Infant Given Morphine by Mistake
Mr. and Mrs. Orland Hemphill of Sixth and Spring streets mourn the loss of their seven months infant daughter, Elva. The death took place yesterday afternoon under very distressing and painful circumstances. Mrs. Hemphill had been suffering from a severe cold, for which she was taking medicine, which had considerable morphine in it. Little Elva was also suffering probably from the grip [flu], and the medicine prescribed by the Doctor was in a bottle similar to the one in which Mrs. Hemphill's was, and similar in color. In some way the bottles were changed, and the mother, in order to stop the infant's cough, gave it some of its medicine, as she supposed. She immediately discovered that she had made a mistake. This was about 10 o'clock a.m. A doctor was at once sent for, and Dr. Taphorn arrived and used all knowledge of the medical art, but in vain. The little one went to sleep and could not be aroused. Dr. Taphorn remained with the child until it expired at 4 p.m. The death of a child under any circumstances is distressing, but in this case is peculiarly so, and the parents, especially the mother, will have the sincere sympathy of their many friends and acquaintances.

 

HEMPKEN, HAROLD G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1899
Harold G., the eighteen months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Gerhard Hempken, died this morning after an illness with whooping cough and grippe. The child was one of a pair of twins, and leaves a little sister. The funeral will be at 2 p.m. tomorrow.

 

HEMPKEN, LAURA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 24, 1905
Laura, the 15 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Hempken, died Friday night at the family home on Vine street after a long illness from diabetes. She had suffered eight months from the disease, and death was a happy relief to her. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock from the family home, 412 Vine street, and services will be conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenney. Burial will be in City cemetery.

 

HENCKELL, FRANCES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 26, 1917
Mrs. Frances Henckell, widow of Helwig Henckell, died Sunday morning at 6:40 o'clock at her home, 447 East Broadway, after an illness of only a few days. She was taken sick on Monday, and from that time was confined to her bed. On Friday she became very seriously ill, and sank steadily until the end came Sunday morning. Mrs. Henckell had lived 69 years in one house. Preceding the time she moved there she had lived in the old building that was occupied as a printing office by Elijah P. Lovejoy on Broadway, a few doors west of Piasa. In that house her eldest son, Frederick, was born. Her husband died in 1855. Mrs. Henckell had lived 69 years. She was born in Germany and was brought to America by her parents in early childhood. She was reared in St. Charles county, and came to Alton in 1848 where she was married. She leaves four children, Frederick, William of Alton; and Mrs. Sarah Heins of St. Louis, and Theodore Henckell of Millers, Nev. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's Church.

 

HENCKELL, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1918
Old Soldier Dies Soon After His Mother
Fred Henckell, aged 71, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Friday night after an illness of three weeks, due to grippe. The death of Mr. Henckell marks the close of a life that was largely devoted to the care of his mother. A soldier in the Civil War, Mr. Henckell had passed almost his entire life in Alton, in fact, was away from the city but seldom from the time he was born until he died. Recently his mother died from old age. The two had lived in the one house practically all of their lives. The son, since his mother became feeble, attended her every want and was a striking example of filial devotion. His whole interest was centered in making her comfortable and seeing to it that she wanted for nothing. When she died his whole existence was so disordered that doubtless the great change from being a man of responsibility to having no one to look after caused him to be less able to resist the malady which attacked him. After his mother's death, to intimate friends, he told of his great grief over losing her and the old soldier, who had never married, was inconsolable. He took down with the grippe a few weeks ago, and when he failed to get better was moved to the hospital. Mr. Henckell was a native of Alton and always lived here except during the four years he was fighting for the Union. He was industrious, honest, and accommodating, and has many friends in the city who will regret to hear of his death. He is survived by a couple of brothers, one living in the far West, the other in Alton. A sister also survives. Deceased was born in the house in which he and his mother lived on East Broadway, near Langdon, and her life and his were spent in that home. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock from St. Mary's Church.

 

HENCKELL, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1918
The funeral of William Henckell, who died Friday at the Nazareth Home, will be held Sunday afternoon from St. Mary's Church, where services will be held. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

HENDERSON, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 13, 1913
Former Alby Street Grocer
As peacefully as a child falling asleep did Charles Henderson, the former well known Alby street grocer, pass from life into Eternity Friday afternoon at 3:20 o'clock, at the home of his son, Albert Henderson, northeast of the city. He had been failing mentally and physically for the past seven or eight months, but did not become wholly bedfast until the last few days preceding his death. He was born in Leicestershire, England, August 22, 1833, and Mr. Henderson was eighty years old last August. He was married to a neighbor's daughter, Miss Jane Lewin, when he attained his majority, and he and his bride immediately left for America. They lived in St. Louis a few months, then came here where they remained through life. For more than fifty years Mr. Henderson worked at his trade as a shoemaker, and conducted a general store at Elm and Alby streets, and he prospered. Mrs. Henderson died in 1900, and shortly after her death he disposed of his business and had done nothing since, except visit around among relatives and take life easy. He made two trips to England, and one extended trip to Utah to visit a sister from whom he was long separated. He was never content, apparently, to remain at his old home after Mrs. Henderson died, and he never seemed the same carefree man after her death, that he was before it. They were the parents of six children, all of whom attained adult life, and five of whom survive. They are Mrs. Patrick Maguire, Mrs. Henry Meyers, Albert and Edwin Henderson of Alton; and Mrs. H. Penning of Mount Vernon, Ill. The latter was here a few weeks ago, but returned home. She arrived in North Alton today. Henry Henderson died in Chicago in 1902 as the result of an accident. Twenty grandchildren and five great-grandchildren are left to mourn the loss of an indulgent grandfather. Mr. Henderson was one of the best citizens of Madison County, kindly, honest, industrious and good throughout. He was public spirited too, and charitable, and his passing is a distinct loss to the community. The body was taken today from the home of the son to Mr. Henderson's old home at Elm and Alby streets, and the funeral will be held from there Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery, and the pall will be borne by six grandson, Charles, Miles and George Maguire, Charles H. Henderson, and Ivan and Lee Meyers. He was a member of Piasa Lodge A. F. & A. M., and the funeral will be under the Masonic auspices.

 

HENDERSON, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 5, 1918
Charles Henderson died at the Emergency Hospital this morning after a two weeks illness with influenza. He was taken from his room in Middletown to St. Joseph's Hospital, and from there to the Emergency Hospital. He was single and aged about 62 years. He has no relatives, and friends will take care of funeral arrangements, which are still incomplete.

 

HENDERSON, J. B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1903
Killed in Wreck on the Big Four Train
The Big Four had a frightful wreck Friday night on the curve near Moro. Train No. 36, from St. Louis to New York, the second section of which collided with train No. 11, and there was an almost miraculous escape of many people from death or injury. Fireman Henderson, whose home is at Mattoon, jumped into the ditch and was killed. Engineer Charles King of the same train is fatally injured at St. Joseph's hospital. The wreck is due to either a lack of orders or disobedience on the part of the train crews. No. 36 was running at the rate of 45 miles an hour, and NO. 11 was going at nearly as high rate of speed and was four hours behind time. The collision was witnessed by a large number of people who were skating on a pond nearby. None of these trains stop at Moro, and consequently there was no chance to avoid a collision when the train going to St. Louis failed to stop at the station east of Moro and take a siding for the other. The passenger coaches did not leave the rails, and the passengers were only slightly injured by being thrown about the cars by the impact.....W. H. Lanterman of Moro saved the wreck from being consumed by fire. He ran to the scene when he heard the crash and noticed that fire was beginning to eat its way through the mass of splinters. Armed with buckets which were filled in a ditch beside the track, Lanterman and the passengers on the train carried water, and after a hard fight put out the flames. The body of Fireman Henderson was found this morning at the scene of the wreck in a ditch beside the track. It is supposed that Henderson in leaping was rendered unconscious by striking the ground and fell into the ditch. When the collision occurred the water tank of the engine was broken and the water ran out into the ditch, where Henderson was drowned. His home is in Mattoon.

 

HENDERSON, JANE (nee LEWN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 24, 1900
Mrs. Jane Henderson, wife of Charles Henderson, and one of the best known residents of North Alton, died last evening at 6 o'clock at the family home on the Coal Branch, after an illness of six months with cancer. During her long illness, she bore her sufferings bravely while undergoing the most torturous pains of the disease. Mrs. Henderson was born in Quordon, Lesteshire, England, March 12, 1834. Her maiden name was Lewn, and she was married to Mr. Henderson in her native home, November 12, 1854. Coming to America soon after, and to North Alton in 1855, where she has lived ever since. Mrs. Henderson leaves to mourn her loss a husband and six children, who are among the most respected citizens of the community. Fifty years ago she came to Alton and settled in North Alton, where she lived until the time of her death. Mrs. Pat Maguire of Alton, Mrs. Mary Penning of Outbike, Mrs. Carrie Meyers of North Alton, Albert Henderson of Godfrey, Henry of Chicago, and Edwin of North Alton, in losing Mrs. Henderson, the family feel the loss of a kind and loving mother, and the community a kind and faithful friend. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and services will be conducted at the family home in North Alton.

 

HENDERSON, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 27, 1904
John Henderson, a well known industrious colored man, who for many years has been engaged at the plant of the Sparks Milling Company, died at 1 o'clock this morning at his home in the southern part of town, after an illness with lung trouble. He leaves a wife and three children. The funeral will probably be Tuesday.

 

HENDERSON, MARGARET T./Source: Alton Telegraph, October 22, 1842
Died, on Thursday the 6th inst., of bilious congestive fever, in Troy, Madison County, Illinois, Miss Margaret T. Henderson, aged 21 years and 5 months. Seldom are we called upon to record a more melancholy duty than that of the above. She was in the spring tide of youth, blessed with health, beauty, and rare accomplishments, but one short month prior to her illness. But the fell destroyer came, and sorrow lays a cold, inanimate corpse, mouldering in the grave, food for worms; but she has left a numerous circle of relatives and acquaintances to mourn her early decease, one of which has hastily penned the above lines, as the last tribute of departed worth.

 

HENDERSON, SARAH A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 8, 1903
Mrs. Sarah A. Henderson, a highly esteemed resident of Moro, died Sunday morning, June 7. Mrs. Henderson was born in St. Louis May 18, 1852. She was the daughter of Jane and Charles Maxwell. The family came to Illinois in 1850, and residents of Moro since that date. She married Ralph Henderson in 1874. Mr. Henderson died September 11, 1883. Mrs. Henderson was a member of the Moro Presbyterian church. She was one of the original members of the Ladies Missionary Society, and was its first secretary and treasurer. She was also a member of the Court of Honor and the Daughters of Rebekah. She leaves three children: William, Olla and Robert. The funeral will be held at Moro Presbyterian church, Tuesday, June 9, at 10:30 o'clock.

 

HENDRICHS, PEARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1899
Pearl Hendrichs, the 3 year old daughter of a farmer living in the American Bottom, died yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. The funeral will be held at the Brushy Grove Church Sunday morning at 10 o'clock.

 

HENDRICKS, ED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 26, 1913
Ed Hendricks, aged about 50, a workman on river improvement jobs and employed by Swift & Rust for years, was drowned Wednesday evening while intoxicated and taking a ramble down Piasa street. Hendricks neglected to observe that he had reached the end of Piasa street when he got to the levee and he kept on walking. It is said that he walked out on the Eagle wharf and off into the river. The watchman on the wharf heard Hendricks moaning and struggling in the water and threw him a line as he floated by. It is said Hendricks was an expert swimmer, and those who saw him in the water say he was floating on his back, keeping himself on the surface by a slight movement of his hands, but he seemed to be making no effort to get to shore. As he passed the Joest fish dock, hands were reached to save him, but he paid no attention, and finally a motorboat was put out after him after he had floated by. He was overtaken at the lower end of the Fluent dock, still afloat, and he was dragged into a boat and taken ashore, but he died about the time he was being transferred to the Joest fish dock. Hendricks' funeral, it was said, would be taken care of by his former employers. The drowned man leaves a brother at Hannibal, Missouri.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1913
The coroner's jury returned a verdict of death from exposure yesterday, over the body of Ed Hendricks. It was thought generally that Hendricks died from drowning. The evidence introduced at the trial yesterday showed that he did not drown, but the fact that he stayed in the water while he floated from above the wharf to the bridge, chilled his body so that he died. Almost all the witnesses of the accident agreed that his head did not go under the water at any time. They said that while he did not struggle, he managed to float along.

 

HENDRICKS, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 10, 1922
Edward Hendricks, son of Henry Hendricks, died this morning very suddenly after being paralyzed while working near Wanda. He died at 10 o'clock, two hours after the stroke. He leaves one daughter. Mr. Hendricks was a member of a large family and leaves a large number of brothers and sisters. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of his sister, Mrs. Fred Bender.

 

HENDRICKS, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 8, 1904
Mrs. Mary Hendricks, aged 27 years, died Thursday afternoon of blood poisoning at the home of her mother, Mrs. Linsig, 812 Liberty street. She leaves a husband and two children. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Evangelical church. Deceased was a member of the Maccabees and the funeral will be under the auspices of that order.

 

HENDRICKS, UNKNOWN INFANT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 18, 1920
The six months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. George Hendricks died yesterday afternoon at the home on Lampert street in Yager Park. The funeral was held at three o'clock this afternoon. Services were in charge of Rev. E. L. Gibson, pastor of the First Presbyterian church. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

 

HENDY, HENRIETTA B. "NETTIE"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph January 22 1921 - Submitted by Steve Horn
Mrs. Henrietta B. Hendy, aged 51 died this morning at 5:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's hospital, following a year's illness. She is survived by her husband, Patrick J. Hendy and five children, Daniel, Sister Cecelia of the Catholic Orphanage, Patrick, Emma, and Owen. She also leaves two sisters Mrs. Anna Young and Mrs. Al Gathercoal of Chicago and a brother Will Diamond of Milwaukee Wis. The body was taken to the home of her son, Patrick, at 1218 Rodemeyer Avenue. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Monday morning from SS. Peter and Paul's cathedral. Internment will be at Greenwood Cemetery.

 

HENDY, JAMES SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1900
Civil War Veteran and Watchman at Glass Works
James Hendy, the venerable night watchman at the Illinois Glass Works the past 22 yearss, died last night at his home, 710 Ridge street, after an illness of eight months with stomach trouble. He had lived in Alton since 1857, was married here and was well known in a large circle of acquaintances. In the early 70s he was for several years on the Alton police force, and since 1878 he held the position at the glass works, where he had the strictest confidence reposed in him. James Hendy was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, and came to America by way of New Orleans when 5 years old. He lived at New Richmond, Ohio, until 1857, when he came to Alton and was married two years later in Alton. He served during the Civil War three years. He leaves his aged wife and two sons, James and P. J. Hendy, and Mrs. Lizzie Bennis of North Alton. He was a member of the A. O. E. W. and Alton Post G. A. R. The funeral will be Monday at 9 a.m., and services will be in St. Patrick's church.

 

HENDY, JULIA LEAHY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph February 26 1906 - Submitted by Steve Horn
Mrs. Julia Hendy, widow of James Hendy, died yesterday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Bennes on the Grafton Road. She was 64 years of age and lived most of these years in Alton. She is survived by three children, Mrs. John Bennes of North Alton, and Messrs.', P.J. and James Hendy, of Alton. The funeral will be Tuesday morning and services will be conducted in St. Patrick's church. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

HENKE, AUGUST/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 10, 1905
August Henke, one of the oldest and best known residents of Moro township, died this morning at three o'clock from the effects of old age and a paralytic stroke received nearly a year ago. Mr. Henke had spent the greater part of his life on a farm in the township and was respected by all who knew him. His wife and three children survive him. His daughter, Mrs. Adam Roessel, and the two sons, William and Louis, all live in the vicinity. Mr. Henke was 72 years of age. The funeral will take place from St. John's Evangelical church on the Springfield road, Monday, June 12, at ten o'clock a.m.

 

HENKE, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 17, 1908
Charles Henke, a Moro patriarch, aged 75, died at his home Monday morning from a paralytic stroke he sustained Sunday while seated in his home talking to the pastor of the church with which he was affiliated. He had been in poor health for some time, but was able to be around the house and in the yard. While talking to his pastor he complained that his head hurt him and then he fell off the chair on which he was sitting and never regained consciousness. He died at 5 o'clock Monday morning. He was the father of twelve children, all living and beside them he leaves his aged wife. All of his children are married and heads of families of their own. They are: Reinhard Henke, Edward Henke, Christian Henke, Jule Henke, Henry Henke, August Henke, Willard Henke, Mrs. Ferdinand Pape, Mrs. Fred Guswelle, Mrs. Charles Hill, all of Moro; Charles Henke and Mrs. John Meyer of St. Louis. Mr. Henke was a prosperous farmer and all of his children are prosperous people. He was a most estimable man, bore a high character and was respected by everyone who knew him. He and his wife raised a family who are among the best people in Madison county, and all of whom are doing well. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the Reformed Evangelical church on the Springfield road near Moro.

 

HENKE, WILLIAM F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 8, 1916
Died From Kick of Mule
William F. Henke, a well known farmer of the Moro neighborhood, died at his home Monday evening from uraemic poisoning following injuries he sustained a week before when one of his mules kicked him. Mr. Henke was injured on one of his knees. The injury made him very sick and it is supposed that the shock started up a latent trouble in his kidneys. He became very ill and finally passed away in a state of coma. Mr. Henke has a wife and five children. He was about 55.

 

HENKHAUS, HENRY EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1918
Young Marine Injured at Battle of Chateau Thierry (WWI)
A telegram was received today by Mrs. Julia Henkhaus of Fosterburg, apprising her of the death of her son, Henry Edward Henkhaus, of the United States Marine Corps. The young man died July 19 from wounds he received in the battle at Chateau Thierry. The telegram which was signed by Brigadier General Charles C. Long, said to the mother: "I deeply regret to inform you that a cablegram from abroad states that Private Henry Edward Henkhaus, Marine Corps, died July nineteenth of wounds received in action. The remains will be interred abroad until the end of the war. Accept my sincere sympathy in your great loss. Your son nobly gave his life in service of his country." The young man was in the 5th regiment, 66th company, 1st battalion of the United States Marine Corps. He left Alton and enlisted in the Marine Corps at St. Louis Friday, December 13, 1917. He commented at the time on his choice of a hoodoo day and date for starting on such an important mission, but he thought that it would be a lucky day for him. He leaves his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Henkhaus of Fosterburg; also two brothers, John of Bethalto and Victor of Alton; and four sisters, Miss Edith of Fosterburg, Mrs. Robert Rundell of Alton, Mrs. Lawrence Stanton of Alton, and Mrs. George Walck of St. Louis. Henkhaus was born in Fosterburg, but had spent much of his life in Alton. He was employed at the Federal Lead Co. just before enlisting and prior to that he had worked at the glass works. About a month ago a telegram came to the mother that her son had been wounded on the nineteenth day of July. Today came the message telling that he had died on the same day, so it was assumed that he lived part of a day after being wounded, which accounts for the space of time intervening between the notices of his being wounded and his death. He was wounded once before, June 14, but he recovered and went back into the line of duty. At the first time he was in the hospital, a Red Cross nurse sent the family word of his being hurt. Afterward he wrote himself, telling his mother he was all right and was ready to go back to "get a German." That was the last the family heard of him, except the two telegrams.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1921
Soldier Boy's Remains Reach Alton Today - Killed In France
The remains of another soldier boy who was killed in France arrived in Alton this morning. Henry E. Henkhaus. The casket was taken immediately to the home of the parents on Elliot avenue, and from there it will be taken to St. Mary's Church Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock for funeral services. The American Legion will have charge of the burial in St. Joseph's Cemetery. Pallbearers have been selected for the funeral as follows: Leland McMichael and Ed Flynn of Edwardsville, George Bowman of Bethalto, Jessie Werts of Fosterburg, William Glassmeyer and Leo Struif of this city. Details of the American Legion burial plans will be given Saturday. The Henkhaus family moved here from Fosterburg since the son entered the service of his country and was killed in action.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 4, 1921
Alton post, 126, Department of Illinois, American Legion, had charge of the funeral services over the body of Henry Henkhaus, Sunday afternoon at St. Mary's church. The Legion furnished an escort and a large number of uniformed members of the post attended the funeral in a body, gathering at the church at 1:30 in the afternoon. The remains were taken from the Henkhaus home, 1006 Elliott avenue, to the church, where they were met by the Legionnaires and escorted into the church by the honor guard, American flag and the Legion colors, up to the altar where Father Meckel delivered a touching funeral oration telling of the accomplishments of the dead soldier, and reviewing his life from the time he left Alton and entered army service until he was first wounded in action, afterwards recovering and again going to the front in July 1918, meeting his death in the line near Soissons. The Legionnaires and friends of the deceased soldier who assembled in St. Mary's church around the flag-draped casket remained until an honor review line through which the casket was carried followed by the relatives and friends of the dead soldier. A line of march was formed upon leaving the church and escorted the body to St. Joseph's cemetery where Commander Pfeiffenberger was assisted in carrying out the funeral ritual by Father Meckel. Dr. Pfeiffenberger, post commander, eulogized the dead soldier in carrying out the Legion ritual after which the body was lowered into the grave and the firing squad closed the ceremony with three volleys of fire following the sounding of taps by the Legion bugler. Pallbearers were the following soldier friends of Henry Henkhaus: Leland McMichael and Ed Flynn of Edwardsville, George Bowman of Bethalto, Jessie Werts of Fosterburg, William Glassmeyer and Leo Struif of this city.

 

HENKLE, HARRISON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 28, 1910
Caught in Pulley Belt On Ore Conveyor - Killed Immediately
Harrison Henkle, an employee of the Federal Lead Co., was killed Sunday morning sometime after 10 o'clock by being caught in a belt on the ore conveyor at the H and H house at the lead works. His body was crushed almost out of semblance to a human form. In one of his crushed hands was a large oil can which was crushed into his hand, and was found by Coroner Streeper after he had taken the mangled form to his morgue. A monkey wrench lying close by indicated that he had been using it too. Henkle's body was found by foreman Frank Clifford, on a platform about ten feet from the ground. He had evidently been dead over fifteen minutes. The big conveyor belt was still running. The belt is about 24 inches in width and over 450 feet long. It runs over a pulley about 26 inches in diameter. The accident occurred near the hopper where the ore is dumped. Coroner Streeper believes from the appearance of the body that Henkle must have caught an arm and been pulled in head first, and that almost his whole body was crushed between the big belt and the pulley. The conveyor belt runs intermittently, and Supt. Porter says the man was supposed to do his oiling when the belt was still. He was alone when the accident occurred. Henkle lived on Washington street, and leaves his wife and two children. He was known as a steady industrious man. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon from the family home.

 

HENNER, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1901
The funeral of George Henner of Woodburn took place at Fosterburg yesterday, and there was a large attendance. The young man was 20 years of age and a member of a well known Woodburn family.

 

HENNEY, BERT LESLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 20, 1912
Young Man Dies After a Hard Fight - Ill For Two Years
Bert Leslie Henney, the 18 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest A. Henney of 1715 Liberty street, died at 12 o'clock Monday night after an illness of two years. Two years ago the young man became affected with a disease causing bleeding under the skin, and this so reduced his vitality that he has been struggling for health ever since. He was in the second year in the high school at this time, and was forced to leave school. The parents of the young man took him to many places in the country in the hope of benefitting his health, but he gradually became weaker. Several times when it was believed the end was near, his determination to live caused him to rally. Just at Christmas time it was feared he would not live to see another Christmas day, and heroic measures were resorted to to prolong life for a number of hours more with the result that when the young man realized he was still alive, he rallied with his strong will again and prolonged his life until midnight Monday, when the end of the long struggle came. The case of Bert Henny is particularly sad. He had many friends who rallied around him during his struggle and encouraged him to keep up the fight. Jovial and cordial in his disposition, he made many friends and created sunshine in the circles he moved in and had much to live for. Besides the mother and father, a sister, Mildred, survive. The disease which first attacked the young man was a puzzle to the physicians he was taken to in many places, and when finally conquered had broken down a magnificent athletic body and undermined a strong constitution. To those who were close to the young man, and knew of his struggle, the fight he made for his life is considered remarkable.

 

HENRY, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 15, 1911
James Henry, aged about 87 years old, died Friday night in a St. Louis hospital, where he went several weeks ago to be treated for cancer. He lived in upper Belle street near Madison for sixty years or more, and was a stone mason. All of his immediate family preceded him to the grave, but he leaves a daughter-in-law, the widow of the late James Henry, and her four daughters. An aged sister also survives and lives in Manhattan, Ill. The body was brought from St. Louis this afternoon and taken to the Henry home in Belle street. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood cemetery. Mr. Henry was an industrious, honest citizen, and all who knew him will regret to hear of his death.

 

HENRY, JAMES JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 15, 1900
James Henry Jr., the well known railroad man, died at his home at Twentieth and Belle streets last night after an illness of six days with pneumonia. He was born December 1, 1863, and lived in Alton all his life. He leaves a wife to whom he was married seven years ago, and four young children. Mr. Henry worked for the Big Four in the local yards and at the freight depot a number of years. He was sober and industrious and was well liked by all who knew him. Six days before his death he was taken ill with pneumonia, and having been in poor health some time before, the illness soon took a fatal turn. The funeral will take place Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock, and services will be in the Cathedral.

 

HENRY, JOHN J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 11, 1908
Old Time Resident of Wood River Township Mourns His Wife's Death Until His Death
John J. Henry, one of the old time residents of Wood River township, died Tuesday afternoon at the residence of his son, the old home place of the Henry's near East Alton. He was 78 years of age January 10th of this year. Mr. Henry's death was due directly to his grieving over the death of his wife, who passed away October 3, after a partnership in life of fifty years. After his wife's death Mr. Henry could not be consoled. He had but one desire, and that was to rejoin her and his wish was accomplished within forty days after her death. The last fifteen days of his life he could take no food whatever. His collapse came October 15, while he was in the crowd attending the unveiling of the Lincoln-Douglas memorial tablet. The aged gentleman was picked up and taken to his home in Upper Alton, and he rallied somewhat there. He recovered enough to go to his old home place at East Alton, where he had lived for many years, and there he suffered another collapse five days after the first one. He never recovered. During his illness he frequently expressed the wish that he might speedily see his wife, and his wish was granted, as he passed away just forty days after her. He was born in Bremen, Germany and came to America at the age of 24. He settled at Downington, Pa., where he lived for 18 years. He was first a member of the Lutheran church, but afterward affiliated with the Baptist church. He came to East Alton from Downington and lived there on one place for thirty years. About fifteen years ago he moved to Upper Alton, and then after eight years, moved back to East Alton for a year. He then went back to Upper Alton and lived there until last month when he returned to his old place. He was a pillar of the Baptist church. When the Brushy Grove church was projected he carried around the subscription list and raised the money needed to pay for it. The funeral will be held from the Brushy Grove church Friday. The funeral will leave at 11 o'clock and after services in the church burial will be in the Vaughn cemetery. The services will be conducted by his old friend, Rev. T. N. Marsh, Upper Alton. Mr. Henry leaves three sons, John of Upper Alton, William and George of East Alton, and one daughter, Mrs. R. M. Kennedy of Bethalto. During his long life Mr. Henry bore an excellent reputation. He was very successful as a farmer and was known as a good neighbor and a kindly man in every respect. He was conscious to the last and died an easy, peaceful death, as he had deserved to do.

 

HENRY, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 25, 1917
Mrs. Margaret Henry, 51, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock from the effects of injuries she sustained in a fall about three weeks ago. She leaves two sons and two daughters. The body will be taken to the home of Mrs. Henry's niece, Mrs. Walter Hutchinson, 105 East Ninth street, and the funeral services will be from there tomorrow afternoon. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

HENRY, UNKNOWN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 19, 1899
Mrs. Henry, colored, aged 65 years, died Wednesday evening at the home of her son-in-law, Mr. James Derrick of Middletown. She died without medical attendance, and Coroner Bailey held an inquest this afternoon.

 

HENRY, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JOHN J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 26, 1904
The body of Mrs. John J. Henry arrived from San Antonio, Texas today, accompanied by the husband and children and one of her brothers and a sister. The funeral took place this afternoon from the Henry family home near East Alton, and was attended by a very large number of people, many of whom came from Edwardsville, New Douglas, Litchfield, East St. Louis, Collinsville and Venice. Services were conducted by Rev. C. L. Petersen of the Washington street Methodist church, and interment was in the Vaughn Cemetery where repose the remains of many of the pioneers of Wood River and Ft. Russell townships and their descendants.

 

HENRY, WILLIAM F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1911
Wann Disaster Recalled by Death of William Henry - Gave Money to Sufferers and Offered His All For Relief
William F. Henry died Monday night at his home in Washington avenue, Upper Alton, after a long illness from lung troubles and complications. He was born near East Alton in 1861, and is survived by his wife and four children, John Henry of Alton, and William Henry of Springfield; Miss Agnes of Alton, and Mrs. Nellie Riley of Montana. A sister, Mrs. Robert M. Kennedy of Bethalto, and two brothers, John J. Henry of Upper Alton and George Y. Henry of East Alton, also survive. For a great many years Will Henry was one of the leading merchants of Wood River township, and conducted business places at East Alton and Edwardsville Crossings at the same time. The day of the Wann oil explosion, eighteen years ago, when scores of people were burned and suffering and immediate relief was needed, Will Henry threw open the doors of his large store and fairly begged helpers to take anything in sight that would tend to relieve suffering or give comfort in any way. Several barrels of linseed oil, hundreds of pounds of cotton, lard, muslin, domestic, bedspreads, etc., to the amount of several hundreds of dollars, and used for the dying or to wrap up the dead. Not only that, but Mr. Henry offered anything else he had to those who needed it on that day. He turned his house into a hospital also, and was indeed a good angel to those in pain and trouble. He was a great hearted, generous man, honest, charitable, and intensely human, and there will be general and sincere regret felt by all who knew him when they hear of his death. The funeral will be held at the St. Paul's Episcopal church Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock. The Rev. Arthur Goodger will officiate.

 

HENSCHEL, J. D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 21, 1902
Mrs. Sophia Demuth, the Alton probation officer, unearthed a peculiar incident while at the county farm Thursday. While at the county farm she stated that she had been requested to inquire into the health of J. D. Henschel. She was informed that he had died at the institution in December of last year. Mrs. Demuth was much surprised, and so were those at the county farm, at her story. Last December when Henschel died, Supt. Tunnell notified the Alton authorities that the man had a family there and to communicate with them. He received word shortly that the relatives wished him to proceed with the burial at the farm, and did so. Mrs. Demuth stated that she was informed someone of the relatives, said to be a daughter, had Henschel's life insured and had been keeping the payments up in ignorance of her father's death. - Edwardsville Intelligencer

 

HENSCHEL, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 18, 1903
Mrs. Mary Henschel, aged 42, died Tuesday evening at 9 o'clock at the Woman's Home after an illness with the grip. The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence of August Weiss, 627 North street. Deceased was a member of the German Evangelical Aid Society, and the members will attend the funeral in a body.

 

HENSCHEL, UNKNOWN CHILD OF FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 19, 1901
The four months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Henschel died last evening at the home, 1216 East Fifth street, of brain fever. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

HENSLEY, "AUNTY" JENNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 29, 1905
Body of Old Colored Citizen Who Died in Poorhouse to be Disinterred and Moved to Alton
The remains of "Aunty" Jennie Hensley, who died at the poorhouse a month ago leaving abundant finance to give her a good funeral and to reimburse her friends for any outlay they may have made for her, will be brought to Alton tomorrow and buried in City Cemetery beside the body of her husband, Peter Hensley. "Aunty" Hensley was always careful to keep up her insurance so she would not be buried like a pauper, and she said she wished that at least $100 be spent on her funeral. She stinted herself to gratify this one vanity of hers, that she be given a proper funeral when she died. Unfortunately she died in the poorhouse without the poor farm officials knowing she had made arrangements for her burial, and she was interred as a pauper. Mr. W. H. Bauer will go to Edwardsville tonight and will disinter the body, bring it to Alton in a nice casket, and lay it away in City Cemetery tomorrow morning. Cornelius Natt will have charge of the funeral, as administrator of Aunty Hensley's estate.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 30, 1905
Mr. W. H. Bauer went to Edwardsville last evening, disinterred the remains of "Aunty" Jennie Hensley, and brought them here in a metallic casket. The remains were interred in City Cemetery at midnight by the undertaker, beside the body of her husband. The colored woman weighed 315 pounds at the time of her death.

 

HENSON, ALLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 25, 1922
Allen Henson, aged 78, died this morning at 4 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. T. Condry, of 809 Hawley avenue. Henson, who came to Alton from Jerseyville six years ago, began to fail about three months ago, but his fatal illness had its beginning a week ago when pneumonia developed. He was a prominent resident of Jersey County for many years and was widely known. He is survived by a family of eight children, including Madison Henson and Mrs. Emma Powell of Fieldon, William Henson, John Henson, Mrs. Kate Penning, Mrs. Nellie Condry of Alton, Oscar Henson of Kansas, and Mrs. Lydia Galyear of Galesburg. He also leaves one brother, William Henson, and one sister, Mrs. J. Sutton, both of Fieldon. The funeral will be held Monday morning from the Presbyterian Church at Fieldon, and interment will be in the Fieldon Cemetery.

 

HENTRICH, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 4, 1904
The funeral of John Hentrich took place Monday morning from St. Mary's church, where a requiem mass was said by Rev. J. Meckle. There was a very large attendance at the services. Interment was in St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

HENTRICH, LIZZIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1903
Lizzie Hentrich, daughter of John Hentrich, died Tuesday night at the family home on east Second street after a long illness with consumption. She was 21 years and two month's of age. Miss Hentrich's death has been expected for several weeks. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock, and services will be conducted in St. Mary's church.

 

HENTRICK, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1907
William Hentrick, aged 25, died at St. Joseph's hospital Sunday night from consumption after a long illness. He was a son of the late John Hentrick, and according to friends of the family he is the last but two of his family to die, there having been seven funerals in the family within five years. He leaves one brother, John Hentrick Jr., who is at Albuquerque, N. W. He was an apprentice glassblower until taken ill. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 8 o'clock from St. Mary's church. A half sister, Mrs. Michael, survives.

 

HERB, BARBARA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 6, 1916
Widow of Senator Charles A. Herb
Mrs. Barbara Herb, widow of Senator Charles A. Herb, died Sunday evening at 8:45 at the family home, 740 Washington street, after being an invalid for about three years. The end came after a period of about three hours of unconsciousness. Mrs. Herb was stricken with paralysis about three years ago, and for much of the time in the past year she has been confined to her bed, a sufferer from anemia. She would rally her strength at times, and then would collapse again. About three weeks ago she suffered another attack and this proved fatal. Mrs. Herb was born in Bavaria, Germany, January 25, 1848. She came here at the age of 8 years and in Alton she was married forty-six years ago to Charles A. Herb. She spent all the remainder of his life in Alton. She proved an inspiring partner for her husband, and he owed much in his rise to public honor and distinction to the quiet influence of his wife in their home. She was a woman who was highly esteemed by all her neighbors, and she was one of the best of mothers to her family. The tragic death of her husband, Senator Herb, while he was in the meridian of his influence and honor, was a sad blow to Mrs. Herb from which she never fully recovered. Mrs. Herb leaves a family of children consisting of Mrs. Robert Opfenring of St. Louis, Mrs. George W. Hershamn of Phoenix, Arizona, C. F. Herb of Webster Groves, Mo., Mrs. George D. Finkel of Boston, Miss Harriet Herb, and E. G. and H. B. Herb. At the time she died, all were with her except the two daughters who live in distant places. It is known that Mrs. Hershamn will be unable to come back to the funeral, and the time of the funeral was being delayed in announcement today until word could be had from Mrs. Finkel in Boston, who was here recently visiting her mother.

 

HERBERT, ISABELLE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 30, 1916
The funeral of Mrs. Isabelle Herbert was held this morning from the home in east Fifth street, where services were conducted by Rev. Arthur Goodger, pastor of St. Paul's Episcopal church, in the presence of a large gathering of friends and relatives of deceased and of her family. Floral offerings were very numerous and burial was in Oakwood cemetery. The pallbearers were J. W., Carl and C. L. Beall, L. J. Juttemeyer, Hugh Horstman and Edward J. Kleinpeter.

 

HERGT, VALENTINE (alias HARRIS, CHARLES)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 7, 1900
One of the roustabouts on the Spread Eagle is thought to have drowned himself by jumping into the river during last night while the boat was lying at the Alton wharf boat. The man was missing this morning and his coat, hat and shoes were found on the boat, causing the supposition that he had committed suicide. The name of the man could not be learned here, as the crew's names were on the clerk's list on the boat. Henry Hyde, a negro, says he was drinking with the missing man last night, and that they separated at bed time. The roustabout went on the boat, and was seen no more. It is supposed he walked into the river. The suicide was a white man and a German. He was in the employ of the Eagle Packet Co. a short time, and was known only by the name Harry.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1900
The roustabout on the Spread Eagle who drowned himself Monday morning by jumping from the wharf boat was named Charles Harris, was 50 years of age, a German, and had a family in St. Louis living on Ninth Street between Franklin avenue and Wash streets. He was a hard worker and had been on the Spread Eagle all season, being a personal friend of the mate. Harris slept on a couch on the wharf boat here, apart from the other roustabouts. His wife says a family quarrel occurred Sunday morning before Harris left hom, and that she thinks the drowning resulted from brooding over the prospective marriage of his son to an objectionable woman.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 14, 1900
The wife of the deck hand drowned by falling between the Spread Eagle and the wharfboat was in Alton yesterday. Valentine Hergt was his real name, and Charles Harris was an alias, which according to a very common practice of the lower class of steamboat employees, he gave as his name.

 

HERL, CASPER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1900
Bethalto News - Casper Herl, an old veteran resident of this city, died Tuesday, February 27, at the age of 74 years, after an illness of about three weeks, with Bright's disease. Mr. Herl was born in Weisbach, Prussia in 1836, was a coal miner by trade, and came to this country in 1863 and located in Caseyville, Ill., where he stayed only a few months and moved to Bethalto, where he worked at the Yankee Digging until closed. He was a good, peaceful and upright citizen, a loving husband and kind father. He leaves a widow, three sons and three daughters. The funeral took place from the Presbyterian church Thursday afternoon. The pallbearers were John Falkenburg, Charles Huether, Frank Marsek, J. G. Johnson, Phillip Schoppitt and Lucas Bauer.

 

HERL, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 11, 1904
The funeral of Mrs. Mary Herl took place Sunday afternoon from the home on Belle street. Services were conducted by Rev. M. H. Ewers and were attended by a large number of acquaintances. Interment was in City Cemetery.

 

HERMANN, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 29, 1919
Joseph Hermann, aged 88, died at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at his home in Godfrey, after an illness which extended over a period of several years, during which time the aged man was bedfast. Hermann was a resident of Godfrey for 28 years, and was one of the best known farmers. He was born in Baden, Germany, but has resided the greater part of his life in this country. Sixty years ago this summer, Hermann was married to Theresa Smith, and the couple was planning to observe their diamond jubilee on their anniversary. Mr. and Mrs. Hermann were parents of six girls and four boys. The girls are: Mrs. Mary Mitts, Raymond, Ill.; Mrs. A. Anderson, Litchfield, Ill.; Mrs. E. Sullivan, Minneapolis, Minn.; Mrs. M. Godfrey, Detroit, Mich.; Mrs. C. Baurbour, Detroit, Mich.; and Mrs. F. Jones of Godfrey. The sons are Fred of Centralia, Wash.; John of Los Angeles, Calif.; Francis of Farmersville, Ill.; and Arnold of Godfrey. The funeral will be held on Thursday morning from the Cathedral. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

HERMANN, M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 24, 1904
The funeral of Mrs. M. Hermann took place Tuesday at 10 a.m. The services were at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. R. Gossrau, on Ninth street. There was a large attendance of acquaintances of the family. Rev. Theodore Oberhellman, of the German Evangelical church, conducted services at the house and grave. The church choir sang at the house and the Maennerchor at the cemetery.

 

HERMANN, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1921
William Hermann, a well known resident of Fosterburg township, died last night at his home from Brights disease, aged 60. He was born the 31st of August 1921 near Dorchester, but was most of his life he had passed in the vicinity of Fosterburg. Mr. Hermann had been in failing health for a long time, but his illness took an acute stage recently and his decline was rapidly from that time. With him when he died were all the members of his family, his wife, also his brothers, Otto of Alton; John of Hilland, S. D.; Benjamin and Matthias of Fosterburg; and his sister, Mrs. Therese Robertson of Fairfield, Ill. Mr. Hermann had for many years conducted a small farm in Foster township and was known as a successful farmer. He had no children. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock. The cortege will leave the home at 9 o'clock for the Fosterburg Presbyterian church where the funeral services will be held.

