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MAAS, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 18, 1903
Henry Maas, aged 67, died Sunday afternoon at his home near Godfrey, after a long illness with consumption. He had lived near Godfrey nearly 50 years. He leaves his wife and two daughters and seven sons. He will be buried Tuesday morning from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock.

 

MAAS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 28, 1901
John Maas, aged 26 years, a well known man of Godfrey - the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Maas, died Tuesday night at a St. Louis hospital where he went just five weeks ago to be treated for stomach troubles. The body will be brought to Alton on the Big Four, arriving here at 9 a.m., and will be taken to St. Mary's church where services will be held. Deceased leaves many relatives and hosts of friends in this city and vicinity to regret his death.

 

MACDONALD, ALLEN G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 19, 1919
Alton City Court Clerk
Allen G. MacDonald, clerk of the City Court of Alton, died at 4:20 o'clock this morning at his home, 818 east Seventh street, after a long illness. The immediate cause of his death was jaundice from which he had been suffering since last November. Notwithstanding the fact that he was in no condition to continue his duties, he insisted upon sticking on the job, ably assisted by his daughter Phyllis, who proved herself the right hand of her disabled father, and made it possible for him to stay at work long after he might have been forced to quit. One week ago last Saturday he found it necessary to take to his bed. He had been in his office on Saturday morning but was unable to remain. On Monday his physician advised that it would be impossible for him to go back to his office and Judge Yager made a temporary appointment of a clerk to take his place, as important court business was on hand. Once Clerk MacDonald had given up his efforts to carry on his work, his decline was rapid. His will power had kept up long, and when he ceased to make the struggle the end came quick. He came to Alton sixteen years ago, a glassblower. About ten years ago, while diving in the Chautauqua bathing pool he struck his head on the concrete bottom of the pool and was partially paralyzed. He never regained full use of himself. He became a candidate for the office of Clerk of the City Court six years ago. He leaves his wife, three daughters, Miss Phyllis of Alton; Mrs. Paul Johnson of Jacksonville; Mrs. Gertrude Lange of Pittsburg, Pa.; and three sons: F. A. of Toledo, Ohio; Alleng, Jr.; and Malcolm of Alton. He leaves also four brothers, Harry of East Alton; C. L. and William of Muncie, Ind.; Norman and Miss Anna MacDonald of Philadelphia. He was a member of Piasa lodge, A. F. & A. M. and the burial services in Oakwood cemetery will be under their charge. Rev. Edward L. Gibson, of the First Presbyterian church, will conduct the services at the home. The time of the funeral will be announced when word is received from all the family.

 

MACHIN, WILLIAM BODEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1901
Upper Alton News - William Boden Machin, the only son of Mrs. Julia Machin, died this morning at 6:15 o'clock after a long and painful illness. He was seventeen years of age last Sunday. His parents were born and reared in Alton. His grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Sawyer, were residents of this vicinity for many years. Willie was a patient sufferer and a lad of strict integrity and had many friends. The funeral will be held from the home tomorrow afternoon at two o'clock. Services will be conducted by Rev. Cole, pastor of the M. E. Church, of which the lad was a member. He leaves two sisters, Nellie and Birdie.

 

MACK, EDNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1918
Miss M. Edna Mack quietly passed away at St. Joseph's Hospital, Thursday afternoon at 5:30 after a lingering illness. Miss Mack was the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Mack and had spent her entire life in this city. Miss Mack possessed an unusually bright and happy disposition, and was most sympathetic to those in sickness or sorrow, her entire life being characterized by the spirit of unselfish service for others, and she leaves a host of friends who will deeply miss her. Miss Mack was a member of the Ninian Edwards Chapter of the D. A. R., and was serving her second term as secretary at the time of her death. She was also a member of the First Presbyterian Church. The funeral will be held from the family residence on State street, Sunday at 3 p.m., Rev. Edward L. Gibson officiating. Friends are invited to the services at the home, but the interment will be private.

 

MACK, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 1, 1901
James Mack, aged 52 years, died at St. Joseph's hospital last night from an abscess of the throat. The funeral will take place Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

 

MACKETT, CHARLES/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 9, 1880
From Edwardsville - Charles Mackett, who had been greatly afflicted for a long time, died yesterday morning at his residence on Kansas street. The deceased was a citizen of this city for many years, and was well and favorably known by a large number of people. He was aged sixty-five years, and has left a widow and children (all adults) to mourn their loss. His funeral will take place this afternoon.

 

MACKINAW, HARRY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 14, 1916
Madison County Clerk
Harry Mackinaw, county clerk of Madison county, died at St. Joseph's hospital at 4:20 o'clock Friday morning. He did not regain consciousness except for a moment when he opened his eyes, but was unable to speak, then relapsed. The death of the county clerk had been expected, and members of his family were in constant attendance. It had been the wish of Mr. Mackinaw that when the end came it would be in Alton, and owing to the attachment he felt for his old home at the corner of Sanford avenue and Washington avenue, it was decided to accept an offer made by the present tenants of the house, Mr. and Mrs. George Phelan, to take the body there and have the funeral services from that place. Harry Mackinaw was born in Steubenville, Ohio, and would have been 48 years of age next May 30. He came to Alton in 1893 and was married here six years later to Miss Emma Bell, a teacher in the public schools. He was a very prominent member of the local branch of the Glass Bottle Blowers' Association, and beside taking a prominent part in the branch, he held position in the national organization. His ability was recognized by the union, and he was selected as a member of the executive committee of the organization time after time, and he also served two terms as vice-president of the national organization of bottle blowers. It was while serving in this capacity he suffered an injury in Washington, D. C., and he was forced to give up that line of work. He was appointed to the position of deputy state factory inspector by Governor Deneen, and to that office gave a high degree of intelligent work. He resigned that position because of his inability to continue when his physical disability became worse. He became a candidate for the Republican nomination for county clerk, carried the primary and was elected by an overwhelming majority in November 1910. He was renominated with very little opposition four years later and carried a tremendous vote. His second term began in December 1914. He was a member of the Elks and the Maccabees, and for many years a member of the Glass Bottle Blowers' Association. In the office of county clerk he was highly efficient, and the duties of the office were discharged with eminent satisfaction to everybody. In this work he had the invaluable assistance of her devoted wife, who contributed much to making his administration one of the most successful Madison County ever had. Mr. Mackinaw leaves his wife and one son, Curtis Mackinaw. He leaves also his aged mother, four brothers and one sister, all residents of Steubenville, Ohio. The body will be taken this evening to the old home of the family, at Sanford and Washington avenues in Alton, and there friends may call this evening and tomorrow to take a last look at the deceased county clerk. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church. The body will be entombed in the Grandview Mausoleum in City Cemetery.

 

MADDEN, LESTER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 15, 1902
Upper Alton News - Lester Madden, the 8 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. George Madden, was buried at Fosterburg on Tuesday, Rev. Payne conducted the services.

 

MADREY, UNKNOWN CHILD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 9, 1906
The 5 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Hadrey died yesterday at the family home on east Second street after a short illness from cholera morbus. Another child is very ill also.

 

MADSEN, CLEMENTINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 26, 1921
Mrs. Clementine Madsen, wife of George Madsen, died Sunday noon, a few minutes before 1 o'clock at the family home on the Godfrey road. Her death followed an illness of about four years and she had been bedfast since a year ago last June. Her death was not unexpected as she had been sinking fast the last few days of her life. She was 50 years of age. Mrs. Madsen came to Alton with her husband about 12 years ago and started the Alton Floral Co. She conducted the business until bad health made it necessary to give it up and she turned it over to her daughter, Miss Marie Willis. On the home place her husband, George Madsen, has hot houses and conducted business on a large scale. Mrs. Madsen came to Alton from Edwardsville. She had been married. She leaves three children, Leo and Marie Willis, by a former marriage, and Helen Madsen. She leaves her husband and one sister, Mrs. Herman Raff of Gerald, Mo. Mrs. Madsen was highly esteemed by all who knew her. She was a successful business woman and by her uniform courtesy she had built up a very good business which she reluctantly gave up when she failed in health. She was a member of the First Presbyterian church and the funeral services, Wednesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock from the home, will be conducted by Rev. Edward L. Gibson, the pastor.

 

MAEHL, ANDREAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 5, 1907
Andreas Maehl, aged 76, died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning from the weakness of old age. He had been an inmate of the hospital over a year. Since the death of his wife a number of years ago, he had lived alone, refusing to go with any of his children, and it was only when he became too weak to take care of himself that he finally consented to removal to the hospital. He possessed considerable real estate, and had plenty of means to take care of himself in comfort, but he had preferred a life of loneliness. Mr. Maehl leaves a daughter in Upper Alton, Mrs. O. T. Christy, and one in St. Louis, Mrs. Harry Ground. He leaves a son, John Maehl in Mascoutah, and William Maehl in St. Paul.

 

MAERDIAN, RUDOLPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 7, 1913
Rudolph Maerdian of 411 Belleview, died very unexpectedly at his residence at noon Monday, after an illness of only a few days. Mr. Maerdian, who was one of the oldest residents of Alton who was still active, was in his 90th year. He had retired from the barbering business only a few years and was apparently in the best of health. He was able to be downtown Saturday evening, and his sudden collapse was a sad surprise to his many friends in and around Alton who had learned to love the kindly old man. His death was due to no particular cause, except a sudden prostration from old age. Mr. Maerdian mowed the lawn at his home Saturday, and afterward went downtown, was taken sick Sunday, but not apparently seriously so, and on Monday morning the collapse came. Mr. Maerdian came to Alton 63 years ago when Alton was still young, and he lived here ever since. He was known as a skillful barber in the olden days, and he did the work for Alton's distinguished men of the olden times. He never lost interest in modern events, however, though old age was advancing, and among the young people he had many friends. He was a devoted member of Piasa lodge, A. F. & A. M., and probably the oldest member. He was born January 24, 1824, and would have been 90 in six months. He was a native of Bavaria, Germany. He was a man with a gentle word and a smile for everyone he met, and he did not let physical infirmities interfere with being pleasant. He leaves two sons, Otto and Rudolph; and one daughter, Miss Louise. Miss Maerdian lived with her father and had been his faithful aid for many years. The time of the burial will be definitely announced when his two sons, Rudolph at Big Timber, Mont., and Otto of Polson, Mont., have been heard from.

 

MAGAR, CHRISTIAN/Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, June 22, 1893
Christian Magar, a German about 74 years old, living in Fort Russell township, committed suicide Wednesday by hanging himself to a willow tree on the banks of Cahokia, one mile north of Edwardsville. He took off his shoes, removed his coat, vest and hat, laid his cane aside, tied a red handkerchief around his neck, and with a small rope fastened this to a lower limb of the tree and swung off. His feet were touching the ground and the body in a standing posture when found by John Bayer and John Kemp, two boys.

 

MAGEE, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 31, 1900
Charles Magee, the well known tailor, died this morning at his home on Market street, after an illness of several weeks. He was taken ill while at work in Moritz's tailoring establishment and was taken to his home. His advanced age told against him and he sank gradually until this morning when death came. He was born in County Antrim, Ireland, and was 64 years of age. He lived in Alton many years and was always highly esteemed as a citizen. He leaves a wife and five children - John and Patrick Magee, and Mrs. Fred Mohr, of Alton; Mrs. Mary McEvoy of St. Louis; Charles Magee of Venice. He leaves also a sister, Mrs. R. Nagle of Alton, and two brothers, Messrs. Duncan Magee of St. Louis and Daniel Magee of Chicago. The funeral will be Saturday morning at 9 o'clock, and services will be in the Cathedral.

 

MAGEE, CHARLES E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1917
Charles E. Magee of 1127 Central avenue, died at 11 o'clock Tuesday morning at his home, after being an invalid for a period of two years. He was 52 years old last November. Mr. Magee was for many years employed as a glassblower in the plant of the Illinois Glass Co. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Rose Magee, two daughters, Estelle and V__da, and two sons, Elmer and Cletus. His brother, John Magee of Springdale, Pa. arrived here in time to see him before he died. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

 

MAGEE, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1900
Mrs. Elizabeth Magee, wife of John Magee, the Chicago & Alton engineer, died at 2 o'clock this morning at the family home, 1504 Belle street, after a long illness. Mrs. Magee had been an invalid the last three years of her life, and two years ago she underwent a surgical operation to remove an internal cancer. She recovered from the operation and was able to be about her home and attended to her household duties. A short time ago she was taken ill with the grip and bronchitis and did not rally. She leaves besides her husband, five children. She was 40 years of age and had been a resident of Alton many years. The funeral will be Monday morning at 9 o'clock, and services will be in the Cathedral.

 

MAGEE, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 10, 1905
The funeral of George Magee was held Sunday afternoon from St. Mary's church, where services were conducted by Rev. Fr. Meckel. Interment was in St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

MAGEE, JOHN "BALDY"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 17, 1911
Old Time Railroad Engineer
John Magee, better known as "Baldy," an old time railroad engineer, died this afternoon at 1 o'clock at his boarding place in Yager Park. He had been living with his daughter, Mrs. Wallace, for some time. Magee had been in poor health for some time, and had not been working at his trade as an engineer. The last work he did was for the Illinois Terminal at the roundhouse. For many years he was employed on the Chicago and Alton railroad, and he ran the local switch engine for many years. He was known as a good engineman during almost his entire career. He had been confined to his home for some time, and his death was expected.

 

MAGEE, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 9, 1899
Margaret, the three year old child of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Magee of Venice, was brought here [Alton] today for burial. Services were at the Cathedral at 9 a.m.

 

MAGENTY, STEPHEN/ Source: Alton Telegraph, November 14, 1862
Brakeman Killed in Railroad Accident
This morning as the switch engine on the Chicago & Alton Railroad was taking a train of empty cars to the summit, about three miles from here, the brakeman, who was standing upon the top of them, when in the act of turning around slipped and fell to the ground. One of the cars passed over his body in two places, and cut him in three different pieces. His legs were broken clear off, and the breast severed from the lower part of the body, thereby causing instant death. Two of the cars were thrown from the track. This caused a detention of the morning train bound northward, as also the southward bound train for several hours. The man was a member of the Catholic Temperance Society of Alton, by whom the body was taken in charge. His name was Stephen Magenty. He has no relatives, but an aunt here in Alton. The coroner, William G. Pinckard, Esq., held an inquest over the body and the following verdict was rendered:

An inquest was held by William G. Pinckard, Esq., Coroner of Madison County, this day, the 13th of November, in view of the body of Stephen Magenty, and we, the jury summoned and sworn, do say that according to the evidence given by both Engineer and Fireman, that the said Stephen Magenty came to his death by accidentally slipping from the cars, and the cars passing over his body, and that no blame is attached to any person or persons belonging to the said Chicago and Alton Railroad. Signed by E. L. McDonaugh, Foreman, John Hartman, Robert Solomon, J. Gray, William R. Jones, Orin Chafee, Michael Connelly, Patrick O’Connell, Patrick Cunningham, John Manahan, Joseph Slawson, Patrick Downee.

 

MAGUIRE, ALICE ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 30, 1918
The funeral of Alice Elizabeth, the six weeks old child of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Maguire of Chamberlain avenue, was buried this morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery. The little one died in St. Louis Saturday, where she was taken for treatment. An operation was performed but did not relieve the suffering of the little child, who died shortly afterwards.

 

Photo of Charles Edward MaguireMAGUIRE, CHARLES EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 22, 1918
Soldier Killed in France
Charles MaguirePolice Magistrate and Mrs. Patrick Maguire were notified by the War Department Thursday night that their son, Charles, had died in France October 8. This message confirmed statements made in a letter by George Smith of East Alton, written to Mr. and Mrs. George Smith, his parents, and which was received last Saturday. In this letter Smith, who had been a close friend of Charles Maguire, and had been with him ever since they entered the service, said that his friend had been badly wounded and he said that he had been told that he had died later in a hospital. The soldier assumed that his family knew all about it, however, and the information he gave was just enough to cause much anxiety. The Maguire family decided not to anticipate the announcement by the government, believing there was a chance that the information of young Smith might not have been accurate. They continued to hope for the best, though with heavy hearts, because Charley had not been heard from in a long time. The War Department message coming Thursday night dissipated all hope that had been held. Charles Maguire was 29 years old. He was in Co. I, 132nd Infantry. He was one of the drafted men sent to Camp Taylor and his going was characterized by the utmost willingness. He was a patriot of the truest type, and in all his letters home he had expressed the utmost willingness to go through with whatever was in store for him. He was a young man who possessed a very large circle of good friends in Alton, was very popular, and the tidings of his death caused general sadness. In the same company with Charles Maguire, beside George Smith, was Cecil Sherer of Alton. The parents of Sherer are deeply concerned over their son as they have not heard from him recently. Maguire was a member of Alton Council 460, Knights of Columbus, and was the second member of the order to make the supreme sacrifice on the field of battle. The other was Edward Kniery. Maguire was a Fourth Degree member of the order, and before leaving for service was given a farewell by the Fourth Degree members. He was also the second member of the Cathedral Parish to have a gold star replace the white.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 3, 1918
A requiem mass for Charles Maguire was celebrated at Ss. Peter and Paul's Cathedral this morning at 8 o'clock, at which the members of the parish showed their respect and attended mass in honor of the first member of the Cathedral congregation who laid down his life on the field of battle in France. The mass was for the parishioners. Tomorrow there will be another mass to be attended by the Young Men's Sodality in which he held membership and who will affix a gold star to their service flag in his memory. There was a large attendance at the service. It was conducted just as any regular funeral service would be held in the Cathedral, except there was no casket in the usual place. No other detail was missing. The young man's body was buried where he fell on the field of battle in France, and the family are uncertain as to what will be done later on about the remains being brought back home.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 31, 1918
Father Receives Copies of Son's Pictures
Magistrate Patrick Maguire today received a number of copies of a photograph made in the St. Mihiel sector during the fighting there in which his son, the late Charles Edward Maguire, participated. The father received a letter from his son telling him to look in the Chicago Tribune of a certain date, and on looking there the father discovered the picture of his son, Charles Edward, a member of a squad which had captured a German machine gun with all its crew, without firing a shot. Soon thereafter the parents in Alton were told that their son had been killed in action, possibly a few days after his picture was taken. The father learned where he could get the prints of the picture, and he sent to the firm in New York, and had a dozen copies made and sent to him. They came in today and will be valued possessions of the family, as they are the only pictures they have of Charles Edward in France, in action. In front of the group of soldiers is the captured machine gun. The members of the party are fully armed and wear their helmets and the features of Charles Maguire were very distinct.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1919
A requiem mass was celebrated at SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral for Charles Maguire, son of Magistrate and Mrs. Patrick Maguire, who was killed in the battle of the Argonne in France, just one year ago today. Word of his death did not come until after the signing of the armistice.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1921
The remains of Charles Maguire, who died on the field of battle in France, will arrive home soon. A telegram received today by Magistrate Patrick Maguire said that the body of Charles Maguire had arrived at Hoboken, J. J., and that it would be shipped immediately on receipt of instructions from the family. Word was sent by way of Chicago as some of the boys there who were with Charles Maguire in battle when he died, desire to place a wreath on the casket, and a party of them have indicated that they desire to accompany the remains to Alton and be here at the time of the final burial in Greenwood cemetery. The arrival of Charles Maguire's remains here may be coincident with the arrival home of the remains of Maurice Walter, another Alton boy, who died a heroic death on the field of battle.

 

MAGUIRE, FOREST (nee CLARK)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 23, 1920
Mrs. Forest Maguire, wife of Miles Maguire of 4101 Alby street, and daughter-in-law of Magistrate and Mrs. Patrick Maguire, died very unexpectedly yesterday afternoon in the office of Dr. A. Don Stocker in the Commercial building, from heart trouble following the extraction of six teeth which had been troubling her. Mrs. Maguire had taken dental gas, and owing to the difficult nature of the operation, had been under the influence of the anesthetic for some time. According to Dr. Stocker, she had come safely out from under the influence of the gas and had risen from the dentist's chair with the intention of going home to her children, when she collapsed. Doctors were called and two of them did all that was known to them to revive her, but without avail. She died at 5:40 o'clock, over an hour after she collapsed. Dr. Stocker, who has devoted himself exclusively to the extractionist line of the dental profession, is an expert at administering the gas, and he said that there was no apparent organic defect in Mrs. Maguire during the time she was under the influence of the gas, and it was a great surprise when she collapsed and failed to rally. It was not known that she had any heart trouble, and members of her family said that except for a bad toothache that caused her to visit the dentist's office to have the offending teeth pulled, she had nothing wrong with her so far as their knowledge went. Mrs. Maguire's maiden name was Clark. Beside her father, J. Clark, who lives in Alton, she leaves two sisters, Mrs. David Beauten of Detroit, and Mrs. J. C. Carroll of Milwaukee. The saddest feature of the death of Mrs. Maguire is that beside her husband she leaves four little sons, the oldest seven years old and the youngest nine months, who are left without a mother. She was the best of mothers and her interests centered chiefly in the little home and her family. Deaths from heart trouble following the administering of dental gas are very rare, and those who have studied the matter closely were greatly surprised that Mrs. Maguire collapsed and died after undergoing the experience. It is believed that Mrs. Maguire must have developed some heart trouble of late, and that the experience of having so many teeth extracted at once proved too heavy a tax on the weakened organ. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at nine o'clock from the Cathedral. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MAGUIRE, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 12, 1903
Switchman Fatally Injured in Illinois Glassworks Yards
James Maguire, aged 27, was fatally injured Sunday morning while assisting in making up a train for the Illinois Terminal in the glassworks yards. The cause of the injury is not fully known, as the accident was not witnessed entirely. The young man was engaged to be married to Miss Anna Rapp of Jerseyville, and the banns of their marriage were announced in the Jerseyville Catholic church Sunday, where the bride attends church. The couple had fitted up a neat little home in Alton, and everything was in readiness for them to go to housekeeping in happiness. Maguire seemed to be unfortunate in his railroad experiences, as he was severely injured about one year ago while working on the same railroad. While riding on top of a box car that was being used to make a running switch, the car left the rails at the foot of Market street and turned over. Maguire's right foot was broken at the instep. Sunday morning he was clinging to the side of a coal car that was being drawn from a siding to make up a train. In some way he lost his hold and fell, striking on the sharp edge of a switch point with the base of his spine. Frightful injuries were inflicted by the switch point, and Maguire's death was hastened by loss of blood. He was moved to St. Joseph's hospital where he died before noon. Deputy Coroner Streeper impaneled a jury this morning to hold an inquest. The body will be sent to Jerseyville tomorrow, and the funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Francis Xavier's church. Maguire leaves his mother, Mrs. Rose Maguire of Alton, one sister, Mrs. James Noonan, and three brothers, John, Thomas and Joseph. He was a young man of good character and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. A strange series of fatalities seemed to relentlessly pursue Maguire and his fianc� in preventing them being married. Several years ago they had the date set for their marriage and the wedding was postponed by the death of Maguire's father. One year ago the date was set again, but that time the groom was injured in an accident on the Illinois Terminal, and the wedding was again postponed. The third time death stepped in and took the prospective groom three days before the wedding day.

 

MAGUIRE, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1900
Mrs. Mary Maguire, an aged resident of this city [Alton], died Saturday afternoon at the home of Patrick Burns, northeast of the city, after a long illness. The funeral was today at 9 o'clock and services were in St. Patrick's church.

 

MAGUIRE, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 19, 1911
The funeral of Mrs. Mary Maguire was held this morning from St. Patrick's church where a requiem mass was said by Rev. Frs. Kehoe and Manning, in the presence of a large gathering of friends and neighbors. Many floral offerings were made and burial was in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MAGUIRE, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 24, 1914
Mrs. Mary Maguire died at her home, 313 Carroll street, this morning at 10 o'clock after a long illness from a complication of diseases. She leaves three children, Leo, Theresa, and Helen Wingate. The funeral will be Monday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

MAGUIRE, NONIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1910
Mrs. Mary Maguire, living on Ninth street near Henry, was summoned to St. Louis Wednesday morning by news of the dangerous illness of her daughter, Nonie Maguire, aged 22. Before she could get there word came that the young woman had died. The first message about the serious illness of the girl was received late Tuesday night and only one of the brothers had time to catch the last car to St. Louis. She had been slightly ill for a long time, and last Sunday went to St. Louis to undergo medical treatment. Her case was not regarded as serious at any time, and it was a great shock to her people to learn of the fatal turn it had taken. Miss Maguire was employed by Melling & Gaskins for a long time. She leaves beside her mother, three brothers, Edward, William, and Thomas, and one sister, Mary Maguire. The body will be brought back to Alton for burial.