 

[See also Herrmann]

HERREN, MOSES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 25, 1904
Well Known Carpenter Succumbs to Bullet Wound
Moses Herren, who was shot Sunday night by a bullet fired by Arnett Poindexter and intended to strike Johnson Dailey, died about 4 o'clock Tuesday morning at his home, 1216 Main street. His condition was so favorable Monday that it was thought he might recover, but later developments indicated during the night that the wound would prove fatal. Deputy Sheriff Laughlin was dispatched early Tuesday morning to go to Bright, where Poindexter was said to be in hiding at the home of some relatives, three miles in the country. Mr. Herren was 53 years of age, and leaves beside his widow a family of three children: Will Herren who is employed at J. E. Pussel's barber shop, Mrs. Mary Timmons, and Mrs. Sylvia Wachter. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home. The death of Mr. Herren was a sad shock to the members of his family who did not feel alarmed over his condition until about ten minutes before death occurred. Mr. Herren was an industrious man, a good father and husband, and he will be sadly missed by the members of his family.

 

HERREN, SUSAN SARAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 6, 1919
Mrs. Susan Sarah Herren, wife of A. P. Herren, died this morning at 2:40 o'clock at her home, 933 Tremont street, after an illness of one year from liver trouble. She refused to remain in bed until last Friday, continuing to get about the house though in a bad condition of health. She was born in Belleville, September 8, 1839, and was in her 80th year. She came to Alton before the Civil War days. She was twice married, her first husband being Clark Crabbe, who was a guard in the penitentiary here. Old residents will recall the incident of Mr. Crabbe being trapped by a convict in his cell and being stabbed repeatedly by the convict who demanded as the price of his sparing the life of Crabbe that he be given his own liberty. The desperate criminal was shot in time to save the life of Mr. Crabbe. After the death of her first husband, she married A. P. Herren, a Civil War soldier, who survives her. She is the last of her own family. She leaves three children by her first marriage, W. C. Crabbe, Mrs. Thomas Rowan and P. S. Crabbe. By her second marriage she leaves one son, Herbert Herren. She leaves also three step-children, Mrs. Ella Edwards of Brighton, George Herren of Okalhoma and Harry Herren of Alton. The funeral will be Sunday at 2 p.m. from her late home.

 

HERRIN, E. M. (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 22, 1912
Veterinarian Murdered
Dr. E. M. Herrin, an Edwardsville veterinarian, was fatally hurt yesterday afternoon by being struck on the head with a clothes prop by Alonzo Hogan, at Collinsville. Herrin died this morning at 11:20 o'clock. Herrin had persisted in publicly operating on a horse after Hogan had ordered him to desist, Hogan's home fronting where Herrin was doing the work.

 

HERRIN, H C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1910
H. C. Herrin, a resident of Park avenue, Upper Alton, died Monday morning at 3 o'clock at his home after an illness from kidney trouble and dropsy. His death had been expected for some time but at intervals his condition became better and his relatives were more hopeful. All last week Mr. Herrin's condition grew steadily worse until death relieved his suffering this morning. Mr. Herrin was born in Madison County at St. Jacob and was 61(?) years old the 12th day of last November. He had lived in Upper Alton with his family the last two years. Before coming to Upper Alton two years ago, he had lived nineteen years in Piatt county. Six years ago one of Mr. Herrin's horses ran away with him and he was badly hurt. On account of internal injuries his illness began, and it was this that eventually caused his death. Mr. Herrin was married to Miss Martha Judy Barber in the Upper Alton Baptist church, March 31, 1881 by Rev. W. J. Chapin. Mr. Herrin leaves three children, Mrs. R. H. Link of Ewing, Ill., and Lyman and Ralph Herrin of Upper Alton. The body will be taken to the old home at Atwood for burial. The service will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock at the family home by Rev. M. H. Day, pastor of the Baptist church, and Rev. S. T. Reynolds of Lebanon, Ind. will assist. The funeral party will leave on the 12:55 train for Atwood, where the funeral will be held Wednesday. [Note: According to marriage records, his full name was Henry Clay Herrin.]

 

HERRIN, H. E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 4, 1915
H. E. Herrin, one of Bethalto's best known and most highly respected residents, died last night at 6 o'clock at his home near Bethalto after an illness from apoplexy. Mr. Herrin died on the farm on which he had lived for over twenty years. He was 66 years of age, and was born in Germany but came to America at an early age, and settled in Madison county where he has lived all his life. He was reputed to be well to do, owned the farm he lived on, and had other property interests besides being a leading stockholder and director in the Bethalto bank. His son, Harry Herrin, who recently graduated from the Ann Arbor University in the law course, is now taking a post graduate law course in the East near Boston, and word was sent to him yesterday of his father's serious illness. It is supposed that he started for home in an effort to reach there before his father's death. He is expected to arrive home today. Mr. Herrin leaves his wife, his son Harry Herrin, and four daughters, Mrs. Lizzie Sanders of Bethalto, Mrs. Ida Roach of Wood River, Mrs. Julia Maustoh of Wood River, and Mrs. Emma Obermiller of Wood River. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the Lutheran Church in which he held membership. Mr. Herrin came to this country when he was three years old from Ostfriesland, Germany. He was married 43 years ago.

 

HERRIN, WILLIAM FRANKLIN 'FRANK'/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 6, 1917
William Franklin Herrin, aged 61, died last night at 11 o'clock at his residence on East College avenue, just outside the city limits at Upper Alton. Mr. Herrin's condition for several days had been very serious, as was stated in the Telegraph, but his end coming so suddenly was quite a surprise to many of his friends who did not realize that his sickness had reached such a serious stage. Mr. Herrin's illness commenced about three months ago. Up to that time he had been in very good health, but in the fall he became ill, suffering from kidney trouble, but he did not consider his own case as serious. He was out and about his duties at home, and occasionally went to town, and only a few weeks ago expressed the opinion that he would soon be a well man and would be able to work again in the future as he had done all his life. Three weeks ago he became very sick and took to his bed from which he never arose. Mr. Herrin was a farmer and dairyman all his life, being born and raised near St. Jacobs in the Highland neighborhood. About twenty years ago he sold out at St. Jacob and went to Bunker Hill where he bought a big farm and entered the dairy business on an extensive scale. He was widely known in that neighborhood on account of his square dealing. After being in the dairy business fifteen years at Bunker Hill, he sold out and came to Alton. He bought a 22 acre tract in the A. H. Hastings place on College avenue, just outside the city limits, and engaged in farming on a small scale in order that he could have something to devote his time to during his advanced years. He continued in this work up to the time of his final illness this winter. Mr. Herrin is survived by his aged mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Herrin of Decatur, who is 81 years old. Relatives believe that the news of the death of her son will have an ill effect upon the aged lady. Besides his widow, Mr. Herrin is also survived by two sons, George Herrin of East St. Louis, and Clyde E. Herrin of Upper Alton. Mr. Herrin is also survived by two brothers, Paul of Terre Haute, Ind., and Charles of St. Louis; and three sisters, Mrs. T. J. Livesey of Decatur, Mrs. Belle Waite of Greenville, and Mrs. Effie Blume of St. Louis. The funeral will be held at Wesley Methodist Church in Upper Alton at 1:30 Sunday afternoon and interment will be in Oakwood cemetery. All friends are requested by the family to omit flowers.

 

HERRMANN, ANNIE K./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 23, 1911
Aged Resident Succumbs to Injuries Sustained by Lantern Explosion
Mrs. Anne K. Herrmann, who was burned Wednesday morning by the explosion of a coal oil lantern she was carrying, died Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from the effects of her injuries. The aged woman could not withstand the effects of the terrible burns she had sustained on her arms, face and the upper part of her body. She was born in Switzerland, November 25, 1840, and came to Alton when she was ten years old. Her husband, John P. Herrmann, whom she married in Alton, died sixteen years ago. She leaves an only child, John P. Herrmann. Her daughter died many years ago. She leaves also a step-brother in St. Louis. Mrs. Herrmann was a member of the German Evangelical church for many years. She was a conscientious member of the church, was a good neighbor and a kind mother to her only child, who was deeply devoted to his mother. They lived together, and the death of the mother is a sad blow to the son. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

HERMANN, FRANCIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1907
Mrs. Francis Hermann, widow of Theodore Hermann, died at her residence this morning at 5 o'clock at the age of 72 years, in Fosterburg. Five sons and two daughters survive her. The sons are John and Ben of South Dakota, William and Methias of Fosterburg, and Otto of Edwardsville, who is superintendent of the Poor Farm at that place. The daughters are Mrs. Theresa Robinson of Wayne county, Ill., and Louise Hermann, who is at home. The funeral arrangements have not yet been made, as her absent children have not been heard from.

 

HERWECK, ADAM/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, May 14, 1897
The funeral of Adam Herweck, who died Tuesday morning [May 11, 1897], took place yesterday afternoon from the family residence on Main street. The services were in charge of his former fellow members of Franklin Grove, Lodge 22, U.A.O.D. Rev. A. Meyer, pastor of the Evangelical church, preached the sermon. The comrades of the G.A.R. also attended in a body and on the way to the cemetery several files of them formed a guard of honor of the casket, which was draped with the national colors. The pallbearers were: Hy Daube, Louis Hartung, George Ziegler, Hy Harmening, Herman Berleman and H. Meyer. Edwardsville Post No. 401 has adopted suitable resolutions on the death of their comrade.

 

HESKETT, ALLEN K./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 26, 1921
Allen K. Heskett died this afternoon about 2 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital from a malady which had been troubling him for some time but had been of a serious nature for only a few days. His death was not unexpected by his family. He underwent a surgical operation on Wednesday after being hurriedly taken to the hospital when his trouble began to assume a grave aspect. It was found that he was in an extremely serious condition, but it was believed that he had been operated upon in time to save his life. Yesterday his family and friends were much more hopeful but there came a change at night and during the night his family were summoned to be with him. It was extremely doubtful that he would last until morning. Mr. Heskett was 48 years of age. He leaves his wife and one daughter, Mrs. E. C. Faulstich, also his aged mother, Mrs. Emma V. Heskett, and one brother, Fred R. Heskett, and three sisters, Mrs. Edward Schulte, Mrs. Oscar J. Paul, Mrs. W. Kittinger. He had lived most of his life in Alton and during the period of his residence here he had won general respect and esteem. He was engaged for many years in the work of a machinist, and at times was interested in shops here. Several years ago he injured his hand severely while at work in the Stanard-Tilton mill repairing an engine, and afterwards he found it necessary to go to Florida. He sold his interest in the machine shop and stayed there a while, returning later to Alton to make his home. Recently he had bought a home on the Grafton road and he had been helping to get it ready for his family. While so engaged, he suffered a recurrence of an old malady and thinking there was nothing serious paid little attention to it. The malady began to develop gravity, and then he was moved to the hospital. Mr. Heskett was a member of the Eagles and the Knights of Pythias. He was a man of the highest character, a capable man in his chosen work, and he had the utmost confidence of everyone. His death is mourned as a personal loss by a very large number of men in Alton who will sympathize deeply with the wife, daughter, aged mother, brother and sisters.

 

HESKETT, JOHN G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 23, 1900
John G. Heskett died at his home, 16 East Ninth street, at 11:15 o'clock this morning, after an illness of over two years with dropsy and a complication of other diseases. He was 58 years of age and leaves a family of seven children and his wife. Mr. Heskett was born in Alton and lived here nearly all his life. He was an industrious man and respected by all who knew him. One year ago his illness became so severe he was compelled to retire from active pursuits, and much of the time he was an invalid at home. The funeral will take place tomorrow at 3 p.m. from the family residence, 16 Ninth street.

 

HESLOP, JAMES/Source: Alton Telegraph, April 8, 1864
Died in Alton on the 4th inst., of consumption, James Heslop, in the 61st year of his age. He was a native of Durham County, England, but emigrated to this country something over twenty years since, and has resided in this city most of the time since.

 

HESS, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 24, 1903
Mrs. Catherine Hess, aged 75 years, died this morning at her home, 909 Harrison street, her death being caused by old age and its infirmities. She lived in Alton nearly sixty years, and was charitable, kind and sympathetic, and is very highly spoken of by all who enjoyed her acquaintance. She leaves four sons and three daughters. They are Charles of Alton; Fred and William of Fosterburg; and Henry of Minneapolis, Minn.; and Mesdames George Dietz and Charles Bilderbeck of Alton; and Minnie Wagner of Denver, Colo. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon from the German Evangelical church, Rev. Theodore Oberhellman conducting the services.

 

HESS, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1922
Charles Hess, 60, died suddenly at his home near Poag, at three o'clock Wednesday morning. His death was due to heart trouble and occurred with the least struggle. His wife was aroused early in the night by his heavy breathing, but was not alarmed as it was natural for him to breathe heavily. Again at three o'clock she was awakened, and found that he was dead. Mr. Hess is known throughout the country as a melon grower. He is survived by his widow, one son, Christie, and one daughter, Miss Bella, of Poag, and two brothers, George Hess of California and Louis Hess near Mitchell, and one sister Mrs. Lena Link of Granite City. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at two o'clock from the St. Paul Evangelical church.

 

HESS, E. O./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 25, 1922
Lost Life In Explosion in the Corning Mill of Equitable Powder Company
An explosion in the corning mill of the Equitable Powder Co., at East Alton this morning, cost the life of E. O. Hess, in charge of the corning mill and the destruction of the three buildings which compose the mill. The explosion occurred about 8:30 o'clock. Its cause is unknown. Hess was working alone in the mill, according to the usual rule, and the destruction of the mill has rendered it improbably that the accident will ever be explained. Hess, who was 38 years of age, came here from Glassford, Ill. His duty was to put in the corning mill the cakes of manufactured powder and after the cakes had been ground, to remove the granulated powder at the other end. It is regarded as an extremely dangerous work, and the corning mill operator, as a rule, has no one near him. That counted for the fact that no one else was affected by the explosion. The main building was blown up and two others so burned as to be practically wrecked. It was said today that there was in the corning mill at the time it went off about 250 kegs of powder holding 25 pounds each. The roar and shock of the explosion was felt for many miles around. It caused instant inquiry, and telephones were kept busy answering queries about it. A corning mill blast usually makes a louder noise and greater shock than any other department as the black powder, on reaching the mill, is in a highly explosive condition. It was said today that Hess had no family. His body was badly mangled by the explosion.

 

HESS, EMIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 3, 1911
The funeral of Emil Hess was held this morning at 10 o'clock from the family home in Upper Alton. Rev. E. L. Mueller conducted the services. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery, and the Harugari(?) had charge of the burial.

 

HESS, THEODORE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 25, 1902
Theodore Hess, aged about 65, for many years a resident of Alton and vicinity, died at St. Joseph's hospital last night after a lingering illness. He had many friends in Alton and Foster township, but it is said all his near relatives have preceded him to the grave. The funeral will probably be Monday morning from St. Mary's church.

 

HESSE, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 25, 1910
Mrs. Ferdinand Hesse, aged 74, died at her home in Fosterburg Thursday at midnight from old age. Mrs. Hesse was native of Germany, and came to America 53 years ago, spending almost all of that time in Upper Alton and Fosterburg. She had lived in Fosterburg 45 years. Mrs. Hesse leaves her husband, two daughters, Mrs. Julia Henkhaus and Mrs. Anna Drexelius, and one son, John Hesse, all of Fosterburg. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from St. Mary's church. Mrs. Hesse leaves 20 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 1, 1910
Mrs. Mary Hesse, wife of Ferdinand Hesse, the well known Foster township farmer, died Thursday night, November 24, from the debilities of old age. She was born in Wurtenburg, Germany, July 6, 1826. Came to America in 1857, and was married in 1858 to Ferdinand Hesse by Bishop Junker at the St. Peter's and Paul's Cathedral. They spent most of their married life in Foster township. Mrs. Hesse was a kind, pleasant old lady and always had a kind word and friendly greeting for her neighbors and friends. She leaves besides her aged husband, 3 children, 21 grandchildren, and 2 great-grandchildren. Also, one aged sister, Mrs. Julia Wulff of Bethalto, besides many other relatives. The children are: John Hesse and Mrs. Julia Hankhaus, and Mrs. John Drexelius, all living in the same neighborhood in Foster township. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Sunday afternoon, Rev. Fr. Meckel officiating. Notwithstanding the very inclement weather, a large number of relatives, friends and neighbors went to Alton to pay their last tribute of respect. The pallbearers were Joseph Berghoff Sr., John Vonnahman Sr., Pete Klinke, Tony Drexelius, Frank Wolff and Charles Brandt. The body was laid to rest in the church cemetery in Alton.

 

HESSENACER, LEWIS/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 1, 1861
Injured by Falling Joist
Lewis Hessenacer, the man whom we mentioned on Saturday as being badly injured by the falling of a joist, afterward died of his injuries. An inquest was held upon his body yesterday, by acting Coroner Pinckard, and the verdict returned by the jury was that “no cause to his death by being struck on the head with a piece of scantling thrown from the top of a house, thirty feet high, by August Geizer and Charles Schrabe.” His death, from present evidences, seems to have been the result of criminal carelessness on the park of those throwing the scantling.

 

HESSENAUER/HESSNAUER, MARY (nee CARR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 26, 1921
Mrs. John Hessenauer, formerly of Alton, died yesterday at her home in Alberta, Canada. She was 53 years old. Mrs. Hessenauer left Alton five years ago. During her many years' residence in Alton she lived on Washington avenue. She was born and raised here. She is survived by her husband, three sons, Earl, Roy and Louis; a sister, Mrs. J. W. Cassella; a half-sister, Mrs. H. Postelwaite; a brother, John Carr, and two half-brothers, Alderman Jonas Johnson and Paul Johnson, all of Alton. The body will arrive Thursday and will be taken to the home of Mrs. Cassella on Washington Avenue. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 29, 1921
The body of Mrs. Mary Carr Hessnauer, wife of John Hessnauer, arrived in Alton yesterday afternoon from Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada, where she died in a hospital last Monday morning. Her death followed three days after a surgical operation performed on her in the hope that it would relieve a malady of about five months standing. She had been seriously sick and her sister, Mrs. Julia Postelwaite, went to be with her this summer, five weeks ago. The party, consisting of Mr. Hessnauer and Mrs. Postelwaite, left Medicine Hat last Tuesday and arrived here Thursday night. One son, L. J. Hessnauer, of Ashland, Oregon, remained at Medicine Hat to look after the business which his father had conducted there during the father's absence. There are two other sons, Earl of Carlinville, and Louis of Alton. There are also two sisters, Mrs. Postelwaite and Mrs. J. W. Cassella, and three brothers, Jonas and Paul Johnson and John Carr. Mrs. Hessnauer was born and reared in Alton and spent most of her life here. She was well known in Alton, and when the family left here four years ago to go to Canada to make their home, they took with them the interest of a large circle of friends. They settled down in a city which is best known as the place from which tidings of bad blizzards come from in winter time, but which is described as a beautiful place with a nice climate most of the time. They were getting along well in business when Mrs. Hessnauer took sick and died. She was 53 years old the 7th of last February. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock and services will be held in the home of Mrs. J. W. Cassella. The body will be entombed in the mausoleum.

 

HESSNAUER, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 28, 1902
Henry Hessnauer, aged 46, died Thursday morning at St. Joseph's hospital after a short illness from cerebral meningitis. He was taken to the hospital less than a week before his death, his illness being very sudden and short. Mr. Hessnauer was one of the best known residents of the East End. He was personally acquainted with nearly everyone in that part of the city, having lived there all his life. He was engaged in various pursuits until a few years ago, when he began keeping a hotel at Second and Shields streets. By carefulness, he accumulated a valuable estate which consists of realty. Mr. Hessnauer was an admirer of horseflesh and was known as the breeder of good horses. He leaves his wife and a family of five children. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home on Bozza street.

 

HETZ, HERMAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 3, 1914
Herman Hetz, aged 52, died last night at 7 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital. He was a glassblower, and was unmarried. The funeral will be held at 1:30 from Bauer's undertaking rooms to the City Cemetery, and the Rev. E. L. Mueller will officiate.

 

HETZINGER, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1902
Mrs. Elizabeth Hetzinger, widow of Michael Hetzinger, died this morning at the family home, 625 East Third street, after a long illness from liver troubles. She was 79 years of age and had been a resident of Alton many years. She leaves three children. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home. Mrs. Hetzinger was a most estimable woman and leaves many friends and neighbors to mourn her death.

 

HEUER, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 7, 1922
Herman Heuer Sr., died at his home in Dorsey, Ill., on Monday, March 6, at 5 p.m., aged 83 years and 5 days. He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, seven sons, and three daughters. The sons are Henry, William, John, Herman Jr., and August of Dorsey; Edward of Minnesota and Otto of Upper Alton. The daughters are Mrs. Henry Schirenbeck of St. Louis, Mrs. John Schmidt of Hornsby and Mrs. John E. Johnson of Dorsey. He also leaves a number of grandchildren and other relatives. Funeral arrangements are not completed.

 

HEWITT, GEORGE R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1922
Businessman and One of Builders of Madison Hotel
George R. Hewitt died at his home, at 1411 Liberty street, Sunday morning at 4:30 o'clock after an illness that extended over a year. He was 73 years of age on the 25th day of last April, and had resided in Alton over sixty years of his life. Members of his family were with him when he died. Mr. Hewitt was born in St. Louis in 1849, and came to Alton with his parents when he was a young man. Later he accepted a position with the Nelson and Hayner Hardware company, and several years later entered business for himself with Albert H. Drury, under the firm name of The Drury-Hewitt Hardware Co. In 1876, Mr. Hewitt was married to Alice Billings, daughter of Judge H. W. Billings. Besides the widow, there are four children who survive, Harold H. Hewitt, an only son, Mrs. John D. McAdams and Mrs. E. A. Elwell, all of Alton, and Mrs. Minor S. Watson of Brooklyn, New York. He leaves no other blood relatives. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home at 1411 Liberty street. Burial will be in the City cemetery and will be private. In the death of Mr. Hewitt, another of Alton's old time and well-known residents is removed. He was in his earlier life active in civic affairs in the city and was public spirited and worked in many projects for the betterment of his city. With the late Henry Watson, he had erected the Madison Hotel, this being the first hotel of any size to be built in Alton. It was built in response to a demand for a public hostelry big enough to care for the visitors coming to the city. This hotel was built about 1883. Mr. Hewitt acted as receiver of the Illinois Mutual Insurance Co., one of Alton's biggest institutions in that time, but which fell a prey to financial difficulties that beset the fire insurance business in its early career. Always a staunch Republican, Mr. Hewitt took part in the party councils in his city and county and attended one Republican convention in Philadelphia as the delegate from this district. Mr. Hewitt retired from active business life twenty-five years ago and has since enjoyed the companionship of old friends and many new friends that came into his life, being known to all as a congenial companion and always the thoughtful gentleman of the old school. His church affiliations were always as a Unitarian. His was a public spirit and he gave to many civic and charitable drives. It is an interesting coincidence that Mr. Hewitt, like Joseph W. Carey, who died the same morning, was an ardent sportsman. He loved to hunt and fish and he was known as an expert at rifle shooting. When his health admitted of it, Mr. Hewitt would go hunting and fishing and he was frequently a companion on such trips with G. H. Lane, postmaster at Alton, who died recently. He was known as a thorough sportsman by those who accompanied him on these outings. Mr. Hewitt had a kindly disposition which made him many friends and during the period he has been confined to his home since he suffered a break down, the progress of his malady has been watched with great interest by a large number who knew him well.

 

HEWLITT, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 14, 1907
The funeral of William Hewlitt was held today from the home in Coppinger avenue, where services were conducted by Rev. M. H. Ewers. Many neighbors and friends, including several members of the Woodmen camps, attended the obsequies. All of the members of the Hewlitt family were present at services. Mrs. Hewlitt is just recovering from a severe siege of sickness and is yet far from well. Burial was in City cemetery.

 

HIBBARD, ELIAS/Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, January 10, 1873
Wealthy Business Man of Alton Dies
Mr. Hibbard, whose death is noticed in another column, was among the oldest settlers in this part of Illinois. He resided the most of his time in Upper Alton, but several years since he removed to this city [Alton] and engaged in active commercial pursuits, in connection with his only son, Mr. James H. Hibbard, who died a few years since. He was possessed of considerable wealth, and during the last summer and fall commenced the erection of a fine residence on Prospect street, which is now about completed. He was originally from New England, but previous to his settling in Illinois spent several years in the South. His wife died only a few years since, and we believe the only relatives he has now living are the widow of his son and several grandchildren; but his circle of acquaintances in this city and Upper Alton was very large.

Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, January 17, 1873
The funeral of this venerable and respected citizen took place Friday morning from his late residence on Prospect street. The exercises were conducted in an impressive manner by Rev. Dr. Bulkley of Upper Alton, who also gave a brief biographical sketch of the deceased. At the conclusion of the discourse, the Masonic fraternity took charge of the remains, members of the order acting as pallbearers, and accompanied by the relatives and friends, acted as an escort to the cemetery where the closing services took place.

Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, June 27, 1873
That magnificent row of elms on College avenue in Upper Alton was set out about thirty years ago by Dr. B. F. Long and the late Elias Hibbard. The man who plants trees builds an enduring monument to his own memory.

 

HIBBELER, BERTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1911
Mrs. Bertha Hibbeler died at 9 o'clock Thursday evening at the home of her niece, Mrs. W. D. Thorn on Langdon street, aged 61. Mrs. Hibbeler was one of a family of six sisters who had clung together and were very devoted to each other. Five of them lived in Alton, and one, Mrs. Mary Hackethal of Belt, Montana, arrived with her son-in-law, Alcide Fischer, Thursday evening, too late to see her sister alive. Mrs. Hibbeler's death is the second in this family circle in ten days, Mrs. Amelia Fischer having died January __, and at the same time Mrs. Hibbeler was very ill. Mrs. Hibbeler's death was due to heart trouble. She had been in a sanitarium at Milwaukee and returned home three months ago, supposing she had been cured. She was overcome by the fatigue of travel and since that time had been in poor health. Nearly all her life she lived at Alton. She was born in Germany but came to America when very young, and with her family settled at Alton. Except a few years she lived at Washington, Missouri, up to the time of her husband's death, she made her home in Alton. She leaves four sisters, Mrs. J. J. Lampert, Mrs. Caroline Atland, Miss Sophie Gottlob of Alton, and Mrs. Hackethal of Belt, Montana. Her husband died about twelve years ago. She leaves two stepdaughters and one stepson at Washington, Mo. The funeral will be at 10 o'clock Saturday morning from St. Marys church, and burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

HICKMAN, FLORENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 17, 1909
Mrs. Florence Hickman, aged 26, wife of John Hickman, died this morning after a long illness with kidney trouble. She leaves her husband and two children. The body will be taken to Greenfield for burial.

 

HICKS, JAMES W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 12, 1908
James W. Hicks, aged 35, died very suddenly at his boarding place, 1006 East Second street, under peculiar circumstances. Hicks had not been feeling very well but was able to be up and at work as usual. He was taken suddenly ill with a smothering ... and Dr. Shaff was summoned. He died a few minutes after the doctor's arriver. Dr. Shaff diagnosed the case as an abcess of the lung and said that the abscess must have bursted and this caused the choking which resulted in Hicks' death. The man died while an ambulance was on the way to remove him to St. Joseph's hospital. Hicks had a notebook in his pocket indicating that he was born at Nokomis, Ill., in 1837. It also mentioned relatives in Iowa. Coroner Streeper took charge of the body and will hold it for relatives to claim it. The man was a painter.

 

HICKS, JESSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 3, 1906
Jessie, the 2 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. ____ Hicks, died last night from the effects of scalds suffered last Saturday at the Hicks home in East End Place. The little one fell into a dishpan filled with boiling water, which its mother had placed on the floor, and was badly scalded about the neck, breast and legs. Yesterday it was thought the child would recover, but a change came and the end followed soon after. An inquest was held this morning by Deputy Coroner Allan Keiser, and a verdict of accidental death from scalding was returned. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, No. 36 Missouri avenue.

 

HICKS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1908
The funeral of William Hicks, the unfortunate man who froze to death while intoxicated a few nights ago near West Alton, was held this morning from Klunk's undertaking establishment. John Hicks, a brother who lives in St. Louis, attended the funeral, which was in charge of Mulville Bros. contractors, for whom deceased had worked many years. Burial was in City Cemetery.

 

HIGBY, MINERVA L./Source: Alton Telegraph, September 27, 1845
Died in Upper Alton on the 16th instant, Mrs. Minerva L. Higby, wife of Stephen Higby, aged 55 (?). The deceased was a native of Claremont, New Hampshire. She is much lamented by her acquaintances, especially by her deeply afflicted husband and only daughter. Mrs. Higby was not much known in Alton except in a select circle, and this circle was sure to find in her a kind, warm and liberal heart - one whose joy it was to diffuse good feeling among her associates, and make them happy. She was remarkably devoted to her family, superintending their domestic concerns, and as far as possible, anticipating and providing for their individual wants. She was a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and died in that faith. "Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord."

 

HIGHAM, HOWARD M./Source: Alton Telegraph, September 5, 1840
Died, on the 24th ult., Howard M., infant son of John and Catharine Higham, aged 4 months.

 

HIGHAM, SUSAN C./Source: Alton Telegraph, March 26, 1842
Died, near this city [Alton], on the 15th inst., of the pulmonary consumption, Susan C., daughter of Mr. John Higham, aged 14 years.

 

HILBERER, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 21, 1908
Joseph Hilberer died Saturday afternoon at his home, 729 North street, after a long illness from abscess of the liver. He had been ill since last April. He was 59 years of age and is survived by his wife and three children. The funeral was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the North street Lutheran church, Rev. A. Semmann officiating.

 

HILD, JULIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 11, 1908
The funeral of Miss Julia Hild was held this morning from St. Mary's church, and was attended by a very large number of the congregation who had learned to love the deceased young lady for her sweet disposition and for the charity she always exhibited towards others. Six members of the young Ladies Sodality of the church served as honorary pallbearers and floral offerings were numerous and beautiful. Services were conducted by Rev. Joseph Meckel and assistants and burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery. The honorary pallbearers were Misses Josephine and May Caldwell, M. Wuellner, A. Keller, M. Cruse and Lizzie Budde. The active pallbearers were Messrs. Fred Meyer, J. Wuellner, John Eckhardt, William C. Gechwend, V. Goecken and H. Braunagel.

 

HILDEBRAND, AUGUSTUS N. 'GUS'/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, June 20, 1893
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hildebrand received the sad news yesterday afternoon of the death of their son, Augustus N. Hildebrand, in Milwaukee, Wis. The young man was but 22 years and 2 months of age, and his death is attributable to consumption, which he contracted several months ago. Less than a year ago he was married to a young lady in Milwaukee. He visited Alton with his wife several weeks ago, hoping to improve his health, and returned slightly stronger. The body will be brought to Alton for interment. The funeral will take place at 3 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the family residence on Belle street.

 

HILDEBRAND, BEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 20, 1905
Ben Hildebrand, the youngest son of the late W. A. Hildebrand, died at St. Joseph's hospital in Alton this afternoon at 2 o'clock from consumption. He was brought home yesterday morning from Jefferson City, Mo., where he had been very ill, and was taken to the hospital by his brother, George Hildebrand. He was in a very weak condition on his arrival and the trip was probably too much for him. He was 24 years of age.

 

HILDEBRAND, MAMIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 14, 1901
Mamie Hildebrand, daughter of the late W. A. Hildebrand, died at midnight Monday night at the home of her brother, George Hildebrand, 311 Park street. The young woman had been an invalid most of her life, but that fact was known to but few of her friends as she was not of a complaining nature and bore her suffering and ill health bravely. Several months ago she was taken ill with dropsy of the heart, and her illness became so serious that she was brought home from a town in Missouri where she was conducting a millinery store. She was conscious that death was approaching and her sufferings were relieved by her full knowledge that they would soon be over. She was a beautiful young woman, whose striking appearance attracted much admiration, and she was of a bright, cheerful disposition. She leaves very many friends whose grief will be mingled with that of the family at her sad end in the bloom of young womanhood. She was a member of the Baptist church, and the funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Baptist church on Market street. She leaves three brothers, Will Hildebrand of Denver, George and Ben of Alton, and two sisters, Mrs. Lydia Heckney of Pana and Nellie Hildebrand of Alton.

 

HILDEBRAND, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 6, 1910
Mrs. Mary Hildebrand, aged 75, a long resident of Upper Alton, died Wednesday noon at her home on Cherry street in Upper Alton. Her illness began on the evening of Easter Sunday. She was taken ill while sitting in church, and never improved. Her condition became so alarming it became necessary to send for her son, George Dieteker, whose home is at Columbia, S. C., and he was with her at the time of her death. She leaves one other son, Eugene Dieteker, with whom she lived in Upper Alton. Mrs. Hildebrand was twice married. Her second husband conducted a store in the north part of Upper Alton for many years. She had lived in Upper Alton the greater part of her life. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Upper Alton Methodist church, Rev. M. B. Baker, the pastor, will officiate. The casket will not be opened in the church, but the friends may see Mrs. Hildebrand at the home. It is the desire that flowers be omitted.

 

HILDENSTEIN, J. G. (REVEREND)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 19, 1920
Rev. J. G. Hildenstein, aged 62, a prominent German Methodist minister, who served in Brighton, Fosterburg and Edwardsville, died at his home this morning after an illness with Brights disease. For twenty years he was treasurer of the St. Louis German Methodist conference, and had been in the ministry ?? years. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at Edwardsville.

 

HILGEMANN, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1915
Fred Hilgemann, aged 80, died at the St. Joseph's Hospital at 8:25 o'clock last evening after a short illness. He was well known in Alton and vicinity, having lived at the home of his sister, Mrs. Ernest Brokmeier of Godfrey, for the past eleven years. Mr. Hilgemann was a native of Germany and came to the United States when he was a child. He lived for many years in Baltimore. Besides his sister he is survived by three nephews, henry and Fred Brokmeier of St. Louis, and William Ulrich of Baltimore, and four nieces, Mrs. Lizzie Burg, Mrs. Mary Millnor, and Mrs. Julia O'Connor of St. Louis, and Mrs. Ida Priestmeier of Chicago, all of whom will be present to attend the funeral. The funeral will be held at 1 o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the Lock undertaking parlors to the Bethany Church, beyond Godfrey, where services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller at two o'clock. The burial will be in the Bethany Cemetery.

 

HILKER, HENRIETTA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1902
Mrs. Henrietta Hilker, aged 77, who was born in Berline, Germany but has lived in Alton since 1854, died Wednesday morning at 8 o'clock at her residence, 613 George street, after a protracted illness. Her husband died about ten years ago. She leaves three children, two grandchildren and numerous friends to mourn the loss of a fond mother, a good neighbor and true friend. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon from the residence, and services will be conducted by Rev. Theo. Oberhellmann of the Evangelical church.

 

HILL, ADA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 17, 1922
Mrs. Ada Hill, aged 47, widow of Dayton Hill, died yesterday afternoon at St. Joseph's Hospital after a short illness from a cancerous trouble. She had been suffering for some time with the malady but not until a week ago last Saturday did it begin to show its fatal character. She was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital Friday. Mrs. Hill was taking the part of a mother to her 2 year old grandson, Dayton Laverne Schmidt. Two years ago next July 30, her daughter, Mrs. Esther Ada Hill Schmidt, gave birth to the little boy, and her death followed soon afterward. The grandmother took charge of the child and since then she had been keeping house for her son in law at Roxana. Beside the grandchild, she leaves one sister, Mrs. Fred Mitchell Schnell of St. Louis, and two nephews, Frank and Thomas Mitchell of Alton. The funeral will be Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home of the parents of the son in law, Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Schmidt, 819 Ridge street. Services will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing of the First Baptist Church.

 

HILL, ALICE V. (nee TITCHENAL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1909
Mrs. Alice V. Hill (nee Titchenal) was born in Foster township on February 20, 1845, and died Thursday morning, September 23, 1909. She was married to William Henry Hill, April 13, 1862. To this union were born five sons, all of whom survive their mother. They are William, James and Scott, of Fosterburg; David of East Alton; and John Hill of Woodburn. Mrs. Hill lost her husband on July 3, 1901, when he was instantly killed by a fast train on the Big Four at Bethalto. Besides her sons, she leaves 14 grandchildren, and 1 great-grandchild; 4 brothers and 3 sisters. The brothers are George Titchenal of Kansas City; John Titchenal of East Alton; David Titchenal of Washington; and Thomas Titchenal of Fosterburg. The sisters are Mrs. Julia Johns of Oregon; Mrs. Melissa Williams of Washington; and Mrs. Rebecca Megowen of Upper Alton. At an early age Mrs. Hill unitedf with the Christian church at Antioch. She was a good neighbor, a kind mother, and a friend to the poor and needy. She was known far and wide for her sympathy and aid. No hungry person was ever turned away from her door. The funeral was held at the Mt. Olive church Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. Rev. T. N. Marsh, of Upper Alton, officiating. It was very largely attended by relatives, friends and neighbors, many being obliged to remain outside during the services as the church could not hold all of them. The casket was borne to the grave by Messrs. John, William, and Moses Thompson, Timothy Merrigan, Clemens Kaller, and N. M. Duvall, all aged friends. Burial was in Mt. Olive Cemetery.

 

HILL, CHARLES "REDDY"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 20, 1909
Charles Hill, known as "Reddy" Hill, died very suddenly this afternoon at his home, Ninth and Easton streets. Dr. D. J. Duggan was summoned to the house to attend him, as he seemed to be very ill, and found that he was dead. He made no examination to determine the cause of death, but reported the case to the coroner. J. A. Neininger said this afternoon on learning of the death of his clerk, that this morning Hill had worked in his store and went home at noon saying that his wife was ill and he had been sent for. Mr. Neininger said he was apparently in his usual health at noon time. Hill was about 35 years of age and leaves his wife and two children. Mrs. Hill was so hysterical over the sudden shock caused by her husband's death she could tell nothing of the attending circumstances. It was reported by neighbors that Hill took poison, and that he laid down on the floor. He was apparently asleep, and the fact that he was dead was discovered by his wife when she went to rouse him. His wife refused to talk, and would not confirm the suicide story. No cause for him killing himself is known.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1909
Coroner Streeper held an inquest last evening of Charles Hill at his home, Ninth and Easton street. A physician examined the mouth of Hill and found from the fluids that came from the mouth at the time of death that he had taken a large dose of laudanum. He had concealed the bottle after taking the poison and no one could say positively until the doctor gave his opinion that it was a case of suicide. A jury found a verdict of death from laudanum poisoning self-administered. The funeral was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and burial was in City Cemetery. Rev. E. L. Mueller conducted the funeral services.

 

HILL, CHRISTOPHER/Source: Alton Telegraph, July 19, 1861
Struck by Train
On the 16th inst., as the train of the Terre Haute & Alton Railroad was backing in from the Junction into Alton, Mr. Christopher Hill was struck by the tender and was so severely injured thereby that he soon afterwards died. Mr. Hill has been long a resident of Alton, and has raised a large family who, with a great number of friends and acquaintances, mourn his sudden and shocking death. He was about 58 years of age. G. T. Allen, Coroner, summoned a jury to hold an inquest over the body, who report that the train was running slowly at the time the whistle was blown some time before reaching said Hill, and the speed checked. Hill is supposed to have been too deaf to hear the whistle. From the point where the train was when the signal was given by the whistle, to the place where Hill was struck by the tender, was three hundred and seventeen feet. This accident may have been unavoidable, but it appears to us the train might have been stopped in time to save the life of this individual. And if it could, we know of no right in railroad men to run their train over all persons who do not clear the track when they blow their whistle. The proper authorities should investigate this case.

 

HILL, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 14, 1916
Window Washer Killed By Fall
Edward Hill, aged 28, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Saturday night from the injuries he sustained Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock by falling from a ladder as he was washing windows at the Monarch saloon on Belle street, near Fourth. He struck on his head and fractured his skull. His death occurred six hours after the accident. Hill was taken to his home at Thirteenth and Alby streets and there an inquest was held by Coroner Sims and a verdict of accidental death was found. He leaves his mother, Mrs. Phillipine Hill, and one brother, Henry; and a sister, Miss Lizzie Hill. The body was taken to the home of the brother, 1905 Central avenue, and the funeral services will be held there at 1 o'clock Tuesday afternoon.

 

HILL, FERDINAND/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, May 1, 1856
We are informed by a gentleman from Edwardsville that Mr. Ferdinand Hill, a German, who resided alone on a farm five miles north of Edwardsville, was found in his field on Saturday last, burned nearly to a crisp. He had been engaged burning cornstalks and other refuse matter, preparatory to putting in seed for a new crop, and it is supposed he fell in the fire in some unaccountable way and was unable to escape. He was a young man.

 

HILL, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 1, 1906
George, 4 months old son of George and Mrs. Hill of Sixth and North streets, was buried in Oakwood cemetery, Upper Alton, yesterday afternoon. The child died Sunday.

 

Photo of Captain Granderson  Winfrey HillHILL, GRANDERSON WINFREY (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1911
Oldest Active River Man Dies
Captain Granderson Winfrey Hill died at his residence, Fourth and Easton streets, at 4:30 o'clock Wednesday morning in his 87th year. His death was due to the weakness of age. He suffered a complete breakdown about a week before the end, and the attending physician could hold out no hope to his family that he would recover. It was known last Saturday that he could not get well, nevertheless he insisted that evening on being allowed to sit up, and he wrote in a firm, unwavering hand a lengthy business letter he believed he must attend to. The letter was not mailed, as it had already been attended to by his son-in-law, S. H. Gregory. However, this incident illustrated the willpower of the aged business man and his close attention to his work, even when on his death bed. He was probably the oldest river man on the Mississippi river who remained actively engaged in the business of transporting freight. His connection with steamboating began almost 67 years ago, and continued up to the last. He was born in Chesterfield county, Virginia, June 29, 1824, and was a member of a large family. His parents moved with their family west, bringing their slaves with them, and they settled near Alexandria. In 1844 he moved to Hannibal where he went to steamboating. It was before the day of steam whistles on the steamboats, and all signals were given with bells. He was engaged on steamboats for many years, holding a master's and pilot's license, and he ran his boats on the Mississippi, Illinois, Missouri and Des Moines rivers, wherever he could get a charter. He was a member of the crew of the Edward Bates, which started a fire at St. Louis in 1849 while the boat was laid up during the prevalence of cholera. The boat was at the head of a long line of steamboats, and while a fire broke loose and drifting down burned all the steamboats below it, also setting fire to the city of St. Louis and burning about a dozen city blocks. He went to California by the Panama route in 1850, and on his return was married in 1851. Mrs. Hill died in 1903. Captain Hill took an interest in the Eagle Packet Company in 1861 with Capt. Henry Leyhe and Capt. William Leyhe, and the partners ran boats in the Keokuk, Alexandria and Warsaw trade, which they afterward extended to Quincy. Another old member of the firm, Capt. Williams, is still living. The Leyhe brothers were good men to run steamboats, but they needed some man on shore who would look after the business, and according to the statements of the Leyhe brothers, they began doing a money-saving business the day that they enlisted the services of G. W. Hill as their secretary and treasury. He held that position until ____, when he retired from the Eagle Packet Co. He came to Alton with his family in 1878, and for many years filled the position of agent for the Eagle company at Alton. When he sold out his interest in the Eagle company, he still held an interest in the Chester line, and when that line was sold he invested in the Calhoun line. The steamer G. W. Hill, now in that trade, was named for him, and it was his first steamboat namesake. The naming of the boat for him was a surprise perpetrated by his family, but he was unwilling to accept the compliment at first. Finally he was prevailed upon to give his consent to the name being painted on the boat. He was formerly interested in the Cape Girardeau Transportation Company, owning four towboats and twenty barges. He also owned an interest in the Eagle Boat Store at St. Louis. He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Virginia H. McKinney, Mrs. Frank P. Hearne, and Mrs. Anna H. Cunningham. Another daughter, Mrs. S. H. Gregory, died recently. Capt. Hill was known as a kindly genial man, plain in his tastes and very loyal to his family and his friends. He was charitable to those needing assistance, and wherever he went he spread a contagion of good feeling with his good cheer and his funny stories and ancient reminiscences. Even to the last he was unwilling to accept assistance from anyone when he was so feeble he could hardly get around. He had always helped himself, and he insisted upon being self-reliant. He never complained, and during his illness was bright and cheerful. He did not lose consciousness until he fell into his last sleep just a half hour before death came. The end was just as his life had been, peaceful and quiet. During his long life he had established a reputation for strict honesty and square dealing, of which his family may be proud. To the family he was ever devoted, and nothing that he could do for them to please his wife or children was ever neglected. His body will probably be laid to rest at the St. Francis cemetery near Alexandria, Mo., where his wife was buried. He had requested that he be laid beside Mrs. Hill, and his wish will be complied with.

 

HILL, JENNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 23, 1909
Mrs. Jennie Hill died suddenly Thursday morning at 5 o'clock at her home near Fosterburg. Her death was believed to have been caused by heart disease. She was 45 years of age, having resided in the vicinity of Fosterburg the greater part of her life. Her husband was killed several years ago by a railroad train in Bethalto, and since that time she has been living on the Hill farm with her two sons, William and Walter. A few minutes before 5 o'clock she arose from her bed and called her sons. When they inquired what was the matter she answered that she was dying. She then sank to the floor without saying more and expired almost before they could reach her side. She leaves four sons, William of Fosterburg, John of Centerville, David of East Alton, and Walter of Fosterburg, the three former being married. Mrs. John Titchenal of East Alton is a sister of Mrs. Hill. Coroner Streeper was called to Fosterburg, and will hold an inquest to determine the cause of her death. The funeral has not been set.

 

HILL, ORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 21, 1914
Mrs. Ora Hill, aged 25, died Monday at her home in Bozzatown after a long illness. The funeral will be held at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the Washington street Methodist church, and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

 

HILL, SUSAN SINCLAIR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 9, 1903
Wife of Captain Granderson  Winfrey Hill
Mrs. Susan Sinclair Hill, wife of Capt. G. W. Hill, passed away Sunday evening at 7:30 o'clock after a long illness at her home on Easton street. Mrs. Hill's death was due to an attack of grip five years ago, from which she did not fully recover. She had been very ill for about one year, and her death had been expected for some time. Sunday night about 6 o'clock she had been bright as usual, when suddenly a change occurred and she began sinking. With the members of her family gathered at her bedside she slipped away peacefully as if falling into a slumber. Mrs. Hill was born in Washington county, Kentucky, November 14, 1831. She was married to George W. Hill at her home in Kentucky, November 22, 1853, and had she lived two weeks longer would have passed her fiftieth wedding anniversary. The Hill family came to Alton from Alexandria, Missouri in 1878. Mrs. Hill's life was one of intense devotion to her family. Her ideal of perfect womanhood was one who could set her house in order and whose husband and children might rise up and call her blessed. Her home life was all that a good mother's should be, and to her husband she was ever a most devoted wife. The affliction that has befallen Capt. Hill in the death of his aged partner in life is a heavy one. Mrs. Hill was a devout Christian and lived her Christianity in her every day life. Always thoughtful of others, she was ever ready to relieve suffering and extend her sympathy to those in trouble. Shortly before the family moved to Alton, mrs. Hill's oldest son died at Alexandria. Within two years after their removal to Alton their second and last son died in Alton. The loss of her two sons was a heavy blow to Mrs. Hill, and she never ceased to mourn for them. She leaves beside her husband, four daughters, Mrs. S. H. Gregory, Mrs. Frank P. Hearne, Mrs. Virginia H. McKinney, and Mrs. Anna H. Cunningham. The body of Mrs. Hill will be taken back to St. Francisville, Mo., to be laid beside those of her two sons. The funeral will take place from the family residence tomorrow at 2:30 p.m.

 

HILL, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 8, 1914
Daring Aviator Killed in California - Grandson of Thomas Howard, Pioneer Resident of the Old Plank Road
Thomas Hill, an aviator with many Alton relatives, was killed December 2 in San Francisco, California, and will be buried tomorrow in Kansas City, according to a letter received this morning by Edward O'Leary from a friend of his and a relative of the dead aviator. The letter explains that Hill was 2,000 feet up in the air and was making what they call the "Death Dip," something that he had done successfully scores of times before. "Something went wrong with his machine," the writer says, "and he and it went headlong to the earth. He must have been killed instantly." The young man was a son of Mrs. Kate Hill of Kansas City. She was a native of Alton and was a daughter of the late Thomas Howard, a pioneer resident of the old Plank Road. She will be remembered by all of the middle aged persons who lived in Alton at that time. She is a first cousin of Mrs. Daniel Gorman and to the Howard brothers of this city. She married a man named Hill in Kansas City, and while the dead aviator was born there, he visited Alton frequently in his younger days, and has many friends who will sincerely regret to hear of his tragic end.

 

HILL, WILLIAM 'BILL'/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 12, 1911
Old Fisherman Drowns After Falling Out of Boat
William Hill, who lives below the foot of Twelve Mile Island, an old fisherman and shell digger, well known to hundreds of people who enjoy motorboating and camping trips, was drowned in the Mississippi river near Portage des Sioux. His 16 year old son, Roy Hill, who was with him, could not tell the exact place where his father lost his life, but as the water was very deep and the current treacherous, the body would doubtless be carried far away from where it went down. According to the story told by the son, father and son were in their launch making a trip from the camp at Eagle's Nest Island to their home. Before reaching Portage des Sioux, the little boat became caught in a whirl in the water and made a sudden turn. Hill was sitting in a chair in the boat, evidently under the influence of drink, and was very unsteady. When the boat made the sudden turn, he lost his balance and fell out, the boy says, never to come up again. The boy was frightened and he hurried on to Grafton. In his nervous condition he neglected to notice a dike and struck it, disabling his boat about a mile below Grafton, and he walked to Grafton to tell the story of his father's death. It was impossible for the lad to tell just where the accident occurred. Hill was on the water almost all his life. He was about 50 years of age. He followed the pursuit of fishing until recent years, when he took up shell digging. He was an old time coon hunter and owned fine coon dogs. He probably was the best coon hunter along the Illinois river.

 

HILL, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 16, 1920
The death of William Hill, 54 years old, occurred this morning at St. Joseph's Hospital at 10 o'clock. He was taken ill with influenza about two weeks ago and pneumonia developed shortly afterwards. He was taken to the hospital several days ago but failed to improve. Mr. Hill was born in Fosterburg June 19, 1864, and had lived there until about a year ago when he went to East Alton to make his home with his daughter, Mrs. Emmett Wasaman. He is survived by three children, Mrs. Emmett Wasaman, Mrs. Harold Shook of Wood River, and William Hill of Little Rock, Ark.; two brothers, James and David, both of East Alton. The funeral arrangements will be made upon the arrival of his son from Little Rock.

 

HILL, WILLIAM HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 3, 1901
Killed by Big Four Limited Train at Bethalto
William Henry Hill, an aged resident of Bethalto, was killed at that place this morning about 9:30 o'clock by the Big Four eastbound limited. Mr. Hill was 69 years of age; he was deaf and did not hear the signals given by the engineer, and did not discover the approach of the swift running train, which does not stop at Bethalto. Mr. Hill attempted to cross the track immediately in front of the engine. He was struck and thrown 80 or 90 feet. His head was nearly severed from the body. One half of the head was destroyed and the brains were scattered some distance. It was a horrible sight. The old man was killed instantly. Mr. Hill leaves a wife and five sons, all of the latter of adult years. Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest this afternoon, and in verdict in accordance with the above facts was rendered.

 

HILLA, JOSEPHINE/Source: Troy Weekly Call, June 17, 1905
Murdered by Russian Miner
The murder of Mrs. Josephine Hilla at Glen Carbon Monday night by the hand of Gustav Markel, a love-crazed Russian miner, was one of the most cold-blooded in the annals of county history, and one which caused great excitement and stirred the residents of that town to arms in the spirit of avenge.

The cause of the shooting which resulted in the death of one person and the injuring of two others, was the opposition to Markel paying his attentions to Miss Mary Hilla, the 15-year-old daughter of the murdered woman. Markel, who is a Russian and about 35 years of age, formerly worked in one of the Glen Carbon mines, and boarded at the Hilla home. He began paying attentions to the daughter of Mrs. Hilla, and receiving no encouragement from the girl, he then south the influence of the mother in his case. Upon telling him that she would not intercede for him, and that she would have nothing to do with the matter, Markel became boisterous and swore vengeance, and was finally ordered to leave the place.

Markel left and remained away until Monday, and that night reappeared at the Hilla residence with a murderous purpose in his mind. Little Joe Hilla first saw Markel coming toward the house with a revolver in his hand and alarmed the family. Mrs. Hilla was returning from the well, when Markel spied her and as he did so, he leveled his revolver and fired. The ball struck the woman in the base of the throat, and as her husband ran to her, Markel fired another shot but missed. Mrs. Hilla fell into her husband’s arms exclaiming, “Gus Markel shot me!” This she repeated over and over until she expired ten minutes later.

After the shooting of Mrs. Hilla, Markle turned and fired two shots into the house through a window, and both took effect. One struck Alberta Marahaska in the stomach, and the other inflicted a wound on the left arm of John Otrema. Both men are boarders, and were not seriously hurt.

Markel made his escape after the shooting, and as soon as the citizens of Glen Carbon learned the news of the tragedy, a posse of armed citizens, headed by officers, started in pursuit and scoured the surrounding country until Wednesday afternoon, when Markel was found in the woods near the schoolhouse at Maryville, where he was shot by one of the posse and captured. A graphic account of the capture was given in a telegraphic dispatch from St. Louis on page two of this issued of The Call.

Deputy Coroner J. E. Marks of Edwardsville held an inquest over the remains of Mrs. Hilla at Glen Carbon on Tuesday evening. The story of the tragedy was rehearsed and the jury rendered a verdict charging Markel with the murder. The funeral of Mrs. Hilla took place Thursday from the family home to St. Mary’s church, and interment was made in the Catholic Cemetery.

Markel’s injuries, it is thought, will not prove fatal, but will disfigure him for life. One of his eyes was torn out and his face was badly lacerated by the charge of shot. He was removed to the county jail at Edwardsville, where he will be held pending trial in which he will have to answer for a serious charge.

The report is that Markel’s mind is believed to have become unbalanced over his wild and desperate infatuation for the girl who was many years his junior. It is said that he has been under the care of a physician who advised him to take treatment at a St. Louis hospital. It also developed at the inquest Tuesday, that Markel went armed and had threatened the whole Hilla family with violence since being ordered away from their home.

Capture of Gustav Markel
Source: Troy Weekly Call, June 17, 1905, page 2
Gustav Markel (also spelled Margel), pursued by a sheriff’s posse in his flight after having killed Mrs. Josephine Hilla of Glen Carbon, Illinois, Monday night, was shot and captured shortly after noon Wednesday by Posseman Brandt in the woods about a quarter of a mile from No. 2 mine of the Donk Bros. Coal & Coke Company at Maryville, Illinois. He had been seen and identified about 11 o’clock on a Suburban car going from East St. Louis, by Albert Evans of Glen Carbon, who at once notified the authorities at Maryville and Glen Carbon.

Immediately upon receiving this information, a posse was organized and started out in pursuit of Markel. He was seen in Maryville and followed into the woods near that place. In a section where the undergrowth was thick, obstructing the view of the searchers so that it was impossible to see more than a few feet ahead, Markel disappeared. The posse then divided into three parties, surrounding this thicket. Posseman Brandt, a miner, pushed his way into the dense growth, carrying a shotgun. He was alone, but others of the posse had entered the thicket from other points. Suddenly, Brandt saw Markel looking stealthily out from behind a tree. The fugitive had a revolver in his hand, and as he caught sight of Brandt, he leveled the pistol at him.

Quick as a flash, the posseman threw his shotgun to his shoulder and fired. Markel fell sideways from behind the tree, dropping his revolver as he fell. So rapid had been Brandt’s actions, that Markel had not had time to pull the trigger of his own weapon. Brandt ran at once to the fallen man, taking care, however, that the second barrel of his gun was ready for instant use if necessary. There was no occasion for its further use, however, as Markel was found almost unconscious, the charge from Brandt’s shotgun having struck him in the face and blinded him for the time.

The discharge of Brandt’s gun brought others of the posse to the scene. Markel was taken to Maryville and placed under a physician’s care, preparatory to his removal to the jail in Edwardsville. His wound is not thought to be serious. In addition to the revolver which he aimed at Brandt when the latter first discovered him, a second pistol was found behind the tree where he was shot.

NOTES:
Gustav Markel was first taken before the court on October 31, 1905 for a sanity hearing. There were several Alton witnesses that testified to the mental condition of Markel. The murder trial was held in November 1905, and he was found guilty, with a sentence of life in prison. The trial lasted 3 days. Markel probably was taken to prison in Joliet, Illinois. Josephine Hilla was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Edwardsville, Illinois.

Accused Murdered to be Tried for Sanity
Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 30, 1905
Several Alton witnesses competent to testify to the mental condition of Gus Markel, accused of murder, have been summoned to testify in the county court tomorrow in Markel’s behalf. Markel will rely for his proof, it is said, on his fellow prisoners in jail. Markel, who shot and killed Mrs. Josephine Hilla at Glen Carbon last June, and who was badly injured by being shot by his captors, will be tried for insanity in the county court in Edwardsville, by ruling of Judge Burroughs, Tuesday. His trial for murder is set for Wednesday in the Circuit Court, and should the county court jury decide that he is not insane, the question of his sanity can be raised again at the murder hearing. The killing of Mrs. Hilla resulted from her objections to the marriage of the accused to her 15-year-old daughter.

Accused Gets Life Sentence
Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 7, 1905
The Circuit Court which tried the case of Gustave Markel, found a verdict of guilty, and fixing his punishment at imprisonment for life. The jury reported just before 3 o’clock this afternoon. Gustav Markel was accused of the murder of Mrs. Josephine Hilla at Glen Carbon, Illinois, on the evening of June 12, 1905. The trial was finished yesterday morning in Edwardsville, after a hearing lasting three days. Only a few witnesses were heard yesterday, among them being Dr. H. L. Whitner of 2009 Grand Avenue, St. Louis, who swore that Markel was under his treatment for six days last January, being treated for melancholy, and that he believed him insane at the time. The arguments were not finished until late last evening. State’s Attorney Gillham represented the prosecution, and R. J. Brown and C. E. Gueltig the defense. A night session was necessary to conclude the arguments and instruct the jury.

 

HILLER, ERNST/Source: Troy Star, July 12, 1894
Sunday morning [July 8] about 9:30 o'clock Ernst Hiller, who has been a resident of this city for the past eighteen years, was found dead in the rear of the small brick building adjoining Aug. Peters' saloon, and owned by M. J. Schott. Hiller had been complaining the previous evening of severe internal pains, and his employer, Aug. Peters, claims he took nothing for breakfast excepting a cup of coffee. This was early in the morning. About the time stated, young Darwin Schott found him in the place described. He evidently had an apopletic fit and in falling struck his head on a rock, making quite a scalp wound. When found, according to testimony, he was still alive, but died a few seconds later. Coroner Kinder was notified, but answered that as he had a case near Alton, he could not come until in the evening. The jury was composed of J. F. Clepper, foreman, John F. Peterman, John Schmiddt, Fred Holtgreve, W. F. Peter, and James N. Jarvis. After hearing all the testimony, the jury returned a verdict of "death from natural causes." The funeral occurred Monday morning at 10 o'clock. Ernst Hiller was born in Germany about 65 years ago and has been living in Troy about twenty years. His occupation was carpenter, but in recent years he has not followed it. He had been working for Mr. Peters the past month and had formerly been a caterer at William Meiners'. He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Chris Behle.

 

HILLMAN, RUSSELL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 28, 1921
Five Drowned in Godfrey Pond Late Friday
Three boys and two girls lost their lives by drowning in the Godfrey pond Friday afternoon, and the details of the drowning will perhaps never be known. There are indications that at least one of the deaths was due to the self-sacrificing heroism of Russell Hillman, aged 15, who is believed to have tried to save the lives of members of the party. The dead are: Russell Hillman, aged 15; Bertha Howard, aged 15; Ernest Howard, aged 9; Harold Howard, aged 7; Bessie Hobson, aged 17. Wilmot Holmes, a sixth member of the party, escaped with his life. Of the five who drowned, Russell Hillman, it is supposed, from the positions in which the bodies of two of the girls were found, succeeded in towing ashore Bertha Howard, leaving her in shallow water where her hands could easily have touched some planks on shore, but she was too weak to save herself and she drowned in shallow water three or four feet from shore. It is supposed that having towed the Howard girl ashore, Hilman swam out to save Bessie Hobson and that the two went down. Their bodies were found very close together. Wilmot Holmes, the only member of the party who survived, at first told a story that he had not been in the boat with the others and that he did not know what had happened. He said that he was at the pond with the party and that when it was proposed to get into the leaky boat, he agreed to stay out and let the others have it by themselves. He said they told him to wait until they came back and that he waited a long time and when they did not return he went on home. Coroner Streeper and Constable Frank Morrison took Holmes to one side and questioned him closely about the story he told, and he then broke down and told the story as follows: He said that all six members of the party were in the boat and that one of the girls, Bertha Howard, was rocking it. He said that he told her she would sink the boat if she did not desist, and that he leaped out into the water. He said that some of the drowning ones got hold of him and carried him down, and he released himself, swimming ashore, when he saw that the members of the party were lost. He said he was so terrified that he made a long detour around Godfrey and made his way home. The body of Bertha Howard was discovered at 6 o'clock, probably two hours after the drowning. Peter Needham had gone to the pond and while walking along the shore noticed the body of Bertha Howard lying in shallow water close to the bank. He called help and her body was drawn out of the water. Searching parties, learning that there had been a party of boys and girls together began the search for the bodies in the pond. The bodies of Russell Hillman and Bertha Hopson were found together in deep water about 25 feet from shore and that of Ernest Howard was found just a short distance from them. The search was continued for the smallest of the Howard children until late at night. The supposition is that the members of the party became alarmed at the boat taking water fast and in their excitement they tipped it over and all got into the water, and just at that time Russell Hillman, a strong swimmer, came along and went to their rescue, losing his own life for his gallant effort. The three Howard victims are the children of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Howard, who live four doors north of the post office in Godfrey. There are two other children of the Howards, Ward and Lee, both older. Russell Hillman was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Hillman, who live across the road from the C. & A. station at Godfrey. He leaves two brothers, Warren and Travis, and a sister, Katherine. Bessie Hobson was an adopted girl. She leaves a brother, who was notified of his sister's fate. She was employed as housekeeper for an aged lady in Godfrey, and formerly was employed at Beverly Farm by Dr. W. H. D. Smith. Deputy Coroner C. N. Streeper took charge of the bodies after they were taken from the water. He fixed the time of the inquest for Tuesday evening at 7 o'clock. An effort was made to find the Holmes boy after the discovery was made that the party had been drowned and for a while it was feared that he, too, had lost his life. Residents in the vicinity reported having seen a boy leaving the place and so inquiry was made at the Holmes boy's home and he was found there and members of his family told the story which has been given as his story of what had preceded the drowning. He said that he could not see from where he was what had happened, and he did not know that the drowning had occurred. The funeral of the three Howard children will be held from the home Sunday afternoon, and burials will be in Godfrey Cemetery. The body of Hilman will be sent to Pleasant Hill, Ill., for burial Sunday morning at 10 o'clock. The funeral of Miss Bessie Hobson will be held Sunday morning at ten o'clock from the home of M. W. Hopkins, at 620 East Ninth Street, then on to the St. Patrick's Church. The interment will be in the St. Joseph's Cemetery.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1921
The body of Russell Hillman was sent to Pleasant Hill, Ill., Sunday morning for burial. A large number of friends and neighbors assembled to see the body off.

 

HINDERHAN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 20, 1916
John Hinderhan, aged 72, for many years an engineer in Alton and for fifty years a resident of Alton, died at 7:45 o'clock Friday morning at the home of his son, William, 314 Prospect street. Mr. Hinderhan had been sick about a week, and his death was unexpected to many of his friends. He was injured several years ago while at work as engineer in the plant of the Illinois Corrugated Paper Co., and was never able to perform any more physical labor from that time. Mr. Hinderhan was for a long time engineer on the Middletown street car line in the days when a steam motor supplied the power for that system. He leaves four children, William of Alton; Mrs. Mary Withers; and John Hinderhan of Decatur; and Mrs. J. Tierney of Monroe, La. He leaves a brother, William, and a sister, Mrs. John Molloy. The time of the funeral is not set.

 

HINDLE, FINIS JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 25, 1914
Two Die When Yacht Capsized in Swift Current
Finis Handle Jr., aged 19, and Martin Kauder, aged 24, were drowned in the Mississippi river Friday afternoon about 5 o'clock, and Charles Southard, aged 21, escaped, when a little yacht belonging to Kauder, in which the three young men were taking a ride, capsized at the head of a barge of the Mississippi Sand Co. fleet, at the mooring of the and company [sic]. According to the story told by the survivor, Charles Southard, and also from the accounts of eye witnesses, the fatal features of the accident could have been avoided, but for the efforts of the two young men who were drowned to save their disabled yacht from being carried under the barge, around and under which a current was racing at a speed of 6 to 7 miles an hour. The engine of the yacht was not working well when the trio started out from the Fluent dock. Capt. W. D. Fluent said he noticed that only one cylinder was working. The party kept on and were working with the engine, hoping to get it running properly. When they were in toward shore trying to avoid the swiftest current, and were about 75 feet above the barges of the Mississippi Sand Co., the engine died down completely and the yacht drifted with the current....When the members of the party saw that they must inevitably float against the head of the barges, Southard stood on the bow of the boat and the two others on the stern as the boat came in contact with the overhanging part of the barge and the three tried to push the yacht away...It is believed that Kauder and Hindle became entangled in the canopy top and were carried under the barge. Hindle never did appear after going under the barge, and was probably drowned under the barge and then shot out under the water far down the river. Kauder, who seemed to be a strong swimmer, managed to extricate himself from the boat and he swam out from underneath after he had gone down the river about half the length of the barge. Frank Yost and Frank Weber, two men employed on the fleet of the sand company, saw the accident and ran along the edge of the barge trying to rescue Kauder, who had appeared on the river side of the barge, swimming and floating. The men shouted to him to swim toward them, but he evidently did not understand them, or was bewildered by being underneath the barge and he continued to swim away, evidently not realizing that he had come to the surface and was far enough away from the barge to be safe. Kauder sank.....Southard, who like the other two, had clung to the bow of the barge when the yacht struck, hauled himself up and was wet only to the knees....Word was sent to the parents of the two victims of the accident. David Kauder, father of Martin Kauder, arrived at the river bank just as Fluent returned with word that there was no chance of getting the two bodies at that time. The father's first thought was of his son's wife. He hurried off to break the news to her. Mrs. Kauder was at her home on Eliot avenue when she learned of her husband's death. Kauder was a young printer, who recently completed his apprenticeship. He had been working for J. J. McKeen at the Alton Printing house, and was studying to become a line type operator....Finis Hindle Jr. is the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Finis Hindle. Finis Hindle, the father of one of the victims, is still suffering from the effects of a bad fall and is a cripple, being obliged to get about on crutches. Coming at this time the loss of one of the bread winners for the family is a heavy one. All three of the young men worked for W. M. Sauvage, and he regarded them as valuable helpers....Mrs. Kauder this afternoon authorized the offer of a $50 reward for the recovery of the body of her husband.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 29, 1914
The body of Finis Hindle, drowned last Friday in a yatching accident at the Mississippi Sand Co. fleet at Alton, was found floating near the mouth of the Missouri River this morning by Charles Homer and David Blankinship, who were one of several parties who had gone out searching for the bodies.....The body was in good condition and did not show many bad effects from being in the water. It is believed by those who saw the body that Hindle was not drowned, but that he was killed by the screw of the boat as a mark on the back of his head indicated that he had received a violent blow there. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, 1304 Belle street.

 

HINDLE, MARY (nee SCOVELL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1917
Mrs. Mary Hindle, a resident of Upper Alton for more than 70 years, died this morning at 11:05 o'clock at her home on Scovell street, after a long illness. Mrs. Hindle had been confined to her bed during her final illness since the 5th day of November. She would have been 84 years old on the first day of May, had she lived three months more. Mrs. Hindle was born in Ohio and came to Upper Alton when a little girl about 10 years old, with her family. She was a member of the Scovell family, one of the best known of the old Alton families, and her death today leaves remaining but two, William and Alex, both of Alton. She also leaves three children, Finis and James of Alton, and Mrs. Peter Kling of Lawrenceville, Ill. Her husband, Edward Hindle, died 19 years ago. Mrs. Hindle was a sister of A. T. Scovell, for many years a boss for the old horse car line in Alton, and later of the electric line, whose death occurred about five years ago. She lived in the next house to her brother many years, and the street - one block long - was named in his honor. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Upper Alton Presbyterian Church, and interment will take place in Alton City Cemetery.

 

HINDMAN, FLORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 5, 1917
Flora Hindman, aged 8 years, 8 months and 2 days, died January 3rd at her home at 1914 Market street, after an illness of congestion of the brain and lung trouble. Funeral services will be held from the Rocky Fork Church, Saturday, January 6th, at 1 o'clock.

 

HINES, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 21, 1902
John Hines, a resident of Fosterburg for 55 years, died this afternoon at 1 o'clock at his home, aged 79. He leaves a wife, four sons and two daughters. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the family home to the Fosterburg cemetery.

 

HINRICHS, ANDREW/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 4, 1912
The funeral of Andrew, the nine year old son of Mr. and Mrs. George Hinrichs, was held from the family home, 722 East Third street, this afternoon and was attended by a large number of friends and relatives of the family. Rev. D. R. Martin conducted the services. Burial was in City Cemetery.

 

HINRICHS, KATE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1907
The funeral of Miss Kate Hinrichs will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the German Lutheran church on North street.

 

HITT, ROBERT Y./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 19, 1922
Old Soldier Answers Call
Robert Y. Hitt, aged 86, a veteran of the Civil War, died last night at 8 o'clock, the closing day of the G. A. R. Encampment, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Etta Schaefer, 1118 Garden street. His health had been bad for the past year, but in the middle of March he began to decline rapidly, and continued until the end came. For a long time he was at Irving school as janitor, but prior to that he was a carpenter. He was born at Brighton, and came to Alton when a little boy, spending all the rest of his life here, except the period he was in the army. He was a member of Co. C, 144th Illinois, enlisting in 1864. For many years he lived on State street, near the intersection of West Ninth street. His wife died about nine years ago. He leaves two daughters, Mrs. Etta Schaeffer and Mrs. Leila Blankenship, both of Alton, a half sister, Sarah Hitt of Alton, a brother, George Hitt of Alton, three grandchildren and one great-grandchild. The funeral will be from the Schaefer home, 1118 Garden street, at 2:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon. Services will be conducted by Rev. S. D. McKenny. Burial will be in the City Cemetery. Mr. Hitt was a highly esteemed man and he had many friends and acquaintances in Alton. He was an expert gardener and for many years his services were in demand in the neighborhood where he lived for making and caring for gardens.

 

 

HITZLER, JENNIE BELLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 1, 1913
Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Morey of Centralia, Ill., are at the Illini Hotel awaiting the arrival of the body of Mrs. Morey's sister, Mrs. Jennie Bellas Hitzler, who died at Detroit in a sanitarium last Saturday. Mrs. Hitzler was a daughter of Capt. Jas. Bellas, for many years a well known steamboat man who lived on State street in Alton. Capt. Bellas died in 1872 and was buried in Oakwood cemetery, and his wife died eight years ago and also was brought to Alton for burial. The surviving members of the family are Mrs. C. D. Morey of Centralia; Mrs. M. C. Atkins of St. Louis; Mrs. M. C. Burgman of St. Louis; Hugh Bellas of Auburn, Nebraska. One of the St. Louis sisters went to Detroit to bring the body to Alton, and Mrs. Morey, who was visiting in Dallas, Tex. was notified to come to Alton and make arrangements for the funeral.

 

HOAGLAN, JOHANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 18, 1910
Mrs. Johanna Hoaglan, widow of the late D. S. Hoaglan, died in St. Louis last evening at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Lee D. Covell, in her 89th year. She had been in failing health for a number of years and had resided most of the time with her daughter, Mrs. Kate Lavenue. Mrs. Hoaglan was for many years one of the most prominent ladies in this city, and was most highly respected. She was a lifelong member of the First Presbyterian church and was deeply interested in all works of benevolence and charity. The body will be brought from St. Louis tomorrow morning, and the funeral will be from the railway station to the cemetery.

 

HOBSON, BESSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 28, 1921
Five Drowned in Godfrey Pond Late Friday
Three boys and two girls lost their lives by drowning in the Godfrey pond Friday afternoon, and the details of the drowning will perhaps never be known. There are indications that at least one of the deaths was due to the self-sacrificing heroism of Russell Hillman, aged 15, who is believed to have tried to save the lives of members of the party. The dead are: Russell Hillman, aged 15; Bertha Howard, aged 15; Ernest Howard, aged 9; Harold Howard, aged 7; Bessie Hobson, aged 17. Wilmot Holmes, a sixth member of the party, escaped with his life. Of the five who drowned, Russell Hillman, it is supposed, from the positions in which the bodies of two of the girls were found, succeeded in towing ashore Bertha Howard, leaving her in shallow water where her hands could easily have touched some planks on shore, but she was too weak to save herself and she drowned in shallow water three or four feet from shore. It is supposed that having towed the Howard girl ashore, Hilman swam out to save Bessie Hobson and that the two went down. Their bodies were found very close together. Wilmot Holmes, the only member of the party who survived, at first told a story that he had not been in the boat with the others and that he did not know what had happened. He said that he was at the pond with the party and that when it was proposed to get into the leaky boat, he agreed to stay out and let the others have it by themselves. He said they told him to wait until they came back and that he waited a long time and when they did not return he went on home. Coroner Streeper and Constable Frank Morrison took Holmes to one side and questioned him closely about the story he told, and he then broke down and told the story as follows: He said that all six members of the party were in the boat and that one of the girls, Bertha Howard, was rocking it. He said that he told her she would sink the boat if she did not desist, and that he leaped out into the water. He said that some of the drowning ones got hold of him and carried him down, and he released himself, swimming ashore, when he saw that the members of the party were lost. He said he was so terrified that he made a long detour around Godfrey and made his way home. The body of Bertha Howard was discovered at 6 o'clock, probably two hours after the drowning. Peter Needham had gone to the pond and while walking along the shore noticed the body of Bertha Howard lying in shallow water close to the bank. He called help and her body was drawn out of the water. Searching parties, learning that there had been a party of boys and girls together began the search for the bodies in the pond. The bodies of Russell Hillman and Bertha Hopson were found together in deep water about 25 feet from shore and that of Ernest Howard was found just a short distance from them. The search was continued for the smallest of the Howard children until late at night. The supposition is that the members of the party became alarmed at the boat taking water fast and in their excitement they tipped it over and all got into the water, and just at that time Russell Hillman, a strong swimmer, came along and went to their rescue, losing his own life for his gallant effort. The three Howard victims are the children of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Howard, who live four doors north of the post office in Godfrey. There are two other children of the Howards, Ward and Lee, both older. Russell Hillman was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Hillman, who live across the road from the C. & A. station at Godfrey. He leaves two brothers, Warren and Travis, and a sister, Katherine. Bessie Hobson was an adopted girl. She leaves a brother, who was notified of his sister's fate. She was employed as housekeeper for an aged lady in Godfrey, and formerly was employed at Beverly Farm by Dr. W. H. D. Smith. Deputy Coroner C. N. Streeper took charge of the bodies after they were taken from the water. He fixed the time of the inquest for Tuesday evening at 7 o'clock. An effort was made to find the Holmes boy after the discovery was made that the party had been drowned and for a while it was feared that he, too, had lost his life. Residents in the vicinity reported having seen a boy leaving the place and so inquiry was made at the Holmes boy's home and he was found there and members of his family told the story which has been given as his story of what had preceded the drowning. He said that he could not see from where he was what had happened, and he did not know that the drowning had occurred. The funeral of the three Howard children will be held from the home Sunday afternoon, and burials will be in Godfrey Cemetery. The body of Hilman will be sent to Pleasant Hill, Ill., for burial Sunday morning at 10 o'clock. The funeral of Miss Bessie Hobson will be held Sunday morning at ten o'clock from the home of M. W. Hopkins, at 620 East Ninth Street, then on to the St. Patrick's Church. The interment will be in the St. Joseph's Cemetery.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1921
The funeral of Bessie Hobson was held Sunday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Patrick's church and burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery. The pallbearers for Bessie Hobson who was buried Sunday, were Ed Hanlen, Oscar Hanlen, Charles McFarland, Earl Smith, Theo Boker and Tracy Coulter. The little girl was buried from St. Patrick's Church and the body interred in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

 

HOBSON, RALPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1906
Ralph, son of Mrs. Ada Hobson, aged 18, died last evening at the family home, 1905 Grove street, from typhoid malaria. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Union Baptist church.

 

HODGMAN, LUCY/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 31, 1845
Died, on the 12th inst., at Paddock's Grove, Madison County, Illinois, Lucy, wife of Calvin Hodgman, formerly of Ashby, Massachusetts, aged 43.

 

HODSON, HOMER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 9, 1921
Homer Hodson, deceased past commander of Alton Post 126, Department of Illinois, American Legion, was laid to rest in Oakwood cemetery this afternoon, with full military honors, funeral services being conducted under the auspices of the Legion. Past Commander Hodson served as post commander of the Legion during the year 1920, and was elected past commander at the annual meeting in January, hence in view of his activity as post affairs, the Legion felt it a privilege to pay tribute to their deceased comrade by having charge of the funeral services. An escort of former service men, members of Alton post, assembled in Royal and Liberty streets at 1:30 this afternoon and proceeded to the Hodson home, 712 Royal street, from whence the funeral cortege departed at 2 o'clock for the Baptist church where services were held at 2:30, Rev. Twing officiating. In the course of his sermon, Rev. Twing eulogized Homer Hodson as a man of real character, greatly enthused over any civic work as well as affairs pertaining to the American Legion and all former service men. He said a most fitting tribute to the deceased veteran of the World War, whose untimely death saddened the entire community. Legionnaires, Boy Scouts and members of the Ladies Auxiliary of the legion attended the funeral service in respective bodies, following the funeral procession from the first assemblage at the Hodson home to the church and thence to Oakwood cemetery. Harvey Harris, Ernest Smith, Dr. F. Kane, Nathan Rosenberg, Thomas Stanton and P. W. Jerwekh, members of the Alton post of the Legion attended the casket, while Joseph Mohr, Jason Bramhall, R. D. Parker, Andrew Leigh, Walter Stiritz, W. F. Gillespie, Jack Hanson, Dr. Groves Smith, A. Kitzmiller, W. P. Boynton, Byron Evens, Leo Willis, Ross Kiser, Clifford Neill, Dr. Mather Pfeiffenberger, J. E. Maxfield, J. C. Aldous, J. A. _____, C. C. Ellsion, Dr. O. A. Meyers, Paul Benrime, Robert Streeper served as honorary pallbearers. Thomas Henry was in charge of the firing squad composed of the following former servicemen: Sidney Gaskins, F. B. Reed, W. F. Gillespie, W. Straube, Leroy Stalp, George Lamm, C. E. Kuhn and W. H. Wohlert. In carrying out the military burial, a volley was fired as the body was being lowered to the grave. A military guard and color bearers, together with a military band and drum corps also followed in time with the funeral procession. A special escort was provided to look after the floral tributes which were numerous, showing in a sense of the word the high esteem in which the deceased veteran was held by his many friends and associates, both in business and in public life. Conveyances were provided for the Legionnaires, Ladies Auxiliary of the post, Boy Scouts and friends in going from the church to the cemetery. As a mark of respect, the offices of Alton, Granite and St. Louis trac___ company were closed this afternoon to permit the employees attending the funeral. A large number of fellow employees from East St. Louis came to Alton for the purpose of paying a last tribute to their co-worker.

 

HOEFERT, MAMIE (nee VOLZ)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 2, 1919
Mrs. Mamie Volz Hoefert, wife of Frederick Hoefert, died Tuesday morning at 6 o'clock at the family home, 621 East Fifteenth street, after an illness which began last Christmas. Her case was recognized as being dangerous and her death had been looked for at any time of late. Mrs. Hoefert, about eleven weeks ago, underwent a surgical operation in the hope of deriving some benefit from it, but the hope was in vain, as very little relief was given her and none of a permanent character. Mrs. Hoefert was born in Alton fifty-six years ago. Her maiden name was Volz. Her aged mother, Margaret Volz, who is 87 years of age, survives her. Besides her husband, Mrs. Hoefert leaves three children, Edgar, Harold and Mrs. J. J. Spindler of Highland. She leaves also two grandchildren, three sisters, Mrs. Theodore Masel, Mrs. G. A. Joesting, and Mrs. E. W. Schmidt, also five brothers, George, Charles, Gus, William and Edward Volz. Thirty-three years ago Mrs. Hoefert was married in Alton and all of her married life she had spent here. She was a well known woman, a member of several social organizations and her home was a place known for its hospitality, and she for her gracious courtesy as a host. In her home she was a dutiful wife and a good mother, and her passing is most sincerely mourned there. She was a member of the Evangelical Church.