 

MAGUIRE, NORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1910
The funeral of Miss Nora Maguire was held this morning from the Cathedral, and the very large attendance of friends and neighbors attested the esteem and affection in which the young lady was held. Floral offerings were unusually numerous and very beautiful, and the grave in Greenwood was completely covered with them.

 

MAGUIRE, M./Source: Alton Telegraph, January 17, 1862
Mr. M. Maguire, lately an active businessman in Alton, departed this life yesterday morning. Mr. Maguire was a native of Baltimore, Maryland, but spent most of his life in Alton. We had but few men who were more active or energetic than he in every enterprise calculated to promote the interest of the city. But about a year since he began to give fearful evidence of sinking into a decline, which terminated his short career on yesterday morning, as before stated. His loss will be severely felt by an interesting family and a large circle of acquaintances. He was 37 years of age.

 

MAGUIRE, PATRICK/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, September 7, 1854
Patrick Maguire, Esq., an old citizen of this city [Alton] and a member of the City Council from the Third Ward, died after a brief illness on Thursday night. His funeral was attended yesterday afternoon by the Members of the City Council, and a large concourse of citizens. Mr. Maguire was highly respected and esteemed by his neighbors.

 

MAGUIRE, VIRGINIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1921
Mrs. Virginia Maguire, widow of Michael Maguire, died this morning at 2:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital. She was 86 years old and had been a resident of Alton for 82 years. In the death of Mrs. Maguire passes one of Alton's best loved persons. It is said of Mrs. Maguire that she lived and labored not for riches, but to make herself useful. In her efforts to make herself useful, she made herself beloved. Mrs. Maguire was married here to Michael Maguire when she was 16 years of age. Her husband, who came here from Baltimore, died ten years later. It seemed that Mrs. Maguire had consecrated her life to service. In her kindly way she was of service to many families. She loved children, and took care of the children of many families when it became necessary for the parents to be away. So kindly was Mrs. Maguire, and so great was her love for children, that she was loved by them. She seemed not to care for the financial returns from this work, so long as she was able to support herself and be of service. She was inspired by her love for children, and her desire to be kind and of service to her friends. Mrs. Maguire formerly lived on Seventh street, but for the past 15 years she has made her home in St. Joseph's Hospital, her staying there being provided for by a former schoolmate who provided for Mrs. Maguire's stay by her will when she died. In a room filled with pictures of children, she was to her callers a hostess of incomparable charm. She was a genuine "old lady" of the old school. Clad in black, her beautiful, kindly features lighted by her pleasant smile, she was a familiar figure at the hospital. Few visitors at the hospital failed to "drop in and see Mrs. Maguire." Her love of children she retained. While she lived at the hospital, many children of St. Patrick's School called on her to receive from her hands crackers, which she always gave the youngsters. Mrs. Maguire was born in Richmon, Va., on February 4, 1835, and came to Alton when she was four years old. Her only surviving relatives are two nieces, Mrs. R. P. Harris and Miss Clare Ginter. Her only sister, Sister Savior, a sister of charity, died last September at Joplin, Mo. The body was taken today to the home of Mrs. Harris at 330 Alby street. The funeral will be Friday morning from Mrs. Harris' home. Requiem mass will be celebrated at Ss. Peter and Paul's Cathedral and interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MAHER, DANIEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 31, 1920
Daniel Maher, 89, died yesterday at his home near Godfrey, following an illness of a year. He had been a resident of that section for more than 30 years. He was born in Tipperary, Ireland, and came to America at the age of 19. Shortly after coming to this section he purchased the farm a mile northeast of Godfrey and has resided there since. He is survived by his widow and four sons and two daughters. The sons are William of Brighton, and Thomas, Edward and James who lived at home; the daughters are Mrs. Margaret Hennely of Granite City and Elizabeth Maher who lives at the Godfrey home. The funeral will be Monday morning at 10 o'clock, from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, where Requiem Mass will be celebrated. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MAHER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 6, 1908
John Maher, aged 74, died Saturday evening at his home, 511 Market street, from Bright's disease. Nine years ago Mr. Maher lost his foot while in the employ of the Bluff Line railroad, and from that time he was never altogether well. His inability to get around caused him to begin failing physically. He had up to that time led a very active life. He has been an invalid for some time, and his last illness began about six months ago. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning from the Cathedral.

 

MAIN, SARAH A./Source: Troy Star, May 10, 1894
Died, at her home in this city [Troy], Friday, Mrs. Sarah A. Main, wife of S. H. Main, at the age of 34 years, 5 months and 22 days. The funeral took place Sunday morning at 11 o'clock from the family residence to the Baptist church, where appropriate exercises were conducted. The remains were interred in the Troy cemetery. It was a very sad affair. She leaves to mourn her death a husband and several children, one of whom is but a few months old.

 

MALCOLM, SAMUEL HAGER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 18, 1917
Old Time Printer Wrote Out Story of His Own Life For Publication
The death of Samuel H. Malcolm, dean of the printing trade in Alton, occurred Sunday morning at 4:30 o'clock. His death followed a period of disability of several months, from arterial hardening. The end had been expected during the last ten days of his life, and once or twice the family were greatly surprised when, as he seemed just about to pass out, he would rally and gain some strength. He was fully conscious of the approach of death, and during the closing days he frequently expressed the wish that the end would come quickly, as he was "so tired." Mr. Malcolm lost his wife three years ago, her death occurring suddenly in the family home from heart trouble. From that time he had made his home with his daughter, Mrs. W. H. King. Mr. Malcolm was one of the old time employees of the Telegraph. He had worked on the paper when he was a young man. Of all the men who worked here then, only a few are living. Mr. Malcolm made it a rule in his later years to visit the Telegraph office on its anniversary dates and demonstrate his retention of his skill as a printer by doing some work, whether there was any special need for his services or not. He was always deeply interested in the Telegraph, and whenever he was down town he was a visitor in the office. He had the distinction of being a double pensioner. He had earned a Government pension as a soldier during the Civil War. He also had earned a pension from the International Typographical Union by having been a member for the required number of years and having attained the age fixed as that at which he could, if otherwise qualified, draw a pension from the union. Prior to his death Mr. Malcolm, with the exactness that was characteristic of him and with a knowledge he had acquired through years of connection with newspaper offices, had prepared the facts as to his life, which he had wished to be given to the newspapers after his death. Samuel Hager Malcolm was born May 14, 1840 at Palestine, Ill. His parents were Walter and Sophia Malcolm. They moved to Terre Haute, when he was an infant. In 1852 he came to Alton with his mother, the trip being made by stage coach to St. Louis and from there to Alton by boat. He was married December 23, 1863 to Sarah M. Harris, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Harris. Six children were born: Mrs. F. H. Gaskins, who died in 1915; W. H. Malcolm; Mrs. J. R. Logan of Colorado Springs, Colo.; George Malcolm who died in 1893; Mrs. W. H. King; and J. M. Malcolm of Alton. Mr. Malcolm was a member of Alton Post, G. A. R. He was for many years a member and an elder in the Twelfth Street Presbyterian Church. He was known as a good citizen, and highly esteemed by a very large number of people who had known him during his long period of residence in Alton. Mr. Malcolm was a charter member of Robin Hood Camp, Modern Woodmen, organized 33 years ago. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock from his late home, 1600 Langdon street, and services will be conducted by Rev. C. E. Combrink.

 

MALCOLM, SARAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 26, 1914
Mrs. Sarah Malcolm, wife of Samuel H. Malcolm, died Thursday evening at her residence, 1600 Langdon street, after a long illness. Mrs. Malcolm's condition had given her family considerable alarm for some time, though she had not been confined to her bed. The family knew she was suffering from heart trouble, and great care was taken to guard against any undue excitement or sudden shocks, and it was hoped that Mrs. Malcolm's life might be spared a long time. Recently when she celebrated the golden wedding anniversary a surprise was planned for her, but it was decided necessary to give her some information about it so that she would not be too greatly surprised, as trouble with her heart was feared. Mrs. Malcolm had been very ill, but yesterday she was reported as being much better. Two of her sons had left last Tuesday on extended business trips, W. H. Malcolm had gone to Galveston, Tex., and E. M. Malcolm had gone to Pittsburg, Pa., both under the impression their mother was much better and out of danger. Thursday evening Mrs. W. H. King had just finished attending her mother and administering some medicine and had stepped out into the yard for a few minutes, when Mrs. Malcolm collapsed. She was found breathing heavily, and before anything could be done for her she died. The death of Mrs. Malcolm is the first in a family of seven children. The surviving brothers and sisters are: Miss Ada Harris; Mrs. Edmond Beall; Mrs. Abbie Greenwood; Mrs. Anna Weld; and Messrs. Charles and B. B. Harris. Mrs. Malcolm leaves her husband and five children: Mrs. Fred Gaskins; Mrs. J. R. Logan; Mrs. W. H. King; and Messrs. Harry and Mont Malcolm. Mrs. Malcolm was a lifelong resident of Alton. She was born her 6_ years ago, and was married here and raised her family in Alton. She was known as a good neighbor and to her family she was a devoted wife and mother. Mrs. Greenwood, the sister, was in Seattle, Wash., E. M. Malcolm was in Pittsburg, Pa., Mrs. J. R. Logan was in Albuquerque, N. M., Mrs. E. M. Malcolm was in Denver, Colo., Benjamin Harris was in Memphis, Tenn., Harry Malcolm was in Galveston, Tex., and W. H. King, a son-in-law, was in Pittsburg, Pa. The time of the funeral was not decided upon, but it was thought it might be Sunday.

 

MALONE, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 15, 1902
Man Commits Suicide in Police Station - Almost Severed Head
This morning a man roughly garbed and about 60 years of age, walked into the police headquarters and told Chief Volbracht that he desired to give himself up. Five weeks ago, he said, in company with John Rohan and two men named "Louis" and "Big Charley," he stole fifteen pigs of lead from the Hoyt Metal Works near Cheltenham in East St. Louis, and he was arrested and held twelve hours as a suspect, and was then turned loose. He gave the name of Peter Malone, said he lived in St. Louis, and had a wife and child in England. "I am tired of dodging and hiding and worried so over the theft that I can't sleep. I will confess everything and take my punishment." He was placed in the Chief's private office, and Mr. Volbracht notified St. Louis officials. They investigated and then telephoned back that they did not want Malone, and that they could find no record of what he claimed to have occurred. Malone was very nervous and walked back and forth a great deal, and once he emerged from the room but was told by the Chief to go back and sit down. He did go back and pretty soon the sound of a heavy body falling in the room was heard. Investigation showed that Malone had almost severed his head from his body with a razor. The floor was covered with blood and the walls were splattered with it also. He evidently was in a standing position when he did the act, as the walls about that high up are literally soaked with blood. The man's mind was undoubtedly unhinged, whether from remorse or disease is not known. Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest this afternoon. The coroner's jury developed nothing new, and the body was taken charge of by Mr. Streeper, who will hold it for several weeks if necessary, in order that something of the man may be learned, if possible.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1902
Coroner Streeper is still holding the body of Peter Malone, the man who committed suicide in the police station last August. Malone's relatives have not claimed him, and Coroner Streeper decided to hold the body as a test case. The body is in good condition and it appears to be possible to keep it indefinitely without burial.

 

MALROY, ANNIE G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 22, 1900
Mrs. Annie G. Malroy died this morning at her home, Seventh and Piasa streets, after a long illness with cancer of the stomach. She was 41 years of age, and leaves three children. The funeral will be Sunday at 1 o'clock, and services will be at the home.

 

MALSON, SON OF EMORY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1900
The thirteen years old son of Mr. and Mrs. Emory Malson died last evening after an illness with diphtheria. The boy was ill about two weeks, and his death is a sad blow to the family. The funeral was this afternoon at 2 o'clock and was private.

 

MAMOJA, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 19, 1921
John Mamajo died yesterday afternoon at 5 o'clock at St. Joseph's hospital after a sleep of five days. From the time he was found unconscious in the home of Frank Savia in Yager Park, last Sunday morning, Mamoja never regained consciousness. Savia, when Mamoja became unconscious, notified Dr. H. W. Davis, who had the man removed to St. Joseph's hospital. The man was then turned over to Dr. G. F. Greenleaf of the Illinois Glass Co. Dr. Greenleaf last Wednesday stated that there was an indication that the man's comatose condition was due to some kind of poisoning, but just what kind was not determined. Reports were circulated that the man had consumed quantities of white mule, but Dr. Greenleaf said such reports could not be credited. He said there was no evidence of injury nor disease and that to all appearance the man had merely fallen into a natural sleep. It was at first thought that the man was in no immediate danger. Some doctors advanced the theory that the man had suffered a apoplectic stroke. Mamoja was married, hospital reports showed, but further facts were not obtainable.

 

MANEKE, DENA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1917
Mrs. Dena Maneke, widow of Henry Maneke, aged 84, died Thursday afternoon at her home in Godfrey township after an illness of over a year, due to her great age. Mrs. Maneke was a native of Germany, but came to America when a young woman and had resided on the old home place in Godfrey township over fifty years. Her husband, who died seventeen years ago, was one of the most prominent farmers of Godfrey township. Mrs. Maneke is survived by eight children. They are: Mrs. Minnie Koch of Omaha; Mrs. Mary Zahn, John, Henry, George and Frank and Miss Emma Maneke of Godfrey; and Mrs. Kate Berger of East St. Louis. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Godfrey Congregational Church, and burial will be in the Godfrey Cemetery.

 

MANEKE, EMMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 15, 1920
Miss Emma Maneke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Maneke of Godfrey, died at 2 o'clock this afternoon at the home of H. H. Hewitt on Liberty street, where she was employed. Miss Maneke was taken ill with diphtheria ten days ago, and became rapidly worse, an infection getting in a few days ago which finally reached her heart and caused death. The mother and father and sisters of the young woman were at her bedside when she died. Miss Maneke is a worker in the organizations of that member of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church, and was an active worker in the organization of that church. Miss Maneke would have been 26 the 7th of October. She leaves her parents, two sisters, Mildred and Anna, and one brother, Albe?? [Albert?]. The funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at the H. H. Hewitt home and will be private. Burial will be in Godfrey cemetery at 2:45 o'clock. The casket will be opened at the grave site.

 

MANEKE, FRED W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 27, 1903
The funeral of Fred W. Maneke was held at the home of deceased yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and was attended by a large number of old friends and neighbors who had known Mr. Maneke for many years. Burial was at the Godfrey cemetery.

 

MANION, WILLIAM/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Wednesday, January 18, 1893
William Manion died, last night, at 8:40 o'clock, aged 77 years, 5 months and 2 days. His health has been failing for several years, but he was confined to his home only a short time. The funeral will take place tomorrow morning, from St. Mary's church. Rev. J. C. Daw will conduct services. The remains will be buried in the Catholic cemetery. Mr. Manion was born in county Golway, Ireland, August 13, 1815. He came to this country in 1837, and lived in New York 3 years, and in 1840 came to Edwardsville and settled on a farm about 3 miles out on the Hillsboro road. He was married just before leaving New York to Miss Mary Foley, who died in August 1874. Of this union four children survive: Thomas Manion and Mrs. Mary Grainey, wife of Michael Grainey, who resides east of town; Martin Joseph Manion of Box Butte, Nebraska, and Michael Manion of St. Louis. He was married April 6, 1875 to Mrs. Margaret Mansfield, who had five children, four of whom are now living. He lived on the farm on which he first settled up to within five years ago, when he came to town to take life easy. He came to this country poor, but by good management and hard work became one of the largest landowners in the county. He leaves a large estate.

 

MANNING, LAURA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1901
Mrs. Laura Manning, aged 22, died this morning at her home in the East End place of consumption. She leaves a husband and two children. The funeral will be tomorrow morning to the Milton cemetery.

 

[see also MANS]

MANNS, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 30, 1904
The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth Manns, wife of William Manns, was held Friday morning and was attended by a very large number of sorrowing friends and neighbors. A Requiem High Mass was celebrated by Rev. Joseph Meckel and assistants at St. Mary's church, and burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery. Floral offerings were very numerous and beautiful.

 

MANNS, EMIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 8, 1905
Emil, the 4 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Manns of Godfrey, died Friday evening at 8:30 o'clock at the family home three miles west of Godfrey. The child was sick only a few days, and last Monday the character of the disease was not apparent. The most malignant form of diptheria developed in a few days and proved fatal. The funeral was held this morning from St. Mary's church, and was private.

 

MANNS, HERBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 23, 1911
The body of Herbert Manns was brought here this afternoon and taken to the home of his brother, William Manns of east Fourth street. He died Saturday evening at one of the hospitals in St. Louis from stomach trouble. He is survived by a wife and six children, and two brothers. His two brothers, John and William Manns of Alton, are the only ones left of a family of six children who left Germany many years ago for the United States. All of the children came to Alton, but later Herbert went to Williamsburg, Mo., where he has been engaged in business until now. As all of the other brothers and the one sister that died had been buried on the same lot at Alton, it was his dying wish that he be buried on the same lot with the rest, and that is the reason that he was brought to Alton. The funeral will take place tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from the St. Mary's church to the St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

MANNS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 14, 1917
John Manns, aged 79, died at his home on East Fourth street shortly after midnight last night. He has been ill for some time with hardening of the arteries, and his condition has been very serious for the past two weeks. Mr. Manns has lived in Alton for the past seventeen years. He was born in Germany and came to the United States when a young man. He settled in the American Bottoms as a farmer, but later removed to Fosterburg where he spent the greater part of his life on a farm. Seventeen years ago he retired and he moved to Alton with his wife to make their home here. His wife died ten years ago. Mr. Manns is survived by six children, two daughters being Mrs. August Zellerman of Nameoki, and Mrs. Peter Luke of Nameoki; and four sons, William Manns of Hope, Arkansas, and John Manns. Frank Manns of Alton and Joe Manns of Godfrey. He leaves twenty-four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held on Friday morning at 10 o'clock from the St. Mary's Church to the St. Joseph's Cemetery.

 

MANNS, KATE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 8, 1903
Mrs. Kate Manns, wife of August Manns, died Monday evening at 9 o'clock after an illness with consumption, at the family home on Union street. She was 32 years of age and was an almost lifelong resident of Alton. She leaves beside her husband, three children. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

 

MANNS, SOPHIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 7, 1916
Miss Sophia Manns, daughter of John C. Manns, died at her home at 1001 Union street Tuesday morning, after an illness of long duration from lung trouble. Surrounded by the members of her family, Miss Manns, before her death, arranged the details of her funeral, and asked that the young men she named act as her pallbearers. She selected the names of Leb Heinz, George Werner, Clement Acker, Frank Acker and her two brothers, Albert and Carl Manns. The funeral will be held from the St. Mary's Church Thursday morning at 9 o'clock, and an uncle of the deceased, Rev. Father Ernest Eckhard of Jerseyville, will have charge of the services. Miss Manns has a valuable list of young friends, and her death has brought much sadness to those who knew her.

 

MANNS, THERESA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 19, 1901
Mrs. Theresa Mans, wife of John H. Mans, died this morning at 1 o'clock at the family home at North and Sixth streets. She had been ill three weeks with grip and pneumonia, and her condition all along has been considered serious. She was 33 years of age. The funeral will take place Thursday morning at 9 o'clock, and services will be in St. Mary's church.

 

MANNS, VEROKIKA (sic) [name could be VERONICA]/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 14, 1907
Mrs. Verokika Manns, wife of John Manns, died at the family home on east Fourth street, Monday evening. She died of the infirmities of old age. Mrs. Manns was 73 years of age and has been a resident of Alton for over fifty years. She was born in Germany and came to this country and direct to Alton when a young woman. She is dearly beloved by the big family circle that has gathered around her from time to time during her old age, for her kindness and love and her helpful advice to them. Six children survive as follows: Mrs. Kate Zellerman of Nameoki; W. T. Manns of Oklahoma; Mrs. Peter Leucke and John H. of Alton; and F. and Joseph, who reside in the country on farms near Alton. Nineteen grandchildren complete the big family circle which gathered around Mrs. Manns not very long ago. The old lady was active until a short time ago when her strength gave away and disease set in and sapped her life strength away. The funeral will be held from the St. Mary's church Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock.

 

MANS, UNKNOWN CHILD OF WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1900
The three weeks old child of Mr. and Mrs. William Mans died last night and was buried this afternoon. Services were held in St. Mary's church at 2 o'clock.

 

MARCH, ANNIE FAUST/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 12, 1915
After an illness which extended over a seven months period, Mrs. Annie March, wife of Afton March, died at 10:50 this morning at her home in the Robertson-Cahill flats on Belle street. Every effort was made by doctors and relatives to better Mrs. March's condition, but she became worse as time went on and death came as a great relief this morning. Although she suffered extremely during her long illness, death came very peacefully this morning just as Rev. Burrows of the Washington Street Methodist Church was leading in prayer at her bedside. Annie Faust March was born in Carrollton, Ill. on April 30th, 1872, and was raised and educated in that city, and was married there to Afton March on June 1st, 1890. Several years after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. March moved to Alton, where they have since resided. Mrs. March was the mother of three children: John Leo, who died in infancy; Mrs. Mary March Heeren of Bethalto; and Calvin Afton March, a pupil at Lincoln School. The deceased is survived by her husband, two children, and one sister, Mrs. Amanda Spears of Clareville, Tex., who has been at the March home the last three months. Mrs. March was one of the best known lodge women of the city, having held the position of Secretary of the Mutual Protective League for ten years, only resigning last January when her illness compelled her to do so. She was an active member of the Brotherhood of the American Yoeman, The Daughters of the America, The Daughters of Veterans, and a social member of the Royal Neighbors. When a girl, Mrs. March joined the Methodist church and all her life was a good Christian woman, a devoted mother and friend. The funeral will take place Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock. After brief services at the house, the body will be taken to the Washington Street Methodist Church where the funeral will be held. Rev. Burrows officiating. Burial will take place in the City Cemetery.

 

MARCUM, VIRGINIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 8, 1909
Pioneer Woman Dies
Mrs. Virginia Marcum, widow of Madison Marcum, and a member of the well known Atkins family who settled in the American Bottoms as early as 1790, died Wednesday at her home near Nameoki. She had been ill for six weeks and died at the age of 68 years, 6 months and 11 days. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home to the Odd Fellows cemetery west of Nameoki. With the death of Mrs. Marcum there is but one surviving member of the Atkins family, Mrs. John W. Segar, who for many years resided on Chouteau Island, but who recently removed to Mitchell with her husband. Of the immediate Marcum family there are four sons surviving: Charles and Madison Jr., who live at home; Hiram, who resides in Nameoki; and Henry Marcum, who is mail carrier on Route No. 1 out of Granite City. Mrs. Marcum was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Atkins, and was born January 25, 1841 on the old Atkins homestead near Nameoki, which is now occupied by William Willie. Her marriage to Madison Marcum took place in December 1863, and to this union seven children were born, of whom four sons survive.

 

MARINO, SAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1921
Dies From Sleeping Sickness
The second death in Alton within three days from the sleeping sickness was that of Sam Marino, an Italian, who died at his home, 802 Cherry street, after being asleep fro 18 days. Marino was supposed to be improving in condition, the attending physician, Dr. D. F. Duggan, said today, but a hemorrhage set in last night which proved fatal this morning. Marino was employed at the plant of the Laclede Steel company. He was a steady, industrious man, and took good care of his family, consisting of a wife and five children. Dr. Duggan, when called to attend Marino, diagnosed the case encephalitis, due to an attack of the grippe, and started treatment. Marino seemed to be responding to the treatment very well, and the sleep seemed to be not so deep as it had been. Two days before he died the attending physician was very hopeful of recovery, but the fatal turn came very unexpectedly from loss of blood. Marino was the head of the family whose home was bombed several years ago mysteriously. The explosion of bombs aroused the whole neighborhood. Pieces of the bomb were found strewn around the next morning. Passersby said that an automobile was driven along Third street, halted, someone hurled something from the car and then sped on. Then came the explosion which damaged the house but hurt none of the numerous inmates. Marino always insisted that he belonged to no secret society, had no enemies and had not the least idea who it was tried to blow up his house. The police were never able to get a clue to the perpetrators of the bomb outrage.