 

HOEHN, ALICE IDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1917
Mrs. Alice Ida Hoehn, wife of George Hoehn, died Saturday evening at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Evans, on Washington avenue. She was 27 years of age and leaves besids her husband, her parents and three brothers, John, Albert and Eugene Evans. The funeral will be held from the St. Mary's Church Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock. Mrs. Hoehn suffered with tuberculosis and made a brave fight to regain her health, but lost her fight with this dread disease. The Hoehn family resided in St. Louis up until six months ago, when the young wife became ill. At the commencement of her illness Mr. Hoehn brought his wife to Alton where she received the best of attention. The body will be laid to rest in the City Cemetery, following Requiem Mass in St. Mary's Catholic Church.

 

HOEHN, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 2, 1911
The many friends and acquaintances of Mrs. Annie Hoehn, wife of George Hoehn, a prominent farmer living between Edwardsville Crossing and Mitchell, will be shocked to learn of her death Wednesday evening after a few hours illness. She was in excellent health apparently, and with her husband ate a hearty dinner yesterday. She went out in the yard shortly after leaving the table, and was stricken soon after that. She called to her husband to help her and he ran to her, but she fell unconscious before he could get her in the house. Two physicians were summoned and they did everything possible until death intervened about 5 o'clock. She was 32 years old and was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Noonan, farmers near Mitchell. She leaves besides her husband and her parents, a brother and sister, who live at Mitchell. The funeral will be held Saturday morning from St. Elizabeth's church at Mitchell, after which a special interurban car will convey the body and funeral party to St. Louis. Burial will be in Calvary cemetery. A ruptured blood vessel caused death.

 

HOEHN, CHARLES/Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, December 2, 1875
Former Business Man Drowns Himself in a Tub of Water
On Saturday evening, many of our citizens were startled by the report that Charles Hoehn had committed suicide at his shop on the corner of Fourth and State Streets. It appears that Mr. Hoehn, for some weeks past, had intimated to several persons in the city that he contemplated taking his life; that he was tired of living, and even gave directions to some of his acquaintances as to what disposition should be made of his children. Among this number was Mr. Joseph Crowe, and when Mr. Hoehn's oldest daughter called on him between four and five o'clock on Saturday evening, stating that her father had not been seen since the night before, and that the shop door was locked, Mr. Crowe went immediately to the shop and broke the door open, and found what he anticipated had happened was only too true, and a terrible reality. Mr. Hoehn had committed suicide in his own shop by holding his head in a tub of water. Mr. Crowe immediately telegraphed to Coroner Miller at Bethalto, who arrived on the eight o'clock train and went immediately to Mr. Hoehn's shop, accompanied by a number of citizens. Mr. Hoehn was found on his knees, with his head in the "slack" tub, the water covering most of his head - showing conclusively that he had strangled himself by holding his head under the water until death ensued. After removing the body and laying it out, the Coroner had a jury summoned and sworn. The jury, after viewing the body, retired to the room over Mr. Crowe's store, where witnesses were examined. The evidence showed, without doubt, that it was a case of self-destruction. The jury returned a verdict that Mr. Hoehn came to his death by strangling himself in the slack tub at his shop on the corner of Fourth and State streets, on the 27th day of November, 1875, and that the jury believe that when deceased committed the act, and for some time previous, he was mentally deranged. Hoehn was about 55 years of age; was a native of Germany, but had lived in this city for 25 or 30 years, and was well known in this vicinity. He established in this city many years ago, a manufactory for locks, iron railing, etc. He was very successful in business for some time, accumulating considerable property, owning at one time one of the finest residences on Second street [Broadway], but falling into intemperate habits, the savings of years, as well as his business, slipped away from him, leaving himself and his family in destitute circumstances. He leaves a large family, nine children, orphaned by this act. His wife died two years ago. Five of the children are quite young, and will not be able to care for themselves, and our citizens should take steps to provide them with homes and employment. Sunday a letter was found, written by Hoehn, which stated the 2d of November, the date of his wife's death, was the day he had fixed for destroying himself, but owing to some clothing not being ready for one of his children, he had postponed the day.

[Hoehn's business was located at the southwest corner of Broadway and Langdon in Alton, and he manufactured iron railing and was a locksmith.]

 

HOEHN, EDITH (nee ASHLOCK)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1917
The funeral of Mrs. Edith Ashlock Hoehn was held this morning from St. Mary's Church, where a requiem mass was said by Rev. Fr. Brune in the presence of a church filled with friends and neighbors of deceased and of her family. Floral offerings were numerous, and burial was in City Cemetery in the Ashlock family lot. Deceased was the wife of Emil Hoehn, and the bereaved husband and two motherless children have the sincere sympathy of the citizens generally.

 

HOEHN, EMMA LOUISE/Source: Alton Telegraph, February 12, 1880
Miss Emma Louise Hoehn, a very estimable young lady of this city (Alton), daughter of the late Charles Hoehn, was found dead in her bed this morning at her home, at the residence of Capt. D. R. Sparks. Coroner C. S. Youree was notified by telegraph and arrived on the 9 o'clock train and, after impaneling a jury, proceeded to hold an inquest. Capt. Sparks was examined and testified that he had known the deceased about five years, that her general health was good, and that she was apparently enjoying her usual health yesterday. As she did not appear at the usual hour this morning, witness' son, Willie, went to call her, but she did not answer. Witness was notified, and surmising that something was wrong, made an examination and found that Miss Hoehn was cold in death. Dr. Davis was immediately sent for, but the vital spark had fled. Miss Julia Hoehn, sister of deceased, testified that she was with her yesterday, that she appeared in usual health with the exception of feeling very cold across the chest. Some years ago she complained at times of fluttering of the heart. My sister's age was about twenty five years. After hearing the evidence, a verdict of death from heart disease was rendered. The jury was composed of G. H. Weigler, foreman, J. W. Joesting, J. A. Cooley, Henry Brueggemann, Cornelis Ryan, I. E. Hardy. The members of the panel kindly contributed their fees to the use of the surviving children of the afflicted family, five or six in number. The funeral of Miss Emma L. Hoehn took place at 2 o'clock p. m. Tuesday, at the residence of Capt. D. R. Sparks. A very beautiful, effective discourse was delivered by Rev. Mr. Fisher of the Unitarian church. A very large procession of mourning relatives and friends attended the remains to the City cemetery.

 

HOEHN, EVA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 24, 1921
The funeral of Mrs. Eva Hoehn, wife of Henry Hoehn, was held this afternoon from the Evangelical church at Eighth and Henry streets, Rev. O. W. Heggemeier officiating. There was a large attendance of friends and relatives at the funeral services. The pallbearers were neighbors of Mrs. Hoehn, Henry Lorch, Amos Maxeiner, F. P. Bauer, C. F. Yeakel, Charles Koch and William Gissal. Burial was in City Cemetery.

 

HOEHN, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 28, 1915
Henry Hoehn, in his ninetieth year, died Tuesday morning at 5 o'clock at his home, 501 Henry street, after an illness of about six months. He had been suffering from a general breakdown due to his great age. Had he lived until March 14, he would have been 90. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the home, and burial will be in City Cemetery. Mr. Hoehn was one of the wealthiest landowners in Madison county. Making a modest beginning when he came to the American Bottoms in 1847, he continued to amass property until his death he had very extensive real estate interests in the county and elsewhere. Most of his best holdings are in the American Bottoms. He was a farmer for many years, but as age advanced he moved to Alton 24 years ago and passed the remainder of his life here. He spent some of his time supervising his property in the bottoms. Mr. Hoehn was the father of a large family, and at his death he leaves eleven children. Most of the eleven children are living in Alton and the vicinity. He is survived by five sons, Fred of Alton; George and Leonard of Oldenburg; John of California; and Henry of East Alton; and seven daughters, May Hoehn; Mrs. Julius Spangenburg; Mrs. Harry Gissal of Alton; Mrs. John Stadler of Mitchell; Mrs. John Wager of Granite City; and one sister, who is living in Texas.

 

HOEKSTRA, R. J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1908
Mrs. R. J. Hoekstra died yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock at her home on the old John Kendall place near Brushy Grove of consumption, after several months illness. Her first husband, Henry Ragis, was killed in 1894 by an explosion in the wheel house of the Equitable Powder Plant. Her second husband survives her with three children by the first husband and four by the second. Mrs. Hoekstra is a member of a well known East Alton family. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon, the funeral cortege proceeding from the house at 1:30 to the East Alton Baptist church. The burial will be in Milton cemetery.

 

HOELTER, UNKNOWN SON OF JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 15, 1900
The ten year old son of John Hoelter of Mitchell died yesterday after an illness with diptheria. The funeral will be at 2 o'clock tomorrow at Mitchell.

 

HOFFER, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JACOB/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1900
Fosterburg News - After an illness of only a few days, Mrs. Jacob Hoffer died on Saturday morning at the age of 81. She was born in Neiderville, Switzerland, Nov. 30, 1818; married to Jacob Hoffer on March 17th, 1842; came to this country in 1852. She leaves two sons and one daughter, eleven grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren. Her husband died 8 years ago. Mrs. Hoffer enjoyed the best of health for a number of years, and was strong and robust until her last sickness, which seemed to be a very sudden and general breaking down of the constitution. The infirmities of old age seemed to strike a short crushing blow. She was a lady of many good qualities, a member of the Presbyterian church here for a number of years. The funeral services took place at the Presbyterian church Sunday, Rev. Morey officiating. Interment in the Fosterburg cemetery. Pallbearers were William Wittie, Christian Huette, George Ortken, Fred Depindoke and Ernest Gabid.

 

 HOFFERDITZ/HOFFERDIETZ, PEARL J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1904
Man Shoots Wife After She Asks for Divorce
Following the service of a divorce suit summons instituted against him by his wife, George F. Hofferditz fatally wounded Pearl J. Hofferditz, his wife. She was moved to St. Joseph's hospital and he was arrested and sent to the county jail at Edwardsville to await the outcome of the injuries to his victim. The shooting was a sensational one. Deputy Sheriff Laughlin served the chancery summons on Hofferditz, who is a freight conductor on the Illinois Terminal. On Monday afternoon Hofferditz went to the place of Pearl Froat in North Alton and called for his wife. He asked her to take a seat with him in a roller swing while they talked, and as they sat there he placed the revolver against her bosom and fired. The bullet entered below the woman's heart and the flash of the revolver set fire to her flimsy dress. Hofferditz thrust the weapon in his pocket, extinguished the blaze in his wife's clothing, imprinted a kiss on her lips, and then drew the revolver a second time and fired a bullet into her abdomen. Dr. G. Taphorn is attending the woman and at once decided the wounds would be fatal. The Hofferditz woman had been an inmate of a house of ill fame.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 10, 1904
Mrs. Pearl J. Hofferditz, aged 20, died at St. Joseph's hospital Saturday morning at 11 o'clock from the effects of a wound in her lung, inflicted by her husband when he shot her last Monday. Dr. G. Taphorn ...that the abdominal wound was not dangerous as there was no perforation of the intestines by the bullet. Acting State's Attorney J. A. Lynn endeavored to get an ante-mortem statement from Mrs. Hofferditz, but she was too weak to admit of it being taken the last few days when it became apparent she would die, and only in the face of death would the statement have effect as evidence. A warrant charging Hofferditz with murder will be sworn out at the instance of Mr. Lynn.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1905
The trial of George Hofferdietz, on the charge of murdering his wife, Pearl Hofferditz, is in progress this afternoon. Many witnesses were subpoenaed. The defense endeavored to prove self defense and also to show that the character of the woman who was killed was bad. Four of the members of the police force, the police magistrate, and many other citizens, were summoned as witnesses in the case to testify in behalf of the defense, the purpose being to allege the general bad reputation of the woman killed. The prosecution finished its side of the case at noon, and the defense took up its work in the afternoon.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1905
The trial of George Hofferditz, who shot and killed his wife in North Alton last summer after she had filed suit against him for divorce, was concluded this morning when the attorneys made the arguments in the case. Hofferditz tried to show self defense, also the bad character of some of the witnesses against him. [George received 25 years for the murder of his wife]

 

HOFFERDITZ, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1909
C. N. Streeper, of Upper Alton, was called to Edwardsville Sunday to assist in taking care of the body of Thomas Hofferditz, a former Illinois Terminal switchman who lived in Alton and who died there from dropsy. He was a brother of the Hofferditz who killed his wife at Alton and is now serving a penal term.

 

HOFFMAN, ALEX/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 10, 1903
Alex Hoffman was the name of the man killed by an Illinois Terminal train near the Federal Lead Works Monday afternoon. The accident was witnessed by three men who were walking near him. They said that Hoffman was walking on the Illinois Terminal tracks, and that he stopped to light his pipe. He failed to observe the approaching train, and while still lighting his pipe he was struck by the Illinois Terminal train. His body was thrown about 12 feet by the first impact and fell on the tracks. It was struck a second time, and then thrown from the track by the pilot of the engine. He lived but a few minutes after the accident. The body was taken to the undertaking rooms of A. I. Keiser, and Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest today. Hoffman was 55 years of age. He came to Alton from Cheltenham last November and was a furnace man at the lead works. He was an industrious workman and ordinarily very quiet. He boarded at Smith's boarding house in the Eastern Hotel. The inquest was held this afternoon by Deputy Coroner Streeper. No relatives of the dead man could be found, and his fellow workmen at the Federal lead works took up a subscription to bury him tomorrow morning in Oakwood cemetery.

 

HOFFMAN, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 13, 1920
George Hoffman, aged 68, died Sunday morning in St. Joseph's Hospital from injuries he sustained a week before in an automobile accident when a car driven by O. H. Gnerich struck Mr. Hoffman, causing a fracture of the skull. The accident occurred on Alby street, near Fifth street, just after the Gnerich car had rounded the corner. Mr. Hoffman was on his way home from work and was carrying a basket of supplies for his household. He was conscious part of the time after the accident, but at no time was there much hope of his recovery. A surgical operation on his skull was performed on the Sunday morning after the accident to relieve the pressure on his brain. This did not give the permanent relief that was hoped for. On Wednesday meningitis set in. Members of the family were with him most of the time. Two sons, Edward and Warren, arrived Saturday morning from San Francisco in response to a summons telling of their father's bad condition. Mr. Hoffman recognized his two sons, but soon after their arrival he became unconscious again. George Hoffman was born in Belleville, Ill. When a young man he came to Alton and was married here. He had been a resident of Alton over forty-five years. He leaves his wife, four sons, George, Maurice, Edward and Warren; and one daughter, Florence Hoffman. He also leaves one sister, Mrs. Schneiderwind of Belleville, who was here attending her brother. For many years Mr. Hoffman was head blacksmith at the Dan Miller Buggy Co. Four years ago he became connected with the Hayden Machine Co. He was a skilled workman and a conscientious one. He was a man of best character and was known as a good citizen. He was well liked in the neighborhood where he had lived most of his married life, and there was deepest concern among all his old neighbors over the outcome of his injuries. Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer will hold an inquest this evening at 7 o'clock. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home, 614 Easton street.

 

HOFFMAN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 23, 1908
John Hoffman, who for many years was a prominent business man of Alton, died suddenly sometime between 11 o'clock Thursday night and 6 o'clock Friday morning at his home, 107 East Ninth street. He had been ill from a cold for a couple of days and had been under the care of Dr. Taphorn. He ate supper with the family last evening and later read the Evening Telegraph. He retired between 10 and 11 o'clock and appeared to be resting well later, when members of the family entered the room. Friday morning Mrs. Hoffman went to the room to call him to breakfast and found him cold in death. Dr. Taphorn said heart failure was the immediate cause of the sudden taking off. Mr. Hoffman(n) was born in Germany May 9, 1830, and had lived in Alton about 60 years. He was for many years associated in business with the late John Sutter and later with John Bauer. He conducted an undertaking business alone for several years, as he did also a hardware and tin store. He retired from business several years ago and has since been taking life easy. He is survived by his wife and five children, Henry A., Theodore, Emil, Otto and Miss Edith. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home to the City cemetery, and will be conducted under the auspices of the German Benevolent society and the Odd Fellows, both of which organizations he has long been an honored member.

 

HOFFMAN, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 2, 1917
John Hoffman, aged 68, died at 2:10 o'clock Tuesday morning at his home, 311 Hampton street, after an illness of about six weeks, with pneumonia and complications. Mr. Hoffman was born in Baright, Germany, August 11, 1849. He came to America in June 1883, and to Alton, where he lived ever since. He engaged at his trade of stonemason, and was a contractor. He leaves his wife and eight children, Miss Annie of Cincinnati; Misses Lena and Tillie and Messrs. George, John, Louis, William and Philip of Alton. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon from the home, at 2 o'clock to the Evangelical Church at 2:30 o'clock, where services will be conducted by the pastor, Rev. O. W. Heggemeier. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

HOFFMAN, JOHN EMIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 6, 1913
John Emil Hoffman, tax collector of Wood River Township for three years, died Sunday night at 11:15 at his home on Washington avenue in Upper Alton, after a several years' illness of locomotor ataxia. Mr. Hoffman was a patient sufferer, and in spite of his disability conducted his business of tinning and taking care of a tinship as well as he could. Within the past few months his health has been failing very rapidly, and he was forced to give up active work. Mr. Hoffman was born in Alton, March 24, forty-four years ago, and has reisded in Alton ever since. Twenty-two years ago he was married to Miss Henrietta Misegades, who survives him. He was a tinner by occupation, and for fifteen years conducted a tinshop in Upper Alton on College Avenue, selling out on account of his illness about a year ago. Mr. Hoffman was elected once for a one-year term and again for a two years' term, which made him serve three years. In spite of his disability, he was a very efficient tax collector. He leaves his wife and one son, Harry Hoffman; his mother, Mrs. John Hoffman of Alton; three brothers, Adolph and Theodore of Alton, and Otto Hoffman of Wood River; and a sister, Miss Edith Hoffman of Alton. He was a member of the Modern Woodmen lodge. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock at the home in Upper Alton. The Rev. C. N. McManis will preach. The burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery.

 

HOFFMAN, MARIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1908
The funeral of Mrs. Maria Hoffman, who died Wednesday at St. Joseph's hospital, was held this afternoon from the Cathedral, where services were conducted by Rev. Tarrent. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

 

HOFFMAN, STEPHEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 3, 1911
Aged Servant Dead - Was in Judge Baker Family Since 1859 - Was Civil War Soldier
Stephen Hoffman, who had been employed by the family of Judge H. S. Baker since the year 1859, died this morning at the Baker homestead. His period of service in the one family, without doubt, is not equaled by any other person in Alton. Hoffman was a native of Germany, and came to this country about fifty years ago. He came to Alton about the time the city hall was being built in 1854, and he worked on that building. Later he went to take a job as a gardener, and then Judge Baker engaged him to take charge of his place of Fifteenth and Liberty street. Hoffman was an expert gardener, and he stayed on the place from that time until he died, except for a period of years he was away serving his adopted flag during the Civil War. He looked upon the children of his employer as his own personal property, looked after them in childhood, and even when he saw them grow to manhood and womanhood he never lost his interest in them. He was highly regarded in the family, and when sickness attacked him, old "Steve" was given every attention, and more could not have been done for him if he had been a member of the family. Stephen Hoffman was born in January 31, 1834, in the parish of Eppeldorff in the Duchy, of Luxemburg, Germany. He was a member of the 144th Illinois volunteers, and served from September 1864 to August 1865 [editor's note: the 144th volunteers served as prison guard at the Alton Confederate Prison]. The funeral will take place from the John Lock undertaking rooms Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, and burial will be in City cemetery under the auspices of the G. A. R., in which he held membership.

 

HOFFMEISTER, ANGIE TEKLA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1909
Prominent Society Woman Dies From Typhoid Fever
Miss Angie Tekla Hoffmeister, known to all her friends as "Birdie Hoffmeister," died at Eureka Springs, Ark., Sunday morning, after an illness with typhoid fever. She was sick over two weeks and shortly after the beginning of the malady was taken to a hospital. Miss Hoffmeister went to Eureka Springs last January to take a position as stenographer for a corporation owning a bank and water works system. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Hoffmeister, broke up housekeeping in Alton, and Mrs. Hoffmeister recently went to make a visit to her daughter. The mother was with her when she died, but her father, who left here Saturday to attend her, arrived too late to see his daughter before her death. The body arrived in Alton this morning at 10 o'clock and was taken to the Hoffmeister home on Elm street, from where the funeral will be. The death of Miss Hoffmeister is an extremely sad one. She was the only daughter of her parents, a bright, sweet dispositioned young woman, who was a great favorite in her home, in her church and in the society in which she moved. In her church she was an active worker. She had a class in the Congregational Sunday school, and it was the rule for her to have her entire class of young ladies with her in the church at the morning services. At a time when she was engaged to be married when she was about to make a home of her own, and while she was the happiest over her near wedding, she became ill and the illness proved fatal. Birdie Hoffmeister was born in Alton, and almost all her life was spent in the city. She was her mother's constant companion, and her parents felt returned to them the devotion they showed to her. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the Congregational church. Burial services in City Cemetery will be private.

 

HOFFMEISTER, EMMA MARIA/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 23, 1846
Died in Alton on the 19th instant, Emma Maria, infant daughter of Mr. J. [or I.] F. Hoffmeister, aged 10 months.

 

HOFFMEISTER, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 5, 1911
Frank Hoffmeister, aged 73 years, died Thursday afternoon at his home, 2400 east Elm street, after an illness of one year and a half's duration. He was born in Alton and lived here all of his life. He was clerk, treasurer or alderman of North Alton many years, was always an active factor in working for the best things in civic life. He never married. He leaves six sisters, Misses Emma and Maria of Alton, Mrs. L. E. Tansy of Chicago, Mesdames C. W. and L. M. Brown of Kansas City, and Mrs. B. R. Gilman of Pearsall, Texas. Two brothers, Fred of Alton and G. _. of Golden City, Mo., also survive. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

Source: Transactions of the Illinois State Horticultural Society
Died at Alton, Illinois, December 30, 1910. For fourteen years he was treasurer of the Alton Horticultural Society and for forty years a member. During all of this time he was actively engaged in the cultivation of orchard and small fruits. His interest in horticulture was constant. He was a regular attendant at the meetings and was particularly distinguished for a knowledge of horticulture which he readily imparted to those who cared to inquire with the certainty that he knew whereof he spoke.

 

HOFFMEISTER, JOHN F./Source: Alton Telegraph, July 20, 1844
Died, in this city [Alton], on the 18th inst., John F., infant son of Mr. J. F. Hoffmeister, aged 8 months.

 

HOFFMEISTER, JOHN FREDERICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 28, 1900
John Frederick Hoffmeister died Sunday morning at 2 o'clock at his home north of Alton after a long illness with debility. He was taken ill in Kansas City six months ago, and it was thought then he would not survive long. Three weeks ago he was brought home and he passed away near the old home he had occupied so long. Mr. Hoffmeister was born in Basle, Switzerland in 1813, and came to America when 19 years of age. In 1835 he came to Alton and lived here during the exciting early days, and there was probably no one who knew more of the early history of Alton than died Mr. Hoffmeister. He first engaged in the bakery business, and seventeen years later he began farming on the place that is now known as the Hoffmeister place, where he lived all the remaining years of his life. He became one of the best known horticulturists in Southern Illinois, and was an authority on anything pertaining to the raising of fruit and farm products. After 51 years of married life, his wife, whom he married shortly after he came to Alton, died in 1888. Mr. Hoffmeister leaves nine children, all of them well known in this community and highly respected. They are: Frank H., Frederick W., Misses Emma and Maria Hoffmeister of Alton; Mrs. L. E. Tousey of Chicago; Mrs. C. W. Brown and Mrs. L. N. Brown of Kansas City; George K. Hoffmeister of Golden, Mo.; and Mrs. B. I. Gillman of Pearsall, Texas. The death of Mr. Hoffmeister was not unexpected, as he had been sinking steadily many weeks. Some of his children were here when their father died. The funeral will be Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Curran home. Rev. George Gebauer will conduct the service.

 

HOFFMEISTER, WALTER/Source: Alton Telegraph, March 25, 1864
Died on the 18th inst., Walter, son of Frederick and Theckla Hoffmeister, aged 2 years, 4 months and 18 days.

 

HOGGATT, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 22, 1918
 Soldier Killed After Shaking Hands with Brother on the Battlefield
The Telegraph today received a copy of a death announcement sent to Mr. and Mrs. Ross Black of Wood River, by Mr. and Mrs. H. Hoggatt of Kansas City, Mo., announcing the death of Harry Hoggatt. Instead of the formal death notice, the parents had the proud privilege of sending out an unusual announcement which reads as follows: "Attained His Ambition and Died on the Battlefield Serving His Country. With deepest regret we have learned that our youngest son, Harry Hoggatt, aged seventeen years, eight months, 79th Co., 2nd Battalion, 6th Regiment, U. S. Marine Corps, A. E. F., France, was killed in action October 5th, nineteen hundred and eighteen, four months and nine days after he enlisted. He fought in several battles and suffered many hardships, and we only find consolation in the fact that he died fighting for the noblest cause. His brother, R. M. Hoggatt, Ph., M., 3, 16th Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment, U. S. M. C., France, writes: 'We met going into battle only long enough to shake hands and say goodbye. Harry was killed by a bursting shell and buried on the field of battle. I visited his grave after the battle.' Mr. and Mrs. H. Hoggatt." (Harry Hoggatt formerly worked at Wood River Refinery.)

 

HOHMAN(N), ANNA MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 12, 1908
Mrs. Anna Martha Hohmann, wife of Nicholas Hohmann, died Wednesday morning at her home, 1001 Gold street, after a three weeks illness with pneumonia. She was 81 years of age January 18. She was born in Ellmanshaussen, province of Hesse Castle, Germany, and came to America in 1852, coming direct to Alton. She was married at the same time. She had lived in Alton with her husband, who survived her, and she raised two children, Henry Hohmann and Mrs. Henry Ullrich. She leaves also nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. She was a member of the German Evangelical church of this city, and an active worker in the ladies' aid society of that church. The funeral will be held from the church Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. E. L. Mueller officiating. Mr. Hohmann, her aged partner in life, is in feeble health but is able to be around. The couple were very devoted to each other, and the death of Mrs. Hohmann is a sad shock to her widowed husband.

 

HOHMAN(N), NICHOLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 3, 1913
The funeral of Nicholas Hohman, mention of whose death was made Thursday evening in the Telegraph, will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the German Evangelical Church, Rev. E. L. Mueller officiating. The German Benevolent Society will have charge of the burial, and will attend the funeral in a body, the White Hussars band being engaged to escort the cortege to City Cemetery. Mr. Hohman was one of the oldest and best known of the German residents of Alton. He had been a hard working man and since his coming to Alton he had accumulated considerable property. He was one of the oldest members of the German Evangelical Church, and was considered one of the most substantial members. He had not been actively at work for a number of years, owing to his age, yet he was strong and well until a few years ago he fractured his leg. He surprised everyone at that time by recovering from his injury, the broken bones healing, and he was able to get around again, much to the surprise of everyone. His last illness was due to a general breaking down from old age, but a brief attack of pneumonia was the immediate cause of his death. Nicholas Hohman was born in Essen, Germany, and would have been 88 years of age October 7. He came to America in 1852 and stayed eleven years in St. Louis, coming to Alton in 1863. He was a stonemason by trade. He leaves nine grandchildren. He was a soldier during the Civil War, and was discharged with an honorable record.

 

HOHNSBOEHN, EMMA J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1919
The funeral of Mrs. Emma J. Hohnsboehn, who died Thursday will be held tomorrow at 9 p.m. from the home, McClure and Broadway, to Milton Cemetery.

 

HOLBROOK, JOSEPH M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 24, 1901
A man dressed as a laborer, evidently about 35 years of age, was struck by the engine of the first 92 Big Four freight, just west of Edwardsville crossing last evening at 7:40, and was instantly killed. Engineer Ryder, who was in the cab, says the man was standing beside the tracks until the engine got within 20 feet of where he stood, then he jumped between the rails and the engine could not be stopped within that distance, although the engineer reversed and attempted to stop. Conductor Bellnap stopped the train and telegraphed Deputy Coroner Streeper, who immediately responded and brought the mangled body to Upper Alton, where it now is in his undertaking rooms awaiting identification. Nothing at all was found in the pockets except a whisky flask which had been emptied. It is not likely the unfortunate will ever be identified. Later - Several bottom farmers viewed the remains this afternoon and identified the man as Joseph M. Holbrook, a farmhand whose home is at Sorento. Messages to that place have not yet been answered. Coroner Streeper will hold an inquest this evening at 6 o'clock.

 

HOLDEN, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 12, 1916 F
ormer Postmaster and Owner of Telegraph at Alton Dies - Lived In Alton Since 1841
Charles Holden, former postmaster at Alton, a resident of the city of Alton since 1841, died at his residence, 400 Henry street, at 10 o'clock Saturday morning from old age. His death had been expected for some time. He suffered many sinking spells, but a week ago last Wednesday he became much worse, and thereafter he was not able to recognize anyone. He had been interested in the reading of the daily newspapers and up to the evening that he was taken worse he had insisted upon the newspapers being read to him, though he was very weak. In the nearly seventy years he had lived in Alton, Mr. Holden had held public offices as well as serving the community in other capacities. He was Postmaster from 1878 to 1886, being retired on the accession of Grover Cleveland as the presidency. Charles Holden was born in Leeds, England, December 5, 1840. He was brought to Alton on Christmas day the year following, and he spent most the remainder of his life in Alton. His first work was as a carrier boy on the Alton Telegraph, and he undoubtedly was the oldest living former newsboy of the Telegraph family. Later in life he became one of the proprietors of the newspaper, and he always maintained in the paper a deep interest, not only because of friendship for those who conducted it, but because of the fact that he had once had an active part in conducting the paper. He became a printer in the Telegraph office and at the age of nineteen he was employed as a regular compositor. After spending a few years away from Alton, working in printing offices, he enlisted in the army under Lincoln's first call for troops, but as the quota was full his company was disbanded. In May 1865 Mr. Holden became foreman in the Alton Telegraph office, and the year following he entered into equal partnership with L. A. Parks in the ownership of the Telegraph. He continued as an owner of the Telegraph until 1880, though two years before he had been appointed Postmaster and had given all of his attention to the duties of the office he had accepted. On leaving the post office, he went back to his first love, the printing trade, and he opened a job printing office which he conducted until a few months ago when failing health forced him to discontinue that line of effort. He was out of his house but a few times after he gave up his printing office. In his home he was given the most devoted attention by his wife and his daughters, and part of the time by his only son. Mr. Holden was identified with the Piasa Building and Loan Association as a direction, and as a member of the valuation committee for many years. He continued in that capacity up to the time of his death, he having been re-elected a director recently, though he was unable at that time to continue in the discharge of the duties of his office. He was also actively identified in the work of the Lovejoy Monument Association, in which he was a director and one of the officers. He gave valuable service in that organization. Mr. Holden was always interested in the city of Alton. He served as a member of the city council for many years, and was given responsible committee posts. He served as chairman of Finance and Ordinance and streets and alleys committee, and at all times his opinion on municipal affairs was taken with much weight. He was a man with decided opinions and was not afraid to express his belief as to what he thought was right. Mr. Holden leaves his wife, three daughters, Miss Carrie Holden of Alton; Mrs. H. W. Davis of this city; Mrs. Charles F. Gray of Sierra Madre, Cal.; and one son, R. R. Holden of Chicago. Mr. Holden was married in Alton February 10, 1863, to Matilda S. Smith, and the couple celebrated the golden wedding anniversary three years ago. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock from the family home on Henry street.

 

HOLDEN, EDGAR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 12, 1912
Sixteen Year Old Boy Drowns in River
Edgar Holden, the 16 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. George Holden, was drowned Sunday afternoon about 4:30 o'clock while swimming in the river off the sand bar, out from the plant of the Illinois Glass Co. According to Capt. W. D. Fluent, who went down to aid in the rescue and brought the body back home after it had been seined out of the river by two fishermen, the drowning occurred on one of the most deadly reefs in the Mississippi River near Alton. It was this same reef that was the scene of the drowning of Michael Riley and a party of six girls a number of years ago, and every year it has claimed the toll of a life or more. Edgar Holden had gone to the river with some of his cousins, a brother and a neighbor's boy. Those in the party were: James Lemon, Harold Cheesman, Elmer Ash, Archie Holden, and Edgar Holden. The mother says that her son had not been feeling well, and it is supposed that he was taken with a cramp. The boy was out in deep water swimming when he began to go down. He called for help and made frantic struggles to get to a log that was floating near him, but he could not even reach the log. Harold Cheeseman, a cousin, went to attempt a rescue, but he failed. He was dragged down himself by the drowning boy and had to abandon Holden or lose his life. The boys in the party reported the drowning and a searching party went down there and hunted without success for a long time. A small seine was being use to make hauls in the neighborhood, but the body was not recovered until a long seine was procured from some fishermen and dragging in deep water was done with it. The party recovered the body at 9:30 o'clock about five hours after the drowning. The victim of the reef was employed at the plant of the Western Cartridge Co. Beside his parents he leaves five sisters and four brothers. The father of the lad is a well known carpenter and a life-long resident of Alton, a brother of Charles and Richard Holden of this city. Harold Cheesman, cousin of the drowned youth, and Henry Hassman, testified at the coroner's inquest held this morning that a yacht which was across the river refused aid at the time the boy could have been saved because they believed the swimmers were joking. The men on the yacht who came over fifteen minutes afterwards said that on the day before they had been fooled by a gang of boys crying for help when they did not need it. They then helped search for the body with hooks and nets, but failed to find it. The two boys said that they were pushing a log with Edgar Holden, Arthur Holden and James Lemon, when Holden got into a step-off and sank. Cheesman tried to rescue him and came nearly being drowned, only breaking away in time to save his life after he found that Holden was too heavy for him. The boys then ran ashore and called for help as Holden was going down. The verdict was accidental drowning. The funeral will be from the Holden residence, Thirteenth and Easton streets, Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. G. L. Clark officiating.

 

HOLDEN, ELIZABETH (nee CUNNINGHAM)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 28, 1902
Resident of Alton Since 1842 Dies
Mrs. Elizabeth Cunningham Holden, widow of Charles Holden, died Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock of general debility. Mrs. Holden was born in Leeds, England, October 10, 1818, having just passed into her 85th year. When 19 years of age she married Charles Holden. In 1842 Mr. and Mrs. Holden, with their two sons, James and Charles, left their native land and came to America, arriving in Alton on Christmas day of that year, where they continued to reside until death removed them. Mr. Holiden died in 1888. Mrs. Holden was of hardy stock, enduring a pioneer life in the West --then an almost unpopulated country -- with the sturdiness of the English race. She was ever a faithful wife and dutiful loving mother, and her children will hold her memory in lasting affection. Her long residence in Alton gave her a wide acquaintance, and all who knew her highly esteemed her friendship. Her faculties remained good until about the last moment, and while she suffered much from weakness and the burden of years, yet she bore all with becoming fortitude. Five children, all of adult years, survive her, viz.: Charles, Richard and George W. Holden, and Mrs. Emma J. Brunner, wife of B. S. Brunner, and Miss Mattie Holden. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home of deceased on the corner of Thirteenth and Alton streets.

 

HOLDEN, GEORGE W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 10, 1915
George W. Holden, a well known carpenter, died Tuesday afternoon at his home, 1321 Easton street, after an illness with the grippe. He had been feeling poorly for four or five months, but two weeks ago he was taken down with an attack of the grippe, and nothing serious was thought of the illness at first. It was believed by his family, the last few days, that he was in a dangerous condition. Mr. Holden was born in Alton and lived here all of his life. He was a carpenter by trade, and was known as an expert mechanic. He belonged to an old and well known Alton family, and he leaves two brothers, Richard and Charles Holden; and two sisters, Mrs. Brunner and Miss Mattie Holden. He is survived by his wife and eight children: Charles, George and Arthur, Mrs. James Mahoney, Misses Hattie, Irene, Helen and Ruth. Charles Holden Jr. has arrived from Keokuk to attend his father. Mr. Holden was a member of Robin Hood Camp, Modern Woodmen, also of the carpenters' union. Mr. Holden would have been fifty-eight years of age Thursday. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, on his birthday anniversary, and burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

HOLDEN, KATE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 29, 1919
Kate Holden, aged 58, an inmate of the Alton State Hospital, died this morning from tuberculosis of the lungs. She has no known relatives. The funeral services will be held at the institution, and the burial will be in the Hospital cemetery.

 

HOLDEN, MARY LOUISE (nee MINER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1920
Mrs. Mary Louise Holden, wife of Richard Holden, died at the family home, 716 Langdon street, Sunday at 12 o'clock after being in ill health for a number of years. For some time past Mrs. Holden has been confined to her room, but her death was unexpected. The past six weeks Mrs. Holden has been confined to her room but she was much better the last few days and had been up and around her room on Sunday. Members of the family had been in and out of the room and at one time, just at noon, when she had been left for a few minutes, apparently much better and stronger, she collapsed. She was found dying, the change having taken place within the minutes that she was alone. Her death occurred very soon thereafter. The sudden collapse of Mrs. Holden was a great surprise and a shock to the members of her family. She was the daughter of the late William K. and Mary A. Miner of Fidelity, and was born in Fidelity, Jersey County, May 7, 1847. She was married in Fidelity on Oct. 6, 1874, and came to this city as a bride. Her maiden name was Mary Louise Miner. She was in her 72nd year. Mrs. Holden is survived by her aged husband, Richard Holden, and by three sisters, Mrs. N. E. Dodge of Jerseyville, Mrs. A. F. Ely of Fidelity, and Miss Alma Miner of this city. The only child of the well known couple died at the age of 12 in 1892. Mrs. Holden was a member of the Congregational church, and took an active part in all church work. She was a good neighbor and her death caused great sorrow among relatives and friends. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home, 716 Langdon street. Rev. C. C. Smith of the Congregational church will conduct the services.

 

HOLDEN, SHELBY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 24, 1905
Shelby H. Holden, son of Mrs. Henry Feldwisch, died at his mother's home at East Alton this morning after an illness of nearly four months. He was in his twenty first year of his age. The young man was taken ill on New Year's day at Texarkana, Ark., and was brought to East Alton February 14. He was unable to sit up when he arrived at East Alton, and his death was expected at any time since his return. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the Feldwisch home, Rev. W. F. Vaughn of Carlinville officiating.

 

HOLLIDAY, JAMES G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 27, 1904
James G. Holiday, aged 17, died today in Upper Alton from pneumonia. Only his mother survives him. Funeral tomorrow at 2 o'clock. Interment in Milton cemetery.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 29, 1904
What James Holiday Sr. thought would be a visit with his family he had not seen in four years Sunday, turned into a very sad event, the funeral of his oldest son and namesake. Holliday lives near Delhi. Four years ago he and his wife separated, she taking the five children with her. Two of her sons have been working in the glassworks, the oldest being James, who succumbed to a pneumonia attack Saturday. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home to Milton cemetery. As the cortege was leaving the house the father rode up on a horse and asked to see Jimmie. "He is in that wagon," someone told him. At the grave the casket was opened for the father to take a last look at his son. After the funeral the father rode off on his horse to return to his home.

 

HOLL, JOSEPH E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 31, 1916
The death of Joseph E. Holl occurred at 6:30 o'clock Friday morning at his residence, 610 east Fourth street. It was due to an attack of pneumonia, which made it necessary for him to take to his bed last Friday. His illness was recognized as being of a serious character a week ago, when he found it necessary to stay at home from his place of business. He had not been feeling well for several weeks prior to that, but he had continued to attend to business affairs and made no complaint of feeling unwell.....Mr. Holl was a cigar maker by trade, and many years ago he was a partner with Henry Brueggemann in the cigar business. Later, he opened a cigar store on East Second street where he continued the remainder of his life. He was a very influential man in the community. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him. In the part of the city where he transacted business, his opinion on public matters was sought by all and his counsels were regarded as being sound. He was a leader in all matters pertaining to that end of the city and in the social life there. He held the office of special tax collector under Mayor Beall during the six years that Beall was in office. He was formerly a leader in the Democratic organization in Alton, but was never a candidate of his party for any office, though frequently urged to become such. Mr. Holl leaves his wife and three daughters, Mrs. R. S. Cousley and Miss Helen and Loretto Holl. Mr. Holl was born in Alton and lived here all his life. He was 53 years old, November 26. His aged mother, Mrs. Mary Holl, survives him, but she is very ill herself and the result of the shock of news of her son's death was feared by the family. Beside the mother, wife and daughters, Mr. Holl leaves three sisters, Mrs. William Fries, Mrs. S. H. Freeark, and Mrs. Allen K. Heskett. He leaves a brother, John Holl, a member of the fire department. Mr. Holl was a member of the Elks, Woodmen, Turnverein and Dobies. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home, Rev. E. L. Mueller officiating. It is related by members of the family that Mr. Holl continued conscious up to the moment of his death. His brain was clear and he talked to his family. He made all arrangements for his funeral, and for the disposition of his business. One of his last thoughts, after his family, was of his old friend Eliju L'Epplatienier, to whom he sent farewell. Commenting on the efforts of the physician in charge to help him, Mr. Holl remarked a short time before his death that he noticed the doctor was disappointed in being unable to rally him. He commented cheerfully on the changing symptoms that portended death and indicated plainly that he knew he was dying and there was no chance to save him. His resolute will was manifest up to the very end. The close was quick and there was no interval of unconsciousness.

 

HOLL, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 8, 1918
Mrs. Mary Holl died at her home, 629 East Fourth street, Monday morning at 12:30 o'clock, following a stroke of paralysis. On Friday Mrs. Holl suffered a slight stroke and on Saturday a more severe one, and one from which she failed to rally. Mrs. Holl was one of the best known women in the East End of town, and was greatly loved by her large number of children and grandchildren, as well as by her many friends, to whom she was always lending a helping hand. Her death will be sadly regretted by all who knew her. She is survived by one son, John Holl, and two daughters, Mrs. Allen Heskett and Mrs. Henry Freark. Mrs. Holl was born September 16, 1841, and would have been 77 years this coming fall. She was born in Germany but came to this country when a young girl. She was married to John Holl and spent her entire married life in Alton. She was the mother of seven children. Her husband and four children have preceded her to the grave. The deceased children were Joseph Holl, Mrs. William Fries, Mrs. William Lawliss [Lawless?] and Mrs. William Parker. Besides her three children, Mrs. Holl is survived by twelve grandchildren and five great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at the home, 629 East Fifth street, on Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

 

HOLLARD, EDWARD E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1915
Edward E. Hollard, in his 74th year, died at 11:30 o'clock Tuesday night at his home, 269 Madison avenue, after a brief illness from heart trouble. Though he had been feeling slightly unwell for several weeks, he was not really taken down until two days before his death when a combination of stomach and heart trouble affected him. Mr. Hollard was an old resident of Madison County, having come here from Switzerland when he was a boy of fourteen years. He settled at Highland and lived there until 1866, when he moved to a farm on the Grafton road, where he lived for forty-two years. He then retired from the farm and moved to Alton. Mr. Hollard was a member of the Congregational church since he was 14 years of age. He was honored and respected by all who knew him. He was for many years a very successful farmer in the Grafton road neighborhood, and he did a good business supplying Alton people with fruit and vegetables. He leaves a widow, Mrs. Ida Hollard, eight children, Mrs. J. W. Challacombe; Mrs. O. R. Gray; Misses Cecella, Ida, Anna and Sophie and Messrs. Victor and Alfred Hollard; besides two grandchildren and one brother, Mr. Eugene Hollard of Highland. Mr. Hollard would have been 74 years old on the 28th of next April. The funeral will be held from the family home on Madison avenue, Friday, at 2 p.m., to the city cemetery. The body will lay in state at the family home on Friday morning from 9 to 11 o'clock.

 

HOLLIDAY, ADDIE SEGRAVES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 12, 1914
Mrs. Addie Segraves Holliday, wife of Caleb Holliday, died at her home near Melville this morning, aged 55. She had been suffering from grippe and rheumatism for __ days, and her death was unexpected. She leaves beside her husband, three sons, Frank, Walter, and Harry Holliday, all residing in Alton. The funeral will be held tomorrow at 2 o'clock from the family home to the Melville Cemetery.

 

HOLLISTER, REV. EDWARD/Source: Alton Telegraph, January 6, 1871 (review of 1870)
January 11, 1870, Rev. Edward Hollister, an eminent divine and an early pioneer of Illinois, died, aged 74 years.

 

HOLMAN, SUSIE OTEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 24, 1904
Mrs. Susie Otey Holman, aged 24, died Tuesday morning at the home of her sister, Mrs. Hugh Collins, on Market street. Death was due to consumption brought on by an attack of pneumonia. The funeral will be held Thursday at 10:30 a.m.

 

HOLMES, J. H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 20, 1914
J. H. Holmes, a well known resident of Main street, passed away Saturday evening at 5:30 o'clock at the family home after an illness of two weeks with typhoid fever. Mr. Holmes' illness was not considered serious at first, and he was able to be about the house each day up to two weeks ago, when typhoid fever developed and he took to his bed. His condition was known to be serious from that time on until death came and relieved his sufferings. Mr. Holmes was born in Macoupin county on January 22, 1849, and had been a resident of that county all his life up to seven years ago, when the family came to Upper Alton to live. He leaves besides his widow two children, Otis Holmes and Mrs. Mable Day; and one grandchild, Kieth Day, all of Upper Alton. Mr. Holmes was a hard worker, a good neighbor, and he was entirely devoted to his family. The body will be taken to Rockbridge, his old home, tomorrow morning for burial. A brief service will be held at the Holmes residence tomorrow morning at 8 o'clock before the funeral party starts for Rockbridge.

 

HOLMES, JAMES W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 9, 1919
Mystery Attends Death of James Holmes - Was Struck on Head
Mystery surrounds the death of James W. Holmes, 18 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Eli Holmes, 548 East Broadway. The boy died last night at 10:20 o'clock, possibly from the effects of a blow upon the head, received about two months ago. The father of the boy this morning told a reporter for the Telegraph that he did not know where or by whom the boy was struck. The boy, Holmes declared, told the attending physician of being struck on the head. Dr. Louis Enos, who attended the boy, declared he died of meningitis. He had heard at the home of the boy, Dr. Pence said, that the boy was struck on the head by someone at Washington Garden, in the East End of the city, about two months ago. Dr. Enos said he could not state if the boy died as the result of the blow. It is possible, however, the doctor said, for meningitis to be caused by infection, which might result from a blow on the head. Deputy Coroner William H. Bauer, who will conduct an inquest this morning, declared he had information that the boy was struck at Washington Garden by a foreman of the Laclede Steel plant, where he was employed. Information given Deputy Coroner Bauer was that the boy was struck in the mouth for using profane language before the other man's wife. Dr. Enos, when questioned by a reporter, said it would be very unusual for meningitis to be caused by a blow on the mouth. The boy was one of six children. He leaves his parents and three sisters and two brothers. He will be buried tomorrow afternoon at 3 p.m. Services will be conducted at the home and interment will be in the City cemetery.

 

HOLOCHER, CONRAD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1901
Conrad Holocher, an old German-American resident of Alton, died this morning at 1:30 o'clock at the family home, 1014 East Sixth street. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and services will be conducted by Rev. Eugene Weiffenbach of the German Methodist church. The funeral will be under the auspices of the German Benevolent Society. Mr. Holocher had lived in Alton many years and was one of the best known residents of the East End. He was 65 years old.

 

HOLT, RAY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1910
Drowns Near Skinny Island
Standing upon the end of a sand bar near the head of Skinney Island below the city [Alton], Levi Bryson was forced to see his son, Elmer, aged twenty years, and a friend, Ray Holt, meet their death in the water, himself powerless to help them, at 10 o'clock Saturday morning. Elmer had been away from the city for the past three months visiting, and returned Thursday with Ray Holt, a lad of eighteen years, who resides in Pana, Ill. They were staying at the Bryson home, 1017 east Third street. Bryson had been telling his friend all about the river, and this morning the father, with his son and Holt, and a lad by the name of William Glassmeyer, decided to take a walk to the river and have a good look at it. They chose the long sand bars below the city for their walk, and were there early this morning. Sauntering along the edge of the water for some time, it was suggested that they go swimming. Bryson and Holt threw off their clothes and were soon in the water. The water where they first went in was very shallow, and as neither of the lads was an expert swimmer, they spent their time mostly in wading. They left the bank quite a distance and wandered a little downstream. When starting for the shore at a point below where they went in, Holt came to a deep hole and was in it before he knew it. The current was strong and he could not hold himself. He shouted for help, and Bryson, evidently not knowing the depth of the water, started to his aid. As Bryson was nearing Holt, he also got in the deep water and soon was floundering as was Holt. Bryson then shouted for aid and the father on the bank, seeing then that the boys were in danger, started for the water, but was unable to reach them at all. He was almost drowned himself in trying to get back to the shore. Glassmeyer ran for a boat which was tied to the bar, but stated that it was chained to a stout post and he could not loosen it. He states that if he could have gotten the boat when he went for it, he could have saved one of the lads at least, and perhaps the two of them. Harry Bilderbeck, who was fishing on the end of a dike just a short distance from the end of the bar, ran to his boat and was soon on the scene. Mr. Bryson was by this time upon the bank almost frantic. Ed Poor, a fisherman, who was running a trot line in that vicinity, with his boat and his fish hooks and the assistance of Bilderbeck, began dragging for the body. The body of Bryson was found in a short time and was pulled to the bank and tied there to await the coming of the coroner, who had been sent for. At one o'clock the body of Holt had not been found. The hole where the two were drowned is only a short distance away, and upon the same bar where Michael Riley and the six little Upper Alton girls were drowned several years ago. Mr. Bryson might have saved his own son, but he misunderstood the cries of help from his son to be calls for help for the other boy. Mr. Bryson thinks his son took a cramp and that this caused the drowning of the Bryson boy, who was a good swimmer. The father says he is a good swimmer himself, but he waited too long laboring under the mistake before he went to help his son. Young Bryson had been working at Assumption, Ill., and returned home only Friday. Bryson leaves his parents and a brother, Harley Bryson of Moweaqua. It was Harley's 24th birthday today. Holt leaves an invalid mother, two sisters at Pana, and two brothers in North Dakota.

 

HOLTON, HARRIET E./Source: Alton Telegraph, April 1, 1864
Died in Alton on the 27th inst., Mrs. Harriet E. Holton, wife of Mr. W. A. Holton, in the 40th year of her age, of disease of the brain. Mrs. Holton has left behind her many precious memories. To those who knew her, all praise would seem superfluous. But so shrinking was her modesty, and so strong her preference for the quiet pleasures and duties of the home circle, that but few, even those considering themselves familiar acquaintances, understood her worth. To say that she was a faithful wife and sister, a kind neighbor, and a devoted Christian, would be but a cold summing up of qualities which lacked no element of endearment, and scarcely a single trait of feminine worth. It is hard to yield such a treasure to Death. Deeply do we sympathize with her husband, and all her kindred. We mourn her loss also as a personal affliction, and in this feeling, we know that a large number of our citizens share.

 

HOLTSWORTH, UNKNOWN WIFE OF CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1917
Mrs. Charles Holtsworth died this afternoon at her home on West Broadway after an illness of a year's duration. Mrs. Holtsworth is survived by her husband, two brothers, one sister, and her mother, Mrs. Mary Easley. The deceased was twenty-five years of age.

 

HOMER, DANIEL/Source: Alton Telegraph, October 7, 1843
Died, very suddenly, on last Monday afternoon, Mr. Daniel Homer, a respectable citizen of this place [Alton], aged 45. The deceased was born in Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England, and emigrated to the United States in 1829. He served in the British army when a youth, in the capacity of a Ferrier, and was present at the great battle of Waterloo in 1815. Soon after his arrival in this country, he united himself with the Methodist Protestant Church, of which he remained a consistent member to the day of his death. Mr. H. was highly esteemed by his fellow citizens, and has left a deeply afflicted widow and many friends and acquaintances to mourn his loss.

 

HONEYMAN, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 30, 1917
Robert Honeyman, aged 29, a member of the fire department and attached to Hose Company No. 1, died Sunday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's hospital where he had been taken a few hours before, suffering from ureamic poisoning. He had been complaining the day before of being unwell, and he was persuaded to go home Saturday. He was not believed to be in a serious condition, but he remained at home. Sunday his case had become much worse, and it was decided to hurry him to the hospital, where he continued to grow worse and death came. Honeyman was a very efficient member of the fire department, and he had been reappointed by the new mayor. He was a young man of good habits, and he was very popular. He leaves his wife and three children, residing at 2200 Central avenue. The death of Mr. Honeyman has been a sad shock to his wife. She had no knowledge that he was in a bad condition Saturday when he went home. Retiring for the night, he was apparently much better. During the night he was restless, but when she spoke to him, got no response. In the morning when it was time for him to arise, she failed to get any answer from him and then she called a doctor, who decided that it was necessary to take him to the hospital at once. He was a member of Piasa lodge, A. F. & A. M. Mrs. Robert Honeyman is in a serious condition at her home on Central avenue as the result of the sudden death of her husband, Robert Honeyman. The fact that he became ill at noon on Saturday and died yesterday afternoon at the St. Joseph's Hospital was such a shock that she was overcome. She has been unconscious since last evening, and relatives state her condition is very grave. The funeral will be held on Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Twelfth Street Presbyterian Church. Services at Oakwood Cemetery will be conducted by members of the Masonic lodge.

 

HONSBEHN, GERTRUDE (nee SCOVELL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 11, 1904
William Honsbehn, who served a term in the county jail for abandoning and abusing his wife, who was Gertrude Scovell, today asked Chief of Police Maxwell to go with him to the home of his father-in-law to get permission for him to see his wife before she was buried. Hosbehn told a Telegraph reported that he went to the home of his father-in-law, William Scovell, to see his dead wife, but was denied entrance and ordered off the place. He was determined to see the woman before her burial this afternoon, and he appealed to the police for assistance. Chief Maxwell refused curtly to interfere, telling Honsbehn that when Mrs. Honsbehn was alive he never treated her well, deserted her and caused her great grief, and that now she was beyond the pale of further suffering it might be well for the husband to suffer some mental pangs. Honsbehn says that since he got out of jail he had been with her only five days in St. Louis. He has been living with his mother at Federal.

 

HOOD, HIRAM/Source: Collinsville Herald, December 8, 1916
Hiram Hood, a well known and popular miner, was killed in Seventeen mine Saturday morning by a fall of slate. Hiram, who is a machine runner in the mine, was temporarily doing company work, preparing to make safe a room which had been marked dangerous. He told his working partner to stand aside while clearing a place for a prop footing when the fatal fall came. Hood was a prominent member of the Moose Lodge, being one of its past Dietafors, and was president of Miners Local No. 264. He was aged 40 years, 2 months, 22 days and survived by his wife and 5 children. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from his residence, 913 Prospect Street, with interment in Glenwood Cemetery. The local lodge of Moose had charge of the services, with his miners' local also attending in a body.

 

HOOD, JANE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 31, 1917
Mrs. Jane Hood died at her home at 420 East Fourth street at 3:30 o'clock this afternoon. She had been ill only a few days. Mrs. Hood came to Alton from Scotland when she was a young girl, and has resided here ever since. She was 95 years of age, and has enjoyed fairly good health up to within a few days of her death. She was a sister to J. A. Ryrie, B. D. Ryrie, and Mrs. James Forbes, former prominent residents of Alton, now deceased. Funeral arrangements have not been made. [Later, on April 4: Burial was in City Cemetery.]

 

HOOD, JANE RYRIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 2, 1917
The death of Mrs. Jane Ryrie Hood received a brief notice in Saturday evening's issue of the Telegraph because the death occurred just before press time. Mrs. Hood, known to many of the older residents and to a host of the young residents whom she loved in her home, lived a beautiful Christian life, and those whom she came in contact with in her life in Alton are the better for the gentleness of character and purity of mind she radiated. Mrs. Jane Ryrie Hood was born in Wick, Scotland, July 16th, 1823, and died on Saturday, March 31st. In 1837 she came with her father's family to Alton. Ten years later in Alton she married Richard Hood, and moved to St. Louis. When death came to the young husband, Mrs. Hood came to Alton and among a circle of devoted relatives spent a long and useful life. No children had blessed her married life, but to a large circle of nieces and nephews, "Aunt Hood's" house was the gathering place. Her death leaves a great vacancy, but she's "over there," and we who are waiting here will have a joyful reunion in that day when "the dead in Christ shall rise first. Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air, and so shall we ever be with the Lord." Due notice of the funeral will be given.

 

HOOSER, CATHARINE/Source: Alton Telegraph, March 24, 1848
Died at Lamb's Point, on the 28th of January last, Mrs. Catharine Hooser, consort of Mr. J. Hooser, in the 30th year of her age.

 

HOOVER, CLARENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 14, 1912
Clarence Hoover, aged 24, died last night at the home of his father, John Hoover, at 1040 Union street. He leaves four sisters, Mrs. William Herron, Mrs. Frank Smith, Mrs. Charles Close, and Miss Jennie Hoover. The funeral will be held from the home Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

HOOVER, JESSE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1902
The funeral of Jesse Hoover took place this afternoon from the home on East Fifth street to the City cemetery, where interment was made. Services were conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing, pastor of the Baptist church.

 

HOPE, ALEXANDER W. (JUDGE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 7, 1922
Judge and Former Alton Mayor Dies Suddenly
Alexander W. Hope, aged 74, for twelve years judge of the City Court of Alton, and three years mayor of Alton, died suddenly at his home in St. Louis, 5371 Waterman avenue. With him at the time of his death was his wife. His end was totally unexpected. He had been suffering from diabetes for several years. Of late, he had been complaining of symptoms of a heavy cold. Saturday night after his daughter and two grandsons had left the house to go to a picture show, Judge and Mrs. Hope took a walk around the block where they lived, and returning to their home about 9, Judge Hope seated himself on the edge of his bed and in a few minutes he was dead. Besides his wife, Judge Hope leaves one daughter, Mrs. Ralph Root, and two grandsons, Hope and Ralph Root Jr. Twelve years ago he left Alton to stay in St. Louis, but he always maintained his voting residence in this city, and he would come back here to cast his vote. He was born in Alton and spent the greater part of his influence for a long time in local politics. He was the youngest mayor Alton ever had, being elected mayor of the city in 1875, and was mayor at the time when the law was changed and mayors began to serve for two years instead of one. He had a passion for politics and he made his influence felt not only in the city of Alton, but also in the county of Madison and in the congressional district. After serving twelve years as judge of the City Court of Alton, he was defeated in 1905 in a hot campaign which has never been exceeded for the exciting interest it aroused. He retained his hold on the Democratic party organization in Alton as long as he desired to keep it. During his period of political control in Alton, he had a powerful influence in the making and unmaking of mayors and other public officials. He held his control of politics by commanding personality, his skill in argument, and his intelligence in seeing a paramount issue in a campaign, which he would seize and convert to the advantage of his side. He was the recognized leader of a strong faction in the Democratic party in Madison county, the opposition to the faction led by the then circuit Judge Burroughs. The life of Judge Hope, which began in the city of Alton, was so closely identified with the city for many years he was the uncrowned king of his home place. Those who recall his career in the early days say that when he was mayor of Alton, he showed ability to bring about the accomplishment of his will, even when he was very young. An incident of that line is recalled when at the end of his term as Alton's youngest mayor, he was not a candidate for re-election, the change was made from the old law to the new law doubling the length of the term. Mayor Hope refused to relinquish the office of mayor to the successful candidate, the father of Postmaster Fries, claiming that under the law he must hold over as mayor. The case went to the Supreme Court where the decision was against Mayor Hope's contention, but, in the meantime, both candidates for office had resigned claim to the office and an election was held at which Lucas Pfeiffenberger, Hope's predecessor as mayor, was chosen. He was a strong supporter of Judge Hope at that time, and continued so until 1905, when the two parted political company. Former Mayor Henry Brueggemann and Judge Hope were at one time strongly allied in local politics, the one dominating Republican and the other the Democratic parties. The partnership was interrupted by a quarrel during the next to the last term of Brueggemann in the office of mayor, and the two friends became political foes and continued so to the end. Both were good haters. The period when the two men were battling against each other for political supremacy in Alton could be best likened to a state of civil war. The city was divided into hostile camps, and there was small chance of an adherent of one getting any favors from an adherent of the other. The factional struggle finally told on Judge Hope's political power and weakened him so that in 1905 Judge Dunnegan, his old political foe, defeated Judge Hope for re-election. That was after Henry Brueggemann had come back for a 2 year term as mayor following the administration of Anthony W. Young, of four years. Judge Hope had worked hard for the election of Mr. Young and with him had defeated Brueggemann the first time. The story of the war between Judge Burroughs and Judge Hope for the control of the Democratic organization would be a long one and an interesting one. It ended by a coup being worked by Judge Burroughs unseating the Hope faction from control in the county, and preventing Judge Hope realizing his life's ambition for a seat on the Supreme Bench of the state, a seat he would doubtless have adorned. It also prevented Judge Burroughs realizing his ambitions too. It was in a convention at Temple theatre that the final blow was struck at Judge Hope's control of the county organization, and it was wrested from him. Judge Hope was born in Alton, the son of Dr. Hope. He inherited from his father a dominating personality which had made the father conspicuous in the public life of Alton since the early days of the city. When on the semi centennial of the Lincoln-Douglas debate in Alton in 1908, Judge Hope participated in the speech making, it was recalled that fifty years before his father had participated in the original debate to the extent of interrupting Judge Douglas, disagreeing with him. The interruption by Dr. Hope was mentioned in the current issue of the Telegraph reporting the debate. After being educated in the Alton schools, Judge Hope received a law education in the University of Virginia. He practiced law in Alton, but gave most of his time to politics. He served for many years as legal counsel for the Merchants Terminal Association at St. Louis, and had charge of the matters relating to taxation of the bridge. During his career as city judge, he was engaged in constant disagreement with opposing factions over the methods of appointing grand juries. At least three prominent persons were called into his court and fined for contempt for interfering with the will of Judge Hope, then city judge, and litigation was carried to the Supreme court in questions relating to matters which were at issue in the management of the court. Judge Hope was known as a man who was true blue to his friends. He undoubtedly had the largest personal following of any man in the city. He could command the services of more men of high standing in a political campaign than anyone else. He had the faculty of enlisting under his banner young men who seemed to worship the very ground on which he trod. He made the young men feel that he was personally interested in them, and through their acquaintance with other young men he prolonged a political career much longer than would be usual, or possible otherwise. No friend could go to Judge Hope for a favor without receiving it, if within his power to grant it. That was one of the strong points of Judge Hope. His friends trusted him to be loyal to them, and he did not disappoint them. Judge Hope had a brain that was a powerful one, and had he devoted all his time to law and less to politics, he doubtless would have adorned a much higher position in civil life than he did. He was an eloquent speech maker, and capable of fiery, impassioned oratory. His ridicule was keen cutting, his invective was biting. His friends say that Judge Hope cold say a sharp thing so that it would do the utmost damage. He would carefully weigh his words in his political speeches to do the most possible damage on his foes. But, it would be unjust to leave the impression that that was all there was to him. He had another side that commanded attention, admiration, from those who had occasion to know it. He was generous to a fault. He would give away with a free hand to those who needed it. He could express sympathy with a sincerity that carried conviction to its object that the sympathy was deep, earnest. He never forgot a friend and seldom forgave an enemy. He was swift to resent injustice or wrong that anyone else did to a friend, and he would make his friend's cause his cause. The passing of Judge Hope marks the passing of a life that was one of the most picturesque, perhaps the most stirring of any resident of Alton. If one is to measure the quality of a man's makeup by the influence he had over his fellow men, by his power to control the actions of his fellows and command either their unswerving loyalty or their undying hatred, then Judge Hope was a great man, because he could do all these things. In his days in Alton they used to train children up to hate the leaders of the opposing political factions, and it is just as true that on the other hand children were trained up to love them Judge Hope had both his friends and his enemies. No one was more loved by the one, and hated by the other than he, but he was a creature of a time that is gone in Alton, never to return. The body will be brought to Alton for burial Tuesday afternoon. The funeral services in City Cemetery will be conducted by Rev. Edwin Duckworth of the Church of the Redeemer (Episcopal) of St. Louis, and will be held at 2 o'clock. Friends of Judge Hope and of the family are invited to be present.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 8, 1922
The remains of Judge Alexander W. Hope, twice mayor and three times judge of the city court in Alton, were laid to rest this afternoon at 2 o'clock in the City Cemetery. The funeral cortege drove from St. Louis to Alton, after funeral services had been held in St. Louis, conducted by Rev. Fred L. Butler, rector of the St. Paul's Episcopal church. The body was accompanied to Alton by a number of relatives and St. Louis friends of Judge Hope. The services at the City Cemetery, at the family burial lot, were conducted by Rev. Mr. Duckworth. There was a large attendance of old friends of Judge Hope at the funeral services in Alton. Many had assembled in City cemetery before the hour set for the services. The pallbearers were St. Louis men. There were in the cemetery many who had been staunch friends of Judge Hope during his long career in politics in Alton and in Madison county. Notable among these was Anthony W. Young, for two terms mayor of Alton, now of Vero, Fa., who was one of the sincere mourners at the funeral of his friend. Another was Joseph Long, of New Douglas, now past 80 years of age, who made the trip to Alton with the body of his dead friend. The two had been close associates in their political life. Mr. Long had never ceased his devoted friendship for Judge Hope, even after both of them gave up politics and went into retirement. Representative F. A. Garesche, of Madison, was also present at the funeral. Grouped around were dozens of men who had been privates in the ranks in Judge Hope's organization in Alton and who attended the services to express their respect for their dead one time chieftain. There were men in the mourners throng who had never in all their voting history cast a vote that was contrary to the best interests of Judge Hope. A great wealth of floral offerings covered the grave in City Cemetery where Judge Hope was laid away besides the members of his family who had gone before him.

I found this unusual story of the Hope family's pet, "Wooly" being buried in the Alton City Cemetery. I have included the story here as an interesting piece regarding the family.    ~Editor Bev Bauser:

HOPE, "WOOLY" (pet dog of Judge Hope)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 26, 1910
Wooly, the poodle dog of former Judge and Mrs. A. W. Hope, received an unusual burial Tuesday morning. The dog had the services of an undertaker, was laid in a little white casket, and a permit was secured for its burial in the Hope lot in City Cemetery. It was ascertained this morning from the cemetery authorities that when the permit was asked, it was not granted until President Tonsor was seen. He said it would be all right to bury the dog in the City Cemetery on the Hope lot, but that no record would be made on the cemetery association books. Mrs. John Lock was called upon to lay the dog out, the body of Wooly was placed in a casket just as if it was that of a baby, and accompanied by members of the family the body was taken to City Cemetery where a grave had been dug. There the body was interred and flowers were put on the grave. It was a very unusual proceeding, but the master and mistress of the dog felt that it was due to their little pet that its body be shown the respect that would be shown to a child. In speaking of it today, Mrs. Hope said that the dog was twelve years old and died from pneumonia. He had traveled Alton to Quebec, Ont., and from Alton to Dallas, Tex., in Pullman cars. The dog had been trained to sit at the table in a chair and wear a bib, and conducted himself like many a well trained child. He would respond to questions by barking, manifesting high grade intelligence, and would make his wants known by giving barks that could not be misunderstood. Mrs. Hope said that the dog had been one of the family so long, he was considered as one of them, and that when he died it was the desire of herself and husband that Wooly be laid away in the same lot that would ultimately receive the remains of the family members. [Note: According to the Alton Evening Telegraph, April 28, 1910, the community was outraged by the burial of the dog in the cemetery, and its body was disinterred and buried elsewhere.]

 

HOPE, JANE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 28, 1905
The funeral of Mrs. Jane Hope was held this afternoon from Union depot to City Cemetery, where services were conducted by REv. H. M. Chittenden of St. Paul's Episcopal church. The body was accompanied from St. Louis to Alton by members of Mrs. Hope's family. The death of Mrs. Hope was the first occasion of a reunion of her children in many years, all being with her at the time she died.

 

HOPE, NATHANIEL/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 4, 1846
Died in Alton on Saturday last, Nathaniel, son of Dr. T. M. Hope, aged 2 years and 9 months.

 

HOPE, THOMAS M./Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, October 15, 1885
A Historical Character
Dr. Thomas M. Hope, for 5 years a resident of this city [Alton], died at 6:30 o’clock this morning after a brief final illness. He had been failing in health for months, but was able to be about until last Sunday, when his left side was paralyzed and he was rendered helpless. Tuesday night the paralysis extended to all parts of his body, but he retained consciousness until the hour mentioned when he passed quietly away. During his illness he had the unremitting care and attention of his son and daughter-in-law, Hon. And Mrs. A. W. Hope.

Dr. Hope was born in Virginia in 1812, and was consequently 73 years old. He came to Illinois in 1832, soon afterwards married a daughter of Judge Pope of Kaskaskia, and came to Alton in 1835. At one time he, in company with his brother-in-law William Pope, kept a drugstore on Second Street [Broadway] near the Sidway store. He was during most of the time of his residence here a successful physician and surgeon. He was noted for his kindness and generosity, especially to his poor patients, and had a warm place in the hearts of many whom he had assisted in the hour of sickness and suffering. On the breaking out of the Mexican War, Dr. Hope was appointed Surgeon of the Second Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, and proceeding to the field of operations in that capacity. Previous to the battle of Buena Vista, Dr. E. B. Price received the appointment from President Polk to the position held by Dr. Hope, and consequently ranked that gentleman. This led to hostile complications. Dr. Price challenged Dr. Hope, and the latter, who was a “typical Virginia gentleman of the old school,” promptly accepted. They met on the field of honor, exchanged shots, and Dr. Price was slightly wounded, his opponent escaping unhurt. [According the Lieut. Edward F. Fletcher who served in the Second Regiment with Dr. Hope, the doctor was wounded severely in the abdomen.]

Dr. Hope used to tell of an experience he had with William R. Morrison, our present Member of Congress, while in Mexico. He found Morrison, who was but a boy at that time, sitting by the roadside near the line of march, tired out, footsore and weary, and put him on one of the baggage wagons. But a short time had elapsed when he again found his protégé sitting disconsolate by the highway, and was told that a consequential sub-Lieutenant of the regular army had, with drawn sword, compelled the crippled soldier-boy to dismount from the vehicle where he was comfortable riding. This unjust, tyrannical treatment enraged Dr. Hope. He had Morrison put on another wagon and stationed a soldier from Alton named McFarlane, and told him to put a bullet through the aforesaid Lieutenant should he again order the lad off the wagon. McFarlane obeyed orders strictly, and when the Lieutenant again made his appearance, he found it wouldn’t be safe to interfere with the arrangements made, and did not do so.

Soon after the duel with Dr. Price, the subject of the sketch returned to Alton and again engaged in the practice of medicine. He was elected Mayor of the city in 1852, being succeeded the following year by the late Hon. S. A. Buckmaster.

Dr. Hope leaves no immediate relatives here except the son already mentioned, his wife, a son and a daughter having preceded him to the silent land. General John Pope, U. S. A., is a brother-in-law of the deceased; Mrs. Beverly Allen of St. Louis, sister-in-law; and Mr. James E. Yeatman of St. Louis is a brother-in-law.

In politics, Dr. Hope was for many years a leading Democrat. In 1860 he was the candidate for Governor of Illinois on the Breckinridge ticket. When the war broke out, he took the side of his native State, and was strongly southern in his sympathies, which he was outspoken in expressing.    [Dr. Hope is buried in the Alton City Cemetery.]

 

HOPKINS, GEORGE EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 8, 1920
Former Wholesale Druggist and Native of Alton Dies
George Edward Hopkins, aged 59, died at the home of his mother, Mrs. Mary B. Hopkins, Saturday evening at 10 o'clock, after a long period of disability. His death had been expected ever since he underwent a surgical operation in a St. Louis hospital about the first of November. Mr. Hopkins had been suffering a short time from a malady which appeared to have developed quickly, and it was decided an operation would be necessary. The surgeons found, on making an exploration, that the conditions were such nothing could be done to prolong the life of Mr. Hopkins and that they would have to let the malady take its course. After he had recovered sufficiently to leave the hospital, he came to Alton and took up his home with his mother, Mrs. Mary B. Hopkins, 1316 Henry street. He was able to be around the streets for a short time, but for most of the time since he came to Alton he has been confined to the house, and most of that time to his bed. Mr. Hopkins was born in Alton in 1862. He was educated here and lived here most of his life. He engaged in the wholesale drug business conducted by his father, George K. Hopkins, and remained with that firm after their removal to St. Louis. On the sale of this drug company to the Meyer Bros., Mr. Hopkins went over to the Meyer Bros. and remained there until that firm encountered financial difficulties. Then he took up the work of being a selling agent for various houses and continued in that capacity until he was disabled by illness. Three years ago he moved to St. Louis to make his home. He was married in 1887 to Anne Eaton of Springfield, Mo. He leaves beside his wife, one son, Kendall E. Hopkins, also his mother, Mrs. Mary B. Hopkins, and his sister, Mrs. George M. Ryrie. Mr. Hopkins was, up to the time of his removal to St. Louis, one of the oldest commuters going daily from Alton to St. Louis. He had ridden on the c. & A. and Big Four trains to and from St. Louis daily, and it was after the steam train was taken off that Mr. Hopkins decided to take up his residence in St. Louis. Mr. Hopkins was interested in outdoor sports and was an interested member in the Country Club at Alton, as long as he lived here. The funeral of Mr. Hopkins was held this afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home of his mother, and services were conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing, pastor of the First Baptist Church. The funeral was private. Burial was in Oakwood Cemetery.

 

HOPKINS, GEORGE K./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 24, 1901
Well Known Druggist Dies
George K. Hopkins died Sunday morning at his home, 1225 Liberty street, after a long illness. Since Saturday afternoon his condition was hopeless. An illness that has been threatening him two years began to develop five weeks ago, and one week before his death compelled him to take to his bed. The end came at six o'clock Sunday morning, and he peacefully passed into the LIght on the Other Side in preparation for which he had spent his whole life. Mr. Hopkins was one of the best known of Alton's older residents. He was most prominent in the work of the Baptist church and Sunday school work, and had been a trustee and deacon of the First Baptist church and trustee of Shurtleff college. For fifty years he had been in the drug business in Alton and St. Louis, and at the time of his death he was vice president of Katharmon Chemical Company of St. Louis. He was born in 1834 and came west from Boston when he was five years of age, settling in St. Louis, then a frontier town. At the age of 13 he started in the drug business, and when he came to Alton at the age of 21 he started in business with the Quigley Brothers, afterwards becoming a member of the firm known as Quigley, Hopkins & Company. In 1879 he went back to St. Louis, and there established the George K. Hopkins Drug Company, which continued under the name Hopkins-Weller Drug Company until two years ago when it was sold out. Since that time Mr. Hopkins has been engaged as vice-president of the Katharmon Chemical Company of St. Louis, which manufactures some well known specialties. In September 1860 he was baptized in the First Baptist church by Rev. Dr. M. Jameson, being the first addition to the church under Dr. Jameson's pastorate. Since then, Mr. Hopkins was one of the most interested of all the members and workers of the church and during most of the time he had charge of a class in the Sunday School. He was married on New Year's day, 1861, to Mary Belle Edwards, who survives her husband. Three children are left by Mr. Hopkins: George E. Hopkins, Mrs. George M. Ryrie, and Miss Mary Hopkins, all of Alton. He leaves two brothers, John Hopkins of Denver and Edward M. Hopkins of Shelbyville, and one sister, Miss Fanny Hopkins. The funeral will take place Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock, and services will be conducted at the home, 1225 Liberty street, by Rev. M. W. Twing. The interment will be in Upper Alton.

 

HOPKINS, MARY NEWBALL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 13, 1901
Miss Mary Newball Hopkins, daughter of Mrs. Mary B. Hopkins and of the late George K. Hopkins, died Monday evening at 10:15 o'clock after an illness of seventeen months. She was 36 years of age and was born in Alton where she lived all her life. The funeral will take place Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from the family home on Liberty street. Miss Hopkins was one of the most generally liked young women among her many acquaintances of any in the city. She was a devoted member of the First Baptist church, and during almost her entire life she was actively engaged in the work of her church. For many years, and until her health gave way, she was a teacher in the primary class of the Sunday school, and there the good work that she did among the children bore abundant fruit in the more advanced departments of the church work. By the children she was the guide that kept them in the path to better things, and by her example she inspired them with higher ambitions. By the parents of the children she taught she was especially beloved, and by the children she was held in the tenderest affection. In other departments of church work she was always interested until her health broke down. When she suffered the paralytic stroke, there were many solicitous friends who kept posted daily as to her condition, and when she began to improve later there were many who watched the progress of her convalescence with loving concern. After the death of her father, she again went into a decline and for two weeks her condition has been such as to cause her family to fear that the end was approaching. Death came to her Monday evening, and she sank into the deep sleep from which she will wake in a painless land, in the full confidence that she would meet her beloved father who had gone before her.

 

HOPKINS, WILLIE WIRT/Source: Alton Telegraph, July 22, 1864
Died at Woo____, this morning, Willie Wirt, son of G. K. and M. E. Hopkins, aged thirteen months and 6 days. The funeral will take place tomorrow, Tuesday afternoon, at 4 o’clock from the family residence on State Street.

 

HOPPE, FRED W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 9, 1921
Fred W. Hoppe, aged 65, died late this afternoon after a long illness which began with a throat trouble. He was operated upon for relief of the malady, but after his return from the hospital he began to grow worse and the past few days his condition was serious. Mr. Hoppe was former township collector of Madison county, for many years conducted a grocery store in Alton, and of late years had been a salesman for the Luer Packing Co.

 

HOPPE, GUS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 7, 1902
Gus Hoppe, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Hoppe of Piasa, died Friday at midnight at the home of John W. Schmoeller, Tenth and Langdon streets. The young man was brought to Alton by his mother and sister three days ago for medical treatment. He had been ill with consumption and it was thought the change would be beneficial. He was 16 years of age. The body will be taken to Piasa this evening, and the funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from the Piasa Methodist church.

 

HOPPE, META (nee HINRICHS)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 10, 1911
Resident of Alton Since 1845 Dies
Mrs. Meta Hoppe, in her eighty-seventh year, died at her home, 209 Oak street, Thursday evening, from pneumonia after an illness of four days. She had been very ill from the start, and her great age had made her condition hopeless. Mrs. Hoppe was the widow of W. C. Hoppe, who died many years ago in Alton. She was born in Aurich, Germany, and came to America in 1844, arriving in St. Louis, where she was married in 1845, and came to Alton as a bride. All the remainder of her life she spent in Alton. She raised a family of children here, of whom two sons survive, W. F. Hoppe and Anton Hoppe, both of Alton. She leaves also a younger brother, Richard Hinrichs, who is an old man. Mrs. Hoppe was one of the best known of the old time east-end residents. She had lived many years in the neighborhood where she died, and she was known there as a thoughtful, kindly neighbor, and to her sons she was a good mother. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon. Brief services will be held at the home, first to be attended by members of the family, and afterward at 2 o'clock, services will be held in the German Evangelical church at Eighth and Henry streets. Mrs. Hoppe was one of the charter members of the German Evangelical church, which was organized in 1852. She had maintained her membership in the church all the years since the beginning, and was a devoted member. Her death is the fifth member of the church to pass away in the past three weeks.

 

HOPPE, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1906
Mrs. Minnie Hoppe, aged 82, widow of Frederick Hoppe, died at 1:30 o'clock Friday morning from the effects of an injury she sustained last Tuesday morning by falling from her bed while attempting to rise in the morning. She had been feeling weak, although she was previously in good health. She attempted to get up and becoming dizzy she fell to the floor to such a way that her left hip was fractured. She suffered so severely from the pain and the shock that she did not recover. Mrs. Hoppe had lived in Alton over fifty-five years. She was the mother of a well known Alton family and leaves five children, Fred Hoppe, William Hoppe, Mrs. James Thrush of Alton, Mrs. John L. Stutz of Nauvoo and Miss Mary Hoppe, Jacksonville. Mrs. Hoppe was born in Berlin, Germany, and would have been 83 years old in December. She came to Alton June 1, 1851, and had lived in the city ever since. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

HOPPE, RACHEL (nee FOREST)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 25, 1918
The death of Mrs. Rachel Hoppe, wife of John Hoppe, occurred Monday night at 7 o'clock at the family home, 635 East Fifth street. Mrs. Hoppe had been ill for some time and her death was not unexpected. Mrs. Hoppe leaves two sons by a former marriage, Harry and Frank Miller. The boys are in the service of their country, Harry being stationed at South Carolina and Frank in the Philippines. Frank Miller has been in the service for four years, and on account of his location it will be impossible for him to return for the funeral. The funeral arrangements will not be made, however, until word is received from Harry in South Carolina. Mrs. Hoppe was born and raised in Alton where she has a host of friends who will regret to learn of her death. She would have been 47 years of age had she lived until the 31st of August. She was married twice, her first husband being Joseph Miller. Her maiden name was Rachel Forest, and besides her husband and sons, she is survived by one brother, John Forest. About a year ago Mr. and Mrs. Hoppe went to Vancouver, Wash. to reside on a ranch, but the altitude was too high and the wife became ill. She continued worse and was brought to Alton about three and one-half months ago. The trip to Illinois accomplished little good, and death came Monday, after a long struggle. The funeral will be held from the home of Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Roberts at 626 East Fifth street, the time to be set as soon as word is received from Harry Miller. Rev. S. D. McKenny of the Cherry Street Baptist Church will conduct the services.