 

MARINO, UNKNOWN WIFE OF FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 30, 1918
The funeral exercises of Mrs. Frank Marino, whose death occurred yesterday at the home, 553 East Third street, will be held Sunday afternoon from St. Mary's Church, Rev. Joseph Meckel, the pastor, will officiate. The burial will be in the St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

MARITTA, GUS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 23, 1912
Falls Under Big Four Train
Gus Maritta, an Italian section crew worker on the Big Four railroad, was run down by a train of cars pushed by the engine near the foot of Ridge street this morning at 9:30 o'clock. Maritta is supposed to have been riding on the front of the engine and must have fallen under the engine which passed over his limbs, severing them below the knee and afterward the cars passed over his limbs above the knees, and they were severed and were hanging by shreds when the man was found. The trainmen on top of the cars heard the cries of the Italian when he was run over, and an examination found him under the cars where he was being dragged, having caught hold on one of the rods. He was taken to the St. Joseph's hospital where in spite of his terrible injuries he still lived. The injured man died at one o'clock at the St. Joseph's hospital. He leaves a wife and an adopted daughter. Their home was in the Paul building on East Second street.

 

MARKS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 7, 1918
John Marks of Wrights, Ill., formerly a resident of Alton, died there last night and his body will be brought back to Edwardsville for burial.

 

MARKS, KATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 26, 1910
Mrs. Katherine Marks, aged 91 years, 1 month, 4 days, died from old age at 12:50 o'clock Saturday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. A. J. Johnson, on Johnson street. Mrs. Marks was the head of five living generations, and her death breaks the chain, she being a great, great grandmother. She was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, February 22, 1819. At the age of 18 she came to America, and two years later married John Marks, who died 34 years ago Monday. Thirteen children were born to her, eight of whom survive her. She is also survived by 27 grandchildren, 19 great grandchildren, and two great, great grandchildren. After coming to America, she went to St. Louis and later came to Alton. Then the family moved to Fosterburg, where they stayed twelve years on a farm until the death of Mr. Marks, 34 years ago. Mrs. Marks then came to Alton and made her home here ever since. She was a devoted member of the German Methodist church with which she affiliated sixty-five years ago, and was much interested in the church work. She was known as a woman of a kindly, charitable disposition, and was a good mother. Beside her family she leaves many good friends. Recently Mrs. Marks was the central figure of a family reunion at which five generations were present, she being the oldest. Her children who are living are Mrs. Louis Unger, Mrs. Katherine Johnson, Miss Mary Marks, Mrs. Peter Hawkins, Mrs. Thomas Hawkins, Mrs. Emma Campbell of Alton; Mrs. A. D. Wild of St. Louis; Peter Marks of Edwardsville. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the German Methodist church. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery, Upper Alton.

 

MARLAND, A. S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 25, 1904
Architect A. S. Marland, who lived by himself on a small place purchased by him a few years ago in North Alton on the coal branch, was taken sick at his home Sunday evening about 6 o'clock, and went to the house of a neighbor, Mr. James Hayes, to get the latter to telephone for a physician. Mr. and Mrs. Hayes induced the architect to go to bed at their home and sent for medical help. Mr. Marland continued ill during the night, and Monday afternoon about 4 o'clock passed away, the physician says from acute gastritis. He was about 53 years of age and came to Alton some eight or nine years ago and opened an architect's office in the Spalding building, afterwards moving to Market street. His sister, Mrs. W. T. Walker and her husband and daughter came up from St. Louis Monday evening, but arrived too late to see him alive. Mr. and Mrs. Hayes did all they could to make comfortable the sick man, and he died at their home. The body will be taken to Kirkwood, Mo. for burial.

 

MARQUIS, JAMES B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 30, 1917
James B. Marquis, well known saloon proprietor, died at his residence, State and William streets, Tuesday evening shortly after 7 o'clock, after an illness of a few days from pneumonia. Mr. Marquis was taken ill on Monday. He had not been in good health for a long time, and had passed through several serious illnesses in the past four or five years. There was nothing of an immediately threatening character in his illness, and he was able to be about the streets and to attend to his place of business. From the time that he became ill with pneumonia, his case was a very serious one, and yesterday it was recognized that he had very slight chance of recovery. Mr. Marquis was one of the best known men in Alton. He had large real estate interests in the city and county. He was one of the leaders in the promoting of a park at Lakeview, which he was not destined to see opened. He had been working hard getting the place ready for opening, and it is possible that his efforts in that direction may have caused his collapse. Mr. Marquis is survived by his wife. Mr. Marquis was 44 years of age. He leaves besides his wife, his mother, three sisters, and a brother.

 

MARQUIS, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1910
Mrs. Mary Marquis, wife of Robert Marquis, died Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock at the family home on Salu street in Upper Alton, after an illness of seventeen years. Mrs. Marquis had been a constant sufferer from rheumatism, and during the last ten or twelve years she was an invalid and was practically helpless. She was 56 years old. She leaves besides her husband, two daughters, Misses Sadie and Ethel Marquis, and two sons, Elmer Groshan of Upper Alton and Alvin Groshan of Kansas City. Mrs. Marquis' first husband was Fred Groshan, a well known resident of Upper Alton who was killed in an accident at the ice houses across the river when they were being built twenty-one years ago. Her son, Alvin Groshan, formerly of Alton, and who is now a prosperous young glassblower of Kansas City, arrived here Saturday afternoon in response to a telegram telling of his mother's condition. He arrived just in time to speak with his mother a short time as she went into unconsciousness Saturday afternoon, and never revived. Mrs. Marquis was born in Ireland and came to America when a girl 16 years old. She has been a resident of this vicinity ever since. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from the family home to Oakwood cemetery, and Rev. M. B. Baker will officiate.

 

MARSH, EBENEZER (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 13, 1911
Chemist, Civil War Veteran, and Teacher
Dr. Ebenezer Marsh, in his 78th year, died shortly before noon Friday at his residence in Upper Alton from weakness of old age. His death had been expected for a week, as he had been unconscious most of that time and he was able to take but little nourishment. For several days all his bodily functions had ceased, except that of the heart, and during the last three days his death was expected at almost any moment. The death of Dr. Marsh removes one of the oldest and best known business men in Alton. He was a chemist of great ability, a student under renowned masters, and he was a teacher who made a success in his work. So great was his fame as a chemist, his advice was frequently asked from others in the same line. He built up a prosperous drug business on Third street which still hears his name in incorporated form. In his long career as a business man, he bore a reputation for strictest honesty. He stood high in the business world, also as a man and a good citizen. He was a religious man by nature and his life was an example to others. He was a man of a gracious disposition, and he always had a good story of a clean quality to make someone smile. For this reason his place of business was a good place to go to dispose the blues, and his good humor had as powerful influence as an enemy of the blues as his drugs did in combating disease. As a citizen, he was a law abiding man, a patriot, and during the Civil War he served as secretary of the Union League, a patriotic organization which combatted the Knights of the Golden Circle. Dr. Marsh's name was one that stood for that which was good and wholesome. Two months ago Dr. Marsh and his wife celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, and at that time they had with them all of their children. Dr. Marsh was then in failing health, but he enjoyed the last visit of his children and was one of the happiest of all. His failing of health began almost a year ago, but he was able to be out around his home some of the time. The last three or four months of his life he was confined to the house almost all of the time. He lost his faculty of sight and some of his hearing in the latter days, but he kept his cheerful disposition. Ebenezer Marsh was born in Alton October 18, 1833, on the site of the present post office. His father, Ebenezer Marsh, had come to Alton in 1828, and soon afterward took a position as a teacher in Rock Springs Seminary, later Shurtleff college. He engaged in the banking business in Alton, and was one of the prominent financiers of the early days here. His son, Ebenezer, was the oldest of the family. At the time of the early schooling of Mr. Marsh, the country was new and his training was along the lines of simplicity of living. Public schools not being established at that time, he was educated in private schools until his twelfth year. He entered the preparatory school of Shurtleff College at 12 years, and was honor graduate in a class of four in 1852, which was the third largest class that had been graduated from the institution up to that time. He then entered the scientific department of Harvard University, from which he was the second graduate in chemistry. In 1855 he visited Europe and spent nearly three years in the universities of Gottingen and Heidelberg, from the former of which he graduated in 1857 with the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Later he studied geology at Heidelberg. During his vacations he traveled through Europe, spending several months in Paris. He was elected to the chair of natural science in 1858 at Shurtleff College. In Harvard, he had studied under such eminent teachers as Agassiz, naturalist; Gray, the Botanist; and Hossford, natural scientist. From these eminent teachers, he had absorbed much he was to use in later life and he was known as a good teacher of the young. He held the position for ten years. Afterward he taught classes in chemistry and geology, and was a trustee of the college. He was married November 11, 18__ to Katherine Provost Foote of Griggsville. In 1872 he entered the drug business and remained the proprietor until ____, when the drug business was incorporated, and he became the president. He remained at the head of the company until his death. He had lived in Upper Alton since 18__. Dr. Marsh is survived by his wife and eight children, George E., Harry A., Alfred E., William H., Joseph V. E., Norman, Charles M., and Alice E. Marsh. He leaves also one sister, Mrs. Ann M. Caldwell, and a half-sister, Mrs. Mary F. Carr, both of Alton. [Note: burial was in Oakwood Cemetery]

 

MARSH, ELLA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 20, 1901
Miss Ella Marsh died this morning at 7 o'clock, very suddenly at her home, 815 Market street. Death was due to heart failure. She had been feeling badly for several days, and last evening while visiting with her class at the home of her Sunday school teacher, Mr. George K. Hopkins, she was taken ill, but a physician was not summoned. She regained her usual condition in a short time and was able to return home. This morning she arose at 7 o'clock and was dressing herself when she fell unconscious on the floor. Death followed in a few minutes after Miss Marsh was found by her niece, Miss Bertha Howard, who hurried to the bedroom on hearing the sound of her aunt's fall. When Dr. Schussler arrived Miss Marsh was dead. Miss Marsh was a prominent member of the Baptist church and a worker in the Sunday school. She had lived in Alton many years and was well known and highly esteemed by all who knew her. She had been employed at the office of Dr. C. B. Rohland and was attending to her duties there yesterday. She leaves two sisters, Mrs. F. I. Crowe and Mrs. Albert Howard, 1220 Alton street, besides many other relatives. The funeral services will take place at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 22, at the Baptist church, corner of Fifth and Market streets. Interment will be at Oakwood Cemetery, Upper Alton.

 

MARSH, JOSEPH V. E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 20, 1918
Well Known Successful Alton Lawyer
Joseph V. E. Marsh, well known and successful lawyer in Alton, died Thursday evening at the Missouri Baptist Sanitarium in St. Louis, from a malady which had been diagnosed less than a week before it proved fatal. Mr. Marsh's end was expected as all hope had been abandoned Wednesday and he was reported Thursday to be sinking steadily. The death of Mr. Marsh removes from the Madison County bar one of the most effective and most successful lawyers. He was not by any means one of the oldest lawyers in the county, in point of service, but there were few who had made any better record in the time he had been at work. He was a son of Dr. E. Marsh, who conducted a drug store in Alton for many years. He had worked his way in life and prior to taking up his new studies he had been private secretary to Col. Jay L. Torrey, author of the bankruptcy law. He served under Col. Torrey also during the war with Spain when Col. Torrey organized his rough riders. Soon after the close of the war, Mr. Marsh completed his law studies, graduated, and being admitted to practice law, opened an office in Alton. He was first associated with E. C. Haugen, the two having adjoining offices, and later with Roe D. Watson. Mr. Marsh was the first secretary of the Citizens Building and Loan Association. Those who knew him best recognized that his success was not due to any mere chance, but that he gained what he had by hard work. He was a close student, had a good legal mind, was very successful in going before juries, and had been highly successful in his work in the Appellate and Supreme courts. He was known as a tireless worker. He early decided that the place for a lawyer to spend his time was in his own office, and when he was not engaged on some office work or in court, he could always be found engaged in study of his law books. He was known as a most thorough man in preparing his cases and his services were sought by many to untangle knotty problems. Less than a year ago Mr. Marsh found it necessary to undergo optical operation because of a sudden destruction of the vision in one eye. Following that there began to appear the malady which caused his death. It had caused him much suffering and just prior to his breakdown he had given indications that he was not in good condition. He did not give up his work, but went on steadily and was still at work when he broke down. The surgical operation to relieve the malady developed that there was no chance at all for his recovery, though the exact situation was not revealed to the members of his family. The family has made a request that friends please omit flowers. Mr. Marsh leaves a wife, Mrs. Anna S. Marsh. He also leaves his mother, Mrs. Katherine P. Marsh, of 1801 Seminary street; six brothers and one sister, Mr. Marsh's death being the first in the large family of children, all grown to maturity. His sister is Miss Alice E. Marsh of Alton. His brothers are Charles M. and George E. of Alton, Harry A. of St. Louis, Mo., Fred of Macon, Ga., Will H. of Los Angeles, Cal., and Norman F. of Pasadena, Cal. Mr. Marsh's father was the late Dr. Ebenezer Marsh, a pioneer druggist of Alton, and who was also actively identified with the early history of Shurtleff College as a member of that institution's faculty. The grandfather, Ebenezer Marsh, was one of the earliest settlers in Alton, and had to do with the early development of the city. He was also the first president of what is now the Alton National Bank, and was a well known financier of this section of Illinois. The body arrived this afternoon on the one o'clock Chicago and Alton train from St. Louis and was taken to the Marsh home at 450 Bluff street. The funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home. The burial will be in the Marsh family lot in Oakwood Cemetery. The interment will be private.

 

MARSH, MARY S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1908
Mrs. Mary Stanford Marsh, one of the oldest residents of Alton, died Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock at her residence, 1403 Henry street, from the weakness of old age. The hot weather probably contributed to the final breakdown which resulted in her death. Mrs. Marsh had lived in Alton almost 72 years, having come here in 1837. She was married in 1840 on one of the houses on Third street, torn down to make way for the new post office building. Immediately afterward she went to housekeeping in her home on Henry street, and there she passed all the remainder of her life. She was born in Ipswich, Mass., November 26, 1814, and would have been 94 years of age in November. In the death of Mrs. Marsh, the First Baptist church loses its oldest member. She became a communican a few years after coming to Alton, her membership dating prior to that of any other of the old members now living. During her long life in Alton Mrs. Marsh was known to her friends and neighbors as a devoted family woman. She was deeply interested in her church and led a consistent Christian life. In recent years her only daughter, Mrs. Mary F. Carr, has made her home with her mother for the purpose of giving the aged lady the care and attention she needed. The mother was devoted to the daughter and the daughter gave her mother all that a daughter could give to help lighten the burdens of great age. Mrs. Marsh was the widow of Dr. Ebenezer Marsh, who died in Alton many years ago. Her husband had two children, Mrs. A. M. Caldwell and Dr. E. Marsh, who survive their step-mother, Mrs. Marsh, also leaves a sister, Miss Sarah P. Caldwell of Ipswich, Mass. Until two weeks ago Mrs. Marsh was able to be up and around the house. Her mentality had been somewhat dimmed by the advance of age, but she was still able to recognize friends and she was glad to meet them. She weakened when the weather became warm and she failed rapidly the last two weeks of her life. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon from the home on Henry street at 4 o'clock.

 

MARSH, MINNIE (nee ALLEN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 21, 1912
Mrs. Minnie Allen Marsh, wife of George E. Marsh, died very unexpectedly this morning at 10 o'clock at her new home near Lockhaven, after an illness that was not regarded as really dangerous until Friday evening. Mrs. Marsh had been a sufferer for some time from a malady that was not fully identified. She was able to be up and around, and on last Monday was down in Alton making preparations for Christmas, and she seemed to be in fairly good condition. She was taken ill again on returning home Monday evening, and did not get better, but her case was not regarded as especially dangerous until Friday evening at 6 o'clock when she went into a state of coma and did not revive. Her death was expected from that time. Mrs. Marsh'a maiden name was Allen. She was a native of Champaign, Ill., but was in Florida when she met Mr. Marsh, and later they were married. The couple lived in Alton many years, Mr. Marsh having charge of the Marsh drugstore, and Mrs. Marsh being well known in social circles. She was known as a gracious hostess, and a charming entertainer, as well as being a good wife and a kind mother. She had many friends in Alton, and a large number of ladies who are shocked at her unexpected death. She had been married twenty-five years. She leaves her husband, one son, George Marsh, and one daughter, Miss Lillian Marsh. She leaves no other relatives, all her own family having died. The Marsh family moved away from Alton a little over a year ago when Mr. Marsh completed a fine home on his farm near Lockhaven. She was happy in preparing her new home, and she was especially pleased over the recovery of her husband, who was very ill and forced to go to the country to regain his health and strength. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of Mrs. E. Marsh in Upper Alton, and services will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing and Rev. M. H. Day. Burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery.

 

MARSHALL, CECELIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 25, 1902
Mrs. Cecelia Marshall died at her residence on East Fourth street at 2 a.m., April 25th, aged 53 years and ten months, after a lingering illness from a complication of diseases. Mrs. Marshall was born at Ruckenhauser on the Rhine, Germany. She came to this country when seventeen years of age. She was a worthy woman. She had been unfortunate in marital relations, and has earned a living for herself and one son, her only child, and a step-daughter by her last husband. She has been janitor at the Presbyterian church almost since its erection, and faithfulness was a prominent characteristic. She loved the church and served it with zeal and joy. Its neat and cleanly condition was ever noticeable and her great grief was when she was no longer able to appear within its courts. The ladies of the church were constant attendants during her illness and saw that nothing was left undone for her comfort. The funeral will take place from the church at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon.

 

MARSHALL, EARL E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1900
The death of Earl E. Marshall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Marshall, took place yesterday after an illness with meningitis. The funeral was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the family home, Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann officiating.

 

MARSHALL, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 12, 1917
Edward Marshall, probably Alton's oldest workingman, died Sunday evening at St. Joseph's Hospital from the effects of injuries he sustained six weeks ago, when he was caught beneath a falling pile of bricks on Ridge street where he was working for Harry Beiser. Mr. Marshall, though eighty-five, persisted in being active. He refused to allow his children to look after him. He wanted to be independent so long as he could continue to do a day's work. To all requests from his children that he take things easy and let them look after him, he would enter a refusal. They tried to give him easy jobs, but he was always sensitive about anyone trying to consider that he was unfit to work as he had done for years. Until a few years ago he worked as night watchman at the plant of Beall Bros., a post he held thirty years. Prior to that he was engineer at the plant of the Drummond Tobacco Co. in Alton. He came to Alton when he was four years old, and he saw Alton grow from a very small hamlet to what it is today. Three years of his life he was away from Alton, when he went to California overland in 1854. He came back here and never went away again. Mr. Marshall was hurt six weeks ago by the falling of some bricks he was piling up, where Harry Beiser was putting in a concrete sidewalk. He was employed by Mr. Beiser. He sustained a fracture of his left leg and also internal injuries. The leg seemed to be getting along all right, but the internal injuries were what caused his death. He was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital where he was given treatment. Last week he began to show signs of collapse, and on Saturday it became apparent the end would not be long. He is survived by his wife, who is 75, and two children, Mrs. Henry Beiser and Otto Marshall. The funeral will be held at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon from the home of C. O. Marshall, at 930 East Sixth street.

 

MARSHALL, JOHN H./Source: Alton Telegraph, August 16, 1837
Killed In Accident at Monticello Female Seminary
We regret to state that on Tuesday of last week, a melancholy accident occurred at the Female Seminary, about five miles from this place. While the carpenters were at work near the roof of the building, the staging on which they stood suddenly gave way, and precipitated three of them from the fourth story to the ground. One of these was killed on the spot; and the others were so much injured as to render their recovery somewhat doubtful. The name of the deceased is John H. Marshall. He was about 40 years old, and has left a large family to deplore his untimely end. The others also have families.

 

MARSHALL, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1904
The body of Mrs. Martha Marshall, who died Friday at the home on Market street, was taken to Jerseyville yesterday for burial. Members of the family, as well as a party of friends, accompanied it.

 

MARSHALL, RUTH/Source: Syracuse, New York Post Standard, August 6, 1904
Alton Father, Daughter And 6 Playmates Drown In Mississippi
[Note: For more information see Michael Reilly obituary]
While bathing in the Mississippi river tonight, Michael Riley, his daughter and six of the latter's little girl friends were drowned. One child was rescued. Riley lived near the river in the southern part of the city and was accustomed to bathe on the beach in front of his home after his return from work. Tonight his little daughter begged to go with him. and Riley took her and seven of her girl friends to the beach with him. When they entered the water, Riley bade the children join hands and they all waded Into the river and walked along a sandbar which stretches out into the stream at that point. They had gone some distance from the shore, when suddenly the whole party disappeared beneath the water, having in the darkness stepped from the sandbar, into the deep channel. The children struggled and screamed, fighting desperately to reach the sandbar, where the water was only a foot or so in depth. Riley who is said to have been a good swimmer. Is thought to have been made helpless by the girls clinging to him and hampering his efforts to save them. The only one in the party to regain the sandbar was Mary Timiny, 8 years old. The child is unable to tell how she saved herself. Riley was 32 years old, and the ages of the children drowned ranged from 8 to 14 years. Four of the bodies have been recovered.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 8, 1904
The families of John Synar and John Marshal united, and the bodies of their daughters, Alice Synar and Ruth Marshall, were taken to the Methodist church where services were conducted at one time. Rev. G. W. Waggoner was to have assisted with the services, but owing to illness he was unable to do so, and Rev. Peterson of the Washington street Methodist church served in his place. Rev. Mr. Peterson conducted brief services at the Synar home at 1:30 o'clock, and Rev. W. H. Ganneway conducted services at the Marshall home at the same hour. The two funeral corteges met at the corner of Edwards and Manning street at 8 o'clock, where they united and went to the Methodist church, where both ministers made addresses. The two little girls had been close schoolmates, and their respective school room scholars sent beautiful flowers as a token of their sympathy. There were many other beautiful offerings. The following young men carried the casket of Alice Synar: Harry Dorsett, Henry Karsten, Harry Lowe, Grover Christy, Ray Black, Homer Clark. Following were the pallbearers for Ruth Marshall's casket: Paul and Earl Ganneway, John and Harry Hackett, Grover Lowry and Jaye Deem. The church was filled to its capacity with friends and relatives of the deceased. Burial was in Oakwood Cemetery. All places of business were closed and the public school bell was tolled during the funeral services in Upper Alton.

 

MARSHALL, SARAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 20, 1910
Mrs. Sarah Marshall, mother of Mrs. William Miller, Upper Alton, died at the Miller home Friday evening at 10:30 o'clock from paralysis. She would have been 83(?) next October. Mrs. Marshall's death is the fourth Mrs. Miller has been called to bear in the past six months. Her husband was killed by being run over by his team at the foot of Central avenue in Alton a few weeks ago. Her father died a short time before at Bunker Hill, and her son was killed in a railroad accident at Bunker Hill six months ago. Mrs. Miller is the only child of her mother.

 

MARSHALL, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 2, 1911
Thomas Marshall, an aged negro resident of Alton, died at his home, 532 Shelly street, this morning, after a long illness.

 

MARTIN, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 31, 1913
M. P. Stevens of the John Armstrong Quarry Co., today notified the authorities that a woman named Annie Martin, aged about 28, had died from consumption in wretched but near the pumping station of the Alton Water Co. She lived with her brother, Joe Martin, who works for the Armstrong company. The woman was taking care of a little girl, aged 4, and whether the child is her own or an adopted one is not definitely known. Some time ago Dr. J. M. Pfeiffenberger was called to visit the woman. He found her in the last stages of tuberculosis. Her brother was working hard and saving what money he could, the physician learned, to send it away to Chicago, where he was patronizing a quack who promised to cure consumption. The woman refused to leave the shanty where she was dying, and refused to consent to being moved. She wanted to stay with her brother and the little child. She had her way about it, as she was then only ten days removed from death. Mr. Stevens was especially interested in the little girl. He believed she should be taken in custody by someone, and he laid her case before Mrs. Demuth. He said that the neighborhood was a bad one for a child to remain in without any woman's protection, and that the child should be taken in charge at once by the authorities and put in a home. The death of the woman was also reported to the supervisor, as she will have to be buried by the county.