 

HOPPE, WILLIAM F. "BILLY"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1930 (copyrighted)
Owner Hoppe's China and Toy Store Dies
Hoppe was energetic, progressive, public spirited, and determined to "dare and do," which placed him in the foremost ranks of successful business men in Alton. He conceived the idea of opening a store in which volume sales with smaller profits would be the rule. It was a success from the start. He carried a good line of china and glassware. It was his connection with Christmas time that made "Billy" Hoppe famous. He put in a big stock of toys, and his store for weeks before Christmas would be jammed with boys and girls. His brother, Anton Hoppe, played Santa Claus during the Christmas season, and in the summer served as a toy doctor.  Hoppe was a member of the Alton Commercial Club and the Retail Merchants Association.

William F. Hoppe died on July 1, 1930 in Alton. He was 74 years old. A native of Alton, he had been in business for 32 years in the city. His china and toy store was on West Third Street in Alton, and he later moved the toy store to Belle street. He retired from business in 1919. His wife died before 1930. He left behind a son, Louis; a daughter, Mrs. Stella Behrens of Gillespie; and a brother, A. L. Hoppe, who lived in Upper Alton. He was buried in the Alton City Cemetery.

 

HORAT, CLEMENS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1907
Well Known Painter Commits Suicide at Home
Clemens Horat, aged 49, one of the best known painters and paper hangers in Alton, committed suicide Friday morning at his residence, Tenth and Alton streets, by drinking carbolic acid. Insanity was the cause of his act. Horat had been suffering from nervous troubles a long time. He had been unable to do much work, and for many months had acted very peculiarly. He had been talking in a gloomy, despondent way and was in a morbid state of mind. He went to Hot Springs recently for the benefit of his health, and when he came back was much improved physically, but his mental condition was no better. He had kidney troubles which might have caused the nervousness, and this was aggravated by the fact that financial reverses came. He had invested in a big supply of wallpaper, which he was trying to dispose of, and the market being bad he was holding it with very little demand for it. This worried him so that he was unable to do much work. He had been incapacitated for work most of the time for six months. Last week his mother, Mrs. Regina Horat, and sister, Mrs. Gaul, left for a steamer trip to St. Paul and he was at the wharf to see them off. He was almost decided to go but finally concluded to stay at home. This morning he arose at his usual time and went to the barn to feed the chickens. While there, he must have made up his mind to kill himself. He returned to the house and went upstairs to his room. Mrs. Horat says that he frequently went back to bed since he became ill and she thought nothing of that. She went upstairs shortly after 7 o'clock and found him lying on the bed with his face down. He was almost cold at the time. Dr. G. E. Wilkinson was summoned and he found that death was due to carbolic acid poisoning. He leaves his wife and four children. Deputy Coroner Keiser will hold an inquest tonight. The time of the funeral will not be fixed until his mother is heard from. The funeral of Clemens Horat will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, Rev. A. A. Tanner officiating.

 

HORAT, REGINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 13, 1914
Mrs. Regina Horat, aged 82, a long time resident of Alton, died Friday night at 11 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William Gaul, 926 east Sixth street. Mrs. Horat was a well known resident of Alton, her husband, who died many years ago having been a prominent man, and her sons and daughters are well known. The children who survive her are Mrs. Mary Kunsch of Minneapolis, Minn.; Albert Horat of Chicago; Joseph Horat of Los Angeles, Cal.; Mrs. John Rost and Mrs. William Gaul of Alton. Mrs. Horat was a member of the German Evangelical church and the funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from her home, Rev. E. L. Mueller officiating. Mrs. Horat had been sick for some time, and some of her children had been attending her. Her death was expected during the past week.

 

HORD, ELMER A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 10, 1922
Elmer A. Hord, 49, died this morning at 3:30 o'clock at the family home at 1807 Washington avenue, following an illness of twelve days, with pneumonia. Two weeks ago an abscess formed on his nose, erysipelas and pneumonia later developed. Eight years ago Mr. Hord moved his family here from Granite City and since then had resided on Washington avenue. For the past eighteen years he has been employed as conductor on the limited street car for the Alton, Granite City and St. Louis Traction Co. For several years the deceased served as assistant claim agent for the street car company. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Emma Hord, one son, Edmond, a student at Washington University, a twin brother, Amber Hord of Vincennes, Ind., five sisters, Mrs. B. F. Corwin of East St. Louis, Mrs. Belle Oliver, Mrs. H. C. Bradbury and Mrs. George Bradbury of St. Louis and Mrs. Carl Jones of Kimmswick, Mo. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon. Mr. Hord was regarded as one of the very reliable men in the employ of the Alton, Granite and St. Louis Traction Co. He was well liked by the patrons of the line, and was always accommodating and courteous. His illness has been the cause of much interest among those who knew him and his death is generally regretted.

 

HORIS, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 21, 1907
Mrs. Anna Horis, a blind woman, aged 70, who was taken from the Woman's Home to St. Joseph's hospital ten days ago to undergo a surgical operation, died Monday afternoon from the effects of tearing off the bandages which had been put on her. The woman could not speak a word of English. She was a native of Switzerland, and spoke German. When being taken to the hospital she told Mrs. S. Demuth, who was caring for her on the way, that she would never leave the place alive. She did not desire to live. She had been blind for many years, and all her family had died before her. What few relatives she had were distant ones and could do nothing for her. She was given every attention at the hospital, as she had been given at the Woman's Home, and her lot was made as happy as possible, but she wanted to die. Time after time she would tear off the bandages which the nurses and surgeons would put on her, and the only way to prevent her doing so would have been to strap her, and this, on account of her age and weakness, the nurses did not wish to do. She had a sickness that made it very unpleasant for her to live and might have made her a care for many years, even if she ever did get well. The funeral was held yesterday afternoon from the Woman's Home at 5 o'clock and services were conducted by Rev. F. S. Eitelgeorge of the German Methodist church.

 

HORN, J. CHRISTIAN 'CHRIS'/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1917
Alton Tailor Dies After Finishing Work
J. christian Horn, in his sixty-second year, died suddenly at his home, 407 Langdon street, Tuesday evening from apoplexy. He had finished his day's work at the store in which he was a partner, and he had gone home for supper. Greeting his family as he entered the house with a cheerful "Good evening," he took a drink of water and immediately fell over dead. Doctors who were summoned attributed his death to apoplexy. He had suffered a slight stroke about five years ago, which had produced a partial paralysis at the time and he had been gradually rallying from the effects of it. Mr. Horn was born in Beyreuth, the home of the Wagnerian opera, in Germany, February 28, nearly sixty-two years ago. He came to the United States in 1874, and after staying two years in St. Louis came to Alton. In the spring of 1882 he opened a tailor shop in Alton and that Fall his brother, William, joined him and they had ever since conducted a tailoring business as partners. Five years ago Mr. Horn began to decline in health, with a slight stroke of paralysis, but was able to be around and carried on business as before, after his partial recovery. He was one of the leading spirits of the Maennerchor, was one of its best singers, and in that musical organization he will be greatly missed. He was also an interested member of the Turnverein. Mr. Horn leaves his wife and three children, F. W. Horn and Misses Florence and Emma Horn, all of Alton. He leaves also four brothers, John of Jerseyville, William of Alton, George of Los Angeles, Philip of East St. Louis, and two sisters, Mrs. John Hartmann of Alton and Mrs. Margaret Kessler of Fieldon. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the German Evangelical Church. The cortege will leave the house at 2 o'clock for the church. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

HORN, KATE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 15, 1919
Over exertion on the part of Miss Kate Horn in carrying a suitcase that was heavy, probably caused her death and made a tragic outcome for what was expected to be a pleasant visit of Miss Horn at the home of her only brother, Casper Horn, the Union street grocer. Without a trace of impending collapse, the sister walked into her brothers store, was greeted cheerily by her sister-in-law, and an instant later was lying dead on the store floor. Miss Horn, after coming to Alton from DuQuoin, Ill., and exchanging a greeting with Mrs. Casper Horn, her brother's wife, jokingly remarked about a heavy suitcase she carried as she entered the Horn grocery store at Ridge and Union streets. Then she dropped to the floor, and was dead when a physician reached her. She was 43 years old. Miss Horn was expected at the Horn home here about noon, and Horn and his wife were surprised when she entered the store about nine o'clock this morning. She and Mrs. Horn caressed and kissed, and exchanged verbal greetings. Mrs. Horn remarked about the heavy suitcase the DuQuoin woman carried, and said, "I ought to give you a whipping for carrying that heavy suitcase," to which Miss Horn gaily replied: "Well, you'd better give it to me now." Mrs. Horn turned to call her husband, and when she again turned to her sister-in-law, Miss Horn was lying on the floor. A physician was called and pronounced her dead from heart trouble. The office of Deputy Coroner William H. Bauer was notified and an inquest was held this afternoon. Miss Horn lived alone at DuQuoin, and visited her brother in Alton frequently. She had not complained of ill health, though occasionally felt bad. Mrs. Casper Horn this morning stated that to her knowledge her sister-in-law was never afflicted with heart trouble before. Miss Horn leaves her brother, Casper Horn of Alton, and a sister, Mrs. Anna Schwinn, of DuQuoin. No arrangements have been made for the funeral as to time. Burial will be at DuQuoin. The verdict of the Coroner's jury at the inquest this afternoon was that death was due to apoplexy.

 

HORN, LOUISE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 3, 1922
Mrs. Louise Horn, widow of John Chris Horn, died at her home, 407 Langdon street, at 9:15 a.m. today, following an illness of three weeks with a stomach ailment. Mrs. Horn was born on August 28, 1856, in Lippedetmolt, Germany, and was in her sixty-fifth year. She came to this country at the age of 12, with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Simon Funke. The family came to Alton, and Mrs. Horn resided here for the remainder of her life. She was married to J. C. Horn in 1880. She is survived by three children, F. William Horn, Miss Florence G., and Miss Emma F. Horn. She leaves also a sister, Mrs. William Horn. Mrs. Horn was a devoted mother and lovable friend. She was a member of the Evangelical Church since childhood and belonged to the Ladies' Aid Society. She was prominent in the activities of the church and gave much of her time and energy to church work. In her activities, she made many warm friends, whom she attached by her kindly disposition and willingness to be of service to others. The funeral will be at 2 p.m., Wednesday, from the home to the Evangelical Church, where services will be conducted by the Rev. O. W. Heggemeier, the pastor, at 3:30. Interment will be in the City cemetery.

 

HORN, PATRICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1906
The funeral of Patrick Horn was held this morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. There was a large attendance of relatives and old friends of Mr. Horn at the services. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery. Fr. Fennessey conducted the services.

 

HORNER, REUBEN/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 21, 1836
Died, in this town, of inflammation of the brain (arnchnitis), on Tuesday, December 13, Mr. Reuben Horner, merchant of this place and late of Washington City, in the 34th year of his age. Mr. Horner was born in Alexandria, Va., and for the last ten years was a highly respectable merchant of that place; from which, but a few weeks ago, he migrated to this place as a hardware merchant. He sustained the reputation of an honest, industrious and enterprising citizen, and was much esteemed by his numerous circle of acquaintances. Urged on by the natural bent of his perhaps too enterprising mind, with the vivid hope of realizing the Ultima Thule of his mercantile operations, he no doubt, in the warmth of his laudable ___, impaired a constitution already too weak to meet the demands of his too urgent business. But Alas! He had scarcely landed in our growing village when all the premonitory symptoms of approaching insanity manifested themselves strongly in his various desuitory actions and conversations, which finally terminated his existence. Post mortem examination was made by Drs. Lurton and Halderman, in the presence of several gentlemen, by the consent of his friends. It was discovered that the inflammation had extended its ravages in a large degree on the superfices of the brain, with unusually malignant rancor, with acro-geiatiuous exudations, and with a more or less portion of serious effusion forced into the ventricles. His distant friends and acquaintances may console themselves with the thought that every attention was paid him; and though he rests far from home and from his native place, he happily sleeps and quietly reposes in the Episcopal burying ground in the suburbs of Alton. "Mark the perfect man; and behold the upright, for the end of that men is pace."

 

HORNEYER, THERESA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1903
North Alton News - The funeral of Mrs. Theresa Horneyer took place Friday afternoon from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Samuel Parker, and interment was in the City Cemetery. The services were conducted by Rev. Theodore Oberhellman, and they were attended by a large number of relatives and friends of deceased and of the family.

 

HORTON, MINERVA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1916
The shipment of the body of Mrs. Minerva Horton from Alton to Golden Eagle [Illinois] for burial will be delayed as the result of the fact that Mrs. Horton was not attended by a physician for four months before her death. It has been impossible to secure a doctor's certificate for her death. In order that the body may be shipped, it is necessary to hold an inquest. The matter has been referred to Deputy Coroner John Berner, who will take charge of the inquest of Mrs. Horton. Mrs. Minerva Horton, aged 82, died at her home on Upper Belle street on Sunday morning after an illness of long standing. She had been troubled from heart trouble for some time, and she slipped away quietly on Sunday morning. She is survived by two sons, Thomas Swift and William Swift, and one daughter, Mrs. John McKinney. The body will be shipped to Calhoun County for burial as soon as possible. The time for the inquest has not been set.

 

HORTON, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 4, 1901
William Horton, who lived near the Milton bridge east of Alton, died on Feb. 2nd, in the 70th year of his age. His wife and four children survive him. He had resided only a short time in this vicinity.

 

HOSEY, MARY RENE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 17, 1919
The grim reaper paid a second visit early this morning at the Hayes home at 10 East Fifth street. Simon Hayes was buried from the family home Sunday afternoon, the funeral services being conducted by Rev. Theodore Cates, pastor of the Wesley M. E. Chapel, and the interment being in the City Cemetery. His daughter and her husband, Edward Hosey, came down from Grafton, to be at the services. They brought their 3 year old daughter, Mary Rene, with them. The little one was taken with an attack of peritonitis Sunday, and at 9:30 this morning passed away. The parents returned to Grafton on the afternoon train and took the body of the little one with them. Funeral services will be held tomorrow at Grafton.

 

HOSKINS, ELIAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 2, 1902
Elias Hoskins, born in the eastern part of this county, but who has lived in Upper Alton for several years, died Friday afternoon at his home, the old Cathcart residence near Rock Spring Park. Mr. Hoskins has been very ill for several weeks, and the family had gathered from various places in anticipation of the worst. He leaves a widow, Mrs. Sarah B. Hoskins, and several children, Mrs. Arkins, wife of the editor of the Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colo., Mrs. Harry Scheer and Charles Hoskins of Edwardsville, Misses Ruth, Edna and Sallie Hoskins and Alvis and Jacob Hoskins, of Wyoming. The remains will be taken to Edwardsville Sunday evening after the services at the home by Rev. M. L. Waterman, and the funeral will be held Monday morning from St. John's M. E. church.

 

HOTZ, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1903
George Hotz died at his home in Edwardsville Tuesday afternoon at __ o'clock after a short illness. Mr. Hotz was twice Sheriff of this county, elected by the Democrats in 1882 and again in 1890. He was a member of a well known family, and was quite wealthy. He was 60(?) years of age last April and was _____ of Madison county.

 

HOUCK, DAVID/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 12, 1901
The many friends of David Houck will regret to learn of his death, which took place last night at 10:30 o'clock after a week's illness of pneumonia. David Houck was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Houck, and was born in Newark, Ohio March 11, 1879, making him 21 years of age at the time of his death. He came to Alton with his parents seven years ago, and has since resided here. He had just entered his second year as a glassblower and was unmarried. Mr. Houck was a member of the Redmen, the F. A. A., and of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. He was a member and active worker in the C. P. church, a teacher in the Sunday school, and a member of the C. E. Society. The funeral will be at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon from the C. P. church.

 

HOUCK, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 27, 1915
Commits Suicide By Drinking Chloroform - In Despair Because of Amputated Leg
Miss Elizabeth Houck, aged 39, drank chloroform with fatal effect Monday morning about 9 o'clock at the home of J. J. Krehling, 512 Oak street. She died about noon after doctors had worked over her for two hours. They said at the time they were trying to save her life there was slight chance for success, as she had taken enough to cause a serious effect of her heart. Miss Houck formerly conducted a millinery store in St. Louis, and because of ill health came to make her home with her cousin, Mrs. Krehling. She had resided with the family the past eighteen months. Some time ago she had undergone an operation for the removal of a leg, and the wound would break open from time to time. She was kept in the house most of the time, it is said, because when she put any weight on her leg there would be trouble. She became despondent because of this failure of her leg to heal up, and she resolved to kill herself. She left a note in which she made explanation of her suicide. After her suicide a considerable sum of money was found in her room, and this was taken in charge by the coroner's undertaker and put in a bank to the credit of her estate.

 

HOUCK, FRED M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1903
Fred M. Houck, who resides at 631 Spring street, died last night at 11 o'clock from illness produced by cancer. Mr. Houck's wife and two children, adults, survive him. He was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, and was 59 years of age. The funeral will take place Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

 

HOUSE, JABEZ B. (REVEREND)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 12, 1917
Godfrey Minister Dies
Just as he was walking across the reading room of the Y. M. C. A. Saturday evening, on his way to attend a prohibition meeting at which Capt. Richard P. Hobson was to be the speaker, Rev. Jabez House, pastor of the Godfrey Methodist Church, was stricken with a fatal illness, and he died Sunday morning at 3 o'clock in the Y. M. C. A. building where he was kept because it was realized he did not have long to live. Rev. Mr. House was the leader of the new band the Y. M. C. A. had organized, and he had planned to lead the hand at the entertainments to be given Saturday evening. He had removed his coat and cap, and it is supposed that, feeling the sickness of the stomach that often comes with apopletic strokes, he started for the toilet room and collapsed before he got there. He remained unconscious to the end. Rev. Mr. House was a native of Holcombe, Somersetshire, England, and was 65 years, 3 months, 18 days. He was the youngest of five children and his father was a local preacher in the Methodist Church. He had also a brother who was a clergyman, and a sister who was a Deaconess. At 31 he become a Methodist preacher and served the following charges: Wanda, Donnelson, Litchfield, Piasa, Bunker Hill, Bethany, Waterloo for eight years, Coulterville, and Godfrey. He was serving the last place very efficiently at the time of his death. He was married to Miss Esther Last in London, England, September 23, 1873. One child was born to them, and it died in infancy. Mrs. Maud Leaply of Liberty, Ill. is an adopted daughter. Mr. House had not been feeling well for some days, but was much better Saturday. He left home to go to practice with the band at the Y. M. C. A., where he suffered the attack of apoplexy. Mrs. House is left alone to mourn his death. The church at Godfrey is deeply stirred at the death of their beloved and efficient pastor. The funeral service will be held in the Godfrey Methodist Church Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 p.m., and will be conducted by Rev. C. C. Hall, district superintendent of the East St. Louis district conferences of the Methodist Church. The interment will be in Godfrey Cemetery. The body will lie in state in the Godfrey Methodist Church Tuesday from 10 a.m. to noon, and tonight from 7 to 9 p.m. Owing to the size of the casket, it was impossible to take it into the home. Rev. Mr. House was a man of scholarly attainments. He was not only a preacher, but he had devoted much attention to newspaper work and was known in many newspaper offices as a man of the deepest sympathy for that profession, and also as a great admirer and a just critic of the newspapers. His death is a big loss to the community in which he lived.

 

HOUZE, REUBEN J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 16, 1910
Reuben J. Houze, in his 85th year, died Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock at his home in Turner tract in the North Side from weakness of old age. He was born in Maryland July 6, 1825. Most of his life he was a farmer, since he was old enough to do any work, and until he became too old to be active. He lived many years near East Newbern and his body will be taken to that place for burial Tuesday morning. Mr. Houze leaves only one son, all the remainder of his family having died before him.

 

HOVEY, JAMES B./Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, August 1, 1878
Upper Alton - The funeral services of Mr. James B. Hovey were attended Tuesday by Rev. Dr. Kendrick. A large company gathered at the house and accompanied the remains to the cemetery. The body was in charge of the Masons, of which order the deceased had long been an honored member. Mr. Hovey held his lodge membership in Texas, but was a member of Franklin Chapter No. ___ of this place.

 

HOWARD, ALEX/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 15, 1913
Man Shot At By David Mays In Fun, Succumbs to Paralysis
Alex Howard, a negro employed as a fireman at the Armstrong quarry, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Monday morning from a bullet wound he received while playfully joking with David Mays. According to the story told at the time of the shooting by Mays, and corroborated by Howard before his death, Howard had thrown a stone from the top of the bluff at Mays to attract his attention, and Mays, just to show his attention had been attracted, fired a revolver. The bullet, it was said, struck a stone and glancing, wounded Howard in the shoulder, a piece of bone being driven into his spine and causing paralysis. Saturday evening a surgical operation was performed to remove the bone from the spinal cord, and Howard failed to rally from the operation. It was said that before his death he made a statement which would exonerate Mays of any murderous intent, and though this statement was made, the chief of police gave orders that Mays be apprehended. He was out on $500 bond. Howard leaves his wife and two children. He lived on Division street. David Mays was re-arrested today and was put in jail to await the action of the coroner's jury following the death of Alex Howard, whom he claims he accidentally shot on the bluffs last week. The inquest will be held tomorrow afternoon. Howard was 25 years of age.

 

HOWARD, ANN VERTER/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 10, 1838
Wife of Alton Mayor Dies
Died, on Friday evening the 2d inst., in the full hope of a blessed immortality, Mrs. Ann Verter Howard, consort of Charles Howard, Esq., Mayor of this City; leaving a deeply afflicted husband, two young children, and numerous friends and relatives to mourn her loss. She lived beloved, and died lamented. The deceased was about 30 years of age.

 

HOWARD, BEAL/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 13, 1874
Mr. Beal Howard, one of our oldest citizens, died on Friday last at his residence on the Grafton Road [West Delmar], in the 84th year of his age. His disease was dysentery.

Mr. Howard, in company with his brother Charles, removed to this city [Alton] in the year 1830, from Alexandria, Virginia, when the site where Alton now stands was almost an unbroken forest. They settled in a small log house which stood, at that time, just above and a little east of the present Union Depot [near the northeast corner of Broadway and Market Streets]. His life has been an eventful one, and there is hardly a person who has resided in this city during the last forty years but knew and venerated him.

In the year 1836, Mr. Howard owned most of the block where the Presbyterian Church now stands, and he was offered sixty-two thousand dollars for it, with the buildings then upon it, but he declined the offer. In 1837, the financial panic swept over the country, severely affecting the business of Alton. Almost every business firm failed, and real estate depreciated at a fearful rate, and the same property was sold for less than that many hundreds of dollars. But Mr. Howard was not the only one who made financial mistakes in the early history of this city.

Mr. Howard was one of the founders of the Protestant Methodist Church, and aided in erecting a small stone church on the hill, near where Mr. Farber’s fine residence now stands, and where that denomination worshipped for several years, of which he was an active and consistent member up to the time is was disbanded, after which he connected himself with the Baptist Church, with which he was connected at the time of his death. He has raised a family of nine children, the most of whom are married and settled in this city and vicinity. His funeral took place at his late residence on Saturday last, the exercises being conducted by the Reverend T. G. Field of this city.

 

HOWARD, BERTHA; ERNEST; and HAROLD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 28, 1921 F
Five Drowned in Godfrey Pond Late Friday
Three boys and two girls lost their lives by drowning in the Godfrey pond Friday afternoon, and the details of the drowning will perhaps never be known. There are indications that at least one of the deaths was due to the self-sacrificing heroism of Russell Hillman, aged 15, who is believed to have tried to save the lives of members of the party. The dead are: Russell Hillman, aged 15; Bertha Howard, aged 15; Ernest Howard, aged 9; Harold Howard, aged 7; Bessie Hobson, aged 17. Wilmot Holmes, a sixth member of the party, escaped with his life. Of the five who drowned, Russell Hillman, it is supposed, from the positions in which the bodies of two of the girls were found, succeeded in towing ashore Bertha Howard, leaving her in shallow water where her hands could easily have touched some planks on shore, but she was too weak to save herself and she drowned in shallow water three or four feet from shore. It is supposed that having towed the Howard girl ashore, Hilman swam out to save Bessie Hobson and that the two went down. Their bodies were found very close together. Wilmot Holmes, the only member of the party who survived, at first told a story that he had not been in the boat with the others and that he did not know what had happened. He said that he was at the pond with the party and that when it was proposed to get into the leaky boat, he agreed to stay out and let the others have it by themselves. He said they told him to wait until they came back and that he waited a long time and when they did not return he went on home. Coroner Streeper and Constable Frank Morrison took Holmes to one side and questioned him closely about the story he told, and he then broke down and told the story as follows: He said that all six members of the party were in the boat and that one of the girls, Bertha Howard, was rocking it. He said that he told her she would sink the boat if she did not desist, and that he leaped out into the water. He said that some of the drowning ones got hold of him and carried him down, and he released himself, swimming ashore, when he saw that the members of the party were lost. He said he was so terrified that he made a long detour around Godfrey and made his way home. The body of Bertha Howard was discovered at 6 o'clock, probably two hours after the drowning. Peter Needham had gone to the pond and while walking along the shore noticed the body of Bertha Howard lying in shallow water close to the bank. He called help and her body was drawn out of the water. Searching parties, learning that there had been a party of boys and girls together began the search for the bodies in the pond. The bodies of Russell Hillman and Bertha Hopson were found together in deep water about 25 feet from shore and that of Ernest Howard was found just a short distance from them. The search was continued for the smallest of the Howard children until late at night. The supposition is that the members of the party became alarmed at the boat taking water fast and in their excitement they tipped it over and all got into the water, and just at that time Russell Hillman, a strong swimmer, came along and went to their rescue, losing his own life for his gallant effort. The three Howard victims are the children of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Howard, who live four doors north of the post office in Godfrey. There are two other children of the Howards, Ward and Lee, both older. Russell Hillman was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Hillman, who live across the road from the C. & A. station at Godfrey. He leaves two brothers, Warren and Travis, and a sister, Katherine. Bessie Hobson was an adopted girl. She leaves a brother, who was notified of his sister's fate. She was employed as housekeeper for an aged lady in Godfrey, and formerly was employed at Beverly Farm by Dr. W. H. D. Smith. Deputy Coroner C. N. Streeper took charge of the bodies after they were taken from the water. He fixed the time of the inquest for Tuesday evening at 7 o'clock. An effort was made to find the Holmes boy after the discovery was made that the party had been drowned and for a while it was feared that he, too, had lost his life. Residents in the vicinity reported having seen a boy leaving the place and so inquiry was made at the Holmes boy's home and he was found there and members of his family told the story which has been given as his story of what had preceded the drowning. He said that he could not see from where he was what had happened, and he did not know that the drowning had occurred. The funeral of the three Howard children will be held from the home Sunday afternoon, and burials will be in Godfrey Cemetery. The body of Hilman will be sent to Pleasant Hill, Ill., for burial Sunday morning at 10 o'clock. The funeral of Miss Bessie Hobson will be held Sunday morning at ten o'clock from the home of M. W. Hopkins, at 620 East Ninth Street, then on to the St. Patrick's Church. The interment will be in the St. Joseph's Cemetery.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1921
The funeral of the three Howard children drowned in the Godfrey pond Friday afternoon, was held yesterday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home in Godfrey. Burial was in the Godfrey cemetery. The three caskets were borne from the home, which is very close to the Godfrey cemetery, over the hill to the cemetery. There was a large attendance at the funeral services and many beautiful floral offerings were sent by sympathizing friends of the family. There was general sorrow in the community and deepest sympathy for the family in their triple bereavement.

 

HOWARD, CATHERINE PATRICIA/Source: Advertiser, November 4, 1911
Mrs. Catherine Patricia Howard, widow of Paris A. Howard, an old resident of Collinsville, born and raised in Ridge Prairie, died Saturday, October 28, at the age of 74. She was the mother of eleven children with five surviving; one son, Charles, and four daughters: Mrs. Ellen Smith of Troy, Mrs. Emma McKane of Caseyville, Mrs. Libby Rdle of Collinsville, and Miss Dairy Howard of St. Louis, Mo. Funeral took place Wednesday from the Methodist church with interment in Glenwood Cemetery.

 

HOWARD, CHARLES B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 23, 1923
Charles B. Howard, a life-long resident of Alton and a veteran of the Civil War, died this morning at 5:30 o’clock at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Anna Fortin of 210 Lampert Avenue. He was born October 17, 1833, bearing in his 90th year. With the exception of the years spent in serving his country, Howard made his home in Alton and vicinity. He was a farmer by occupation. For the past seven years, he made his home with Mrs. Fortin. He is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Anna Fortin and Mrs. Mollie Larsh of Alton; Mrs. Lillie Keidel of Melville; and Mrs. Etta Timmons of St. Louis. He also leaves 22 grandchildren and 26 great-grandchildren. His wife died 18 years ago. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at two o’clock from the Fortin home. Interment will be in Melville Cemetery.

 

HOWARD, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1910
The funeral of Edward Howard, the old colored resident of Salu, was held Sunday afternoon at the A. M. E. church. The service was conducted by Rev. Flemming Gray, pastor of the church, and remarks were made by the Revs. Otley, Smith and Barton. There was a very large attendance of friends of deceased who had known him during the long number of years he had resided in Alton. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

 

HOWARD, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 8, 1904
The funeral of Miss Ellen Howard, who died Saturday at St. Joseph's hospital, will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and services will be conducted by Rev. H. M. Chittenden; burial in City cemetery.

 

HOWARD, EMILY M. (nee PIERCE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 29, 1904
Mrs. Emily M. Howard, wife of C. O. Howard, and daughter of George G. Pierce of Godfrey, died of typhoid pneumonia on Wednesday at 4:10 p.m. Mrs. Howard contracted the disease while nursing her father, who died just one week ago. She was born in Alton, August 18, 1844. She has resided in Alton steadily since 1891. Her husband and five children survive her, viz: Mrs. Annie Fortin; C. O. Howard Jr.; Mrs. Mollie Larsch; Mrs. Etta Price, all residents of Alton; and Miss Lillie Kiedell of Melville. Her mother also survives her. Mrs. Howard has been a Christian since early childhood and an attendant of public worship whenever it was possible for her to do so. The funeral will take place on Sunday, 2 p.m. from the family home.

 

HOWARD, GUS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 20, 1902
Gus Howard, formerly a resident of Godfrey, died at Mexico, Mo., Sunday, and was buried at Godfrey today. The body was taken in charge by Western Star Lodge, No. 1. Burial was in the Godfrey Cemetery. Many years ago Mr. Howard lived on Main street in Alton, and was engaged in business here. Twenty years ago he sold out his possessions here and went to Mexico, Mo., to engage in agricultural pursuits. The pallbearers were Thomas Corbett, Thomas Hyndman, Oliver Gent, Charles Strittmatter, W. B. Rose, and Joseph Kehr.

 

HOWARD, HAZEL VIRGINIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 25, 1905
Hazel Virginia, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Howard, died Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock after a brief illness, aged 4 months. The funeral will be Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the home in North Alton to City Cemetery, Rev. H. M. Chittenden officiating.

 

HOWARD, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1901
James Howard, son of John Howard, died last evening at 8 o'clock at the family home on Elm street after a short illness with pneumonia. He in his twenty-seventh year, and had lived in Alton all his life. He was an apprentice at the glass works and was a member of the Columbia bowling club and the Alton Cocked Hat League. The funeral will be from the Cathedral and will probably be held Tuesday morning.

 

HOWARD, JENNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 25, 1907
Mrs. Jennie Howard, wife of George Howard, died at the family home on Bloomfield street Saturday night from stomach troubles, after a long illness. She was 32 years of age. Her mother, Mrs. Laura Curtis, and five brothers survive her. The funeral will be Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. Services at the A. M. E. church.

 

HOWARD, JOHN/Source: The Ottawa Free Trader, Ottawa, Illinois, July 24, 1846
Reported from Alton - John, third son of Mr. Beall Howard, an aged and respectable citizen of this place, met with a melancholy end, drowning, near the Alton House in Alton, on Monday evening. He was bathing with his two brothers, and some other lads, when he unfortunately got out of his depth and was drowned. His body was recovered about an hour and a half afterwards, and every exertion made to restore him to life, but without success. May the bereaved parents and connections of the deceased be supported under this heavy affliction by the rich consolations the gospel affords to "those who mourn." Alton Telegraph.

 

HOWARD, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 5, 1901
John Howard, aged 61, died this noon at the family home on Elm street after a week's illness with liver and kidney trouble. Mr. Howard was one of the best known residents of the northwestern part of the city. He came to Alton in 1856 and lived in the city continuously. A week ago last Sunday his son, James Howard, died, and the father never recovered from the effect of the shock of losing his son. A few days after the funeral the father was taken ill downtown and failed rapidly. His death has been expected the last three days. He leaves his wife, four sons, John, Robert, William and Frank Howard, and two daughters, Mrs. Daniel Gorman and Mary Howard. The funeral will take place at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon and services will be held in the Cathedral.

 

HOWARD, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1904
John Howard died Thursday morning at 11 o'clock at his home in Upper Alton, death resulting from the injuries he sustained last Friday by falling 35 feet with a scaffold at the glass works. Howard and another man were building a smoke stack, and the scaffold upon which they were working collapsed. Howard sustained a broken ankle and was badly bruised, but it is supposed that an injury to his spine caused his death. Since the accident he suffered great pain, and the last few days his body was paralyzed. John Howard was a respected colored man and was a steady, hard worker. He was 52 years old and leaves besides his wife, one son, Arthur Howard, also two brothers, Ed and Will Howard. The funeral will take place from the home at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon.

 

HOWARD, MARY E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 4, 1917
Miss Mary E. Howard, colored, aged 37, died at her home on Piasa street on Saturday evening. She is survived by one brother, four sisters and a mother. The funeral services will be conducted at ten o'clock tomorrow morning at the Campbell A. M. Chapel.

 

HOWARD, SAMUEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 31, 1844
Died, near Alton on the 21st inst., after a short illness, Mr. Samuel Howard, in the 85th year of his age. During the last forty years of his long life, he endeavored, by the aid of the Gospel, to prepare for death, and his last moments were such as indicated that he fully realized that, "Jesus can make a dying bed Feel soft as downy pillows are; While on his breast be laid his hand, And breathed his life out calmly there." We would not call thee from bliss; but rather mourn thy loss until we meet above!

 

HOWARD, SOLOMON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 17, 1900
Superintendent of Elm Ridge Dies
Solomon Howard, an old resident of Alton, died this morning at the place of William Eliot Smith, where he had been employed many years as superintendent of Elm Ridge. He was 68 years of age. Five years ago he suffered severe injuries by a fall, and never recovered fully. Consumption set in and caused his death. The time of the funeral is not appointed.

 

HOWARD, UNKNOWN INFANT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 26, 1918
The four months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Howard died Sunday at St. Joseph's hospital from acute stomach trouble. The father is a soldier stationed at Camp Shelby, Miss., and the funeral has been postponed until he can get here. It will be held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from St. Paul's Episcopal church, and burial will be in City cemetery. Since Mr. Howard entered the army, his wife and child have made their home with Mr. and Mrs. George Kitzmiller of West Delmar avenue, the ladies being sisters. The child was removed Saturday from the Kitzmiller home to the hospital.

 

HOWARD, UNKNOWN WIFE OF HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 28, 1905
Bullet Wound Proves Fatal - Accidentally Shot by Two Boys Playing
Mrs. Harry Howard, who was wounded seven months ago by a rifle bullet fired by two boys who were playing with a rifle at Tenth and George streets, died Monday night at her home, 622 east Fourth street, after long suffering from the wound accidentally inflicted upon her. It will be remembered that while Mrs. Howard was in the yard at her then home, on Tenth street between Langdon and George streets, when a bullet form a 22 calibre rifle struck her in the spine, severing the spine and completely paralyzing her. At first she did not suffer, but in the latter weeks of her life she suffered severely, and it became necessary to keep her under the influence of opiates all the time. She wasted away from the paralysis, and during the past week her death was expected at any time. The death of Mrs. Howard is one of the saddest accidents of the kind that has occurred in Alton. The family have had the active assistance and the sympathy of all who know them and everything has been done that was possible to relieve the situation produced by the unfortunate accident. Mrs. Howard was in St. Joseph's hospital for several months after she was shot. Mrs. Howard was just past 23 years of age and was the mother of two children, who are bereft by death of their mother's care. The funeral will be held from the family home, 626 east Fourth street [article had 2 different addresses], Wednesday at 2 p.m

 

HOWARTON, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 19, 1918
Assaulted by Pro-German [this was during WWI] - Later Dies
Harry Howarton underwent a surgical operation at St. Joseph's Hospital this morning in the hope that it would save his life, which has been in danger ever since he was struck on the head with a poker by Grover Hays in a fight, one week ago last Sunday night. Howarton may not live, though it was said at the hospital the trephining of his skull was successful, and it was found that his skull had been fractured by the blow administered by Hays. Details of the trouble were not in the hands of the police today, but from what had been learned it was said that Howarton and Hays quarrelled, and that Hays wielded the poker over Howarton's head. After that Howarton had a large lump for a while, and he began to show indications of bad consequences of the blow. He was dazed for a while, and instead of recovering he kept getting worse. Sunday Dr. George K. Worden had him taken to St. Joseph's Hospital, as he had become unconscious and seemed to be going to pieces. He was kept in the hospital until Tuesday morning, without being operated upon. Then it became apparent that something would have to be done as Howarton would not improve. A section of the bone was taken out to relieve the pressure on the brain, and this operation is looked to for relief, if anything can help the injured man. The police recalled today that Hays was arrested last fall at the time when a contingent of Alton soldiers were leaving for Camp Taylor. He made some uncomplimentary remarks about the men and seemed to be in a bad humor. He was taken to Springfield and held there for a while until he had convinced the authorities that his ill humor manifested toward the drafted men was merely the results of a bad morning after the night before. He had been drinking heavily and was in a bad humor when it came time for him to go to work. He was working at the State Hospital at the time, one on the way while riding on a street car he made remarks as he passed the drafted men. He was arrested very soon afterward and pleaded he did not mean any harm. His employer vouched for him at the time, and there was some sentiment that the man perhaps was not as bad as he appeared. The assault he had committed on Howarton, however, is a very serious one, and he is being held without bail until the outcome of Howarton's injuries can be known. Howarton's folks came from Jerseyville to be with him. It has not been learned definitely whether Hays and Howarton had been discussing war when the assault took place. (Later) Howarton died this afternoon at St. Joseph's Hospital. After the trephining operation he kept growing gradually weaker, and there seemed to be no hope for his recovery. The police went to the hospital this morning and attempted to get a statement from him, but he was unable to do any talking. Chief of Police Fitzgerald said this afternoon he would hold Hays without bail until the coroner's jury could hold an inquest. Howarton was 38 years of age.

 

HOWELL, ALFRED J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 21, 1908
Alfred J. Howell, aged 54, died at St. Joseph's hospital Sunday evening at 10 o'clock after an illness of several months. The death of Mr. Howell has been expected the last four or five days. He had been very ill, his friends knew, and he could see but few people at the hospital, but it was not generally realized that his condition was so grave. A few weeks ago he arrived home from Hot Springs, Arkansas where he had gone for the benefit of his health. The change did not improve him and he was very ill at Hot Springs before returning to Alton. He was taken to the hospital immediately on his arrival in his home city and was never able to leave the place. His decline after his return was steady and rapid. It was found that he had an incurable liver trouble. Mr. Howell's death following so soon after the death of his wife was the cause of a great surprise generally among those who had know him and had done business with both of them in their store. Both were apparently in good health and Mrs. Howell had been engaged about her usual duties in her store until the day before she was taken to the hospital to undergo a surgical operation which proved fatal. Her husband was supposed by his friends to be strong and well, and it was only after he disposed of his business recently that his health began to break down completely. He came to Alton over 25 years ago and engaged in business. He was an expert embalmer and also conducted a carpet store, first on Belle street then on Third street. With his wife he conducted a very successful business for many years. Beside his aged father, Joseph Howell of Brighton, he leaves one brother, Edwin of East St. Louis, and three sisters, Mrs. G. M. French of Mattoon, Mrs. D. A. Rice of Brighton, and Mrs. T. H. Hall of Gillespie. The three sisters were with him when he died. The body was taken to the home of Arthur Johnstone on Alby street, and will remain there until Wednesday at 1:30 p.m., when the funeral will be held from the Congregational church, of which Mr. Howell was a member. He was connected with the Masonic fraternity and the funeral services at City cemetery will be under the auspices of Piasa lodge, F. & A. M.

 

HOWELL, MARY (nee JOHNSTONE]/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 19, 1907
Mrs. Mary Howell, wife of Alfred J. Howell, died at 12:45 o'clock Tuesday noon at St. Joseph's hospital, aged 48 years. Altonians generally were shocked when the news was sent out over the telephone wires that Mrs. Howell was dead. Only a few days ago she had been at her usual post of duty in the place of business conducted by her husband on Third street. She was seemingly in good condition, so far as her friends could tell. She had, however, been a long sufferer from a malady which once before had made a surgical operation necessary. She was operated on last Sunday morning at an early hour, and at first her condition seemed to be favorable. The attending surgeon had said that it was a very grave operation, and that it was a serious case, but Mrs. Howell was determined to undergo it in the hope that she would get permanent relief which was promised if the operation was a success. She failed to rally promptly, however, and the first twenty hours from the time the operation was begun she was very restless, which was taken as a very bad symptom. She rallied then, however, and seemed to be much brighter, but at 8 o'clock Tuesday morning she was taken with another bad spell. Members of her family had been with her all morning, and at noon they thought that she was better and they left for their homes, but had no sooner arrived than they were summoned to return to the hospital at once. The end came very suddenly and was not expected by anyone. Mrs. Howell was a member of an old and prominent Alton family. She was a native of Alton and had lived in the city all her life. She had been engaged in business with her husband in Alton for twenty years, and was one of the best known women in the city. She was always in the store with her husband and even up to the day last week when she went to the hospital to have the surgical operation performed she was engaged as usual in the store. Outwardly she seemed to be in a condition that would warrant belief in her life being prolonged many years, but she was a sufferer for many years and few knew what her trouble called upon her to endure. She was a woman of excellent judgment, possessed good business ability and contributed largely to the success in the business the firm was doing. She had very many friends, who have found her tender and sympathetic with them in their hours of trouble, and always ready to do what she could when sorrow came to those she knew well. She leaves one sister, Mrs. Thomas W. Collins, and two brothers, A. H. Johnstone and Ralph J. Johnstone. Her husband, who had been constant in his attendance upon her since she was taken to the hospital, was with her when she died. [Burial was in Alton City Cemetery]

 

HOWELL, UNKNOWN MAN/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 27, 1845
Elderly Man Burns To Death in Scarritt's Prairie
We are pained to state that a Mr. Howell, an elderly citizen of this county, lost his life on Saturday last in Scarritt's Prairie [Godfrey], in the following manner: It seems that he was walking near a dry tree to which fire had been set, when a large limb, nearly burnt off from the trunk, fell upon him, breaking one of his legs and otherwise so disabling and confining him that he was wholly unable to move from the spot. In this most distressing stiuation he remained until the fire, as it gradually consumed the limb, approached the wretched man, seized on his helpless frame, and brought him to a painful end. Towards the close of the appalling scene his wife accidentally reached the fatal spot, but he lived only a few minutes after her arrival.

 

HUBBARD, JOSEPH L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 17, 1904
Mr. Joseph L. Hubbard, after a lingering illness, entered into rest Thursday morning, March 17, in the 88th year of his age, having been born in Prince Edward county, Virginia, April 6, 1816. Mr. Hubbard, by his kind, gentle and patient nature, endeared himself to all who knew him intimately, and his passing away leaves a loneliness for family and friends. Four children survive - Mrs. J. W. Milner of Sulphur Springs, Va.; Mrs. Edward Phillips of St. Louis; Mr. T. A. Hubbard of Chicago; and Mrs. G. A. McMillen of Alton. The funeral will take place from the residence of Dr. McMillen at 10 o'clock Saturday morning. Interment private.

 

HUBBEL, MARIE MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 16, 1921
Marie Margaret, the three weeks' old daughter of Lieutenant and Mrs. Lewis Hubbel died early this morning at the home of Mrs. Hubbel's mother, Mrs. Anna O'Dell, on Holland avenue, after an illness of three days, suffering from summer influenza. The deceased is survived by her parents, Lieut. and Mrs. L. Hubbel, and one sister. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made, as Lieut. Hubbel is stationed at Charleston, S. C. As soon as word is received from him, the funeral arrangements will be made.

 

HUBDE, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 10, 1901
Commits Suicide on Wife's Grave
Frank Hubde, a well known and prosperous farmer living on a farm this side of Edwardsville, swallowed a vial of carbolic acid Tuesday evening on the grave of his wife and was dead when found a few hours later. His wife died recently and since that event he has been very despondent.

 

HUBER, ADAM/Source: The Highland Journal, April 1907 - Submitted by Robert Snyder
Adam Huber succumbed to a stroke of paralysis at 6:30 Saturday evening (April 14, 1907). He had been ill some time, and all day Saturday he suffered intense pain. Shortly after supper he fell to the floor and within a few minutes was dead. The funeral took place Tuesday morning, services being conducted in St. Paul's church by Rev. Ferdinand Stick. Interment was in the Catholic Cemetery. The pall bearers were Louis Lehmann, John Mannhardt, Frank Buettner, Baptist Estenpreir?, Frank Jacober, Sr., and Louis Wunsch. Mr. Huber was born in Oestrrigen, Baden, Germany, on December 1, 1843, and hence attained the age of 63 years, 4 months and 12 days He served in the commissary department of the German Army during the Franco-Prussian war, and in 1871, at the close of the strife he came to America. On February 1, 1876, he was united in marriage with Miss Margaretha Uhl, with whom he came to Highland in 1880. Thirteen children were born to the union and all save one daughter, Elizabeth, survive. They are: Martin, Joseph, Carl, William, Clarence, Anna, Emma, Mary, Selma, Isabelle, Hannah and Margareth. Besides wife and children, deceased leaves three brothers residing in Germany. Deceased was a man devoted to his family and a lover of home. Up till a few years ago, when health began to fail, his services as a laborer were eagerly sought for no one could put aside more work than he in a given time.

 

HUBER, ALVIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 7, 1905
The family of Fabian Huber was called to mourn again today the death of a child, the second to die within ten days, from diphtheria. Alvin, the 3 year old son, died at 5 o'clock this morning at the family home. Burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

HUBNER, JOHN C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1922
John C. Hubner, aged 40, died at St. Joseph's Hospital at 6:30 o'clock this morning, where he has been receiving treatment for the past four weeks. He has been ill since last October and his death was not unexpected. He is survived by his wife, Maud Logan Hubner, to whom he was married fifteen years ago, and a daughter, Margaret Dorothy. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Hubner and leaves his parents, four sisters, Mrs. Frank ???ekhl of St. Louis, Mrs. Henry Koenig, Mrs. Jacob Schneider and Miss Lucretia Hubner, and one brother, Robert Hubner. "Dick" Hubner, as he was best known to his intimates, was born Sept. 27, 1882, and was reared in Alton. For many years he has been employed as switchman for the Big Four being on the "Plug." He was a well known young man and his illness has been watched with interest by friends. News of his death caused much sorrow. The body has been taken to the family home, 1007 East Fourth Street, and the funeral will be held from there to St. Patrick's Church on Wednesday morning.

 

HUDDLESTON, EUNICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 9, 1920
The funeral of Eunice, the 18 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Huddleston of 915 Alby street, will be held tomorrow afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, from the home, and burial will be in City cemetery.

 

HUDGENS, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 16, 1908
In the death of "Jim" Hudgens in St. Louis yesterday, there passes away one of the best known old river men at Alton. He was a familiar figure along the river bank, and he seemed unable to stay away from the water, even in his old age, and when afflicted with a terrible disease. He had lived in Alton almost all his life. Many years ago he ran a boat named the Jerome, which was the then only pleasure boat in Alton harbor, and he carried many a party of Alton people out for pleasant times. The body arrived this afternoon from St. Louis and was buried immediately afterward in the City Cemetery.

 

HUDGENS, NENA McADAMS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 15, 1904
Mrs. Nena McAdams Hudgens, wife of H. R. Hudgens, died Wednesday evening at the family home on Grove street after an illness of twelve hours. Mrs. Hudgens' death was due to uraemic poisoning which set in several days before her death, but which manifested itself for the first time Wednesday morning when she fell in a convulsion at her home. She did not regain consciousness and did not know of the birth of a little daughter which was the primary cause of the malady. Mrs. Hudgens was 35 years of age November 29. She had lived in Alton since girlhood. When very young she united with the Cumberland Presbyterian church, since then she was one of the most consistent, devoted and earnest members and workers in the church. She was deeply interested in the work of the Ladies Aid Society and the missionary society of her church, and was a most useful member. The death of Mrs. Hudgens is a cruel shock to her family circle. She leaves beside her husband, 3 children: Helen, aged 7; and Warren, aged 4; and an infant daughter, one day old. She was the daughter of Mrs. Annie McAdams and the late William McAdams. Her family did not know that her condition was serious. She had been in what appeared to be the best of health, and there was no cause for alarm until she was taken with the convulsion. Other convulsions followed after the poison had affected her brain, and only once, then for a minute, did she manifest any signs of consciousness before death ended her life. At one time she roused herself from the comatose condition into which she had fallen, and her mother instinct, ever uppermost with her, caused her to inquire after her children, and when she was told they were well she relapsed into unconsciousness. The home life of Mrs. Hudgens was perfect. She possessed a loveable, sweet disposition which endeared her to everyone she met. She was a good mother and a faithful wife, always most deeply interested in the care and welfare of her family, and her loss is a very sad affliction to them. Few of her friends knew of her serious condition until the sad news of her death was speeding quickly about the city. Mrs. Hudgens leaves beside her husband and children, her mother, four sisters: Mrs. Eugene Gaskins, Mrs. J. H. Dickie, Mrs. Frank Clifford, Miss Fay McAdams; and three brothers, Clark, John D., and William McAdams. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Cumberland Presbyterian church.

 

HUDSON, CURTIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 24, 1921
Man Went Insane, Killed in Gun Fight With Railroad Policeman
It is established that the negro slain at Granite City several weeks ago in a gun fight with a railroad policeman, after the negro had menaced the crew of a train on the Big Four, was an escaped inmate of the Alton State Hospital. The negro, whose name is said to be Curtis Hudson, was formerly imprisoned in the hospital for criminal insane at Chester. He was discharged there and afterward picked up at Belleville and committed to the Alton State Hospital, where he proved tractable. He escaped about March 9, and after wandering about, boarded a train at East Alton and attempted to take possession of the train. He had an old rusty revolver that was worthless, but he managed to get a revolver away from a member of the train crew and then he had something dangerous. He engaged in a battle with the conductor at Granite City and a policeman shot the negro just in time to save his own life. It was said at the state hospital that no one had been sent to identify the man who has been kept in the morgue at Granite City ever since he was killed. It is believed from the description the dead man was the escaped insane man. Dr. George A. Zeller said that the man should never have been brought to the Alton hospital, as he had given trouble wherever he was. He was not originally a criminal, but went insane and developed criminal traits which made it necessary that he be sent to the hospital for the criminal insane. He was a man of gigantic stature and of such giant strength that its full power was never tested. Dr. Zeller said that the patient could have easily taken any ordinary man and broken his back by exerting the strength of his body or arms. In such respect was the negro's strength held he was always kept idle and never allowed to help, as his tendency when used for labor was to attempt to take charge of the job and then trouble always started. During the period he was in the state hospital here, Hudson gave no trouble because of the system of handling him that was adopted. He improved mentally and then decided to run away. According to the description of the man given by hospital attendants, the negro was built with the strength of a huge gorilla, and it was only by keeping him pacified that it was possible to handle him. Dr. Zeller said that when the man was sent here his record was known in Belleville, but that it was not known to him or he would never have received the man.

 

HUDSON, JOHN H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 28, 1906
John H. Hudson, aged 48, died last night at the home of his niece, Mrs. J. Johnson, on the Grafton road near Melville. His death was due to injuries he sustained last week by falling from a hammock when the rope supporting the hammock broke. He was struck on the back of his head and broke a blood vessel. Mr. Hudson had been in ill health this summer and came out from St. Louis to spend the summer. He leaves one brother, living near Upper Alton, and a number of nieces and nephews. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from the Melville church, and burial will be in the Melville cemetery.

 

HUDSON, JOHN H./Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, May 25, 1893
Mr. John H. Hudson died Friday morning at 11 o'clock, at his home on East Fourth street in this city [Alton]. Mr. Hudson had been complaining for a few days, but was not in bed. His death was sudden, and was caused by heart failure. Mr. Hudson was in his 78th year, and had lived in Alton for many years. He had also been a resident of Kane, in Jersey County. Mr. Hudson was most highly esteemed by a very large circle of acquaintances for his sterling worth and readiness to aid in every good cause. He has been a leader in the Prohibition movement in this section for a number of years. He was a member of the Unitarian church. Mr. Hudson was born in Mendham, N. J., in 1815. He was twice married, and leaves a family consisting of Mrs. Ulrich Eberhardt of Newark, N. J.; Mrs. Joseph Dresser of Kane, Ill.; Mrs. Addie O'Haver, Miss Sara Hudson and Mrs. William Cartwright of this city. He came to Michigan in 1837 and came to Illinois in 1856. Since coming to Alton, he was proprietor of the old St. Charles Hotel, after which he was engaged at the carpenter's trade until the last ten years.

 

HUDSON, MARY A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 15, 1904
Mrs. Mary A. Hudson, wife of Peter Hudson, died Sunday at noon at the family home on East Brown street after a long illness with consumption. Besides her husband, Mrs. Hudson is survived by two sons and four daughters. The funeral will take place Wednesday morning from the family home, and the body will be shipped to Carrollton for burial. The Hudson family moved to Upper Alton from Carrollton two years ago.

 

HUDSON, SARA E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 12, 1919
Instructor in Alton Schools for Forty-five Years
Miss Sara E. Hudson, a teacher in the public schools for forty-five years, died at the home of her sister, Mrs. W. H. Cartwright, 1524 Jersey street, Upper Alton, Sunday afternoon at 5 o'clock, after an illness that began with the influenza, ran through a course of pneumonia, and finally resulted in a nervous collapse after she had returned to her duties before she was able to do so. Miss Hudson's death removes from the corps of teachers in the Alton public schools one of the best beloved teachers ever in the Alton schools. Taken according to old time standards of disciplinarians, Miss Hudson might not have qualified as a great success, in the days when the rod was supposed to be used unsparingly. She was one of the advance guards of the advocates of theories now generally practiced in schools that kindness and the stimulating of higher conceptions of honor and responsibility among pupils went further than the use of the old time bundle of switches. Miss Hudson ruled her pupils by the Golden Rule, and it is safe to say that there is not one pupil who passed under course of instruction but remembers with kindly thoughts the days he sat in her classes. She possessed a motherly nature that found its expression in mothering the children who came to her. She never forgot any of them, and during the long period of her work she accumulated a fund of good stories, and she could recall many incidents of school days to the former pupils of her she would meet. She began her work of teaching in 1873 in a little school known as No. 4, the forerunner of Washington school, and she was transferred a few years later to Lincoln School, where she took charge of Room No. 4 in that school, the seventh grade. She taught there for many years. When there was vacancy in the office of supervisor of drawing, Miss Hudson had qualified herself for appointment and she took the place, discharging her duties there to the satisfaction of everyone. She was a kindly, Christian woman who had a wide influence over all who came in contact with her, and who could be rated as nothing but a complete success in her work. Miss Hudson is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, teachers in years of service in the Alton public schools, having rounded out forty-six years of continuous work, begun in September 1873, and has counted among her pupils many men and women of the city who have passed into middle life. For the past eleven years she has held the position of supervisor of drawing for the schools and has brought that department to a standard equaling that of any city of Alton's size. Her resignation had just been tendered to the Board of Education on account of her failing health. Miss Hudson was born in Milford, Mich., September 6, 1851, and came to Illinois with her parents when a small girl. She was educated in the public schools of Alton, graduating from Alton High School in 1873 as valedictorian of her class. Several terms of Normal training added also to her educational preparation. Miss Hudson was a devoted member of the Congregational Church and her interest with that people was shown in many ways, especially in her concern for the advancement of the young people in the Christian Endeavor and in her devotion to her large Sunday school class. Miss Hudson was a loving woman in her home, public spirited in all civic affairs, and especially loyal to the public schools and their teachers, zealously guarding their honor against all criticism and fault finding and never so happy as when seeing development among pupils individually and as a whole. Three sisters survive Miss Hudson - Mrs. Ulrich Eberhardt of Newark, N. J., Mrs. Joseph Dressel of Kane, Ill., and Mrs. William Cartwirght of this city. Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock at the Congregational Church. Burial will be at Kane, Ill. From 4 until 9 p.m. Tuesday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Cartwright, all friends who desire may view the remains of Miss Hudson. At the request of Miss Hudson flowers will be omitted.

 

HUDSON, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Telegraph, January 9, 1899
One of the saddest deaths in a very long time occurred yesterday morning when Willie Hudson of North Alton passed away. He was a manly little fellow who tried to make a living for himself and father, mother, brothers and sisters, by carrying messages for the Western Union. He was only 17 years of age, still, when his father was made a helpless cripple four years ago by the accident in the yards of the North Alton Paving, Building and Fire Brick Co., the little fellow with manly determination undertook the support of the family of nine. As he expressed it himself to the editor of the Telegraph the day before he was taken ill, it had been a "pretty hard pull" on himself. A short time ago his father was awarded a verdict of $7,500 for his injuries and just as the load was about to be removed from the manly little fellow, he was taken ill and died. Last Wednesday morning he was taken with the grippe and he died Sunday morning. All who knew Willie admired him, for never a word of complaint was heard from him, and his employer remembers him as one devoted to performance of his duty. Of all the number who knew him, there will be not one who will not grieve at his untimely death. The funeral will be Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

HUDSPETH, ALLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1910
The remains of Allen Hudspeth, who died yesterday morning from pneumonia after a few days illness, will be sent to Hillview, Greene County, this evening where burial will take place.

 

HUDSPETH, NORA BELL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1905
18 Year Old Girl Commits Suicide
Nora Belle Hudspeth, aged 18, daughter of William Hudspeth of 531 east Eighth street, committed suicide in St. Louis Tuesday afternoon by drinking carbolic acid. The girl drank the acid at the corner of Franklin and Broadway in St. Louis, and was found reeling on the streets in a bad condition. She was hurried to a drug store, an antidote was applied and the ambulance called to take her to the city dispensary. She died a few minutes after her arrival there, while the stomach pump was being used to withdraw the poison from her stomach. The girl could give no good reason for her attempt on her own life. The family were informed of the fate of the girl, about 10 o'clock, and it was a great shock to them. A newspaper reporter called at the house to break the news to them, and the father of the girl said that he knew of no reason whatever. He said that his daughter was in Alton last Sunday to visit the family. She formerly worked in the Dawson overalls factory at Alton, but becoming dissatisfied she went to St. Louis and found a position in a shirt factory. She came up last Sunday from St. Louis with a Mrs. Libbie Barnes, a friend of hers, and to see her sister who is visiting at the Hudspeth home for the first time in six years. The girl seemed in the best of spirits then, the father said, and the family parted from her without any unpleasantness that might lead to such an end. The girl would have been 19 years of age next March. Her two brothers, George and Charles Hudspeth, live in St. Louis, and they knew nothing of the girl's suicide until apprised of her death at a late hour by newspaper reporters. No one could offer any explanation of the act of the girl. Her father said he knew of no love affairs of the girl, and that if she had any they must have been in St. Louis. Mr. and Mrs. Hudspeth have a large family living at 531 east Eighth street. The father is a teamster and does a general transfer business. He went to St. Louis today to take charge of the body and to bring it here for burial. [Burial was in City Cemetery]

 

HUEBNER, CHRISTINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 24, 1901
Mrs. Christina Huebner, one of the best known and wealthiest German residents of the Bottoms below East Alton, died Tuesday night, her demise being attributed to the awful heat. She was 67 years of age and in fairly good health up to a few weeks ago, when the hot weather began to tell on her, and ultimately prostrated her completely. She leaves 10 children, all grown. The funeral will be conducted at the home by Rev. G. Plassman of Nameoki. Interment will be in City cemetery.

 

HUEBNER, ELEANORA CHRISTIANA (nee HALLMANN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 24, 1901 - Submitted by Marsha Ensminger
Mrs. Christiana Huebner, one of the best known and wealthiest residents of the bottoms below East Alton died Tuesday night, her demise being attributed to the awful heat. She was 67 years old and in fairly good health up to a few weeks ago when the hot weather began to tell on her, and ultimately prostrated her completely. [22 Feb 1837 - 23 Jul 1901; widow of Johann Georg Huebner; mother of ten children; John, Caroline (Mrs. William Wille), Jacob, Henrietta (Mrs. Leonard Hoehn), Mary (Mrs. Louis Buenger), Elizabeth (Mrs. Louis Wille), Frances (Mrs. Henry Riekenberg), George, August, and Wilhelmina (Mrs. Theodore Krauskopf).]

 

HUEBNER, JOHANN GEORG/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 7, 1897 - Submitted by Marsha Ensminger
John Huebner, an aged resident of the vicinity of Oldenburg, committed suicide yesterday by hanging himself to the limb of a tree. He was seventy years of age and had lived near Oldenburg for the last forty-two years. During the past five years he has been in bad health and for two years he had been under medical treatment. His poor health is the only reason known for committing the rash act. [born 21 Jul 1826 in Bavaria; immigrated 1854; married Eleanora Christiana Hallmann 18 Feb 1856. Ten children listed under Eleanora Huebner]

 

HUEBNER, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 3, 1902
Farmer Fatally Injured With Shotgun
Louis Huebner, a prominent farmer of the American bottoms, was fatally injured Sunday afternoon while loading a shotgun at his home, one mile from Mitchell. Huebner formerly lived at Edwardsville Crossing. Mr. Huebner went out to hunt for crows that were feeding in his wheat Sunday morning. The gun was accidently discharged, the load striking him in the right breast ranging upward and killed him instantly. Deputy Coroner Streeper went to Mitchell today to hold an inquest.

 

HUESTIS, WILLIAM E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 11, 1904
Moro News - The funeral of William E. Huestis, who died at his home on the Springfield road last Wednesday, took place Friday afternoon at the Helmkamp Cemetery. The services were conducted by REv. J. W. Ritchey of Liberty. The pallbearers were William E. Cooper, L. S. Dorsey, William Kueths, Fred Weiseman, D. L. Stahl and G. R. Sutton. Mr. Huestis was born in New York State in 1830. He came to Illinois by steamboat in 1837. He was married in 1887 to Miss Amanda Hilton, who, with one daughter, survive him. He had been in feeble health for some time but was supposed to be improving, but was stricken down and in a few moments was dead. Hiram Huestis, a brother residing in Elgin, was present at the services.

 

HUETTE, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 6, 1907
Death of Fosterburg Octogenarian
Charles Huelte, aged 81, died at his home in Fosterburg Saturday, and his funeral was held yesterday from German Presbyterian church at Fosterburg. He had been a resident there many years and was one of the most prominent farmers living there. He had been a member of the German Presbyterian church and a leading supporter of it for many years. He leaves his widow, three sons - Charles, Henry and Ernest; and three daughters, Mrs. William Fenstermann, Mrs. August Fenstermann, and Miss Amelia Huelte. Mrs. Eliza Schlueter of Alton is a sister of the deceased. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Ratz of the Fosterburg Presbyterian church, and burial was in the Fosterburg cemetery.

 

HUETTE, MINNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1913
Mrs. Minnie Huette, aged 82, died at her home at Woodburn yesterday afternoon from paralysis. She was a native of Germany. Mrs. Huette leaves three sons and three daughters, Charles, Henry and Ernest Huette; Mrs. William Fenstermann, Mrs. August Fenstermann and Miss Amelia Huette. The funeral will be Thursday morning at 10 o'clock.

 

HUETTE, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1911
William Huette, aged 24, died from heart failure today at the home of his father, Charles Huette, near ______ (might have been Moro).

 

HUFF, RICHARD "DICK"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 26, 1905
Mummified Body of Man Drowned Last February Discovered
The body of Richard Huff, who was drowned in the Missouri river in St. Louis county last February, while trying to rescue a companion he thought to be drowning, was discovered on a sandbar yesterday in a mummified condition, and the features were so well preserved that the body was easily recognized. Huff was a laborer, about 50 years old, and worked upon farms near Centaur, Mo. He was unmarried, but was well known in the county. One day last February Huff was walking near the river when he saw another man leading a cow across on the ice. The animal broke through and pulled the man beyond his depth. His cries brought Huff to his assistance, but the cold water chilled the would-be rescuer, and he was drowned. The man thought to be drowning held onto the rope by which he had been leading the cow, and the animal pulled him to the shore in safety. Search was made for the body of Huff at the time, but it could not be discovered, and it was thought that the river would be his last resting place. The matter had almost been forgotten, when yesterday Charles L. Bishop of Vigus, St. Louis county, started on a hunting expedition with his little son. They visited the scene of the drowning and were walking along the edge of the river. When they came to a big sandbar that stretched out into the water, the dog that accompanied them began sniffing about a log, and Mr. Bishop and his son investigated. They found, half buried in the sand, the body of a man, the features almost as well preserved as those of an Egyptian mummy. In a short time the sand was cleared away from the body and several persons identified it. John Gullhofer and J. T. Drury positively recognized it as that of Huff. They said the features were so well preserved that they had no doubts on the point. Huff formerly lived across the river from Alton.

 

HUFF, SAMUEL LOWBER/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 24, 1838
Died, in this city [Alton], on the 16th inst., Samuel Lowber Huff, aged 19 years, 5 months, and 1 day, formerly at Cincinnati.

 

HUFF, W. H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1918
W. H. Huff, aged 93 years, died this morning about 6 o'clock at the home of his son, Henry Huff, of 303 Dry street, after an illness of over three months. Huff was born and lived his entire life in and around Alton, and was well known. Huff is survived by two sons, Henry of Alton, and Calvin of Arkansas, and one daughter, Mrs. Whitaker, of Piasa, Ill. No funeral arrangements will be made until after the arrival of the son from Arkansas.

 

HUFFMANN, ALIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 13, 1908
J. W. Anderson of Salina, Kansas succeeded today in establishing beyond a doubt that his missing uncle, Alie Huffmann, a Swede, was killed by an Illinois Terminal train February 16, 1903 at Alton, and was buried in Wood River cemetery. Anderson arrived in Alton Wednesday night and sought Coroner Streeper for some information. He had been conducting a long chase and was singularly fortunate in finding the official records of his uncle's death so quickly. It was found that Huffman had been working at the Federal Lead Works, and while on his way home he was struck by a train and killed. Coroner Streeper was then deputy coroner under Coroner Tuffil. He held the inquest and buried the body....Coroner Streeper said today that when the old man was killed he held the body a long time before interring it, and was expecting that someone would claim the body, but none did until last night. The body will not be moved from Milton cemetery.

 

HUFKER, JOSEPH SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1908
Joseph Hufker Sr., whose remarkable case has been noted in papers everywhere, and whose vitality and cheerfulness were causes of wonder to all conversant with the conditions, passed into the Great Beyond Thursday morning shortly after 4 o'clock at his home in the Grafton road. For almost four weeks previous to his death he was unable to eat anything or to retain any nourishment of any kind, and his dissolution was expected time and again. He was a victim of cancer of the stomach, and knew there was no hope for him. He suffered intensely at times but he was cheerful and patient through it all and faced death with calmness and a courage born of the faith within him. His son Louis, who had been in Austria completing his studies preparatory to being ordained a priest, was cabled for several weeks ago, and the dying man's whole ambition after that was to live long enough to again see his boy. The prayer was granted, and Louis spent the last four or five days of his father's life in close attendance upon him. He was a good man, a good citizen and excellent neighbor. As a husband and father, he was a model, and his death will cause sincere sorrow to all who know him. He lived in the vicinity for half a century, and would be 70 years old next June. He is survived by his wife and thirteen children, most of the latter being of adult age. The children are August, Charles and John Hufker of St. Louis, and Sister Rinaldo also of St. Louis; Mrs. John Mullen, Fred, Joseph, Henry, Louis and William Hufker of Godfrey; and Misses Helen, Marie and Annie Hufker. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 8:30 o'clock from St. Mary's church, and burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

HUGO, EDWIN M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 10, 1922
Edwin M. Hugo, one of the oldest residents of Alton, died Sunday morning at 10:20 o'clock at his home on Tremont street, one week before a stroke of paralysis had completely disabled him, following an attack of the grippe which had confined him to his bed. The aged gentleman was able to recognize those about him until one day before his death, when he became unconscious and the end came less than 24 hours later. Mr. Hugo had passed his ninety fourth birthday, just three days before his death. He was born in Belliar, Md., April 6, 1828, and he came to Alton 68 years ago. For many years he was a contractor and builder in Alton, and continued at that work until fifteen or sixteen years ago, when he was forced to give up all work because of his great age. He was a man of the highest character and though the present generation did not know him, fifty years ago Mr. Hugo was prominent in the city of Alton. He leaves one sister, Mrs. Isaac C. Price of Alton, and beside her he leaves three nieces, Mrs. Harry Collins, Miss Florence Price of Alton and Miss Julia Hugo of Delta, Pa. He leaves also two nephews, William Keefe of St. Louis and Ed Hugo of Savannah, Ga. Three grand nieces and two grand nephews. Mr. Hugo was a member for many years in the Masonic fraternity and was the oldest member of Piasa Lodge, Franklin Chapter and Belvidere Commandery. The funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of Isaac C. Price, 418 East Third street. The services will be conducted by Rev. Edward L. Gizson of the First Presbyterian church. Burial will be under the auspices of Piasa lodge, with an escort from Belvidere Commandery, K. T.

 

HUGO, O. V./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 27, 1919
O. V. Hugo, son ofj Dr. Samuel B. Hugo, died at 1:00 o'clock this afternoon at the home of his sister, Mrs. Julia B. Price, 418 East Third street. He was 79 years old. Hugo was born in Baltimore, Md., in 1841, and came west in 1852. He was associated with the late Charles Rodemeyer in the carriage business. He is survived by an older brother, Edward M. Hugo, and one sister, Mrs. Julia Price, and two nieces and a nephew. Interment will be in City cemetery.

 

HULBERT, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 7, 1900
Mrs. John Hulbert, 42 years old, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Sunday afternoon, after three months illness. He leaves a wife and two children. The funeral will be from his home in East End place tomorrow morning.

 

HULBURT, AMOS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 4, 1901
Old Soldier Dies
Amos Hulburt, an old and respected citizen of Upper Alton, died Thursday night at 6 o'clock. Death followed a severe attack of la grippe. Mr. Hulburt was born in Wabash county, Ill., September 15, 1828. When a youth of 12 years he came to the vicinity of Upper Alton to live. January 15, 1854 he was married to Miss Mary G. Newell. Of this union were born two children, both of whom are dead. In 1862 he went into the army and served in Company B, 80th Illinois, volunteers. After the war he moved to Upper Alton where he has since resided. For a number of years he was a member of the G. A. R. A widow and one grandson survive him. Funeral services will be held at the Presbyterian church, of which he was a member and had been sexton for many years, at 1 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Services will be conducted by Rev. W. H. Bradley, assisted by Rev. G. W. Waggoner.

 

HURLBUT, THADDEUS BEMAN (REVEREND)/Source: Alton Telegraph, April 2, 1885
Mr. Albert Wade received a telegram Wednesday giving the sad intelligence of the death, at Austin, Texas, yesterday, of Reverend Thaddeus B. Hurlbut of Upper Alton, who went south a few weeks ago to make his home with his daughter, Mrs. Ira H. Evans. Mr. Hurlbut has been in feeble health for a long time, especially since the loss of his wife last December. On the 21st ult. (as we learn by a private letter) he had a fall, breaking a rib near the spine, and this, with advanced age and feeble condition, resulted as stated above.

Mr. Hurlbut had reached the advanced age of 84 years. A long and honored career had been his, and he has passed away crowned with the respect and reverence of a new generation that has come upon the stage since he was actively engaged in his life’s work. Mr. Hurlbut was one of the intrepid band of abolitionists in early days who not only resisted by tongue and pen the aggressions of slavery, but took up arms in defense of free thought and free speech. He was the friend and associate of Lovejoy at the time of the pro-slavery riots in this city in 1837. His death leaves Mr. Henry Tanner of Buffalo, New York the sole survivor of the defenders of the press on the fatal night of the 7th of November 1837.

Rev. Thaddeus B. Hurlbut/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, April 3, 1885
Nearly half a century has rolled away since, in this city, was witnessed the first armed resistance to the aggressions of the slave power in America. It is an oft-told tale, now become historic, and we do not intend here to recount its tragic and far-reaching incidents. In current history, Alton is stigmatized as the city where Lovejoy was murdered by a pro-slavery mob. The historian of the future, reading events with broader vision, will record that Alton was the first place in America that dared, by force and arms, to defy the slave power that then dominated the country – the power before which statesmen cowered, the press cringed, and the pulpit, to a great extent, upheld. Concord is immortalized in Revolutionary lore as the spot where the first hostile blood was shed by the patriots in resisting the tyranny of England, and Alton will be designated by the historian of the future as the spot where freemen first dared to openly resist with arms the legions of slavery. Emerson writes of Concord:

“Here first the embattled farmers stood, And fired the shot heard ‘round the world.”

And the echo of the shots fired by the beleaguered abolitionists in Alton in 1837 reverberated throughout the land, awakening the conscience and courage of the North, and created a wave of anti-slavery sentiment that widened and increased until it culminated in the election of Lincoln to the Presidency in 1860. Illinois gave to the country the first anti-slavery martyr and the first anti-slavery President. The uprising of the abolitionists of Alton in 1837, in defense of free thought and free speech, was the prelude to the uprising of the North in 1861 in defense of free soil and free men. The band of heroes who rallied about Lovejoy in those dark days were men of no common type. Wiser than their generation, incapable of fear, risking their lives and fortunes in a forlorn hope, their names will go down the ages to come linked with the good and great of ages past, who lived and suffered in advance of their times.

The defenders of the press were mainly young men, and the greater part of them lived to see in the final wiping out of slavery, the fruition of their hopes. But, one by one, they have since passed away until with the death of Mr. Hurlbut, but one survives – Henry Tanner of Buffalo. The chief counsellor and advisor of Lovejoy was the man whose death we mourn today. He was his trusted personal friend, and his associate in the editorship of the Observer. When Lovejoy fell, he was at his side and composed his form in the last sleep. Loyal and devoted in their lives, in death they rest in the same burial ground. One went down in the gloom of transient defeat, in the glow of his prime. The other lived to hear the plaudits of the victors and to witness in the eventide of a life the regeneration of a race.

Thaddeus Beman Hurlbut was the descendant of an old English family that settled in America prior to 1636. He was born at Charlotte, Vermont, October 28th, 1800. His youth was spent on his father’s farm. He was educated at Hamilton College, New York, and graduated from Andover Theological Seminary in 1831, and was licensed as a Congregational minister by Dr. Lyman Beecher. In the Fall of that year, he went to Virginia in the interest of a benevolent society. In 1832 he returned to Vermont and was married on the 2d of December to Miss Abigail M. Paddock, daughter of an eminent physician. This lady was possessed of unusual attainments, and a character of much loveliness, devotion and fortitude. Their union remained unbroken for 52 years, until in December last she preceded him to the silent shore, mourned and revered by the friends of a lifetime who realized in her their ideal of womanly perfection. In January following their marriage, the young couple removed to Cincinnati, and thence in 1834 to St. Louis. In St. Louis Mr. Hurlbut formed the acquaintance of Elijah P. Lovejoy, and a warm attachment arose between them. Both were ordained to the ministry in 1835. Mr. Lovejoy being driven out of St. Louis by the pro-slavery mobs, removed to Alton and established the Observer, Mr. Hurlbut becoming associate editor. After the tragedy of 1837, Mr. Hurlbut contemplated the re-establishment of the Observer, but the persistent hostility of the pro-slavery element and other adverse circumstances prevented the realization of his purpose. After a brief residence in Jacksonville, he returned to Upper Alton and established the home in which he spent the remainder of his life, engaged in preaching and teaching until the infirmities of age retired him from active labors. For a time, he served as pastor of the Upper Alton Presbyterian Church which Mr. Lovejoy was supplying at the time of his death. Possessed of a keen and active intellect, broadened liberal culture, and refined by a most lovable and genial disposition, with the courage of his convictions, his was a ripe and beautiful character. Even old age, when it came upon him, had no power to dampen his sympathies or lessen his interest in current events. He kept fully abreast with the progress of the times in science and literature, and added years but mellowed and developed the kindly impulses that beat responsive to all good and beautiful things. Sorrow and bereavement swept over him like a great flood, but to his friends he ever turned the sunshine of his mind, benevolent face which never lost the lustre of hope and faith. None who had the pleasure of meeting him in his declining years will ever forget the light of a great peace, which ever illumined his serene and gentle features.

To Mr. and Mrs. Hurlbut were born three children, all of whom reached maturity. Wilberforce Lovejoy Hurlbut, the only son, a young man of remarkable intellectual endowments, gave his life to his country. After a brilliant military career, participating with marked distinction in all the great battles of the Army of the Potomac, leading the Fifth Michigan Regiment in the battle of Chancellorsville, lying wounded for days on the bloody field of Gettysburg, he went down to death in May 1864, in the battle of the Wilderness, aged less than 24 years. Of all the gallant young officers Illinois sent to the war, none ranked higher than he or gave greater promise of a distinguished career. “A worthy son of a noble sire,” the work the father began in 1837 the son aided in bringing to its consummation.

Isabella E. M., the elder daughter, a lady of rare gifts and graces, became the wife of Rev. J. L. M. Young, and died in the Fall of 1880. The younger daughter, the wife of Hon. Ira H. Evans of Texas, is the only surviving member of the family, and at her home in Austin, on March 31, the father closed his eyes on earthly scenes, cared for with a devotion that had never wavered through long years, and which was supplemented by the affection and watchfulness of one who took the place of the son gone before. In the retrospect of such a life, how much there is of compensation for the pain of the present separation.

Funeral Services
The remains of Mr. Hurlbut arrived from Texas last evening, accompanied by his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Evans, and the funeral services took place this morning at the homestead in Upper Alton. They were conducted by Rev. Mr. Chaddock, pastor of the Congregational Church, assisted by Rev. George C. Adams of St. Louis, and Dr. Bulkley of Upper Alton. Mr. Chaddock spoke from the text: “I have fought the good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith. Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, shall give me at that day; and not to me only, but unto all them also that love his appearing.” 2 Timothy IV, 7 and 8.

All the Reverend gentlemen named made remarks founded on the text, and also gave brief sketches of the eventful life and sterling character of the deceased. The memorials were tender and heartfelt tributes worthily bestowed.

The remains were laid to rest in the family lot in the  Alton City Cemetery, beside the companion from whom he had been parted but a few short weeks.

 

HULETT, FANNY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 5, 1902
Daughter of Captain Hulett Stumbles and Drowns in Mississippi
Fanny Hulett, daughter of Captain Richard Hulett, fell overboard from her father's boat at the foot of Prospect street, at 2:30 this afternoon, and was drowned in deep water before assistance could reach her. The girl was walking on the gunwale of the Mary's barge when she tripped on a rope and fell into the river. Her mother and brothers were on the boat, but did not see her. Engineer John Raymond of the steamer Eva Alma, lying nearby, saw the girl fall into the river and gave the alarm, but too late to give help. The mother saw her child's hands as she went down the last time. The drowned child was nine years of age. The family live in Beardstown. The father went to St. Louis at noon to superintend the placing of a boiler on one of his steamboats there.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 7, 1902
The body of Fanny Hulett, daughter of Capt. Richard Hulett, was found this morning by two fishermen, floating in the Mississippi near the mouth of Wood river. The finding of the body was reported to Deputy Coroner Streeper of Upper Alton, and he went to the place where the body was found to bring it back to Alton. Capt. Hulett was notified at 9:30 o'clock that the body had been found and the search in the river near where the girl fell overboard was discontinued. All day yesterday a party of men under the direction of Capt. Hulett had been dragging the river and exploding dynamite in the hope that the body was lying near where the girl was drowned and that it could be raised in that manner. The current is very swift at the foot of Prospect street and the water deep, and it is supposed that the body floated off at once. Capt. Hulett offered a reward of $25 last night, and that amount will be paid to the two fishermen who found the body floating. The body was in a decomposed condition, and was taken to Upper Alton where C. N. Streeper prepared it for shipment to Beardstown. Capt. Hulett and family will leave for Beardstown this evening on the steamer Mary with the body, and interment will be at the Beardstown cemetery.