 

MARTIN, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 16, 1914
Steamboat Pilot Dies at Post of Duty
For a few minutes at least, the steamer Dubuque of the Streckfus line, the longest sternwheel boat on the Mississippi river, loaded with freight and carrying a crew of sixty, and about ten passengers, ran without a guiding hand. Up in the pilot house, the aged pilot, Charles Martin, was lying dead on the floor where he had collapsed at the pilot wheel. He was alone at the time, and not until the roof watchman, Paul Lamont, noticed that the boat was off its course and glanced up to see if there was anything wrong, was it discovered that the boat was without a pilot. Stricken with apoplexy after eating his supper, and within ten minutes after he had relieved his wheelmate, John Richtman, the aged pilot collapsed, his hands fell from the handles on the steering wheel, and when Lamont went into the pilot house he found the crumpled up form of the steersman lifeless. Lamont's first thought was to relieve the stricken pilot, but when the boat struck a sandbar and commenced to slide over he realized he must signal to stop the engines and call for relief. The boat officers came, the pilot's place was taken by Richtman, and the Dubuque brought on to Alton. The death of the pilot occurred near the mouth of Alton slough [near the railroad bridge at Alton]. At Alton, the body was taken off the boat and turned over to C. N. Streeper, who prepared it for shipment to Cincinnati, Ohio where sisters of Martin live. Martin was over thirty years a pilot between St. Louis and Burlington. He was known as a man of steady habits, a money saver, and his knowledge of the river and steamboating was surpassed by none. When he died he had about $500 in his pockets....It was a close call for a bad accident when the pilot dropped dead, alone in the pilot house. His stroke must have come without warning, as he would otherwise have sounded the signal for relief to be sent to him. It was fortunate that the boat was not in any close proximity to some stone dikes, or there might have been a wreck of the palatial steamer. Officers of the boat claim that the boat did not stick when it struck the sandbar, which Martin would have avoided but for death, and that it drove on over it and then the wheel was stopped.

 

MARTIN, HENRY "PRESS"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 4, 1910
Henry Martin, an Upper Alton negro, is the real iron man at the glass works. "Press," as he is generally known, has a record of doing more work than any other person in the city of Alton and vicinity. Eight hours a day is not in his schedule. He works double eight hours and then some. It is said on good authority that for years Martin has been holding two men's jobs at the glass works, and he gets paid every payday for working double time. He works night and day, and each working week he puts in eleven days, according to men who work with him.

"Press" starts in the morning at 7 o'clock, and works during the day shift, then he gets busy when the night shift starts to work and he works as long as the night shift does. He snatches a few minutes sleep as he can. When lunch time comes he eats a small lunch, then drops down to sleep. He can go to sleep instantly. When it is time for him to wake up for work, he gets busy again. He wastes no time in play, but puts in every minute he can get in sleep.

Martin was drawing pay for two $1.50 days every day for a number of years. He does what is known as "carrying in" work in No. 8 on his regular shift, and on his extra shift every day he takes a place wherever vacant. Martin claims that on Sunday he does not sleep much. He gets up early Sunday morning and gets busy taking care of his place he has bought in Upper Alton. He raises chickens and takes much pride in them. He has a wife and several children. Martin claims that he took a job at the lead works, but his wife insisted upon his quitting and going back to his old job at the glass works. Martin is sick now. The long strain of hard labor has caused him to feel bad, and he is not working, but he expects to get back to holding down the two men's jobs again soon. Martin may well lay claim to being the most industrious man in Alton. The long hours of work has taken all superfluous flesh off him, but until recently he felt well enough.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1923
The funeral services held yesterday afternoon in the Allen Methodist Church for Press Martin on Salu Street were very lengthy, and were participated in by a number of colored preachers. The services commenced shortly after 2 o'clock, and were attended by many colored people from all parts of the city. Deceased was a native of Upper Alton and was one of the best known colored men in this locality. When the funeral cortege got started away from the church to go to Oakwood Cemetery for burial, it was just a few minutes before 5 o'clock and was almost dark.

 

MARTIN, JOHN/Source: Alton Telegraph, May 24, 1845
An inquest was held on Monday last upon the body of John Martin, a resident of this city [Alton], who had accidentally lost his life at the mouth of Shields' Branch on the preceding Saturday. It seems that the deceased, who was a stonemason by trade, having been engaged in hauling sand, attempted to water his horse at a place filled with quicksand, which giving way, overwhelmed and suffocated him before he could be extricated. He was a German, about 32 years of age, and we are informed, sustained a good character.

 

MARTIN, LAURA E./Source: Alton Telegraph, September 12, 1862
Died in Alton on the 4th instant, Mrs. Laura E. Martin, consort of W. W. Martin, and daughter of J. H. and Marsh E. Pierson, aged 25 years. Mrs. Martin has been afflicted with consumption for several years, and during the time has been a great sufferer, but she bore up under it with great fortitude. She was a most estimable woman, and will be greatly missed by her devoted husband, parents, and brothers and sisters, and numerous friends. She was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

MARTIN, MARY M./Source: Alton Telegraph, October 16, 1863
Died at her residence in Alton, on the 11th inst., at 9 o’clock a.m., Mrs. Mary M. Martin, consort of D. C. Martin, in the 29th year of her age. The death of this lady has caused a vacuum in society, which it will be hard to fill. She was intelligent, amiable, and pious, and no one knew her but to love. She was constant and unremitting in her efforts to do good, and to relieve the sufferings of others, and especially of our sick and wounded soldiers. We deeply sympathize with her bereaved husband and other relatives and friends in their great loss.

 

MARTIN, THOMAS/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, September 20, 1855
An inquest was held yesterday in this city by W. G. Pinckard, Coroner, on the body of Thomas Martin who was drowned on the 12th inst., opposite this city, whilst loading a flatboat with railway ties. Verdict, came to his death by accidental drowning.

 

MARTIN, UNKNOWN CHILD OF DR. L. D./Source: Alton Telegraph, December 12, 1862
Today we publish the notice of the death of another child of Dr. L. D. Martin. This is the second one this week, and another one is sick, the last and only one remaining of that little family. The disease is diphtheria, and quite a number of children in that neighborhood are lying sick with the same disease.

 

MARTIN, WILLIE GUTHBERT/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 5, 1862
Died in Alton, December 2, 1862, Willie Guthbert, son of Dr. L. D. and H. A. Martin, aged four years and six months.

 

MARX, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 6, 1902
Peter Marx, aged 26, died last night at the home of his brother, Matthew Marx in East End place, after a long illness with consumption. The body will be sent to Streator, Illinois tomorrow.

 

MASBECK, ALBERT/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 11, 1893
Albert Masbeck, an old resident of the Bohemian settlement, south of town, died Saturday morning of lung fever. The funeral took place Monday morning. The remains were interred in Oaklawn. He was 76 years, 9 months and 12 days old. He was born March 25, 1815, in Prussia, and came to this country in February 1854 and settled in St. Louis. He located in Madison county in 1881.

 

MASEL, BARBARA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 27, 1904
Mrs. Barbara Masel, wife of Theodore Masel, died this morning at the family home, 831 East Third street. Last evening she was out walking and was feeling in her usual condition of health. During the night she became very ill, and notwithstanding medical attention she died in the morning. Mrs. Masel leaves her mother, husband, and five children. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home. [Burial was in City Cemetery]

 

MASEL, THEODORE SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 25, 1922
Theo. Masel Sr., in his sixty-fifth year, died at St. Joseph's hospital at 4:30 p.m. yesterday following an operation for the relief of a malady which had been causing him trouble for a long time. Mr. Masel delayed speaking of the trouble he was having because he did not wish to alarm his wife. She had undergone a surgical operation last June in St. Louis, and had returned home. It was necessary to avoid causing her any worry, and for that reason Mr. Masel, not realizing the gravity of the trouble that was affecting him, said nothing about it until he found it absolutely necessary. Then, it appears, it was too late to do him any good. He was taken very seriously ill last Saturday afternoon as he was ending up his two weeks vacation. It was found that a surgical operation would be necessary if there was to be any hope at all of saving his life, and even then he had a slender chance. He underwent the operation Tuesday, and it was evident then that there was no hope for his recovery. He continued in a very bad way until 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon, when he died. Mr. Masel was the chief construction engineer for the Western Cartridge Co., with which he had been connected since he came to Alton, twenty-seven years ago. He had charge of all building operations there and was regarded as a valuable member of the cartridge company's organization. He was born in Baryeuth, Germany, December 26, 1857. When he was nineteen years of age, he came to this country, and twenty-seven years ago he moved to Alton and took employment with the Western Cartridge Co. He had seen the plant grow from a comparatively small institution then, and his pride was in his work with that company. He was a member of the Evangelical church and was deeply interested in the work of that church. Mr. Masel was twice married. His second wife survives him. He leaves four sons, Henry, Theodore Jr., Max and Frederick, and three daughters, Mrs. George H. Handler, Mrs. H. B. Klenker and Miss Helen. Mr. Masel was a member of the Elks lodge. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock from the family home, 607 Henry street. Services will be conducted by Rev. O. W. Heggemeier, the pastor. Burial will be in City cemetery.

 

MASON, CHARLES HENRY/Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, December 17, 1874
Godfrey - This community is clad in deepest mourning, occasioned by the sudden and untimely death of Charles H. Mason. His funeral took place on Sundaylast, and was largely attended by the numerous friends of the deceased. His death has caused a void that will not soon be filled in this neighborhood. A good neighbor, a useful citizen, and a Christian gentleman has gone to his long home. His life furnishes an example that it would be well for all to emulate, and it is one of the inscrutable ways of Providence that one in the prime of life, in the midst of his usefulness should be thus cut down, while so many, seemingly, worthless creatures are permitted to live on. But 'Why regret his speedy passing, From this world of sin and woe, He who marks the sparrows falling In His wisdom willed it so.'

Charles Henry Mason, the subject of this notice, was born in Rutland County, Vermont, October 15th, 1835. At the early age of two years, he was brought by his parents to Illinois and settled in Monticello [Godfrey], Madison County, where he grew up, married and finally met his sad fate. At the age of six he lost a devoted Christian mother, who left upon her only son the impress of her own character, sanctified by faith and prayer. Two years later he was again blessed with a mother's care and love by the second marriage of his father with Mrs. Cinthia Stockton, and to the day of his death he had in her a wise, watchful, loving guardian, and she in him, a dutiful, trusting and affectionate son. In early life he seemed physically frail, and always with quiet temperament and retiring habits, he remained in, and near the old homestead, blending his own interests to associations with those of beloved parents and studying to make their declining years peaceful and happy, as they had made his early life pleasant and prosperous.

In the winter of 1858-9, he became the subject of converting grace, during a series of meetings, conducted by Rev. Hirden Sears in the Bethany M. E. Church, and gave his first public Christian testimony within sixty rods of the spot where he was so suddenly struck down. He soon joined the Presbyterian Church in Monticello, where his parents held their connection, and remained a consistent member to the last; was for three years an Elder of weight and worth, uniformly exemplary and efficient. At the age of twenty-five, he married Miss Matilda Stewart, who survives him, and with two little daughters mourns the loss of a devoted husband and affectionate father.

In the full vigor of honored manhood, in the enjoyment of well-earned prosperity at his own quiet, well-provided and beautiful home, he was struck down, as in a moment. On Friday, the 11th inst., while superintending the work of digging up a large tree near his barn, he saw his oldest daughter in great danger, just as the tree was falling. He rushed to her rescue - the child escaped unhurt, but the father was struck by a branching limb with such force upon the head and neck as to destroy, instantly, both sensation and consciousness, and in nine hours, without a word or look of recognition, he breathed his last. Seldom does the death of one man, a private citizen, move so large a community to sadness. His family relations are extensive in Madison, Macoupin and Jersey counties. Also from St. Louis and Chicago come weeping sisters to gaze upon the noble, but now prostrate form of an only brother. But not kindred alone, are mourners. While the body lay in the habiliments of death, scores, hundreds of persons, representing the various classes and callings, come with bowed heads and careful tread to look, through their tears, once more on that mild, yet manly face, that face in which friendship was always so plainly written that the listless look of childhood, or the dim eyes of age did not fail to read it there. Uniformly amiable, and kind as a fixed habit, yet in all the social, business and religious relations of life exhibiting a broad and solid manhood that has few equals. The question passes from one to another, who will, who can, fill his place? And yet remains unanswered.

The funeral took place on Sabbath from the Presbyterian Church at 2 o'clock p.m., Rev. Mr. Sargent, the Pastor, officiating, and a very large assembly attending.

NOTE: Charles Henry Mason lived on what is now Bethany Lane, across from the Bethany Cemetery, and donated part of his land for the church and school, which became Mason School.

 

MASON, HAIL (or HALE)/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 12, 1842
Godfrey Pioneer and Preacher Dies
Departed this life, in sure hope of a glorious immortality, the Rev. Hail Mason, of Monticello, Grafton Circuit, Illinois, October 20th, 1842, in the 49th year of his age. Brother Mason contracted religion in Castleton, Vermont, about 27 years ago, under the preaching and influence of the Presbyterian Church; and shortly after united himself with the same. About two years after this event, he immigrated to this state; and becoming more fully acquainted with the doctrines and teaching of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he united himself with it in 1818 - and remained a valuable, useful and exemplary member until his death. Nor did he ever resent having taken this course. He frequently expressed his thankfulness to God for the happiness he enjoyed among the people of his choice. He filled the office of Recording Steward of the Quarterly Conference for the last ten years immediately preceding his death, with credit to himself and usefulness to the Church. In 1837, he received and ordained in the church to preach the Gospel, after which he immediately entered upon the great work which he and the church fully believed God had called him to.

Brother Mason was attacked with a disease the physicians called bronchitis - and although every exertion was made by the physicians and his numerous friends, as well as hundreds of prayers, which daily ascended to Heaven for his recovery, yet all was in vain. God had determined otherwise, and thus called him from a world of care and sorrow, to a world of joy and glory. A short time before he died, on being asked by one of the friends, if he thought he was going to leave them, he said, "he was going to that bright rest which was prepared for the faithful of God." He said, "I love my companion, I love my children, I love the cause of God and His people; but I love Jesus better." Thus died our beloved Brother Mason, leaving behind him for the comfort of his numerous friends, a clear and loud evidence of his happy exit from earth to Heaven. He has left an inconsolable widow and seven children to mourn their loss, and they mourn not as they would were there no hope in the case. In the death of Brother Mason, the church has met with a great loss. His talents as a preacher were not of the highest order - but his ardent zeal, deep piety, and peculiarity of manner rendered his preaching quite successful. As a husband and father, few, if any, excelled him - as a friend, he was all a person could desire. But he is gone - his usefulness and labors are at an end. His funeral was attended by a very large concourse of people. Signed by William Jerome.

NOTES:
Hail (also spelled Hale) Mason was one of three brothers who impacted Madison County history. James, Perez (also spelled Paris), and Hail Mason were natives of Grafton County, New Hampshire. Their parents were Perez Ormsby Mason and Martha Lois Barney Mason. Perez O. Mason fought during the Revolutionary War, and he and his wife are buried in Grafton County, New Hampshire. The Mason brothers came to Edwardsville in 1817, when Illinois was still a territory.

James Mason purchased Kirkpatrick’s interest in the original town of Edwardsville. He engaged in the real estate business, and was one of the prominent men in this vicinity. In 1830 he met Dr. Silas Hamilton, and with Dr. Hamilton and James’ brother-in-law, Henry Von Phul, an arrangement was made to create a ferry across the Missouri River at Grafton (named after the county in New Hampshire where he was from) for easy access to St. Louis. Mason and Hamilton incorporated the Grafton Manufacturing Company in 1833. Both James Mason and Dr. Hamilton died in 1834, and the dream of the ferry died with them. James’ widow, Sarah Mason, and his brother, Paris, assumed the responsibility of platting the town of Grafton. Paris later had a falling out with the family and moved west of Grafton to Mason Hollow. He built a house and warehouse, opened a store and began to transact considerable business at what was called Mason’s Landing (Upper Grafton). His stone house was located at the foot of Springfield Street in Grafton.

Hail Mason, a preacher, became one of the early settlers in Godfrey. He lived in Edwardsville for a number of years and filled the office of Justice of the Peace. During his time as Justice of the Peace, a man named Mike Dodd from Wood River Township became intoxicated while in Edwardsville. He resisted arrest. Mason took part in the arrest of Dodd, and Dodd brought suit against him. Mason was defended by some of the best lawyers of the court, and was acquitted. Hail Mason moved to the Clifton area for a year or two, where he and D. Tolman (who owned a mill) sold property and founded the town of Clifton (later called Clifton Terrace). Mason then settled in Scarritt’s Prairie (Godfrey). His house was a short distance northeast of the town of Godfrey. He served as Justice of the Peace in the Godfrey area, and afterwards became a preacher. Hail Mason is buried in the Godfrey Cemetery.

Charles H. Mason, the grand-nephew of Hail Mason, donated the land for the Mason School, near the corner of Bethany Lane and Humbert Road in Godfrey.

 

MASON, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JOHN/Source: Alton Telegraph, March 23, 1844
Died, on last Sunday at Monticello [Godfrey], Mrs. Mason, consort of Mr. John Mason Sr., aged about 60. The deceased had suffered under a pulmonary complaint about 20 years, during which period she has been confined only about one month previous to her decease. An aged and bereaved husband and several children and friends mourn her loss.

 

MASSOULI, MARY (nee EBBERT)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 10, 1913
Mrs. Mary Massouli, wife of Louis Massouli, died Sunday morning at her home in Godfrey township from pneumonia, after a weeks' illness. She was 40 years of age. Mrs. Massouli's maiden name was Ebbert, and she was a long time resident of Godfrey. She leaves beside her husband, six daughters and two sons. The funeral will be held at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Mrs. Massouli's children are Harry and August Massouli, Mrs. Theo Ressman of Alton; Mrs. Mamie Crabtree of East Alton; Misses Clara, Agnes, Edith and Lizzie Massouli.

 

MASSULLA, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1904
Louis Massulla, one of the oldest farmers in the vicinity of Godfrey, died Thursday afternoon at his home near Godfrey in the Piasa bottoms, aged 82. He had long suffered from the feebleness of old age. Mr. Massulla had lived in Godfrey township fifty years and raised a large family, who are among the most respected residents of the township. The funeral will be held Saturday at 10:30 a.m. from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

MATHEENEY, HARRIET E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 14, 1911
Mrs. Harriet E. Matheeney, wife of Samuel A. Matheeney, died Thursday night at 9:45 o'clock after a brief illness at her home on Eighth street. Mrs. Matheeney belonged to a well known Bethalto family, her maiden name being Clark, and she leaves beside her husband, three sisters and two brothers. Misses Lillian and Mida Clark live in Alton, and Mrs. H. W. Zimmerman at Bethalto. One brother, James, is at Jefferson Barracks, and the other, Robert, is at Anthony, Iowa. The funeral will be held at 3 o'clock from the home, and the services will be conducted by Rev. W. T. Cline.

 

MATHER, CAROLINE E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 2, 1905
Mrs. Caroline E. Mather, who has been ill from diabetes for several days at her home in North Alton, passed away peacefully this morning about 10 o'clock. She lost consciousness about a half hour before she died, but just before the supreme moment came she rallied somewhat and recognized members of her family. From the beginning of her last illness to the time she died she expressed herself perfectly willing and anxious to go. She expressed the greatest confidence in the hereafter and in the goodness and mercy of God, and she comforted the grief stricken watchers and members of her family and told them not to mourn for her - that she felt confident of her happiness on the other side. It was a beautiful death and will never be forgotten by those who were present or who saw and conversed with her at any time during her last illness, because every utterance, every act of hers, tended to convince all that she was impatient to begin the experience awaiting her in the other world. Mrs. Mather was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Harris of Lebanon, Tennessee, and she was born in that city February 13, 1837. Her parents removed to Alton in 1852, and deceased married to Mr. R. M. Mather in Alton in 1858. She was 68 years, five months and 21 days of age, and all but 15 of these years were spent here and in this vicinity. She is survived by seven children: Alderman R. H. Mather, H. G. Mather, and S. L. Mather, Misses Alice and Mabel J. Mather of North Alton, Mrs. Louis Kortcamp of Hillsboro, and Mr. R. R. Mather of Godfrey. A peculiar circumstance connected with the death of Mrs. Mather is the fact that her brother, Thomas Harris, a well known resident of Delhi, died six years ago today, aged exactly the same as she, and his death was caused also by diabetes.

 

MATHER, RICHARD M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Thursday, February 23, 1899
Mr. Richard M. Mather, a well-known and highly respected citizen of North Alton, died at 5 o'clock this morning at his home. Mr. Mather had been suffering from stomach and heart trouble for a month, but had only been confined to his bed for a few days. He was down town only last Saturday consulting with a physician, and there was no anticipation that his taking away would be so sudden. He was 88 years of age. A sad coincidence connected with the death of Mr. Mather is the death of his only sister, both within a few hours. Shortly after a telegram had been sent to Sedalia, Mo., notifying his sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Wright, a dispatch was received hearing the news of her death at 7 o'clock this morning. Mr. Mather was born in Covington, Ky., and came to Alton in the early '50's. For thirty years he was a trusted employ of the Alton Agricultural Works, and moved to North Alton fifteen years ago. He was a charter member of Alton Lodge, No. 117, A.O.U.W., a man of sterling character and worth, whose death will be a severe shock to his family and acquaintances. Besides a wife and two brothers, George Mather of Sedalia, and Russell Mather of St. Louis, he leaves a family of four sons and three daughters: Russell H., Hiram G., Richard R., and Shelby L. Mather, all of North Alton; Mrs. Louis Kortkamp, of Hillsboro, and Misses Alice and Mabel Mather of North Alton. The funeral will take place Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

 

MATHER, RUSSELL H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1912
Russell H. Mather, for many years a business man and contracting painter of North Alton and Alton, died Friday morning in Dallas, Texas, according to a telegram received this morning by his brother, Hiram G. Mather, the Piasa street newsdealer. The telegram came from Mrs. Russell Mather, and was a surprise and a shock. Relatives here did not know he was sick, and recent cards and letters written by members of the family stated all were well. Last June he had an attack of appendicitis, but recovered. It is supposed he was again attacked and succumbed. His wife and daughter, Miss Ruby, have been with him since last June. He had several big contracts in Dallas, and this is why he remained in the south. He was 51 years of age, and besides his wife and daughter, is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Louis Kortkamp of Hillsboro; Mrs. Fred Harberer; and Miss Alice Mather of Alton; and three brothers, H. G., Shelby, and Richard R. Mather. He was for many years a member of the board of aldermen of North Alton, and served as an official of North Alton in almost every office within the gift of the people. He was a charter member of Oakwood Camp, Modern Woodmen, and did efficient service as clerk of that camp for many years. He conducted a hardware store in North State street for several years also. He was public spirited, industrious, and honorable to a high degree, and the news of his death will cause sincere regret wherever he was known. The body will be brought here for burial, but the time of its arrival or the particulars of his death are not known as yet.

 

MATHEWS, HIRAM C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 15, 1921
Hiram C. Mathews died yesterday at 4:30 p.m. at his home, 431 East Fourth street. He was 56 years old, and had been a traveling salesman for 35 years. He was formerly a member of the City Council. Mr. Mathews, though troubled for a few years with a kidney malady, was seriously ill and confined to his bed for only two weeks. Three days ago his condition took a turn for the worse, and it was known by members of his family that the end was near. Mr. Mathews was a native of Alton. He was born here in 1865. He was married to Miss Josephine Lynch of St. Louis, in the Missouri city 31 years ago. Mr. Mathews was a salesman of advertising specialties, and was an accomplished man in his profession. He was a member of the United Commercial Travelers, and a member of the Masonic Fraternity, Piasa Lodge No. 27. During his long residence in Alton he made many friends by his genial disposition and willingness to be of service to others. His acquaintance was wide and he was respected by all who knew him. Mr. Mathews is survived by his aged mother, Mrs. H. S. Mathews; a sister, Mrs. T. P. Nesbett of Chicago; his widow, Mrs. Josephine Mathews; and four sons, Stephen E. of Cambridge, Mass., Harry S. of St. Louis, George H. and Clarence L., both of Alton. He is survived also by two grandchildren, John Edward and Daniel Hunter Mathews, both of St. Louis. Funeral services will be conducted Saturday, but the time will not be set until Stephen E. Mathews of Cambridge reaches Alton. He is expected tomorrow. Burial will be in city cemetery.

 

MATHEWS, HIRAM S./Source: Alton Telegraph, August 14, 1913
Hiram S. Matthews, aged 83, died Wednesday after an illness of three years due to the gradual break down from advanced age. Mr. Matthews had been a resident of Alton since 1854. He was born in Canterbury, N. H. The time of the funeral has not been set. He is survived by his wife, who recently passed her eightieth birthday, and by three children, Mrs. P. L. Betts and H. C. Matthews of Alton, and Mrs. T. P. Nisbett of Chicago. Mr. Matthews was for many years engaged in business in Alton. He dealt in hides and wool and had a wide reputation. It was only a few years ago that he gave up active business pursuits. He was known as a kindly, courteous gentleman of the old school, who never found it hard to be polite. He was always cheerful and always friendly to all whom he met. Though not an active member of the First Presbyterian Church, he always attended services there, even after he was really unable to get around safely, for many years he was the leader of the choir in the old Presbyterian Church and gave the most faithful service in that capacity. It was generally known that he was in failing health, but the news of his death came as a shock both to his relatives and his many friends.

 

MATHEWS, JESSE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1919
Harry B. Mathews, of the Mississippi Lime and Material Co., received word yesterday evening that his brother, Jesse Mathews, had died in Ft. Worth, Tex., from acute Bright's disease. The young man had only recently been discharged from service in the army. He is remembered here as he lived in Alton in his young boyhood, in the house now occupied by A. J. Struif on State street. The body will arrive here tomorrow and will be taken to the Matthews home on Summit street, where funeral services will be held and burial will be in Alton. It was the request of the young man who had just returned from two years service in France in the army, that he be taken back to Alton. In accordance with his wish the funeral service will be at 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon from the Matthews home on Summit street, and entombment will be in the Grandview mausoleum.

 

MATHEWS, ROSS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 2, 1917
Deputy Coroner William H. Bauer ordered a searching investigation made Monday morning of the case of Ross Mathews, aged 42, who died at his home at Shields street Sunday night after an illness of two weeks. In all four doctors attended the man, and each refused to sign the death certificate. There seemed to be a doubt in the minds of the doctors and other persons as to whether the malady which caused his death was brought on by blows he received in a card game two weeks ago. When the deputy coroner learned that Mathews and a number of other men had engaged in a card game which ended in a fight, he decided that the inquest and the autopsy should be held. According to the information obtained by the Telegraph, the game was in Yager Park at a private residence. It was to be just a friendly game, but there were stakes. While playing for stakes an argument arose which resulted in blows being exchanged. One of these struck Mathews on the head. Shortly afterward he was taken ill. It was then believed that the blows had caused the death of Mathews. William H. Bauer secured detention of the two men this morning under the suspicion that they were the men who had been in the card game and knew something of the affair. An autopsy was conducted this morning and the facts in the case were laid before the coroner's jury in Alton this afternoon. Coroner Roy Lowe came over to conduct the inquest. surgeons who held an autopsy on the body of the dead man found that his death was probably not due to any injuries he had sustained in a fight. They found evidences of a malignant tumor in his stomach and decided he died from that cause. Coroner Lowe decided to go ahead and hear evidence in the case, nevertheless, inasmuch as the corner had taken charge of the case.

 

MATHIE, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 13, 1911
The funeral of Miss Mary Mathie was held this afternoon from Trinity Chapel on State Street. The services were conducted by Rev. Arthur Goodger of St. Paul's Episcopal church. There was a large attendance of relatives and friends of the family at the funeral services. She had had charge of the Chapel from which she was take to Oakwood since its existence. She was the faithful caretaker, doing the work out of love for the cause she exemplified so practically, and for the church, in the prosperity of which she was peculariarly interested. And so much was this affection for the house in which she worshipped, and where her mother found equal ..... that she bought the lot that lies between her home and the Chapel in order that it might never during her life pass into the possession of alien hands that would shut from her sight the beloved church. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. Arthur Goodyer. The following were the pallbearers: William Mathie, James Mathie, John Mathie, Weston Mathie, Joseph Mathie, Edgar Baird.

 

MATTHEWS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 19, 1905
John Matthews, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Matthews, died Friday afternoon at the residence of his parents, Eleventh and George streets, after a long illness from lung troubles. He was born in Alton and lived here until he attained the years of young manhood and was educated in the Alton schools. John Matthews was always well liked by those who knew him in Alton, and he had a wide acquaintance. He had not lived in Alton for a number of years until recently. His health began to break down 8 months ago, and he was obliged to seek relief in southern climate, but the change did not prove beneficial. He returned home recently, and it soon became apparent that his life would not be spared long. He came to Alton to pass the closing days in the old home under the care of his mother and father, whose youngest child he was. There is genuine regret among those who knew Mr. Matthews that death has cut short his career and has deprived his family of the father and husband. John Matthews was in his 35th year. He lived in Alton until twelve years ago when he went to Chicago and became connected with the People's Gas Co., afterward going to St. Louis, where he subsequently became manager of the Carondelet branch of the Laclede Gas. Co. Last January he suffered an attack of the grippe and it settled on his lungs, entailing the illness that proved fatal. He leaves beside his wife, two children, a son and a daughter, and his parents, a brother, H. C. Matthews, and two sisters, Mrs. P. L. Betts and Mrs. T. P. Nisbett. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home of his parents. Friends of the family are invited to attend the services at the home, but services at the cemetery will be private. Rev. J. M. Wilson of Mingo Junction, O., who will preach in the Presbyterian church tomorrow, will conduct the services.

 

MATTHEY, AMELIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 15, 1902
Mrs. Amelia Matthey, aged 63, died this morning at the home of her son-in-law, Albert Volper, 1023 Staunton street, after a long illness with lung troubles. She leaves two children, a son and a daughter. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon, and services will be at the Volper home. Burial will be at Oakwood Cemetery in Upper Alton.

 

MAUL, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 11, 1917
Dies in County Hospital
Though quite a different character, Anna Maul died yesterday, able to echo the sentiments of the author of Home, Sweet Home. She died in the county hospital where she was given the best of attention, and where she could be as comfortable as possible under the circumstances in her dying hours, yet she longed for the wretched hovel that called her in vain. She was a police character, a woman who was often arrested in years gone by. She had dwelt on the sandbar for years, and had for her associates the lowest of negroes and whites. She had been rearing on the sandbar, a girl, who was known for her beauty, but who fell a victim to the influence of bad heredity, and she saw that girl go. She had drifted lower and lower and finally she had come to the stage where she was homeless, a victim of tuberculosis due to her hard life. She was taken to the poor farm with her friend, Kitty Snipes, but the call of the humble home in the mind of Kitty Snipes was no stronger than that in Annie Maul. One time not long ago Annie escaped from the county home, came to Alton, and building a leanto out of sheet iron close to the Bluff Line tracks, she rested there in very bad weather. She was taken back and escaped again. She was not to be confined in a county poor house. Finally she became so ill she could not stay here any longer and was unable to come back when taken over. The end she had always dreaded, dying in a county poor farm, was hers. She will be buried there as a county charge. City authorities were not surprised to learn of her death, as she had been looking as if near death for a long time.

 

MAUL, CATHERINE OTTILIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 13, 1921
Mrs. Catherine Ottilia Maul died Saturday afternoon at 2:45 o'clock at the family home at 823 East Fourth Street after an illness of nine months or more. Just four months ago a sister of Mrs. Maul, Mrs. Louis Gleich, died. Mrs. Maul was 58 years of age last July. She is the widow of John Maul, who died twenty years ago. She is survived by three children, Mrs. Edward Cremens of Chicago, John and Albert Maul of Alton. Also by a sister, Mrs. Rose Magee, and six grandchildren. She was born in St. Charles, Mo., but has resided in Alton many years. She was a kindly neighbor, a good mother and a friend to those in need of her assistance. Her death will be learned with much regret by friends of the family. The funeral will be held Tuesday at nine o'clock from St. Mary's church, with interment in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

 

MAUL, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 4, 1901
John Maul, aged 43, died at his home, 800 east Second street, last evening at 7 o'clock after severe sufferings with stomach troubles and inflammation of the bowels. His mother was buried about a month ago, and he leaves a widow, four children and a brother, Peter. "Jack" Maul, as he was called and affectionately was well known throughout the city, and few men had more warm personal friends than he. He was genial, honest, sympathetic and charitable. A good, kind husband, father and neighbor, and a friend "to tie to." He will be greatly missed and his sorrowing relatives will be far from alone in grieving over his death. Sympathy at such a time can do but little to assuage grief, but the consciousness that there is something better in the Hereafter for the good here should assist faith and hope very much in convincing the bereaved ones that "all is well with him now." Mr. Maul has occupied several clerical positions in Alton and was Deputy Postmaster under John Buckmaster. Of late years he has been conducting the hotel at Second and Spring streets. The funeral will be Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

 

MAUL, MECHTILDE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 25, 1901
Mrs. Mechtilde Maul, widow of Jacob Maul and mother of Peter and John Maul, two well known residents of Alton, died Sunday afternoon at the family home at 918 East Third street. Mrs. Maul had been confined to her home several weeks, helpless with paralysis of the brain. She was 71 years of age and had passed the greater part of her life in Alton. The funeral will take place Tuesday morning at 8:30 o'clock, and services will be in St. Mary's church.

 

MAUL, MINNIE RICHMOND/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 30, 1902
Mrs. Minnie Richmond Maul, wife of Conrad Maul, died Saturday evening at her home, Seventh and Belle streets, after a short illness from heart disease. She had been employed at Ecke's restaurant, and on going home she fell unconscious and died almost immediately. She has a little daughter, aged 14. Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest and took charge of the body. The jury found a verdict of death from heart disease, as there was evidence to show that other members of her family had died in the same way. Mrs. Maul was 45 years of age. She was a native of Ireland, but had lived in Alton nearly 20 years. She was most respectably connected in the old country. The funeral took place today at 2 p.m. from the late home of the deceased on Belle street. Services were conducted by Rev. H. K. Sanborne.

 

MAUL, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 21, 1905
Mr. Peter Maul, a well known and generally respected citizen of Alton, died Tuesday morning at the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Ottilie Maul, east Third street, after an illness which had its beginning more than a year ago. The immediate cause of death was dropsy. Mr. Maul was a bachelor, aged 54 years, and was a man of many kindly qualities, who will be missed greatly by his numerous friends. He leaves some nephews and a niece, but all of the immediate members of his family preceded him to the grave. He was ex-president of the WEstern Catholic Unio, St. Boniface Branch, and was a strictly honest and industrious man. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

 

MAUL, WILLIAM P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1918
William P. Maul, formerly of Alton, passed away at his home in Springfield, Ill., on January 30, at 5:30 p.m. He leaves his wife, Georgia, daughter Velma, aged 6, and son, William Jr., aged 3. He als leaves his mother, Mrs. Otillia Maul; his sister, Mrs. Edward Cremens; and two brothers, John A., and Albert Maul, all of this city. Mr. Maul left Alton about five years ago for Springfield to make his home. He would have been 31 years of age on the 17th of this coming March. He was sick a little over a week, his illness commencing about January 21, when he suffered from an infected tooth. An operation was performed, but his condition failed to improve. The remains will be brought from Springfield this evening, and the funeral will be held from the home of his mother, 823 East Fourth street. No time for the funeral will be announced until after the body arrives in Alton.

 

MAUPIN, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 2, 1900
Alton Candy Maker Dies in Chicago
A message was received here today announcing the death of George Maupin, in Chicago, where he has been living for some time. Mr. Maupin was well known in Alton, having been born here, being a son of the venerable James Maupin, who lives north of the city. He passed his boyhood days here, and later conducted a candy store in the McPike building, opposite Temple Theatre. His fame as a candy maker was established in Alton, and he was known as an expert in his line of work. He closed up his place of business in Alton and has not been here since. Mr. Maupin's death occurred in Chicago Saturday, and notice was not sent to the family in Alton until last evening. The body will arrive here Wednesday morning, and the burial will be in City Cemetery. Complete arrangements for the funeral were not made this afternoon. Mr. Maupin leaves his wife, who is in St. Louis, and will attend the funeral, and three children, Ralph, Fay and Orra.

 

MAUPIN, JAMES H. SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 1, 1902
Came to Alton in the 1830s
Death claimed another of Alton's old residents when it removed James H. Maupin Sr. from the shores of time to those of eternity. Mr. Maupin was born July 16, 1818, in Cumberland County, Kentucky, but spent all of his boyhood and some of his young manhood days in Fulton, Missouri. He came to Alton in the thirties [1830s], and was connected for years with the G. D. Sidway Saddlery company. He afterwards went to Otterville to superintend a tannery operated by Mr. Sidway, and later he engaged in merchandising in Jerseyville. Returning to Alton late in the sixties, he again engaged in business here. Upon his retirement some fifteen years ago, he repaired to a farm on the Grafton road, where he spent most of his time since. He has been in failing health for a year, and about three weeks ago was brought in from the farm to the home of his son, James Jr., at Third and George street, where the end came. His wife preceded him to the other shore about eleven years ago. Four children survive him, James H. Jr., the well-known contractor; Mrs. Margaret Moore of Denver, Colorado; Mrs. Clara Maupin of the Grafton road, and Edward Maupin of Los Angeles, Cal. Mrs. Moore came from Denver several days ago, and four generations were present in the sick room - children, grandchildren, and a great grandchild of Mr. Maupin. Deceased was a kindly man, and for many years was a most energetic enterprising one. He saw Alton grow from a little village to the progressive city it now is, and he did his share towards causing the progression. The funeral will be Wednesday afternoon from the residence of James H. Maupin Jr., Third and George streets, to the City Cemetery.

 

MAUS, ANTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 29, 1917
Anton Maus, 76 years of age, died Monday evening at 8:30 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Lewis, in Garden street, from the effects of a paralytic stroke he suffered Sunday evening about eight o'clock. He never regained consciousness after being stricken and the end was peaceful. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Brighton Evangelical church of which he had long been a member. The funeral party will leave Alton at 11:30 a.m. and will drive to Brighton. Mr. Maus was a native of Germany, but came to this country about 50 years ago, settling in Brighton. About 10 years ago, having lost his wife and all of his children having become residents of Alton, he moved to this city and had since been making his home with his daughter, Mrs. Lewis. He has been ailing for years, and sometimes during that period was very sick for weeks, and the paralysis was the culmination of all these years of feeble health. He was a man of sterling honesty, and was charitably inclined. All of those who knew him best speak of him as having been a very desirable neighbor and friends. The children surviving are: Adolph, Julius and Henry Maus; and Mrs. Harriet Lewis, all well known and generally esteemed citizens of Alton.

 

MAUZY, EDWARD T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 21, 1911
Edward T. Mauzy, a native of Alton, died at Riverside, Cal., April 16. He was the son of Cornelius G. Mauzy, and was born in Alton, December 17, 1846. He leaves his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Luther Cell, also a brother, Dr. Joseph A. Mauzy of Los Angeles, Cal. Mr. Mauzy's father built a row of houses on Fifth street between Market and Alby streets, known for many years as Mauzy's row, and now owned by David Ryan. There are many Alton people who remember the family and knew Edward Mauzy.

 

MAUZY, LUCRETIA MINERVA/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 24, 1847
Died on Sunday afternoon, somewhat suddenly but probably in consequence of disease produced by the measles, Lucretia Minerva, only daughter of Mr. C. G. and Mrs. Caroline Mauzy of Alton, aged just three years. The deceased was a very promising child, the idol of her fond, but now deeply afflicted parents.

 

MAXEINER, HENRIETTA W. BURKHARDT BIERBAUM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1904
Mrs. Henrietta W. Burkhardt Bierbaum Maxeiner, with many relatives and friends in the Altons, was killed by a Big Four train at a road crossing near Bunker Hill Sunday morning. Mrs. Maxeiner was sixty-eight years of age, and lived on a farm between Fosterburg and Bunker Hill, and attended Divine services regularly at the latter place. Sunday morning she started to church as usual, and while traversing a road crossing near Bunker Hill was struck by the engine of a fast running train and hurled 75 feet to instant death. Deceased had been thrice married, all of her husbands preceding her to the grave. She leaves three daughters, one of whom is Mrs. Frank Mason of Godfrey. Deceased will be buried tomorrow afternoon at Fosterburg.

 

MAXEINER, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 19, 1916
Mrs. Margaret Maxeiner, widowed twenty-six years ago when death claimed her husband, Henry Philip Maxeiner, passed away last night at the home, 220 West Thirteenth street, after an illness caused by grippe. She was seventy-nine years and eight months of age and had lived in Alton for the last twenty-five years. Previous to that time she had lived in Foster township for several years, and although born in Germany, the most of her life was spent in Alton and vicinity. She was a woman of most lovable character, and was beloved by all who knew her. She was a faithful, self-sacrificing mother, and a splendid neighbor. She was a generous, charitable woman too, and believed in adhering as closely to the Golden Rule as it was possible for mortal to adhere to it. She is survived by seven children: one daughter and six sons - Miss Emma Maxeiner, Amos, George and Henry Maxeiner of Alton; Jacob Gra__ of Foster township, Charles Maxeiner of Shipman, and August of Kansas City, Mo. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 10 o'clock from the home on West Thirteenth street, where brief services will be conducted by Rev. Austermann, pastor of the Grace Methodist Church. The cortege will then take its way to the German Methodist Church in Fosterburg, where funeral services will be conducted in the presence of the people she lived among so long and by whom she was esteemed and beloved. Burial will be in the cemetery at Fosterburg.

 

MAXEY, ELIZABETH W./Source: Alton Telegraph, February 22, 1840
Departed this life on the 15th inst., Mrs. Elizabeth W. Maxey, relict of the late Rev. Benncit(?) Maxey of Upper Alton. She had been an acceptable member of the M. E. Church, more than 50 years, and left us in the triumph of the Christian faith.

 

MAXEY, FRANCIS 'FRANK' ANDERSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 16, 1914
Francis Anderson Maxey, aged about 73, died Saturday in Chicago and the body was brought here for burial this afternoon, arriving at 1:25 o'clock....For many years Mr. Maxey had been a conductor on the old horse car line in Alton, and he was well known here. He had been very low for several months, and his death was looked for. Burial was in Oakwood Cemetery.

 

MAXEY, JOHN ANDERSON/Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, January 25, 1877
The funeral of John A. Maxey, Esq., was attended yesterday afternoon from the M. E. Church. As the deceased was, for over thirty years, identified with the civil interests of Upper Alton, a brief sketch of his life may not prove uninteresting to the few of his contemporaries who survive him, and his many friends of the younger generation who have been accustomed for years to see his venerable form during his daily walks. John Anderson Maxey was born June 17, 1799. He was a native of Powhattan County, Virginia. When John was 5 years old, his father left the Dominion State for what was then the wild, far west, settling in Ohio, where the family lived till 1817, when they moved to the new state of Illinois. After some prospecting, Mr. Maxey Sr. located in what was then the flourishing frontier town of Milton, Madison County, and a few years later entered some land on the present site of Upper Alton, and moved there. On this property is the late residence of the deceased. In 1821, Mr. John A. Maxey was elected Constable, which position of honor he held for a term of two years. In 1824 he was commissioned U. S. mail carrier, the route being from Belleville, Illinois to St. Charles, Missouri, via Edwardsville, Upper Alton, and Portage des Sioux. The mails went over this route twice a week on horseback. He discharged the burdensome duties of this office for four years. In 1834 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and for over 30 years he administered justice in an impartial manner. Mr. Maxey was married in 1832 to Miss Sarah Beem, who survives him. The fruit of this union was four children, two of whom died in infancy, and two sons, Thomas J. and Frank A., still live on the old place, where the family have lived for about 40 years. For the past year or two, the infirmities of age have been creeping upon Mr. Maxey, so his face was seldom seen upon the street, and at 10 minutes before 8 o'clock Sunday morning, he quietly passed away. The funeral services at the grave were conducted by the Masonic Order, of which Mr. Maxey was long a faithful member. Signed by Ivan.

 

MAXEY, LIZZIE/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, July 22, 1879
Miss Lizzie Maxey died in Upper Alton, July 13th, aged 44 years. Deceased was born in Virginia, from which state she moved with her parents to Upper Alton, when four months old. She had been sick for some months with a painful disease, but was recovering, when the excessive heat of the few days preceding the date of her death induced brain congestion, which led rapidly to delirium and death. She was a grandchild of Bennett Maxey, one of the founders of Upper Alton before Alton proper was located. He donated to the people of Upper Alton the first piece of land for their present cemetery. Miss Maxey will long be remembered as a faithful teacher in the public schools of Alton and Upper Alton, and scores whom we meet on our streets every day received their first mental culture from her. She was a consistent Christian and faithful worker in the Sunday school.

 

MAXEY, SARAH (nee BEEM)/Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, August 29, 1878
From Upper Alton, August 24, 1878: Mrs. Sarah (Beem) Maxey, widow of the late John A. Maxey, Esq., died at noon Thursday, aged nearly 78 years. Esquire and Mrs. Maxey were among our oldest citizens. Always of a delicate constitution since the death of her husband, the infirmities of advancing years have told more plainly on Mrs. Maxey's health, and finally she has passed away. Two sons, T. J. and Frank A. Maxey, both living here, are the only surviving children. The funeral took place yesterday morning at 10 o'clock.

 

MAXWELL, FRED "MAXEY"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1900
Fred Maxwell, who was taken to St. Joseph's hospital a few weeks ago seriously ill, died this morning. He had been in failing health many years, and for the past three years has been unable to work. He came here from Rock Island and had no relatives in Alton. The funeral will be Thursday at 2 p.m. from the hospital. [Burial was in City Cemetery]

 

MAXWELL, JANE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1899
Jane Maxwell, aged 80, of Moro, died Tuesday morning between 2 a.m. and 9. Her husband was in the same bed, and heard his wife speak about 2 o'clock. Coroner Bailey held an inquest, and a verdict was rendered that death was caused by general debility.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 2, 1899
From Moro - Mrs. Jane Maxwell was found dead in her bed about 9:30 o'clock Tuesday morning by her husband, C. J. Maxwell. She was in her 83d year, and had been quite feeble for several months, but no fears were entertained by her family that she would not soon regain her health. Coroner Bailey was summoned and impaneled a jury, whose verdict was that death was caused by old age and heart failure. The funeral will take place from the family residence at 11 o'clock Thursday morning.

 

MAXWELL, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 8, 1919
Former Chief of Police Killed by Train
John Maxwell, former Chief of Police at Alton, was fatally hurt and Harvey Smith was seriously hurt when a fast M. K. & T. passenger train struck and demolished a motor truck at Twin crossing, two miles west of West Alton, Monday afternoon. Maxwell had gone across the river to seek a job with a threshing outfit on the Joe Golike place. Finding no job, he was riding on the motor truck to where another threshing outfit was at work, when at the crossing the accident occurred. The train was stopped and Maxwell taken aboard to be put in a hospital in St. Louis. Smith, not so seriously hurt, was taken to West Alton. The truck was completely demolished. Maxwell has relatives in Alton. He came back here recently after a protracted stay in Indiana. For ten years he was Chief of Police of Alton under Mayors Brueggemann and Beall. He was retired about eight years ago. He was 70 years of age. Maxwell died in the train before reaching St. Louis. He told his name and the address of relatives. Mrs. John Bailey of Alton is his niece. Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer of Alton went to St. Louis today to look after the body. It was not known whether the body would be brought back here for burial. Jabez Dorsett, of Alton, who was working near by where Maxwell was hit by the train, witnessed the accident.

 

MAY, HILDA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 3, 1912
Commits Suicide by Jumping Into Cistern
Miss Hilda May committed suicide in Marine, Ill. this morning by jumping into a cistern. She left a note saying that she committed the deed because her parents would not let her go to Alton to visited with Miss Sadie Byron. Miss Sadie Byron, who conducts a music class in Alton, was interviewed at the home of Mrs. Edward Levis this afternoon. She said that she had invited Miss May to attend a recital by her pupils at Alton yesterday, and that she did not come. Miss Byron did not know why and did not know Miss May had jumped in a well and drowned herself. She said that Miss May had been suffering from ill health for some time. Miss Byron said that the parents were very indulgent to the girl, having considerable wealth, and that the only time they denied her any request was when granting it would damage her frail health. It was the excitement of preparing to come to jAlton that caused her to become ill, and then the girl probably became so downcast that she resolved to commit suicide.

 

MAY, JENNIE FINGLETON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1922
Mrs. Jennie Fingleton May, aged 39, died this morning at 4:45 o'clock at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Fingleton, of 606 Belle street, following an illness of eleven months with heart trouble. Mrs. May was born in Alton on Nov. 29, 1883, and spent the greater part of her life in Alton. She possessed a very sweet and charming disposition, making her a great favorite with all with whom she came in contact. She attended the Cathedral school, being a member of the SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral Parish. For the past four or five years she has been telephone operator at the Alton Gas and Electric Company, and by her courteous treatment made many friends among the patrons. She is survived by her two small sons, Edward Jr. and Alton May, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Fingleton, three sisters, Mrs. H. C. King, Mrs. H. Aswede, Mrs. R. C. Gardner and two brothers, Harry and James Fingleton. The body will be removed to the home of Mrs. Aswege, 420 Carroll street, and the funeral will be held from there. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning when a Requiem High Mass will be celebrated at SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MAY, JOSEPHINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 14, 1916
The death of Mrs. Josephine May, wife of James May of Fifth and Alby streets, this morning, is probably without parallel in the history of the City of Alton. The attending physician, W. H. Enos, says in his experience he never knew of such a case. Saturday morning Mrs. May became a mother, the babe born being still alive and with every indication of living on. The remarkable part of the birth of the child was that there was no one in the home so much surprised as the mother herself. She was not expecting anything of the kind, and it was farthest from her mind that a new babe was to come to the house. At least she so told the doctor who called when she was taken ill. The mother of Mrs. May was present in the house when the child was born. The mother of the infant was not prepared to receive any child, and the physician accepted her statement that she had no idea what was to happen in the household. He believed her because of her evident sincerity even in the face of possible death. After the birth of the child the mother was taken with uraemic poisoning. She died Monday morning, about 48 hours after the child was born. The infant weighed six pounds. Besides her husband she leaves four children. The funeral will be conducted on Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock from the First Baptist Church. Six of the brothers and brothers-in-law of deceased will act as pallbearers.