 

HULL, CYNTHIA A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1900
Mrs. Cynthia A. Hull, widow of the late James Hull, died at the family home in the Bottoms Saturday night after a long illness with dropsy. Mrs. Hull was 67 years of age and had lived in the Bottoms east of Alton many years, the family being one of the best known in that vicinity. She leaves many relatives and friends in Alton, and she was highly esteemed by all who knew her. The funeral will take place tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock, and services will be at the home. Interment will be in the Alton Cemetery.

 

Dr. Edwin S. HullHULL, EDWIN S. (DOCTOR)/source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, November 11, 1875
The news of the death of Dr. Edwin S. Hull, the celebrated horticulturist, will be heard with regret by his large circle of friends and acquaintances, not only in this city, but throughout the State. The sad event took place Monday morning at his residence on the bluffs, about six miles from Alton, after an illness of only a few days. His disease was inflammation of the stomach and intestines. He was in town last Tuesday in apparent good health. At the time of his death, Dr. Hull was a member of the Alton Horticultural Society, President of the State Horticultural Society, and held the office of State Horticulturist.

The doctor’s life had been devoted to the advancement of horticultural science. To his researches, studies and experiments, western horticulture is more indebted for its present development than to any other one man that we know of. He was an indefatigable student, and in the progress of his investigations, he had visited England and France. He was an enthusiast in his calling, and had made remarkable progress in the mastery of its details. He was a proficient botanist and entomologist, his knowledge of these branches proving an invaluable auxiliary in his investigations. He was a prolific contributor to various horticultural and agricultural papers and periodicals, and was considered standard authority. The general correctness of Dr. Hull’s theories and systems of cultivation was proved by his practical success. The fruits from his orchard were, without doubt, the finest that appeared in the Western markets. As a man, Dr. Hull was a warm friend, a genial acquaintance, and a kind neighbor – one who was highly esteemed in all the walks of life. He leaves a wife and four children.

Dr. Hull’s death will leave a void in the ranks of horticulturists, that it will be difficult to fill. His enthusiasm for his calling, his attainments in the sciences, his practical experience, will all be keenly missed, and by none more than his immediate friends and associates.

The funeral of Dr. E. S. Hull, State Horticulturist, took place Wednesday morning from his late residence on the bluffs near Alton. There was a large attendance of the friends and acquaintances of the deceased. Rev. M. Chase, rector of St. Paul’s Church, officiated on the sad occasion. The remains were interred in the family burying ground on the brow of the bluff, by the side of his first wife and two children.

NOTES:
Dr. Edwin S. Hull was born in May 1810 in Connecticut, and died at his residence on the bluffs near Alton on November 8, 1875. In 1844, he moved to the famous Hull farm near Alton (about a mile west of the Blue Pool and Hop Hollow entrance), on the bluffs now known as “Hull’s Bluff.” In 1917, Charles Levis built his “La Vista” mansion where the Hull’s farm once was. At his farm, Hull planted large orchards of fruit trees, and soon became a leader in this area. He overcame insects, blight, etc., through his study and hard work. He largely aided in the founding of the Alton Horticultural Society, where he became the first President of this society. Besides the positions he held mentioned in the article above, he was the horticultural editor of the “Prairie Farmer.”

 

HULL, EVLYN T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 24, 1915
Evlyn T. Hull, in his sixty-first year, died at 11:30 o'clock this morning at his home, 949 Union street, after an illness of three months standing from organic heart trouble. He is survived by his wife and three sons, Lynn, Kenneth and Irving; also two brothers and one sister, George Hull of East St. Louis, L. M. Hull of Washington, D. C., Mrs. F. J. Harford of Shawnee, Kan. Mr. Hull was a son of Dr. E. S. Hull, who for many years conducted a fruit farm on the bluffs, and was one of the foremost horticulturists of this vicinity. After removing to Alton, Mr. Hull engaged in the commission business and later in the oil distributing business. He was born in Godfrey township, and attended school at Summerfield, and later at the University of Illinois. Mr. Hull was a quiet, gentlemanly man, a good citizen and highly esteemed by everyone who knew him. He had been in poor health for many years and his ill health culminated in the heart trouble.

 

HULL, LEE A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 27, 1913
Lee A. Hull, son of E. T. Hull, aged 24, died Saturday night at the family home, 949 Union street, after a long illness from a blood disease, which affected his liver. The young man had been employed in the Alton National bank for five years. Though his health was on the decline, he continued at his post of duty in the bank until a few weeks ago, when he was obliged to give up work. He leaves besides his parents, two brothers, Lynn and Kenneth Hull. He was a member of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church, and the funeral services Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock will be conducted by Rev. G. L. Clark of that church. Burial will be in the City Cemetery. The deceased was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was a faithful employee in the bank where he was engaged, and his death is keenly regretted.

 

HUMBERT, AUGUSTUS G./Source: Alton Telegraph, September 21, 1844
Died, at Upper Alton on the 18th inst., Augustus G., son of Dr. Frederick Humbert, aged 5 years and 6 months. He was an amiable and interesting youth, and his early death has plunged his affectionate parents, who had previously been called to follow the remains of five other children to the grave, in the deepest affliction.

 

HUMBERT, ELVIRA M./Source: Alton Telegraph, July 16, 1847
Died in Upper Alton on the 12th inst., Elvira M., infant daughter of Dr. F. Humbert, aged 2 months and 16 days.

 

HUMBERT, FREDERICK (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, May 18, 1891
Dr. Frederick Humbert died this morning at 8:30, at the residence of his son-in-law, Dr. Robert Gibson, on Market Street. Dr. Humbert had been ill nearly a year, and had suffered severely a large portion of the time. He was in his 84th year, and had lived 56 years in Alton and Upper Alton. He was born in Frankfort, Germany. His father gave him a small amount of money, and he walked to Vienna and entered the college there, from which he graduated with distinction. He began his practice in Frederickford, Germany, and concluded it in this city. He was one of the earliest and most influential Germans of this part of Illinois, and for nearly half a century his name has been a household word as an eminent and successful medical practitioner and surgeon. Some of Dr. Humbert's surgical operations have made his name famous in medical and other works. His end was peaceful. He fell asleep this morning, after confessing his faith in God and the saving grace of the Savior of men. He leaves one daughter (his only child), Mrs. Dr. Gibson, who with her husband and three children, mourn his loss. The funeral will take place on Wednesday at 10 a.m. from Dr. Gibson's residence. Rev. Dr. Kendrick will conduct the services. The interment will be in Upper Alton Cemetery, where he will be placed by the side of his wife and eight children who have passed on before him. [Burial was in the Upper Alton Oakwood Cemetery.]

 

HUMBERT, THEODORE E./Source: Alton Telegraph, July 2, 1842
Died, on the 23d ult., at Upper Alton, Theodore E., son of Dr. F. and Mrs. A. M. Humbert, aged 5 months and 11 days.

 

HUMM, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 25, 1911
John Humm, aged 68, an old soldier, was found dead in bed this morning at his home in Bethalto. He had died during the night. He had lived in Bethalto since 1866. Mr. Humm is survived by his wife, two daughters, and four sons.

 

HUMMERT, FREDERICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 27, 1909
Old Soldier Dead
Frederick Hummert, in his 80th year, died Monday morning at 6 o'clock at his home, 942 Tremont street, after a long illness with kidney trouble and old age. Mr. Hummert's condition had been considered dangerous for a week, and his children had been attending him. At the time of his death all his family were with him. He came here 34 years ago and worked at first at the cooper's trade, but later he retired from that business and devoted his attention to real estate. He was an old soldier serving with honor for three years during the Civil War. During his life in Alton he was known as a good, upright citizen and was highly respected. Mr. Hummert leaves his wife and four children, Mrs. Orland Hemphill, Miss Ida Hummert, Messrs. Fred and charles Hummert. He leaves also two sisters, Mrs. Lena Vogelpohl and Mrs. William Keiser of Ord, Nebraska. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home.

 

HUMMERT, ISABEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 11, 1910
Mrs. Isabel Hummert, wife of Fred Hummert, died Thursday morning at 4 o'clock at the home of her stepmother, Mrs. Fanny Cowling, 53 east Eighth street, after an illness of three years from lung troubles. She was 35 years of age and leaves her husband and one daughter, 13 years old. Mrs. Hummert was the daughter of Thomas Cowling, and with the exception of her brother, Edgar Cowling, is the last of that family. She was born and raised in Alton, and was a graduate of the Alton high school in the class of 1893. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Methodist church of which she was a member.

 

HUMMERT, NELLIE G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 6, 1902
The funeral of Nellie G., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hummert, was held this afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Hummert in Middletown. The services were conducted by Rev. A. H. Kelso of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. Burial was in City Cemetery.

 

HUMPHREY, E. W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1899
Bethalto General Store Owner Dies
E. W. Humphrey, one of the most prominent residents of Bethalto, died Sunday night at his home after a long illness with consumption. He was 38 years of age and leaves a wife to mourn his death. Mr. Humphrey was the proprietor of a village general store, and was well known in all the surrounding country. The funeral will be at 1 o'clock Wednesday from the family home.

 

HUMPHREY, LUCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1901
Mrs. Lucy Humphrey died at the residence of Mr. J. T. Fahnestock at Wanda, on Saturday last. Mrs. Humphrey formerly lived in the family of Mr. J. S. Roper in this city. The funeral took place this morning at Wanda. Rev. D. L. A. Abbott, conducted the services. Messrs. H. M. Carr and W. M. Pierson attended the funeral.

 

HUNDLEY, JOHN B. (COLONEL)/Source: Alton Telegraph, June 18, 1847
Died on Saturday, June 17th, at his residence in Middletown, Col. John B. Hundley, a resident of this place for the last 11 years. Col. Hundley was a man whose loss must be sensibly felt by all intimately acquainted with him. Of an ardent temperament, his friendships were strong; and no self-denial was considered too great when a friend desired his aid. May God protect those held most dear by him, who ever sought to alleviate the sorrows of the bereaved.

 

HUNT, ADOLPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1915
Alton Fire Chief Stricken With Paralysis and Dies
While he was enjoying his day off at his home Monday, Fire Chief Adolph Hunt was stricken with paralysis and he died less than seven hours later without speaking or recognizing anyone. The fire chief had been working about his place Monday morning and was in a cheerful frame of mind, apparently feeling very well. He was sitting on his bed at home talking to his wife just before 3 o'clock in the afternoon, and was joking and laughing with his wife. Suddenly he remarked to her: "Something's wrong with my hands, they are going to sleep." His wife became interested at once, but at first did not believe there was anything wrong, but the fire chief insisted that something was wrong, and then his wife became convinced that he was correct, as his hands and arms appeared drawn. In another instant Chief Hunt fell over against his wife, and then to the bed. She called a doctor, and by that time her husband had become unconscious. He never revived. Fire Chief Hunt was born in Alton in 1866, and was 49 years of age. He first became a member of the fire department when A. W. Young was elected mayor of Alton, sixteen years ago, succeeding Andrew McDonald. He had served without interruption ever since. "Ade" Hunt was known as a good man in his line of duty. He was an old experienced fire fighter, and it was a tribute to his ability that he was reappointed by one mayor after another as part of an understanding that there was to be civil service in the fire department. He got along well with his men. Several years ago he had a bad fall down a flight of stairs which, it was feared, might prove fatal, but he recovered from that and resumed his position. A few months ago his fellow members in the fire department were aroused by Hunt making peculiar noises in his sleep, and with difficulty they aroused him. It was believed at that time that he was suffering some kind of a stroke, but when he revived it was passed off in their minds as merely "bad dreams." At that time, the men said, the fire chief was apparently having a premonition of death. It is believed that the trouble then was merely the beginning of the stroke that caused his death. The fire chief was married in Alton thirteen years ago. He leaves his wife and one son, David; also one brother, George; and two half-brothers, Edward and Harry Smith.....The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the German Evangelical Church. It is planned to have six members of the fire department to serve as pallbearers.

 

HUNT, ANTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 2, 1903
The funeral of Anton Hunt took place this afternoon from the residence of Peter Guertler Jr., at Second and Langdon street, to the City Cemetery, and was attended by many friends of deceased and of the family. Rev. Theo. Oberhellman conducted services at the cemetery, and the pallbearers were members of the G. A. R.

 

HUNT, CAROLINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 5, 1910
Mrs. Carolina Hunt, aged seventy-two years, died at the home of her son, Louis, one mile east of Fosterburg, Saturday morning at eight-thirty o'clock, after an illness of several months duration. She was well known in this locality and has many friends in this city. The funeral will take place Tuesday morning at ten o'clock from the German M. E. church at Fosterburg, of which she had been a member for the past forty-eight years. She leaves her eight children, four sons and four daughters. She leaves also forty-two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Four sons and two son-in-laws will serve as pallbearers at the funeral.

 

HUNTER, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 26, 1908
Charles Hunter, aged 36 years, died yesterday afternoon at St. Joseph's hospital after a surgical operation had been performed on him for the relief of appendicitis from which he suffered intensely for a time before his death. He lived in Riverview addition for many years and was an employee of the Standard Milling company for the past eight or ten years. He is survived by a wife and child. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from the Cathedral and burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

HUNTER, ELMIRA/Source: The Syracuse, New York Daily Standard, April 7, 1862
Mrs. Elmira Hunter, first wife of William Leggett, died at Alton, Ill., on the 31rst of March.

 

HUNTER, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 8, 1922
Mrs. Martha Hunter, wife of Henry B. Hunter, one of Alton's most highly respected citizens, passed away at her home, 901 Gold street, Saturday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. Though she had been in poor health for some time, she was bedfast just one week and her death came as a shock. Mrs. Hunter was born and reared in Alton. She was married to H. B. Hunter in the year 1878 and was a devoted wife and mother. She was a Christian and a very active member of the Union Baptist church, having connected herself with that church at an early age. But of late years has not been able to attend services there. She is survived by her husband and two daughters, Lulu and Minnie Hunter. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 3 p.m. from the home. The Rev. DeWitt of Jacksonville, Ill., will officiate. Interment will be in the City cemetery. Friends invited.

 

HUNTER, RUSSELL E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1921
Boy Drowned - Two Are Saved by Their Brother .... Prophecy Made
"The coroner will bring me back," was a prophecy made by Russell E. Hunter, aged 19, as he started off with a gay party of his friends to go swimming, Saturday afternoon. Twelve hours after he had made the prediction it was verified. The young man had been drowned in the Mississippi river off Skinny Island, and it was only through heroic efforts of Jesse Blevins that two Blevins brothers, Frank aged 23, and Lawrence aged 16, escaped death. Others in the party were Herb Blevins aged 13, Fred Blevins aged 12, and Frances Erthal. They had disrobed and left their clothes on the main shore, going wading across in shallow water to Skinny island, and there they were going swimming. Expert swimmers in the party were few. Three of the boys, including Jesse Blevins and Francis Erthal, walked upstream a short distance when it was noticed there was trouble in the other group of the swimming party. Jesse Blevins noticed his brothers, Frank and Lawrence, were in deep water, and Erthal went back with him to help save them. Frank Blevins had gone down twice when Jesse seized him by the hair and dragged him out. Lawrence managed to scramble to shallower water by himself, after a little help. Then the boys noticed that Russell Hunter, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hunter of 1606 Joesting avenue, had disappeared. They called for him and when he did not respond they feared he had been drowned. Some fishermen near by came over and said they had seen the missing boy sink beneath the water. The drowning occurred about three o'clock Saturday afternoon. The body was recovered about 3 o'clock Sunday morning. The inquest was held Sunday night, by Deputy Coroner Streeper.

 

HUNTER, SAMUEL STEELE/Source: Alton Telegraph, April 13, 1851
Died at Troy, Madison County, Illinois, on the 31st March, of inflammatory rheumatism, Mr. Samuel Steele Hunter, aged about 40 years.

 

HUNTER, SMITH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 16, 1901
Smith Hunter, one of the best known colored residents of Alton, died this morning at 8 o'clock at the family home, 1140 Bloomfield street, after a long illness and feeble health consequent of old age. He had been a resident of Alton since 1863, and was a teamster. He was born at Washington in Franklin county, Mo., February 18, 1835. He leaves besides his widow, one son, Henry T. Hunter, and a daughter, Mrs. Maghte Cross. He leaves also one brother, Clinton Hunter, and four sisters, Caroline Cahill, Mary Crowe, Fannie Birch, and Amanda Simpson. The funeral will take place Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the Union Baptist Church. Burial will be in the City cemetery.

 

HUNTINGTON, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Telegraph, March 19, 1842
Died, on Friday the 11th inst., at the residence of her Father (on Wood River), Miss Caroline Huntington, in the 17th year of her age. Twelve days previous to her death, she was in attendance at the Upper Alton Baptist Church. With what resistless force should this dispensation of God's providence, impress upon the young, as well as the aged, the admonition of our Saviour, "Be ye therefore also ready, for in such an hour as ye think not, the son of man cometh." The deceased was deeply impressed with the importance of those revealed truths, which alone can make man wise unto salvation. She was convalescent from a protracted illness, and only waiting the return of sufficient strength, publicly to profess herself, not ashamed of Jesus, when Morbilli or Rubeola supervened, producing in its progress, peupneumony under which she sank. Her afflicted parents, brethren and sisters, can render a tribute to her memory, worthy of that love and kindness, which she ever displayed towards them, and all with whom she became acquainted in this world.

 

HUNTINGTON, CORNELIA/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 5, 1838
Died, on Wednesday, 29th ult., Cornelia, youngest daughter of Ebenezer and Margaret Huntington, aged one year and nine months.

 

HUNTSMAN, SUSAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 15, 1912
Mrs. Susan Huntsman, wife of William Huntsman, who had been living in a tent on the river front, died at the hospital yesterday and was buried this afternoon, Rev. S. D. McKenney officiating.

 

HUNZE, CHARLES HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 1, 1918
Funeral services over the body of Charles Henry Hunze, whose wife was Miss Dora Steinheimer, were held this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home at 517 East Tenth street. Rev. O. W. Heggemeier, pastor of the Evangelical Church, spoke words of comfort to the relatives and friends, and burial was in the City Cemetery.

 

HURFORD, FRANK L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 18, 1916
Frank L. Hurford, aged 39, died Monday morning at 5:30 o'clock at his home, 302 Henry street, after a long illness. He is survived by his wife. Mr. Hurford had been in the employ of the Federal Lead about fifteen years. He came to Alton when the Federal Lead Co. opened its plant here and had remained at the plant up to the time it _______ necessary for him to give up work because of failing health. He was a prominent member of the Alton lodge of Elks and he served as Exalted Ruler of the lodge for a term, retiring after the last election of officers in the lodge. The funeral will be Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

HURL, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 8, 1904
Mrs. Mary Hurl, wife of Jacob Hurl, died last night at the family home, 914 Belle street, after a short illness. Her death was expected during Thursday, although she had been ill only a few days. She leaves beside her husband, two children. She was 27 years of age.

 

HURLEY, JOHN F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 24, 1914
Well Known Saloonkeeper Commits Suicide
John F. Hurley, who conducted a saloon at Second and Washington streets, committed suicide Tuesday morning between 11 and 12 o'clock in a room upstairs over his saloon. He drank carbolic acid. The cause of the suicide is not definitely known. It is said that he had been in a nervous condition for some time. He had been reading in the St. Louis papers of the suicide of a friend in St. Louis, Patrick Nolan, and seemed to have been deeply impressed by it. Whether this caused him to reach a sudden decision to kill himself is not known, as so far as could be ascertained he left no word to explain his act. In killing himself he had evidently made great preparations. He had gone into a barber shop and had his hair cut and was shaved. Then he called up his wife on the telephone and he chatted gaily with her. He seemed in a very cheerful frame of mind, notwithstanding the fact that he was about to kill himself. He then went upstairs, telling his bartender, Alderman Jonas Johnson, who had just taken the place that morning, that he was going upstairs to take a nap. Nothing was heard from him for a while, when Johnson went upstairs to make an inquiry from him. Hurley had sent for a transfer man to haul some baggage for him, and the transfer man wanted directions. When Johnson went upstairs he found Hurley lying on the floor, partly in the room and partly in the hallway of a rooming house he conducted. He was dead. He had removed his shoes before taking the poison. Hurley had apparently drank a whiskey glass filled with acid, and his death must have been soon after he went upstairs. There was evidence that he had suffered severely, and he had probably tried to make his way from the room to call for help, as was indicated by the position of his body. Hurley was very well known in Alton. He had been a resident here for many years. Until he gave up his trade of glassblowing he was prominent in the local glassblowers' union. He made a great run for Republican nomination for sheriff in Madison County four years ago, and he had been prominent in the fight for coroner two years preceding that, taking the part of one of the candidates for the nomination. He had a wide acquaintance throughout Madison County as well as in Alton. He took a deep interest in politics and served as a member of the Republican County organization for a long time, and was an efficient member. In the recent campaign he worked hard for his friend, Harry J. Mackinaw, to whom he was strongly attached. Hurley's suicide caused much surprise. While some of his intimate friends knew that he was not in the best of health, and that his nervous system seemed to be suffering, they did not suspect that his light hearted gay manner was covering such an intention as he must have had. Some of his friends believe that his reading of his friend's death might have caused the final unbalancing of his willpower, and prompted the suicide. Hurley is survived by his wife, one daughter and two sons. His children are: John and Paul, and Miss Florence. It was reported among his friends that Hurley's death might have been precipitated by a suit that was filed against him in the Circuit Court yesterday by G. F. Leu for $600. The money is said to have been advanced to Hurley at the time he made his unfortunate canvass for the Republican nomination for sheriff. Dr. D. F. Duggan, who was called to examine Hurley, said that he was dead before being discovered. A coroner's inquest was held this afternoon, and a verdict of death from suicide was found.

 

HURLEY, UNKNOWN WIFE OF PATRICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1914
Commits Suicide by Carbolic Route
Mrs. Patrick Hurley committed suicide late Saturday night at her home over the Dick store, Fifth and Ridge streets, by drinking carbolic acid. She was 22 years of age, and had been married but a short time. The circumstances attending the suicide of Mrs. Hurley were very unusual. Apparently, in the happiest frame of mind, she had been out shopping with her husband and they returned home late at night. They had sat around reading for a while, and Mrs. Hurley had retired first. Her husband was sitting on the opposite side of the bed removing his shoes, when his wife tossed him an empty bottle and said, "I've just drank that." He smelled the bottle and recognized the odor of carbolic acid. Quickly the husband called in Dr. N. P. Merritt, but when she arrived Mrs. Hurley was beyond any help. She made no explanation of her suicide, leaving no note, and her husband said that so far as he knew there was no cause why she should not want to live, unless it was some secret reason that had filled her mind with a determination to kill herself. He said that for six months she had carried the bottle of acid in her trunk, but that she did not examine it to see what it was. Once before she had tried to kill herself by drinking a lot of horse liniment, but beyond causing herself a lot of pain there was no bad effect. Mrs. Hurley was a handsome woman, apparently of a happy disposition, and it is believed that her mind must have been unbalanced. Her husband is connected with the Ohio Fire Extinguisher Co., and is here putting in a sprinkling system for the Alton Boxboard and Paper Co. The couple has been doing light housekeeping in two rooms over the Dick store. Mrs. Hurley's parents live in the country near Dalmo, Mo., and it is to that place it is expected the body will be taken for burial. Her parents were notified by wire Sunday that their daughter was dead.

 

HURRY, AGNES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 10, 1906
The funeral of Agnes, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Hurry, was held yesterday, and burial was in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

HURST, MARTHA CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 15, 1920
Mrs. Martha Caroline Hurst, wife of William Hurst of 9 West Delmar avenue, died this morning at 7:30 o'clock following a ten days' illness with bronchial trouble and measles. She was 48 years of age, and the mother of ten children, all grown. The body will be shipped to Ironton, Mo., Friday morning at 5:40 o'clock for burial.

 

HUSGENS, OVA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 3, 1921
Mrs. Ova Husgens, 32, died in Collinsville yesterday of injuries in a fall upon the steps of her home.

 

HUSKINSON, KATE IRENE/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 9, 1864
Died in Alton on the 7th inst., Kate Irene Huskinson, aged one year, six months, and seventeen days.

 

HUSKINSON, LUCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1910
Miss Lucy Huskinson died suddenly at her home, 1127 Easton street, Sunday afternoon about 5 o'clock, from heart failure. She had been attending the Y. M. C. A. vesper service at the First Presbyterian church with her sister, Mrs. G. H. Lane, and Miss Lizzie Beem, and a niece, and had just returned to her home preparing to busy herself about getting the evening meal ready. Without any warning whatever, while members of the family were near her, she collapsed and was caught just before she struck the floor. She made no complaint and never breathed after the heart stroke. Doctors were summoned and they pronounced her dead. Members of the family say that Miss Huskinson had never complained of heart trouble, and the only indication of it they could recall was a shortness of breath sometimes when she would be hurrying. She had walked rapidly home from the vesper service because of the rain, and probably overtaxed her heart by the exertion. Miss Huskinson was the youngest daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Huskinson, and was a life-long resident of Alton. In her home she was beloved by all the members of the family, and she had stood in the position of mother, even to those who were older than herself. She had a quiet, loving disposition, was slow to think ill of anyone, and never spoke anything but kindness. In her own home, where one would prefer to have the best things said, Miss Lucy Huskinson leaves nothing but beautiful memories of her faithfulness and her tender solicitude for her brothers and sisters. Her death is a very sad shock to her family, who had through long years found her their main reliance and home center. She leaves three brothers, George, Charles and Guy Huskinson, four sisters, Mrs. G. H. Lane, Mrs. J. W. Hopkins, Mrs. J. B. Schiffiet, and Miss Jennie Huskinson. George Huskinson was to have left within an hour from the time his sister died for Springfield, and Mrs. Hopkins of DeSoto, Mo., was to have left today for Colorado to make her home. She was notified of her sister's death and came to Alton instead of going west. Miss Huskinson was born April 8, 1868. She was a long time member and a leader in the Altar Guild of St. Paul's Episcopal church. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from the family home.

 

HUSKINSON, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 17, 1905
Pioneer Railway Builder Dies
After a lingering illness, William Huskinson died at his residence on the corner of Twelfth and Easton street at 10 o'clock a.m. Saturday. Mr. Huskinson has for more than 50 years been a resident of Alton. No man was more generally known or more highly appreciated than deceased. Of a kindly disposition, obliging to an extent that but few men have reached, he made and held friends fast. Few have ever heard a word of disparagement spoken of the venerable man. His employees on the Chicago and Alton railroad of years ago still hold him in the greatest admiration, and all speak kind words of him. For nearly half a century he held the post of road master on the Chicago and Alton railway. It was he that superintended the work of the building of the Alton from Alton to Springfield, and the work of road building done on that railway was of the most substantial sort. In fact, William Huskinson would do no other kind of work, and when he completed a job it was a guarantee of security, strength and substantialness. All his children were born and raised in Alton, and they reflect credit on the sterling qualities of the father, who showed them a good example, both by precept and practice. His wife passed away ten years ago, leaving the flavor of a good wife, a splendid mother, and a kindly neighbor behind her. That he missed the companionship of forty years or more was evident, and when he met a neighbor similarly bereaved, his warm handshake and sympathetic words were deeply felt. All similarly afflicted knew that he walked in the way they were traveling, and had a kindly friend in him who would, if he could, alleviate the sharpness of the grief and assuage the pain. Eight children survive him, viz: Misses Jennie and Lucy Huskinson, George, Charles and Guy; Mrs. G. H. Lane, Mrs. J. B. Shiflet of New York, and Mrs. J. H. Hopkins of DeSoto, Mo. They have a rich heritage in the memory of a loving father, a liberal provider for all their wants, and a kindly teacher in all the way of life. Several children preceded him to the land of perfection and peace, and no doubt the greeting was a joyous one today, when father, mother and children met for the first time on the golden shore. There were many sad expressions today as neighbors met, of regret in the passing of an old, tried and true friend and neighbor, even when recognizing that it would be better for him farther on. Mr. Huskinson was the last of the original builders of the Chicago and Alton railroad, he having seen all his old co-workers pass away before him. William Huskinson was born at Mansfield-Woodhouse, Nottinghamshire, England, March 26, 1827. He was educated as a civil engineer at Newark-on-Trent, and after completing his education he worked under his uncle, James Huskinson, a railroad builder who constructed the first railroads built in England and France. He spent nine years in France constructing railroads, and afterward went to Algiers where he was with a corps of engineers in charge of the building of French fortifications. He came to America in 1849, first going to New York then to New Orleans, where he built the New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain railroad. Afterwards he built the railroad from Jackson, Mississippi to Jackson, Tennessee, and later built the locks in the Kentucky river at Frankfort, Kentucky. He was superintendent of construction for the Alton and Sangamon river railroad, and later became road master of that railroad and of the C. & A. subsequently. He was a director of the Chicago and Alton. He was road master of the C. & A. for 34 years. Mr. Huskinson was married in 1852 at Alton to Jane Braznell, who died in 1896. He was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal church and held offices in the church for many years. He was also affiliated with all the Masonic bodies in Alton for many years, and was a member of Piasa lodge, A. F. & A. M. at the time of his death. The funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home on Twelfth street, and the services at the grave will be under the auspices of Piasa lodge, A. F. & A. M.

 

HUSKINSON, WILLIAM D./Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, April 4, 1893
The funeral of William D. Huskinson took place at two o'clock today from the home of his father, No. 1120 Easton street. The many friends and school mates of the young man attended to pay their respects to the departed one. He was a young man of rare traits and his death is a shock to a large circle of warm friends. The services were conducted by Rev. H. M. Chittenden, Rector of St. Paul's Episcopal church in an impressive manner. A long cortege followed the remains to City Cemetery, where they were interred. The pall bearers were Samuel Wade, Charles Yager, Baker Ash, Lee Nichols, Oscar Bozza, J. O. Booker.

 

HUSS, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 23, 1911
Bartender at Arcade Saloon Dies From Heart Failure
Joe Huss, a bartender at the Arcade saloon on Market street, fell dead this morning at ten o'clock, in the bar of the saloon. He was in the act of serving drinks to a customer and had turned to place a glass of water on the counter, when he was stricken. He turned partly around and fell to the floor and was dead before assistance could be brought. The cause of his death is now occupying the attention of the coroner. He was a sober person, without any evil habits. He was a very moderate drinker and his friends say they never saw him intoxicated. He boarded at 448 Front street. Joseph Huss had been in his usual health for the past few days, and had shown no signs of any ailment. He attended the funeral of James Piggott yesterday at Elsah, and when he returned last night to the Piggott boarding house, he showed no signs of any trouble, or did not make any complaint this morning when he left the boarding house to go to his work at the Arcade saloon. He had boarded at the Piggott home for the past twelve years, and there his sudden death had been a cause of mourning in the family to whom he was from long attachment, that extended back to the family's life in Elsah, as one of the family. He has in Alton a brother, Michael Huss, who is a watchman at the Hapgood plow works, and one sister, Mrs. James Riley. In Elsah he has two sisters: Mrs. William McDow and Mrs. Edward Keller. The body was taken in charge by the undertaker and removed to the Keiser rooms on East Second street, where the Coroner's inquest will be held. The funeral arrangements will be made by the members of the family later. When the police arrived at the Arcade immediately after the death, they found there was no one to take charge of the place, owing to the absence of the proprietor, and the place was locked by the police. Later, it was opened by Charles Thomas, whom the elder Mr. Hoppe had given charge to open it until the return of the owner. He was deeply interested in some business matters pertaining to the James Piggott estate, and a friend whom he had sent to consult a lawyer about the estate had just returned to report to him when the friend found Huss dead. The two men who were in the saloon at the time of the death said that Huss had been joking with them as he served them, and suddenly dropped to the floor.

 

HUTCHINSON, ASA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 5, 1921
Asa Z. T. Hutchinson, aged 73, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William Lively, 310 Mill street, after a long illness with Brights disease. He had been sick over a year. Mr. Hutchinson was a well known resident of Alton, and had lived here for many years. He is survived by six children, six grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. The children are C. W. Hutchinson, Alton; George W. Hutchinson, St. Louis; Mrs. William Lively, Alton; Miss Margaret Hutchinson, Jess Hutchinson, Alton; and Mrs. S. T. Nerup of Lakemore, Ohio. Hutchinson passed away Friday noon. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the Lively home, and burial will be in City cemetery.

 

HUTCHINSON, FANNY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1904
Fanny Hutchinson, colored, wife of James Hutchinson, aged 29, died this morning after a long illness. She leaves beside her husband a child, six weeks old.

 

HUTCHINSON, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1922
George Hutchinson, in the mechanical department at the plant of the Laclede Steel Co., died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning after a long illness there. He was an intimate friend of Lafayette Young, the general manager of the Laclede. Mr. Young had known him in his own boyhood and he sent for Hutchinson to come here three years ago. Mr. Young knew of the address of a brother, H. C. Hutchinson, in Cleveland, and notified him of the death. The address of two daughters of the deceased is not known to Mr. Young. Information was being awaited today from the family. Mr. Hutchinson was about 55 years of age.

 

HUTCHINSON, KNOCH/Source: Collinsville Herald, February 7, 1919
Knoch Hutchinson of Cedar Street, only negro coal miner, age about 70 years, member of the United Mine Workers, living in Collinsville, died at his home Tuesday. The funeral on Thursday afternoon was attended by the members of the miners local union No. 364, to which he belonged. Hutchinson had worked around the mines for 40 years, according to old-timers in the organization, having been an employee of the Consolidated Coal Company before the union organized. He worked at the old Consolidated Mine No. 2 before it was abandoned for the present Mine No. 17. There formerly was another negro, named Otles, in the organization years ago, but he died. Hutchinson is survived by his wife and several children.

 

HUTCHINSON, SARAH J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 30, 1912
Mrs. Sarah J. Hutchinson, wife of Asa Hutchinson, aged 57, died May 29th after a long illness. Mrs. Hutchinson is survived by her husband, three daughters, and three sons.

 

HUTCHINSON, WILLIAM "HICKORY BILL"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 24, 1911
William Hutchinson, known throughout Alton as "Hickory Bill," and one of the best known negroes in the city, died from Brights disease this morning at his home, Ninth and Piasa streets. Hutchinson had been sick many months and had suffered intensely. His career was one filled with police court incidents, in which he was defendant in cases brought by the Humane society. Hutchinson always claimed that he was being persecuted, that because the society had once prosecuted him the officers kept it up. He was fond of horses, and at one time he had a very fine horse which was his special pride. That particular horse was not allowed to do any work and was quite a fine animal. Many a time Hutchinson was summoned by the Humane society because he was fond of horses and sometimes bought more horses than he had feed for. It was at one of these hearings that Hutchinson replied to the criticism of the humane officers that his horses were lean. He contended that they were not the kind of horses to show their feed, and would not fatten. Pointing to the two humane society officers present, he drew a parallel case with them, one of them very stout and the other slender. "Now those two women have good care, plenty of feed and both ought to be fat, but are they?" Hutchinson's logic was unanswerable, and for a time he almost swayed the balances of justice in his favor. He was a hard working man and powerful in physique. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon from his home at Ninth and Piasa streets, at 2 o'clock.

 

HUTTON, CHRISTINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 9, 1910
Mayor Beall has been in correspondence for some time with a lawyer at Baden, Germany about a Miss Christina Hutton who committed suicide in Alton in 1882. The girl would have been heir to an estate in Germany. Her people did not know what had become of her, and since she is the only heir the authorities were trying to locate her. Mayor Beall ascertained from the records of the Alton Cemetery Association that the girl drowned herself and was buried here in 1882. Mayor Beall sent a certificate of burial to the lawyer, who will have to look elsewhere for someone to inherit the girl's estate.

 

HYLER, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 4, 1907
The funeral of Fred, 14 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Hyler, was held this afternoon from the home, and was attended by many neighbors and friends of the afflicted parents. Services were conducted by Rev. Dr. Twing, and burial was in City Cemetery beneath a coverlet of flowers, the sympathetic offerings of friends.

 

HYNDMAN, ANDREW JACKSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 15, 1906
Death of Founder of Rocky Fork Church
A. J. Hyndman, colored, founder of the Rocky Fork A. M. E. church, died at 9 o'clock Thursday night after a long illness, aged 68. He was a veteran of the Civil War. The A. M. E. church at Rocky Fork was founded in 1862, and immediately afterward Hyndman enlisted in the Union army and served three years. He returned to Rocky Fork after the war and lived there ever since, respected by all who knew him. He leaves three sons and four daughters. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the Rocky Fork church.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 16, 1906
The funeral of A. J. Hyndman, founder of the Rocky Fork, A. M. E. church, will be held Sunday afternoon at Rocky Fork, and four or five colored ministers will assist in the services. Large delegations of colored people from Alton, North Alton, and Upper Alton will attend the funeral.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 18, 1906
The largest funeral assemblage ever seen at Rocky Fork was that which congregated Sunday afternoon to pay their last respects to all that was mortal of A. J. Hyndman, founder of the Rocky Fork A. M. E. church. All of the Altons and Brighton, as well as the surrounding country, contributed mourners and the services were participated in by all the colored ministers of the Altons.

 

HYNDMAN, BEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 12, 1921
Ben Hyndman died yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock at his home, at the age of 54 years. Hyndman, who was the son of the late Robert Hyndman, for many years an employee of the Alton Woolen Mills, was known as the "Popcorn King" through the raising of a fine grade of popcorn. Hyndman was single, and is survived by his mother, Mrs. Eliza Hyndman, two brothers, John of Texas and Robert of Dorsey Station, and by a sister, Miss Jennie Hyndman. The funeral will be held from the Jacoby Undertaking parlors of this city, but the time of the services has not been set, awaiting word from John Hyndman. The family moved away from Alton many years ago, but will be well remembered by old time friends. Hyndman died at the family home at Dorsey Station.

 

HYNDMAN, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1915
Robert Hyndman, aged 93 years, is dead at his home in Dorsey, Ill., after a short illness. He died at noon Monday of the infirmities of old age. Mr. Hyndman is one of the well known residents of Madison county. He was for many years a resident of Alton, and during the operation of the woolen mills on Belle street was the engineer there. He was a cousin of Thomas Hyndman, formerly connected with the C. & A. railroad here in Alton, and has many relatives in this section of the county. Mr. Hyndman is survived by three sons, Benjamin and Robert of Dorsey, and John, who lives in Houston, Texas. Two daughters also survive, Miss Jennie Hyndman of Dorsey and another daughter who resides in Danville. Funeral arrangements will be made as soon as the son in Texas is heard from. Mr. Hyndman moved to his farm near Dorsey about eighteen years ago, and has resided there since. He has owned the land for many years but had not always resided there. The members of the Western Star lodge No. 1 of Odd Fellows will have charge of the funeral.

 

HYNDMAN, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 23, 1904
The funeral of Thomas Hyndman was held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of his son, Frank Hyndman, at Sixteenth and Belle streets. Mr. Hyndman was one of the best known men in the city of Alton, and had an acquaintanceship embracing nearly every man who worked in the operating department on the Chicago and Alton railroad. The funeral was one of the biggest ever seen in Alton. The home where the services was held was not large enough to accommodate the friends of the old engineman, and a long cortage followed the body to City Cemetery and saw it laid away. Mr. Hyndman was connected with Piasa Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and of Western Star lodge, I.O.O.F., and both lodges were unofficially represented by a large number of members at the funeral. The services were conducted at the home and cemetery by Rev. Dr. L. A. Abbott, by special request of Mr. Hyndman before his death. The pallbearers represented the two lodges, S. F. Connor, George Gray and Lawrence Stoehr from Piasa lodge, and William Flynn, W. F. Sappington and George Long from Western Star lodge.

 

HYNDMAN, THOMAS SR./Source: Alton Telegraph, November 22, 1861
We understand that an elderly Scotch gentleman, a resident at the Coal Branch about three miles from Alton, by the name of Hyndman, the father of Thomas Hyndman, who is well known in the city, started to town this morning with a wagon, and was soon afterwards found fatally bruised in the breast and otherwise injured, from the effects of which he soon afterwards died. As he was alone when the accident occurred and was unable to speak, it is not known how he was hurt. It is supposed, however, that he was in some way thrown from his wagon.

 

HYNING, A. O. VAN/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, January 6, 1892
A. O. Van Hyning, foreman of the bath tub shop at Leclaire, died Friday night [Jan. 1] at 10:30 o'clock of rheumatism of the heart. The remains were sent to Butler, Monday, for interment. The entire working force of Leclaire accompanied the remains to the depot. Mr. Van Hyning was 41 years and 9 months of age and leaves a wife and four children.  

 

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