 

MAY, LEONORA J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 17, 1914
Mrs. Leonora J. May, wife of Harry J. May, died at 2:55 o'clock Thursday morning at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. T. McCrea, 1703 Liberty street, after a long illness. Her death was not unexpected. Since the birth of her baby nine months ago, she had not been in good health. She had become unable to keep house and for that reason she had come to Alton to make her home with her parents during the past summer. She also submitted to a surgical operation in a sanitarium in St. Louis, which was expected to give her relief, but the expectations were disappointing. For four weeks she had been in a very serious condition, and her relatives were forced to realize that the end could not be far off. Mrs. May became a bride less than two years ago. She was a very highly esteemed young woman, and she had many admirers. She was generally known as Nellie McCrea. Her marriage at Alton was a surprise wedding as the couple had not confided their plans, except to nearest relatives. Mrs. May was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Alton since girlhood. She came to Alton in August, 1900 with her parents, when the father came to take a position in the Alton schools. She was born in Marine, Madison County. Her death, coming as the tragic culmination of her married life, is a sad shock to a large number of friends and relatives of the young wife and mother. In their affliction the family have the sincerest sympathy of the entire community. Owing to the uncertainty of the arrival of a brother, Hugh A. McCrea, who has been at Schenectady, N. Y., and is now traveling, the time of the funeral is uncertain. It is expected the funeral will be Sunday, and that services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Gibson of the First Presbyterian Church. Beside her husband and one child, Mrs. May leaves her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh T. McCrea, a sister, Mrs. Oliver Berner, and a brother, Hugh A. McCrea.

 

MAY, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 12, 1918
Old Employee of Sparks Milling Co. Falls Four Stories To His Death
William May, aged 58, an employee of the Sparks Milling Company, fell from the fourth floor of the mill this morning to the concrete walk at the rear of the mill, sustaining fatal injuries. He was a sweeper at the mill, an old employee, having been with the company for fifteen years as a floor sweeper. He began work this morning in company with a fellow sweeper, James Murphy, to whom he complained of feeling oppressively warm. He left Murphy and walked to one of the rear windows which he opened and from the time that elapsed between this act and when he was found, he must have fallen directly after opening the window. The body was found by W. J. Russell, a car inspector making his rounds along the levee tracks. The injured man was picked up by the mill hands and carried into the retail rooms of the mill where he was laid on a bed. His skull was crushed at the base, showing he had fallen head first to the paving fifty feet below. He had sustained other injuries. He was removed to St. Joseph's Hospital, where he was accompanied by his wife, who had been summoned. He was barely breathing as he was carried into the hospital. He was married - his family consisting of his wife and four children. His home is at 344 Dry Street. Deputy Coroner William H. Bauer will hold an inquest at 8 o'clock this evening. Mr. May leaves a widow and six children - three of the children are by a former marriage. They are Mrs. Thomas Stettinger of Springfield, Ill., Mrs. Riley Wolf of Upper Alton, and William May Jr., of Rodemeyer Avenue. The three children by the second marriage are Fred, Herman, and Hazel. The funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the family home. The Reverend O. W. Heggemeier, pastor of the Evangelical Church, will officiate. The burial will be in the City Cemetery.

 

MAYFIELD, MANNING (MAJOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 12, 1903
Man Who Assisted Materially in Development of Alton Dies in California
Friends in Alton are in receipt of the information that Major Manning Mayfield died a few days ago at the home of his wife in Lakeport, California. He left here several months ago suffering with Bright's disease, and the announcement of his death was not unexpected. Mr. Mayfield was 65 years of age, and he assisted materially in aiding the development of Alton. The Turner tract on State street became open for homes through his efforts, and he engineered the street car deal which gave Alton electric cars instead of mule cars. The Laura building is the result of his agency, and he labored indefatigable to bring about the construction of an electric railway between this city and St. Louis. Personally, Major Mayfield was a cheery, optimistic, companionable and good-hearted man, and believed firmly in looking on the bright side of life and doing all one can to cause others to see that side also. He will be missed both in financial and social circles in Alton and in St. Louis. He left considerable property in Madison county, St. Louis, and California.

 

MAYFORD, MARTHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 2, 1914
As peacefully as if she were dropping asleep, Mrs. Martha Mayford, widow of the late Christopher Mayford, passed quietly into eternity Wednesday morning at the family home, 2124 State street. She suffered a paralytic stroke several months ago, and was seriously sick for some time afterwards. She rallied, however, and her health was reasonably good until a few weeks ago when she suffered another stroke. Since then her decline has been steady until the end. Her six children were with her at the end, as were other relatives, and she passed into eternity with a peaceful look upon her face. She was born in 1838 in Germany, but came to this country with her husband fifty one years ago, and settled in North Alton. Until his death, her husband conducted a cooper shop in this locality. He died eighteen years ago, leaving the widow with six children, some of them quite small. She devoted the remainder of her life to them, and they idolized her. She was a kindly, charitable woman, and a fine neighbor, as well as a devoted mother, and there is general regret here over her death. The children surviving are Henry, Mrs. Louise McGee, John (foreman of the cooper shop of the Sparks Milling Company), Caris(sp?), a well known glassblower, George (one of Alton's police officers), and August Mayford (janitor of the McKinley School). Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

 

MAYO, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, March 13, 1899
The funeral of Frank Mayo took place Sunday from the family home on Market street, at 2 p.m. There was a very large attendance at the services, of Frank's friends. He was a youth of excellent character, hard-working, up to the time of his long illness. He had many friends and a large number of them was present at the funeral.

 

MAYO, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 16, 1907
Camp Cook for General Fremont
Henry Mayo, than whom there was no better or more widely known character in Alton, died shortly after noon, Saturday, at his home at Ninth and Market streets from pneumonia. It was not known to many of his white friends - and he had scores of these - that he was ill, and the announcement of his death will come as a painful surprise to them. Up to the last he was active as a man of fifty usually is, and his tall, straight form gave no tell tale sign of his age. He was a young man when he went with General J. C. Fremont on the historical "Pathfinding" trip to the Pacific coast, and he was with General Fremont through all that trip as camp cook. Another member of the party was Samuel Lotee of Alton, and these two have been believed for a long time to be the only survivors of the party under Fremont. Henry was a Democrat, and was for many years the only colored Democrat in Alton or in Madison county, and some of his own race were angered at him for years because of his political faith. He was janitor of rooms and buildings for several persons in Alton for many years, and he made many friends among the white residents of the city who were always glad to see Henry doing well and who were always willing to help him do that way. The death of Henry Mayo will remove from Alton one of her best known citizens. Although he had black skin, there was no drawing the color line on Henry, even by the most pronounced opponents of any proposition teaching racial equality. He was a cook for above the average in culinary skill. For years he was employed by the Mitchell brothers, and was with them when they were making their start in Alton which led them to riches afterward. Mayo was also "dry nurse" for ex-Governor Richard Yates and was in the employ of the family of Governor Richard Yates. Henry Mayo was 84 years of age. He was born free at Halifax county, Virginia, and came west with John J. Mitchell, William Mitchell and Leander Mitchell. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon from the family home, Tenth street, between Piasa and Market.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 18, 1907
The funeral of Henry Mayo was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Union Baptist church. There was a large attendance of old friends of the deceased. Burial was in City Cemetery. Services were conducted by Rev. Mason, pastor of the church.

[Editor's note: John Charles Fremont (January 21, 1813 - July 13, 1890) was an American military officer, explorer, and the first candidate of the anti-slavery Republican Party for the office of President of the United States. During the 1840s, that era's penny press accorded Fremont the sobriquet The Pathfinder. Historians call him The Great Pathfinder. He retired from the military and settled in California, after leading a fourth expedition, which cost ten lives, seeking a rail route over the mountains around the 38th parallel in the winter of 1849.]

 

MAYO, HERBERT GUY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 8, 1907
Herbert Guy Mayo, nine months old son of Mrs. Rebecca Mayo, died this morning from summer complaint at the home, 1802 Alby street, and the funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. Deceased was the youngest son of the late Thomas Mayo, being born a short time before the father passed away.

 

MAYO, REBECCA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 7, 1908
The funeral of Mrs. Rebecca Mayo was held Sunday afternoon from the home of her brother, Lee Jackson, in Division street, and was attended by a large number of friends of deceased and of her family. Services were conducted by Rev. Mason assisted by some of the visiting ministers, and burial was in City cemetery. The pallbearers were Andrew Brock, Oliver Jackson, Walter Jackson, George Means, Frank Bramble and Ed Taylor.

 

McADAMS, ERNEST/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 5, 1920
Ernest, the 3 month old child of Mr. and Mrs. Earl D. McAdams, died from spasms yesterday noon at the family home, 914 West Ninth street.

 

Professor William McAdamsMcADAMS, WILLIAM (PROFESSOR)/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, April 16, 1895
Prof. William McAdams of Alton, the noted archaeologist, is dead. He was drowned in the Mississippi River Thursday. That morning he started in a sailboat up the river to make some researches and to join a party of hunters, which included his son Clark, who left Alton about a week before. The son returned to Alton Saturday, and learning that his father had left, started with his brother John to look for him. They searched the river banks until they came to Eagle Nest Island, where they learned that Mr. McAdams had been there at noon Thursday, and appeared to be in good health. Some further up the river they were informed by a fisherman that Mr. McAdams landed his boat on the upper end of the island. Here on the bank, the sons found the boat and the faithful dog which accompanied Mr. McAdams on all his tours. No trace of the missing man was found, and the boys returned to Alton Sunday. Other parties with H. M. Schweppe's steam launch, Nina, and Beall Bros.' yacht, Glad Tiddings, started out to make a search. They visited the island and found the same traces of a mishap as the boys did the day previous, but were unsuccessful in making any new discovery. At this point, the marks of the prow of the boat were plainly visible in the sand. On the bank were marks of his footprints and of the dog. Yesterday morning at 5 o'clock, Beall Bros., with the yacht, Glad Tidings, took a small party to the island. After a thorough search of the vicinity, they became convinced that Mr. McAdams was dead. They believed that his boat became loosened from its fastenings and that he waded out to recover it or attempted to reach the opposite shore. They accordingly let down a line of hooks and began to drag the river. The form of the dead man was caught and raised to the surface. It appeared probable that he waded out about 20 feet and came to a "step off," where he was drowned. The body was found at 10:30 o'clock Monday morning. Prof. McAdams was widely known. He was a member of the legislature twenty years ago, representing Jersey County. He has been a relic hunter all his life, and was considered an authority on archaeological and geological matters. He had charge of the geological exhibit at the World's Fair, and at the time of his death was preparing an exhaustive report. He was a good writer and an author of note. He had attained the age of 60 years, and leaves a wife and family. The funeral took place this morning from his home. The remains were interred at Otterville, Jersey County.

 

McANERNEY, ELMER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 24, 1916
Killed by Train at Long Lake (Near Mitchell)
Elmer McAnerney, the 17 year old son of contractor and Mrs. John McAnerney of Granite City, was instantly killed Saturday evening at the Long Lake, as the automobile crossing over the Wabash tracks was dragged about 300 feet, as he became caught on the train and his body horribly mutilated. The father of the boy was not at home at the time, and when the news was broken to the mother she collapsed. The family are well known in Alton. They have had more than their share of trouble in the past few years. The father was driving an automobile in Alton when the car collided with another in which E. M. Clark was riding, and Miss Emelia Rotsch in the Clark car, and a man named Meehan in the McAnerney car were killed. Later, last summer, while Mr. McAnerney was driving in Alton, his car became unmanageable on Washington street hill and dashing down the grade collided with a post at the street side and was wrecked, the passengers being hurled out without anyone being seriously hurt. The father is a brother of Mrs. Thomas Gallagher of Alton, and members of the family frequently visit in the city. The other boys who were with young McAnerney at the time of the accident say that he saw the train as it was approaching the car and realized that he had little chance to escape. He told the other members of the party to jump, but he was powerless to leave the car on account of the wheel. The other members of the party owe their lives to the fact that they jumped. Roy McAnerny, an older brother of the deceased, was on an auto tour with Mayor Garesche of Granite City at the time of the accident. An effort was made at many towns along the line of the tour to get the brother and he was finally found in Fayetteville. He telegraphed that he would be home in time for the funeral tomorrow. The funeral will be held tomorrow at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning from the St. Joseph's Church in Granite City to the St. Mark's Cemetery. A large number of the Alton relatives and friends of the deceased will go to Granite to attend the funeral.

 

McANTHIS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 16, 1901
The funeral of John McAnthis took place from the home in Fosterburg, Sunday morning, to the Bethalto cemetery. Many Altonians attended the obsequies.

 

McARTHUR, CHARLOTTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 16, 1910
The funeral of Mrs. Charlotte McArthur was held this morning from Union depot on the arrival of the body from St. Louis, accompanied by members of her family. The body was taken direct to Oakwood cemetery in Upper Alton. Brief services were conducted by Rev. H. M. Chittenden of the St. Paul's Episcopal church.

 

McAVOY, DANIEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 11, 1905
Daniel McAvoy, the last of his family, died at 8 o'clock this morning at his home, Sixth and Ridge streets, after a brief illness from heart trouble. Old, blind, deaf and feeble, he had seen the members of his family pass away one after another until he alone was left. He buried the last survivor but himself on last New Year's day, and the aged father was scarcely able to totter down the aisle of St. Patrick's church to follow the casket containing the remains of his last child who was buried on that day. It was said then the father could not long survive. A few days later he was stricken with heart disease, and after suffering great pain the sole survivor of his family passed away Wednesday morning at his home. Mr. McAvoy was the father of six children, every one of whom, with his wife, died and preceded him in taking up their last long sleep in Greenwood Cemetery. A similar fate had pursued his brother's family in St. Louis, and Mr. McAvoy is the last. The exact age of Mr. McAvoy is not known, but it is said to have been 71, friends saying that his daughter so informed them before she died. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

 

McAVOY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1904
John McAvoy, member of a well known family which formerly lived in Alton and which in the last ten years has buried every member in Greenwood cemetery, died Sunday very unexpectedly. He had been a sufferer from a form of quick consumption which had taken his brothers and sisters, and finally claimed him. He was the son of Patrick and Margaret McAvoy, both of whom sleep in Greenwood, and a brother of James McAvoy whom John McAvoy brought here a short time ago to be buried. When in Alton, the sole survivor of the big family said to a close friend that it was only a course of a few months until he too might be a victim of the disease. Sunday, it is said, he was able to be up and around and there was no indication that he would be dead Sunday night. Almost without warning he was stricken and will be buried Wednesday morning in Greenwood. Only recently Mr. McAvoy married.

 

McAVOY, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 30, 1904
Sole Mourner of Deceased Was Octogenarian Father
The funeral of Miss Margaret McAvoy, Monday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Patrick's church, was an extremely pathetic one. The aged father, Daniel McAvoy, who has passed his four score years, was the sole surviving member of a big family. The father, who is deaf and almost blind, has attended the funerals of his wife and all his children. So near sightless is he that he could scarcely see as the casket was being moved in the church. Rev. Fr. P. I. O'Reilly, the officiating clergyman, spoke feelingly of the sad condition of the aged father, and said tender words for his consolation. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

 

McAVOY, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 1, 1911
Mrs. Mary McAvoy, wife of Patrick McAvoy, died Tuesday afternoon at 3:40 o'clock at the family home on Sixth street. Her death was due to the burns she sustained Monday morning by the explosion of a coal oil lamp she was carrying. Mrs. McAvoy's recovery seemed impossible from the first, as the burns covered such a large extent of surface. Mrs. McAvoy was a native of Ireland, but had lived in this country about thirty years, and about sixteen years in Alton. She leaves her husband and five children, John and Daniel, and Misses Mary, Anna, and Maggie McAvoy.

 

McBEATH, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Telegraph, June 21, 1845
Died in Alton, on the 14th inst., Mr. William McBeath, aged 36 years. He emigrated from Scotland to this country several years since, and has for the last eight years resided in this place. He was an excellent citizen, upright and honest, a kind and obliging neighbor, ever ready to attend on the sick and afflicted; a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a constant and faithful Sunday school teacher. He died after a painful illness of but eight days duration, and has left a deeply afflicted widow, and a large circle of acquaintances who were much attached to him to mourn his loss. "What is life? It is even a vapor, that appeareth for a little while, and then vanisheth away." "Behold, I come quickly, and my reward is with me, to give every man according as his work shall be."

 

McBRIDE, ALEXANDER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1905
Alexander McBride, aged 38, died at his home, 914 East Fourth street, Friday morning at 10:15 o'clock, after a long illness from consumption. His most recent illness began about two months ago, but he had been a sufferer from the disease for several years. Mr. McBride had lived in Alton many years and was among the best known of the local glassblowers. He had very many friends in Alton and took an active part in politics. By those who best knew him, McBride's friendship was highly valued and his death has caused general grief among his acquaintances. He leaves his wife and four children. He was a member of the order of Eagles, and that order, with the glassblowers union, will have charge of the funeral arrangements. The body will be taken to Brooklyn, N. Y., for burial, and the funeral party will leave Saturday evening.

 

McBRIDE, HARRY D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 15, 1919
Harry D. McBride, in his 24th year, died Friday night at midnight at his home, 1029 Gold street, after an illness of about four months. He had been employed as inside trouble man for the Bell Telephone Exchange. Mr. McBride is survived by his young wife, also by his mother, Mrs. Katherine McBride, and two brothers, Archie and Alex. He was 23 years 9 months old. During his long illness he underwent a surgical operation in the hope of being benefitted, but no permanent relief was given by the operation. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church.

 

McCABE, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1919
Man Burned With Acid - Fell Into Acid Tank at Standard Oil Refinery
Frank McCabe, 46 years old, of Wood River, died this morning at 12:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital, the result of burns sustained when he fell into the acid melting tank of the soda ash house of the Standard Oil Refinery at Wood River last Sunday. The tank was filled with a very corrosive acid. McCabe went from the press house to the soda ash house of the plant, according to testimony of Robert Parks, to get some soda for clearing purposes. He was employed at the press house. He went upon the platform of the soda house and tried to get in the side door, which was locked, and then tried the end door, which was also locked. Stepping over from the tank from the platform, he fell into the tank. He fell with his arms and shoulders on the outside of the tank. According to Parks, McCabe got out of the tank without assistance. McCabe told Parks he stepped on the end of the plank. The tank containing the acid into which McCabe fell is five feet deep, one foot being underground. Four feet of liquid was in the tank, at a temperature of 161 degrees Fahrenheit. McCabe is also said to have told John Tricker that he stepped on the plank and went down into the tank. He was badly burned below the waist and suffered much pain. McCabe was married, and had been a resident of Wood River for seven years, during which time he was employed at the oil refinery. He had been a resident of this section for 20 years. He leaves his wife, Ada, three sisters and four brothers. The funeral will probably be at one o'clock Sunday afternoon from the home on Ferguson avenue in Wood River, and interment will be in the Bethalto cemetery.

 

McCALLEY, HANNAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 7, 1902
The funeral of Miss Hannah McCalley took place at Moro on Friday. Deceased was about 16 years of age and was the daughter of Mrs. Carrie McCalley. She was taken ill with diphtheria while employed with a family near Upper Alton, and died on Wednesday morning.

 

McCAMBRIDGE, CAPTAIN FRANK/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Friday, April 17, 1896
Captain Frank McCambridge, one of the most stalwart friends Venice has ever had, breathed his last Tuesday morning at his home on the Edwardsville Rock Road in Venice, in the 64th year of his age. Frank McCambridge was born at Larne, county Antrim, Ireland, in 1832, and immigrated to this country with his father in 1848. In 1849 he went to California but soon returned and entered the employ of the Chicago & Alton railroad as engineer continuing until 1860. He went south to join his fortunes with those of the lost cause, but after the war returned to Venice. He was captain on the ferry boat for 18 years. After his retirement from the ferry service, he was appointed levee commissioner and held various offices of trust all of which he filled faithfully and honestly. He served in the county board repeatedly and was chairman. He leaves a wife but no children. The funeral took place Thursday at one o'clock under the auspices of Triple Lodge No. 835 A. F. and A. M. to Bellefontaine cemetery, St. Louis. Dr. H. T. Burnap, of Upper Alton, acted as worshipful master, and Rev. J. J. Tomlins of East St. Louis, as chaplain. A large number of friends from Alton, Bunker Hill, Edwardsville, East St. Louis and St. Louis were in attendance. The pallbearers were: Louis Van Buskirk Sr., John Clark, B. Ogeltree, John Nesbet, R. P. Tansey, J. C. Wilson, W. Wilcox and Aug. Kron Sr. Captain McCambridge was respected by all. He was the embodiment of Candor and honesty. He was true to his friends and numbered them wherever he went. He did much to bring about the present growth and prosperity of the southwestern portion of the county. Venice can ill afford to lose him.

 

McCARROLL, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 24, 1907
Charles, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip McCarroll, died at the home of the parents at 1211 East Fifth street at 4 o'clock, Monday afternoon. The little one was one year old. The funeral will take place from the St. Patrick's church at 2:30 o'clock, Wednesday afternoon.

 

McCARROLL, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 23, 1912
Mrs. Mary McCarroll, aged 45, wife of Philip McCarroll of 1211 1-2 east Fifth street, died at St. Joseph's hospital Monday afternoon at 5 o'clock. Her death was due to a sickness which began with gallstones, and made a surgical operation necessary. During the operation Mrs. McCarroll lost so much blood her case became desperate. The operation was performed four weeks ago, and on April 8 her sister, Mrs. Thomas McCarroll, in the hope of saving the life of her sister, gave up about two quarts of her blood, which was transfused into the circulation system of Mrs. Mary McCarroll. The sick woman rallied, but later another decline set in and she died. The sacrifice had been in vain. Following the operation for gallstones, which apparently was going to prove successful unless the patient died from weakness and loss of blood, the physicians declared to members of the family that the only hope for prolonging and possibly saving her life was for someone to give up enough blood to assist in restoring her to strength. Mrs. Thomas McCarroll, whose husband is a twin brother of the deceased woman and who is herself a sister to her at once volunteered to give up the requisite amount of blood. She was strong and healthy, weighing something like 250 pounds, and said she could easily spare the blood. The operation was arranged for and held on April 8 at St. Joseph's hospital, lasting from 1 o'clock until 6:30. Neither were put under anesthetic and both were conscious. The operation was performed by Dr. J. N. Shaff and Dr. Homer Davis. Long glass tubes were put into the well sister's left arm just above the wrist, being stuck into the artery and tightened so that the blood would flow from the artery into the glass tubes. The other end of the tubes, two being used, were fastened into the sick lady's flash, one at the wrist and the other near the shoulder, and the work of transfusion was started. Mrs. McCarroll said today that it was a little painful, but she felt called upon to sacrifice her life if it were necessary for her sister's welfare. She suffered no ill effects from it, and today showed the arm perfectly well and healed up. Her only regret was that it did not entirely save her sister's life, although the physicians said that this was responsible for the prolongation of life for only two weeks. Mrs. McCarroll leaves a husband and nine children: James, Daniel, Bryan, Thomas, Margaret, Mary, Annie, Joseph and George, all of Alton; and two sisters: Mrs. James Teets of Pittsburg, Pa., and Mrs. Thomas McCarroll. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock at St. Patrick's church.

 

McCARTHY, BRIDGET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1902
Mrs. Bridget McCarthy died yesterday afternoon after a long illness at her home on Easton street. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and services will be in the Cathedral.

 

McCARTHY, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 28, 1914
Miss Caroline McCarthy, daughter of Mrs. Eliza McCarthy of Eighth and Alby streets, Alton, died at the home of Dr. W. H. Binney in Granite City Friday night from pneumonia. She had been sick since Sunday. Members of her family had been in attendance since her sickness manifested a very serious turn. Miss McCarthy's death was a great surprise to her many friends in Alton, as it was not realized by them that she was in a dangerous condition. She had been a teacher in the Granite City public school for thirteen years, and filled the post of principal in the Washington School in that city. She was reputed to be the highest salaried female school principal in Madison county. She was highly efficient in her work as a teacher, and was esteemed as one of the best teachers in the county. She leaves beside her mother, three sisters, Misses Hattie, Alice and Sarah McCarthy. Miss McCarthy was taken sick last Sunday night after arriving in Granite City. She had spent Sunday at home in Alton, and going through the storm she suffered exposure which developed a bad illness. It was not realized that her case was so bad, and when the end followed a complete collapse this morning at 7:30 o'clock, it was very unexpected. Miss Harriet McCarthy, her sister, had come to Alton, though the remainder of the family was with Miss McCarthy when the end came. Miss McCarthy died at the home of Dr. W. H. Binney in Granite City, where she had boarded. The body will be brought to Alton this evening and taken to the home on Alby street. The departure from Granite City was delayed so that the school children and her other friends might have an opportunity to see her. She was beloved as a teacher in Granite City, where she had started as instructor in a one-room country school in west Granite. That school had grown to a twelve room building, and Miss McCarthy was the head of it. Because of the respect the board of education and teachers felt for Miss McCarthy, it was decided that the Granite City schools would be closed Monday and Tuesday, and that the school teachers and school board would attend the funeral, which will probably be held in the First Baptist church of Alton Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Miss McCarthy was a member of the First Baptist church of Alton. She was the youngest of her mother's daughters, was devoted to her family, and her death is a sad blow to her mother and sister.

 

McCARTHY, DANIEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 21, 1910
The funeral of Daniel McCarthy, the old resident of Alton who died while on a visit in East St. Louis Tuesday, was held this morning from the home of his son, Addis McCarthy in Yager Park, to St. Patrick's church, where a requiem mass was said by Rev. Fr. Kehoe. The church was filled with friends and neighbors of deceased and of the family, and the funeral cortege was a long one. There were many floral offerings, and burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

 

McCARTHY, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 30, 1900
Mrs. Elizabeth McCarthy died this morning at her home on East Second street, aged 56 years, after a long illness with cancer of the stomach. She leaves five sons, Addis, Richard, Edward, James and Daniel McCarthy, and one daughter, Mrs. Dilks. The funeral will be Thursday at 9 a.m., and services will be in St. Patrick's church.

 

McCARTHY, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1914
Mrs. Ellen McCarthy, aged 85, died at her home on the Grafton road this morning from old age. Mrs. McCarthy is the widow of the late Timothy McCarthy. She has lived in and about Alton for the past 60 years, and had a large number of friends. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at nine o'clock from the Cathedral to the St. Patrick's cemetery.

 

McCARTHY, HANORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 28, 1903
Mrs. Hanora McCarthy, aged 68, died this morning after an illness from the grip. She had lived in Alton since 1841, and was well known. She leaves a family of five children, Mrs. Simon Scully, Mrs. Ed Conley, Mrs. John Lawliss, Mrs. John Welch, Miss Nellie McCarthy. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

 

McCARTHY, HARRY AND THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 21, 1901
Brothers Drown in Mississippi near Alton Bridge
Two little boys of eight and ten years respectively, Harry and Thomas McCarthy, sons of Thomas McCarthy of 450 east Third street, were drowned Thursday evening about 7:30 o'clock while swimming in the Burlington pocket near the Illinois end of the Alton bridge. The boys were swimming in shallow water with a number of little boys, none of them much older than the ones who were drowned, and there was no one to help them. Thursday was the tenth birthday of Harry McCarthy. He saw his brother struggling in deep water, where he had got into a deep hole near the pier, and went to his rescue. Unable to save his brother from drowning, he went down with him, and the two bodies were found together where they sunk in close embrace. The terrified companions gave the alarm, and in a few minutes the news had spread over the whole east end of the city, and there was a big crowd on the viaduct and on the ground near the hole where the two boys lost their lives. Joseph O'Hare dived into the hole and rescued the bodies about forty minutes after the drowning. They were taken to the home of their parents today after they had been cared for by Undertaker Bauer. An inquest was held this morning by Deputy Coroner Streeper, and a verdict of accidental drowning was given by the jury. Mr. McCarthy works at Hapgood Plow works. Recently he lost a child by death, and this double affliction has an added poignancy on that account. Mr. and Mrs. McCarthy had a family of 6 boys. Three have been claimed by death within a half year. The oldest and the two youngest survive. The grandmother of the children, Mrs. Doyle, who is over 70 years of age, is in a critical condition because of the awful accident. Fears are entertained that she will not recover. Mrs. McCarthy also is in a pitiful state. The funeral of Harry and Thomas McCarthy will take place tomorrow at 9 a.m. from St. Patrick's church. [Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery]

 

McCARTHY, KATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 11, 1909
Miss Katherine McCarthy passed peacefully away this morning at 9 a.m. at the home of her aunt, Mrs. Mary Sheehan of east Ninth street, after an illness of several months duration. The deceased leaves no immediate relatives. She was an only child, her parents having preceded her to the grave a few years ago. She was of a sweet and amiable disposition, loved by all with whom she came in contact. The funeral will take place Monday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral to Greenwood cemetery.

 

McCARTHY, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1901
Mrs. Mary McCarthy, wife of Addis McCarthy, died this morning at five o'clock after an illness of one week with an abscess of the stomach. Her death was unexpected and is a sad shock to the husband and her family of two little children, who have been deprived of a wife's and mother's loving care and affection. Mrs. McCarthy was 33 years of age and was a member of a well known east end family. She was taken ill about one week before her death and was confined to her bed, but it was not thought the illness would take a fatal turn. The funeral will be Sunday at 2 o'clock and will be from the home, 1131 Bloomfield street, to St. Patrick's church.

 

McCARTHY, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 26, 1906
The funeral of Thomas McCarthy was held this morning from the home of his sister, Mrs. Mary Downs, near Upper Alton, and services were conducted in the Cathedral by Rev. Fr. Tarrent. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery.

 

McCARTHY, UNKNOWN INFANT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 15, 1907
The funeral of the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard McCarthy was held this afternoon from St. Patrick's church where services were conducted by Rev. Fr. O'Reilly. Many friends and neighbors attended the obsequies, and burial was in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

McCARTY, EMMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 10, 1920
Mrs. Emma McCarty, wife of Harry McCarty, 32 years old, died at 10:40 o'clock last night at St. Joseph's Hospital following a short illness with pneumonia which developed from an attack of influenza. Mrs. McCarty is survived by her husband. Mr. and Mrs. McCarty moved here a month ago from Oklahoma, to which they had gone from Coffeyville, Kan., shortly before. They lived at 1330 East Fourth street. McCarty is employed by the Standard Boiler Plate Co. at the Roxana Refinery. The funeral will be tomorrow afternoon from the Bauer undertaking parlor, and interment will be in the City Cemetery.

 

McCARTY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 12, 1915
The funeral of John McCarty will be held at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the Cherry street Baptist church to the Oakwood cemetery.

 

McCARTY, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 30, 1917
Michael McCarty, aged about 65, died at the Madison county hospital in Edwardsville, Thursday at midnight, after an illness brought on by exposure. McCarty was picked up by the police in Alton and was very sick. He was believed to be in a bad way when he was taken to the county hospital by Overseer of the Poor, Joseph Hermann, a few weeks ago. He seemed to be suffering from pneumonia. The body was taken in charge by Undertaker James Klunk today and brought to Alton at the direction of Rev. E. L. Spalding of the Cathedral. Mike McCarty had a wide acquaintance in Alton. He was a laboring man, and a good one, when he let John Barleycorn alone. His services were always in demand. He was one drinking man who would say he knew his enemy and he made it a practice to sign local option petitions and to vote against liquor every chance he had. His name was a regular one on local option petitions and his support of an anti-saloon fight could always be counted on by the dry forces. He conducted a saloon one time on Belle street, for a short time.

 

McCARTY, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 24, 1907
Thomas McCarty, of 450 east Third street, died very suddenly Thursday morning shortly after 3 o'clock, supposedly from heart disease. He was 52 years of age and for many years he had been employed as a blacksmith at the Hapgood Plow works. About 3 o'clock in the morning he woke with a strong mental impression that he had heard the factory whistles blowing for 6 o'clock, and he rose from his bed and went to look at the clock. When he found out what time it was, he returned to his bed. A few minutes later his wife heard him breathing heavily, and she went to see what was the trouble, and she found him gasping for breath. He died before a physician could arrive. Mr. McCarty was a steady industrious man and was well respected by all who knew him. He is survived by his wife and three sons. It will be remembered that several years ago two of his boys were drowned at the draw span of the Alton bridge while one of the boys was trying to rescue his brother, and both were carried down and lost their lives. Mrs. McCarty did not hear her husband complain of being ill and she was much surprised at the fatal termination of his night's sleep. It is supposed that what Mr. McCarty thought was the factory whistles blowing was only due to his weakened condition resulting from the failure of his heart.

 

McCAULEY, MARY (nee THOMPSON)/Source: Alton Telegraph, February 26, 1913
Mrs. Mary Thompson McCauley, aged 72 last October, passed away yesterday at the home in Fosterburg after an illness of six weeks. Her illness started with the trip, and later developed into bronchitis, which caused her death at 8:50 o'clock today. She was the widow of William McCauley, who died eight years ago on the 11th day of last July. The couple were old time residents of Foster township and were well known over that section of the country. Mrs. McCauley leaves a family of five sons and two daughters. The sons are William, Harry and Bert McCauley of _uhi, Idaho; Robert, John, Lizzie and Gertrude McCauley, all of Foster township. Word was sent today to all the children and it is not known whether the sons from Idaho will attend the funeral. No arrangements for the burial will be made until all the relatives are heard from.

 

McCAULEY, UNKNOWN WIFE OF GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 25, 1899
The funeral of Mrs. George McCauley of East Alton, daughter of the late W. E. Hill, took place Friday morning. The services were conducted by Rev. H. M. Spickler at Mt. Olive Church, of which she had been a member for thirty-five years. She leaves a husband, five daughters and one son, besides an aged mother, to mourn her death. The pallbearers were L. J. Lawrence, L. Cooper, R. Douglas, E. Young, W. Jackson and C. White.

 

McCAULEY, UNKNOWN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 23, 1904
Fosterburg News - The funeral of Mr. McCauley Sr. took place Wednesday from the family residence, one mile south of town. Rev. G. W. Wagoner officiating. The attendance was very large. Mr. McCauley was regarded as one of our best citizens, possessing numerous friends. The G. A. R. Post had charge of exercises at the grave. Pallbearers were: William Paul, James Dillon, Irby Williams, Mose Thompson, John Titchenal, and Fred Bauer. In their bereavement the family have the sympathy of the entire community.

 

McCAULEY, UNKNOWN WIFE OF SAMUEL (nee STILWELL)/Source: Alton Telegraph, October 5, 1893
Bethalto - Mrs. Samuel McCauley, of Fort Russell, died on Sunday morning [October 1] at 10 o'clock and 40 minutes, aged 48 years. Her sickness was of short duration and the death quite unexpected. She was the second daughter of the late Nimrod Stilwell. Mrs. McCauley was one of those unassuming ladies of quiet and gentle life, yet endeared herself to her family and friends by her generous qualities and womanly worth. The kind husband and seven children have the sympathy of the whole neighborhood. The remains will be laid to rest in the family burying ground near the home farm.

 

McCLAIN, NORMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 11, 1915
Norma McClain, colored, died at her home on Belle street last night. She was 28 years of age. The funeral will be held from the Campbell M. E. Church tomorrow afternoon.

 

McCLURE, MARY J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 15, 1906
On Sunday morning at 7 o'clock, Miss Mary J. McClure, oldest daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McClure, died at her home on Langdon street, corner of Eighth, after a few days' illness with typhoid-pneumonia. On Tuesday Miss McClure was taken with a slight chill, which developed the fatal disease, when a very useful and good life was taken from earth to her reward. Miss McClure was one of those women who performed every duty with scrupulous care, and performed it so well that all who knew her could express only words of praise. For many years her life work was largely in connection with the primary class of the First Presbyterian church. As teacher of this class and other classes, she was pre-eminently satisfactory to the conductors of the school. Her duties there were never neglect nor lightly set aside to meet other demands on her time. As a member of that church from early childhood, she was respected by all who knew her, and who knew where to find a ready assistant in any labor of love for the church. She has been for many years a mother to the family of brothers and sisters, and she was depended upon in that capacity by the other members of the family, and that dependence never failed. Her loss to these relatives will be a heavy one, a burden to be carried with aching hearts and fond memories. Fifty-two years ago Miss McClure was born in Pittsburg, Pa. In 1857 she came with her father and mother to Alton, where she has since resided. Her father died many years ago, and her mother more recently. Since her mother's death she has been at the home the mainstay of the family. The remaining members of the family are: S. R. McClure, Mrs. C. B. Stanton, John T. McClure and Mrs. E. J. Lockyer. The funeral services will be conducted at the family home on the corner of Langdon and Eighth streets, on Wednesday, January 17, 2:30 p.m. Interment in City Cemetery.

 

McCOLLUM, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 26, 1912
Mrs. Ellen McCollum died this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Joseph E. Holl, on East Fourth street, after an illness of six months. Mrs. McCollum had been suffering from asthma for about six months and this, combined with her age, caused her death. She had lived in Alton about forty years, and was a member of the First Baptist Church. She leaves two sons, George and William McCollum, and one daughter, Mrs. Joseph E. Holl.

 

McCONNELL, R. C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 13, 1902
R. C. McConnell, a farmer living near Brushy Grove school house below East Alton, dropped dead shortly after he returned from a visit to town. Just as he was hanging up his coat he fell to the floor and died. He had been in excellent health and spirits and his sudden death almost crushed with sorrow the widow and two children thus parted. Mr. McConnell was about 50 years of age. Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest Sunday, and the jury found that death was caused by paralysis of the heart. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from Brushy Grove church. [Burial was at Milton Cemetery]

 

McCORKLE, THOMAS C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1918
Old Time Printer on Telegraph Dies in Arkansas
Miss Theodosia Watkins has received word that her uncle, Thomas C. McCorkle, had died November 15 at Ravenden, Ark., from old age. He was 78 years old. Mr. McCorkle, a few years ago, made a visit back in Alton to renew old acquaintances. He lived here many years ago and for many years was employed as a printer on the Alton Telegraph. While he was here Former Mayor Edmond Beall entertained with a party at his home in honor of Mr. McCorkle, to which were invited all the old time employees of the Telegraph who had worked there at the time that Mr. McCorkle was employed on the paper, and some of them at a subsequent date. It was an occasion of great interest, and was remarkable for the number of men present who had at one time been employed on the Telegraph, among them Mr. Beall. Mrs. McCorkle wrote a letter to Miss Watkins telling of her husband's death.

 

McCORMICK, GEORGE M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 13, 1913
Former States Senator and County Treasurer Dies at Home in Collinsville
George M. McCormick, former State Senator and for many years a county officer in Madison county, died at 4:30 o'clock Monday morning at his old home in Collinsville. His death was due to the effects of a wound he received while in the army during the Civil War. Mr. McCormick had been in poor health for many years. In fact, he had always suffered from the wound, and it was only by vigorous self control that he managed to keep at his post of duty many times, when his health would have been better served had he given up and discontinued attempting to follow out the activities he pursued. For the past four months he had been staying all the time at Collinsville, undergoing treatment from his old doctor there, and once, about two months ago, he came to Alton and was so weak that he had to be moved in a carriage. The old wound had caused poisoning of his system, and this finally caused his death. He was 72 years of age. The death of Mr. McCormick removes from the political circles of Madison county a man who was personally one of the most popular men in the county. He served two terms as county treasurer and one term as deputy county treasurer, and every time he went before the people he received immense majorities. He was regarded as invincible at the polls, because of the long lead he carried in the voting at all elections where he was a candidate. He closed his political career in the office of state senator. He served one term of four years in the Senate, and was succeeded by Senator Beall, whose cause Mr. McCormick advocated. Mr. McCormick is survived by his wife, one daughter and three sons. Mrs. Charles Huskinson of Alton is his only daughter, and his sons, William, Wade and George M. McCormick Jr. Mrs. McCormick continued living in Alton after her husband decided to go back to his old doctor for treatment. Mr. McCormick served in an Ohio regiment during the war, of which Rutherford B. Hayes, afterward President, was the colonel. He was a gallant soldier and served with distinction, and for the injury he received and from the effects of which he suffered, he was allowed a liberal pension by the government. There was not a week of his life for many years that he did not have to get the wound on his leg dressed.

 

McCOY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1916
John McCoy, aged 62, died at St. Joseph's Hospital last evening as the result of the injuries he sustained at the Standard-Tilton Milling Co. last Thursday evening. McCoy has suffered intensely since the time he was injured, and the attending surgeons held out little hope for his life at any time. He was injured by a descending elevator in the basement of the mill on Thursday evening. As he was passing under the elevator shaft hauling flour, the descending elevator hit him and knocked him to the floor. Many bones were broken as the result of the accident, and he suffered internal injuries. He was removed at once to the St. Joseph's hospital. From the time he was examined by the surgeon, little hope was held out for his life. He had been working at the Standard-Tilton Milling Co. but a few days before the accident. He is survived by a wife and several grown children.

 

McCRACKEN, HANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 17, 1900
Mrs. Hanna McCracken, aged 71, died very suddenly Sunday morning at the home of Mrs. Elias Hoskins in Upper Alton. She has been suffering over one year from the effects of the amputation of her foot, but her condition was not considered serious. Sunday morning a noise as of someone falling was heard from her room, and Miss Hoskins investigated to find that the aged lady was dead. Deputy Coroner Streeper held an inquest, and a verdict of death from natural causes was found. The funeral took place Monday morning from the home of Mrs. Hoskins.

 

McCRACKEN, JEANNETTE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 5, 1918
Mrs. Jeannette McCracken died last evening at her home at Broadway and Langdon streets after a short illness with influenza. She was 47 years old, and leaves four children, two daughters and two sons. Mrs. McCracken has relatives at Virden, Ill., and pending word from them the funeral arrangements have not been completed.

 

McCREA, UNKNOWN WIFE OF THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 3, 1900
Mrs. Thomas McCrea, mother of H. T. McCrea, principal of Lowell school, died this morning at the home of her son in Middletown, after a short illness. She was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, September 2, 1811, and had been a resident of Madison county more than half a century. She has been making her home with her son since his coming to Alton, having lived many years at Fosterburg, which is the old home of the family. All day yesterday, Mrs. McCrea was in apparently the best of health, and last evening when she was taken ill, her condition caused no alarm. She was ill all night, and at 5 o'clock the attack took a fatal turn. Death was due to a wearing out of the machinery that had run so well and so true during the long life of Mrs. McCrea. She suffered only a short time, and slipped away at daybreak as peacefully as though falling asleep. The funeral will take place Monday morning, and services will be at the family home. Burial will be at the Fosterburg cemetery.

 

McCRILLIS or McGRILLIS, MARY/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 5, 1862
Died on the 30th ult., Mary McGrillis, wife of Colonel McGrillis, aged 47 years.

 

McCROSKEY or POTTER, W. C or W. G../Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 28, 1901
W. C. Potter (or McCroskey), who came from Cairo here some time ago with a party of linemen to work for the Central Union Telephone Company, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Saturday night, after a two weeks illness with pneumonia. In conversing with Manager McKee before he died, he said he had a divorced wife and a family of children, but that he didn't want them to know anything about him. Papers in his pocket showed he had been a member of K. of P. Lodge No. 171, Wilton, Ia., and a message was sent to that lodge but no answer was returned. There is an inscription on the inner case of his gold watch, which shows it was presented to him by a Mrs. R. Walker, Galesburg, Ill., but what relation she bore to the man could not be learned. The body is being held until relatives are heard from. Manager McKee says that McRoskey was known by the alias of Potter during all the time he was in the employ of the telephone company.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 29, 1901
Undertaker Will Bauer received a message last evening from Wilton, Iowa, to send the body of W. G. McCroskey to that city. McCroskey's wife and children live at Wilton. The body was sent north this afternoon.

 

McCUNE, GEORGE DEWEY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 4, 1918
Killed in France
That his son, George Dewey McCune, a member of the Marine Corps had given his life for the defense of the American flag in France on October 3, was the word that came to Grant McCune of 2038 Brown street today. The young man had enlisted in the Marine corps and went to France. He had participated in much heavy fighting and had done his part well. He had a wide acquaintance in Alton and the news of his death was of the deepest interest to many people of Alton. The young man was 20 years of age and his parents reside at 2038 Brown street. George McCune, the young man who fell on the battlefield, had been in the service of the country since the United States entered the war. He enlisted as soon as the call came for men, and was one of the boys to be sent to France early in the game. The McCune family had three sons in the service. They were all anxious to get in at the start, and the youngest son was refused admittance at first because of his age but he was accepted later.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1921
Funeral services for George D. McCune, whose body recently was returned from France, were conducted yesterday at the Upper Alton Presbyterian Church by the Rev. John Morrison, the pastor. George McCune was a son of Charles and Mary McCune and was born at Browns Station, Mo., May 30, 1892. He resided in East St. Louis and Edwardsville before coming to Alton. While here he was a prominent member of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church. He enlisted in St. Louis on December 31, 1917, and was immediately assigned to Paris Island, S. C. He was next stationed at Camp Ovantico, Md., and after a stay of three months sailed for France. With the 3rd replacement battalion of the 144th, he landed at Brest and was sent to Chatillion for further training. He was killed in the capture of Mont Blanc Ridge on October 6, 1918, and was buried by his comrades in St. Stenne. At the time of his death he was entitled to wear three battle clasps on his victory medal. He was stationed at Chatillion from May 10, 1918 to June 8 of the last year. From there he went to Beileau Woods and joined the Sixth Regiment, with which he was at the front until June 5. He fought in the battles of Vierzy, Soissons sector, July 18 to 22, 1918, where a successful attack was made on German positions.

 

McCUNE, SARAH/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, October 21, 1916
Mrs. Sarah McCune, aged 85 years, a former resident of Edwardsville, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. R. L. Dixon, in Decatur, at 7:45 o’clock last evening, after an illness of more than a year. Old age and a stroke of paralysis were the causes. A year ago, while on a visit with relatives shortly before Thanksgiving, Mrs. McCune suffered a stroke, and for a time her condition was very serious. She recovered sufficiently, however, to return to her daughter’s home, but since that time her health has been feeble. Four weeks ago, Mrs. McCune had another stroke, which hastened the end. The news of her death was received with much surprise and regret by her many friends in Edwardsville. She was well liked by all who knew her, and was possessed of a kind and generous nature which won for her the admiration and respect of all who chanced to gain her friendship during her long life. Mrs. McCune was born in Ireland, and came to this county at the age of eight years. Her parents settled in Pennsylvania, and she attended school there. In the year 1851, she removed to Alton and was married there slightly more than a year afterward to George McCune. In the year 1854, Mr. and Mrs. McCune removed on a farm north of Edwardsville, where they remained until the year 1883, when Mr. McCune retired from active life, and the family removed to Edwardsville. Mr. McCune died five years afterwards, and Mrs. McCune continued to remain here until twenty years ago, when she went to Decatur to make her home with her daughter. She never failed to make a visit to her old home every year. She is survived by six sons and two daughters. They are: John and Grant of Alton; Samuel of Le Moore, California; James of Wallace, Idaho; Pogue of Decatur; and Joseph D. of Edwardsville; and Mrs. R. L. Dixon and Mrs. John L. Shields of Decatur. There are thirty-one grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the First Presbyterian Church here. Rev. James R. Sager, pastor of the church, will conduct services. Interment will be in Woodlawn Cemetery.

 

McDADE, JOHN/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 11, 1893
John McDade, son of Mrs. Sarah McDade, of this city, died Sunday night [Jan. 8] at 8:45 o'clock at the home of his brother, Samuel, at Glen Carbon. He had an attack of la grippe, which affected his brain and caused death. The remains were brought to his mother's home Monday afternoon and the funeral occurred yesterday afternoon. The interment was made at Woodlawn. He was 19 years old and was an industrious and energetic helper in the support of the family. For the past several months he has been employed by the Press Brick Company at Glen Carbon.

 

McDANIEL, AMELIA [nee SCHRADER]/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1917
Killed Herself With Gun When Husband Said He Would Sell Wedding Gift
Because her husband wanted to dispose of the automobile he presented to her on their wedding day, Mrs. Amelia Schrader-McDaniel, 26 years old, a bride of 10 days, Wednesday night, shot and killed herself in her home in Leclaire, a co-operative suburb of Edwardsville. Neighbors of the McDaniels told Coroner Roy A. Lowe they overheard a violent quarrel just a short time before the young wife killed herself. Her husband, Frank McDaniel, admits there was a quarrel. It was the motor car, he says, which brought on the difficulty. Mrs. McDaniel wrote a note - her brother identified the script - which reads as follows: "Please give to mamma, 325 South Buchanan. Mrs. Amelia Schrader-McDaniel. Frank told me he is going to sell everything he has. Love to all. Hattie - notify her at once. Amelia, daughter and sister." Amelia Schrader and McDaniel eloped from Edwardsville on Miss Schrader's birthday anniversary, which was Saturday, April 21. They came to Alton and were married. Upon their return to Edwardsville they began housekeeping at 822 Troy road. McDaniel presented his wife with a new automobile upon their return home. It was in this car the couple ran away. After Mrs. McDaniel killed herself, McDaniel ran into the street, where he met his wife's brother, Frank Schrader. He cried out that his wife had shot herself, and continued running down the road. He ran fully two miles to a church where Dr. Flegenbaum was attending a religious service, and returned with him to his home. In the meantime the woman's brother called other physicians and the Coroner.

 

McDANIEL, BAILEY P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 25, 1901
Upper Alton News - Bailey P. McDaniel died Monday morning at his residence on Main street after an illness of several weeks. He had been a sufferer for several years. He was born in Tennessee, May 12th, 1839. He came to Illinois when a small boy. Served in the Ninety Seventh Illinois Regiment. A widow and three children, Edgar V., Nellie and Willie McDaniel, all of Upper Alton, survive him. He will be buried at Gillespie on Wednesday.

 

McDEAVITT, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 12, 1907
William McDeavitt of Chicago arrived in Alton this morning accompanied by his sister and two cousins, seeking the burial place of his father, Edward McDeavitt, who died very suddenly in this city one month ago. McDeavitt was taken to the hospital evidently suffering from an attack of the grippe. He was very ill but was conscious and said nothing of any assault upon him for the purpose of robbery. The son is impressed strongly with the belief, however, that his father was robbed and that his injuries were due to blows inflicted by the persons who robbed him. He was staying at the place kept by J. C. Kulp on Second street and known as the Empire House, opposite the Stanard mill. McDeavitt was picked up on the sidewalk in front of the Empire house where he had fallen and struck his head. He was never well afterward. The doctors thought he had the grippe. They said they could find no tract of any skull fracture and no indications of other injuries. McDeavitt's son told a Telegraph reporter that his father carried a gold watch valued at $150. He had worked in Alton five years and was well known. He could not understand why no information was given to the undertaker who had charge of the burial so the family could be communicated with, as he believed that friends of his father at the boarding house knew where the relatives could be found. The son was very much distressed when he learned his father was dead and had been buried as a pauper. He said that the family would have given the body a decent burial and that he intends to have the remains disinterred in Milton cemetery and will take the body to Shipman for burial. McDeavitt has many relatives at Shipman, who learned of his death and notified his son. He left four children. Soon as the son learned of his father's death the son came immediately from Chicago to investigate the causes and to find where the father was buried. Dr. Squire, who attended McDeavitt, said that the man gave little or no information to the hospital authorities.

 

McDEBETT, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 26, 1907
George McDebett, who was taken to the hospital a week ago, suffering from the effects of drink, is dead and will be buried tomorrow. McDebett fell, striking his head on the sidewalk on Second street and from that time he was crazy, and physicians could do nothing for him. His wife cannot be found.

 

McDONALD, ANN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 8, 1903
Mrs. Ann McDonald, widow of Michael McDonald, died at 10:20 o'clock Wednesday morning, after an illness of 15 years, aged 48. Mrs. McDonald was helpless most of the time she was ill. She will be buried Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

McDONALD, BRIDGET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 18, 1913
Mrs. Bridget McDonald, aged 78, died at her home on Jefferson avenue last night from apoplexy, after a short illness. She came here from Grafton some time ago to undergo medical treatment, and the body will be taken to Grafton for burial. She had been living in America for 60 years. Mrs. McDonald came here from Grafton six weeks ago to live with her daughter, Mrs. James Moo___, and a week later was taken down with her last illness.

 

McDONALD, CAROLINE (nee MONNETT)/Source: Central Transcript, DeWitt County, IL, March 28, 1861 - Submitted by Judy Simpson

Died - In Troy, Madison county, Illinois, after a brief illness, Mrs. Caroline McDonald, twenty-one years, wife of Samuel McDonald and daughter of Isaac Monnett of Mt. Pleasant , DeWitt county, Illinois. Mrs. McDonald was a member of the Methodist Church and in her life and intercourse with her associates manifested a high tone of character, winning the esteem of the community and of all who became acquainted with her. But a few months since, Mrs. McDonald came into our midst and her departure was sudden and unexpected. Just entering upon the active duties of life, and when the prospect of usefulness seemed most fair, she is called suddenly away, and the companion of her youth is left alone. Unable as we are to fathom the purpose of God, in thus cutting off anticipated hopes, we can only fall back upon the assurance: "He doeth all things well." [Note: Caroline was the daughter of Isaac and Ruth (Wiggins) Monnett.]

 

cDONALD, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 10, 1922
Accidently Shot By His Brother With Rifle
The funeral of Charles McDonald, son of Mr. and Mrs. James McDonald, slain Saturday by accident by his brother, Leroy, was held this morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church where services were conducted by Rev. Fr. Kehoe. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery. The Telegraph mentioned briefly the fact that the killing had occurred, but it was too late for any details to be given Saturday. The two boys had been taking a bath in a shed outside the house, and while so engaged one of them noticed a defective cat rifle that was hanging up in the shed. The rifle had no stock, and the hammer would not stay placed. The older boy, Charles, aged 11, reached up for the rifle and pointing it at his younger brother, Leroy, aged 9, in play, must have touched the defective hammer, pulling it back far enough to make it slip and discharge the little 22 caliber cartridge. The bullet entered the boy's breast, piercing his heart. After the shooting the wounded boy ran a short distance to the house and there fell dead.

 

McDONALD, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1902
Frank, the infant son of Mr. Fred L. McDonald, died Friday afternoon at the home of Mr. Ralph Dixon on Bluff street, after an illness of cholera infantum, aged 7 months. The funeral will be held Sunday morning and will be private. Burial will be in the Godfrey cemetery.

 

McDONALD, JANE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 28, 1921
Mrs. Jane McDonald died Sunday at twelve o'clock at her home, 1110 East Sixth Street, from weakness of old age, she being in her 83rd year. Mrs. McDonald has been feeble for a long number of years and for the past six months has been bedfast. She passed away quietly and peacefully, closing a happy and useful life. She was born in Bingar, Ireland, in 1838, and at the age of seven went to Scotland. In 1855 she came to America and went to Salt Lake City, where she became the bride of Alex McDonald. The following year the young couple went east and located in Godfrey township, where they raised a large family of children. McDonald died 26 years ago. Mrs. McDonald was a widely known woman, a good neighbor and mother. She is survived by six children, eighteen grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren. The children are Mrs. Jane Mitchell, Delhi, Ill.; Mrs. Agnes Cheney, Coronodo Beach, Calif.; Norval McDonald, Springfield, Ill.; John McDonald, Maywood, Ill.; Mrs. Mathilda Robertson and Mrs. Mary Smith of this city. She also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Mathilda McDougal of Centralia, Kansas, and Mrs. Margaret Chew of Atchison, Kansas. The funeral will be held at two o'clock Tuesday from the family home and services will be conducted by Elder George S. Barraclough of East St. Louis, pastor of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

 

McDONALD, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 23, 1910
Suicides When Wife Plans to Divorce
Joseph McDonald, the 23 year old son of former fire chief, Andrew McDonald, killed himself about 1 o'clock Saturday by drinking carbolic acid. His manner of death was somewhat sensational. He entered police headquarters and sat down in a chair, then called to Chief Maxwell to get a doctor as he was dying. Several policemen then noticed that something was wrong, and rushed to his aid. They carried him to a back room, laid him on a cot, and there he died in a few minutes. A physician came in a few minutes later and said he was dead. The suicide was the direct result of a failure on the part of the young man to effect a reconciliation with his wife, who had him arrested a few days ago. The wife, who lives with her mother, Mrs. Minard near Melville, refused to stay with her husband. McDonald was working in Chicago and sent for his wife. When she did not go to him he came after her. The charge the wife and mother-in-law made was that he brandished a revolver, threatening to shoot and kill them. After his arrest McDonald seemed to feel deeply the fact that he had become separated from his wife, and she was contemplating a divorce suit. Friday he asked Mrs. Demuth to help him accomplish a reconciliation and blamed his mother-in-law for his wife's hostility to him. He told Mrs. Demuth that unless she would come back to him, he "could not stand it." Again Saturday morning about 11:30 o'clock, he attempted to interview his wife. With her mother she had gone to the office of assistant states attorney Wilson to make plans for filing a divorce suit. As the two women were leaving the office, McDonald entered. He asked Mr. Wilson to assist him in getting an interview. Mr. Wilson called the women back, but Mrs. Minard insisted upon doing the talking, according to Mr. Wilson. McDonald refused to talk to her and said that he wanted to speak to his wife privately. He offered his hand and the wife refused to take it. Then McDonald must have gone out for the carbolic acid. He drank it before entering police headquarters. The parents were notified and they gave instructions for A. I. Keiser to take charge of it, by whom it was moved to his undertaking establishment. Later Coroner Streeper was called to hold an inquest. The young man was a life long resident of Alton. It is believed by those who knew him that his mind was overwrought by the thought of the separation from his wife, to whom he was married a year ago last June. Mrs. McDonald is in a bad state of health.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 25, 1910
The jury empanelled by Coroner Streeper to inquire into the death of Joseph McDonald, who died from carbolic acid poisoning in the police headquarters Saturday noon, found a verdict of death by suicide. A note was found in his pocket which indicated deep feeling on the young man's part over his wife's determination not to live with him any more. The note was as follows: "I am about to leave Alton for all time, and when I am gone remember Gert Minard (his wife) and her mother sent me. Gert loves ___ and I know it. I knew it for years. I have never been anything but gentleness itself to her. I am a staunch Catholic, and when we were married before the altar of God I swore to live, love and protect her until death, and I will keep my oath if it takes my life, which it is about to do. Joe McDonald. P. S. - I do not fear trial, but it is the feeling that the only woman in the world I love outside of my mother, should treat me so. J. McD." The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. In this connection it may be stated that the Catholic church refuses to permit suicides to be buried from the church, unless it can be satisfactorily shown that the person was mentally deranged at the time. The members of the McDonald family believed that the actions of Joseph McDonald for several days prior to his death were very certainly those of an insane man, and for this reason it was stated at the residence of Bishop Ryan today, the benefit of the doubt was given to the young man and his funeral services will be in the Cathedral.

 

McDONALD, LYDIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 18, 1901
The funeral of Mrs. Lydia McDonald, wife of F. L. McDonald, was held this afternoon at two o'clock at the home of Ralph Dixon on Bluff street. There was a large attendance of the friends of the family and Mrs. McDonald. The death of this young mother has an added poignancy because of the sad circumstances under which it occurred, and in their bereavement her husband and the family of her father have the sympathy of the entire community. Rev. M. W. Twing of the Baptist church conducted the services. Burial was at the Godfrey Cemetery.

 

McDONALD, LYDIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 8, 1902
Lydia, the 10 months old child of Mr. F. L. McDonald, died this morning at 2 o'clock at the home of its grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Dixon, on Bluff street. The child had been ill three months. She was one of the triplets born to Mr. and Mrs. McDonald at the time of the death of the mother. One of the children is still living. The funeral will be private, and will be held Thursday afternoon.

 

McDONALD, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 4, 1901
Soldier Dies in Philippines
Information reached Alton last evening of the death in the Philippines of Michael McDonald, who was serving in the American Army there. His term of service would have expired the latter part of this month, and he would have left at once for Alton. Among the relatives left in Alton by the young man, who is very highly spoken of by all who knew him, are his aged mother, Mrs. Catherine McDonald, who lives with her daughter, Mrs. Frank Girard at Third and Langdon streets, and Thomas McDonald, a brother, the well known glass blower living at 1224 East Second street.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 14, 1901
The body of Michael McDonald, the soldier who died in Manila, will not be buried in Alton. His body will be taken direct from San Francisco to Pittsburg, and his brother, Thomas, and sister, Mrs. Frank Girard, and mother, will attend the funeral.

 

McDONNELL, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1902
Michael McDonnell, aged 56, died Saturday morning at 2 o'clock at his home on Main street after a lingering illness with consumption. He was well known about the city, was a hardworking honest man and devoted husband and father. His wife, who survives him, has been paralyzed for 15 years or more, and he cared for her tenderly all these years. He leaves one child, a son, Bernard. The funeral will be Monday morning at 2 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

McELLIGOTT, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 13, 1908
Mrs. Mary McElligot died Sunday afternoon at her home, 1836 Alby street, after a long illness. She leaves beside her husband, two daughters, Miss Mary McElligott and Mrs. Elizabeth Volk of St. Louis. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

McELLIGOTT, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1909
Miss Mary McElligott, daughter of the late Roger McElligott, and the last of her family, died at St. Joseph's hospital this morning from the effects of burns she sustained two weeks ago before her death. While kindling a fire in her kitchen stove December 13, she accidentally ignited her waist and this, being made of light material, soon flamed up and was beyond her control. Miss McElligott ran out in the yard and rolled in the snow to extinguish the fire, but did not succeed until almost every garment was burned off her. She was burned all over the body and limbs, and it was not believed she could live very long. When she finally began to show strong vitality and manifested a strength that would pull her through, she was moved to the hospital. She became worse, however, and passed away this morning. She had lived alone in the house at 19th and Alby streets from the time of her father's last sickness. She had been his housekeeper. She was 45 years of age. Miss McElligott leaves one sister, Mrs. Edward Volk of St. Louis. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

McELROY, LUCY JANE/Source: Alton Telegraph, March 26, 1847
Died at the St. Charles Hotel, New Orleans, on the morning of the 8th inst., of a pulmonary disease, Mrs. Lucy Jane McElroy, consort of Mr. William C. McElroy of this city [Alton], aged about 25 years and __ months. The deceased was a native of Virginia, but removed to the west with her parents about 15 years since. In all the relations of life - as a daughter, wife, mother, sister, and friend, she displayed a most amiable character. In early youth, she made a public profession of religion, by attaching herself to the Methodist Episcopal Church of which she remained a consistent member to the day of her death. The following extract of a letter from a friend who was with her in the last living hour will show that the faith she professed sustained her triumphantly during her passage through the dark valley, and afford much comfort to her afflicted relatives and acquaintances under their sad bereavement. "If you could only have seen her patience under all her sufferings - and they were great at times - and never heard one murmur or complaint! But for severl days, and with her latest breath, she shouted 'Glory! glory! Come, Lord Jesus, come quickly!' And with a sweet smile upon her countenance, which never forsook her in the midst of all her pains, nor even in death, for it was still upon her face when we laid her into, and sealed up the coffin. The Rev. Mr. Cross of the Methodist Church, who had visited her frequently during her illness, in his address over the corpse, made a very beautiful allusion to her triumphant and glorious exit from this world to Heaven, where she would meet her little children, and her father and brothers, who have gone before her." She has left an affectionate husband, two young children, and many friends and relatives to mourn her loss.

 

McEVOY, AGNES/Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, March 25, 1897
The body of Miss Agnes McEvoy arrived from St. Louis at 9:15 a.m. Monday. It was accompanied by a large number of friends and relatives and was met at the depot by an assemblage of friends from this city. Funeral services were at the Cathedral at 10 o'clock, and interment was in Greenwood cemetery.

 

McEVOY, NELLIE (nee SCULLY)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 20, 1916
Today the body of Mrs. Nellie McEvoy, widow of Philip McEvoy, was brought to Alton to be interred in Greenwood cemetery, the last of a series of nine funerals in that family. All but two of the deaths were due to tuberculosis. Nineteen years ago Philip McEvoy was killed by a train and his body was brought to Alton and buried in Greenwood, after services were held at the Cathedral. The nine deaths followed in regular order, taking five brothers and three sisters, tuberculosis claiming all after him until there was none of the McEvoy name and blood left but the widow of the man who started the series. Now she has died from pneumonia. Services were held at the Cathedral, and burial was in Greenwood, Mrs. McElvoy was born in Alton and she leaves a brother residing here, Simon Scully. She was 55 years of age.

 

McFARLAND, ROY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 26, 1909
Former Street Car Conductor
Roy McFarland, aged 27, died Friday morning at 8 o'clock at his home on Evergreen avenue in Upper Alton, after an illness of about three weeks. He was formerly a street car conductor, and later served on the interurban line. He had a miraculous escape from being injured in an accident on the line, and after that changed his employment. He went to the Standard Oil refinery where he was employed. Recently he became ill with malaria, it was supposed, and he recovered enough to go back to work. He suffered a relapse and symptoms of typhoid fever began to be manifest. This developed into brain fever. His condition had been very serious for a week, and his death was not unexpected. He leaves his wife and one child. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

 

McFEDTRIDGE, JULIA RAE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 6, 1902
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. George McFetridge, Julia Rae, was buried Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, 1223 Pearl street, to beautiful City Cemetery. Rev. Theo Oberhellman spoke comforting words to the bereaved parents and sorrowing friends of the family.

 

McGANTLIN, CORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 7, 1905
Cora McGantlin, the 13 year old daughter of William McGantlin, died this morning after a painful illness at the family home in Godfrey township.

 

McGANTLON, AGNES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1917
Mrs. Agnes McGantlon, wife of William McGantlon, died at her home in Godfrey township Monday afternoon shortly after 12 o'clock from ureamic poisoning, after being sick one year. Mrs. McGantlon was among the best known residents of Godfrey township. She was a member of the old Waggoner family, one of the best known in the township, and had lived there all her life. She was 62 years of age. Mrs. McGantlon leaves besides her husband, two brothers, Lathy and John Waggoner; and three sisters, Mrs. Martha Cain, Misses Deborah and Irene Waggoner. She served for years as a school teacher in the Godfrey neighborhood. For thirty-five years she had lived with her husband, William McGantlon, and the devotion of the couple to each other was remarkable. The affliction that has fallen on the husband is doubly hard, as in his old age he is deprived of his partner in life.

 

McGEE, ANNA (nee VOEGEL)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 5, 1920
Word has been received in Alton of the death of Mrs. Anna Voegel McGee of Venice, Ill. She is the wife of Postmaster James McGee. The funeral will be tomorrow morning at 8:30 from the Catholic Church in Venice. Mrs. Frank Pieper and Mrs. Katherine Kane will attend the funeral.

 

McGEE, MARTIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 23, 1908
Martin McGee, aged 65, a quarryman, died this morning at the Piggott boarding house on Front street from consumption. He had been ailing a long time. This morning he attempted to arise and dress and was found sitting on the bed half dressed in a very weak condition. He was given attention, and Mrs. Piggott returned 15 minutes later. She found him dead. He leaves one sister, Mrs. James Fitzgibbons, a nephew, John McGee at Grafton, and a niece, Mrs. Barney McDonnell of Alton.

 

McGEE, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 3, 1902
Mrs. Mary McGee, widow of the late Charles McGee, died at 6:30 o'clock this morning at her residence, 1020 Market street, after a long illness, aged 72 years. Mrs. McGee was a native of Ireland, but had lived 36 years in Alton. Five children - three sons and two daughters - survive her. The funeral will take place on Wednesday. The hour will be given later.

 

McGEE, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1909
Mrs. Mary McGee, wife of John McGee, aged 43, died at 8:15 o'clock this morning at the family home on South Main street in Upper Alton, after a long illness from a complication of diseases. She had been ill about three years. Although she had been a long time invalid, her death was not expected when it occurred, and her husband had left home a few hours before to go to work on the Illinois Terminal railroad. The time of the funeral is not set.

 

McGEE, UNKNOWN WIFE OF SAMUEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1901
Upper Alton News - Mrs. Samuel McGee, an aged colored woman living about four miles north of here, died last night at 12 o'clock. Mrs. McGee was seventy-five years old and had lived there many years. Funeral services will be held at the Wood River Baptist church next Sunday at 2 o'clock.

 

McGIBBENS, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1905
Woman Succumbs to Privations Under Distressing Circumstances
Without any medical attention and in an old shanty boat, 12x20 feet in dimensions, Annie McGibbens died Tuesday morning at the home of Andrew Litwilder near the water works pumping station while giving birth to a child. The story told to the coroner's jury impaneled by Coroner C. N. Streeper was a sad ending of the way of a faithless wife who deserted her husband at Ft. Madison, Iowa, and came to Alton with her lover, Frank Piers. Since coming to Alton, Piers and the McGibbens woman had been living together. The appearance of the dead woman indicated that she had suffered great privation, and that her condition must have been a pitiable one for some time. Although she required the services of a doctor at 10 o'clock Monday night, none was sent for. The people who live in the boat said she refused to allow them to send for a doctor, but the jury did not give much credence to that particular point of the story, as there appeared to be entirely too much carelessness over the fate of the unfortunate person. She died at 4 o'clock in the morning, and the people with her said the child was dead when it was born. The hut is a wretched place, and in it are three beds, a table, several chairs and a cook stove, together with a washstand and several other articles of furniture. The inmates of the place said that at night time the place was divided off by the hanging of curtains, and that previous to a few weeks ago another man boarded there. Frank Piers and Mrs. McGibbens "boarded" with Litwilder and his wife. The jury found a verdict of death from exposure and neglect during childbirth, and Piers was notified that he must bear the expense of burying the woman and child or he would be prosecuted for neglecting to care for her. Chief of Police Maxwell says that last Spring a man, who was the husband of the woman, complained to him that Piers had eloped with his wife from Ft. Madison and he had followed them to Alton, but could not induce his wife to return to him. She was about 33 years of age.

 

McGILL, ROSANNA LEAKE (nee SAWYER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1916
Mrs. Rosanna Sawyer McGill died last night about 11:30 o'clock at her home on Edwards street in Upper Alton after an illness with pneumonia that commenced the first of May. She was 85 years old. Mrs. McGill had lived in Upper Alton about fifteen years. She was a member of the Sawyer family - an old Upper Alton family. She was born in Burslem, Staffordshire, England, September 18, 1831. She came to America with her mother and five sisters, going direct to St. Louis in 1846, and since that date Mrs. McGill had been a resident of this locality. She was married to William S. Leake on March 27, 1849, and to this union three daughters were born, one, Miss Addie Leake surviving, and with whom the deceased lady had lived many years. Miss Leake lived a life of devotion to her mother and she remained with her mother and she remained with her up to the time of her death. In 1853 William S. Leake died and in 1857 she was married to Daniel McGill. To this union three sons and one daughter were born, and two sons and the daughter survive. They are William L. McGill and Henry E. McGill of St. Louis, and Mary Bailey of Mt. Vernon, New York. All the children will be in Alton for the funeral and arrangements will be made when all arrive. The date has not been set, but the funeral service will be held at the home on Edwards street and burial will be in St. Louis. Mrs. McGill had been a member of the Church of England all her life.

 

McGINNIS, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1907
Killed In Explosion at Equitable Powder Co. At East Alton
In an explosion at the plant of the Equitable Powder Co. at East Alton Saturday morning, Charles McGinnis was instantly killed and Charles Walters, who was 76 feet away, was badly injured. Every bone in the body of McGinnis appeared to be broken. The building in which the explosion occurred was blown to pieces, and trees close by, four or five of them with trunks 14 inches in diameter, were snapped off. Leaves were blown off the trees in the neighborhood as if a frost had hit them, for a distance of several hundred feet around, and the ground was covered with fallen leaves to a depth of six inches. The shock of the explosion shook the city of Alton and was heard in all directions, as far as Carlinville and Litchfield. The cause of the explosion is not known. The building in which it occurred is used for giving powder the final treatment before it is ready for market, that is treating it to a smooth glaze. The building was about 25x30 feet and was one story in height.....McGinnis, who is a laborer, was cleaning out a large barrel and had climbed inside the barrel to facilitate the cleaning process when the explosion occurred. His body was picked up with every bone seeming to be broken and his flesh torn and bruised. About 100 feet away was Charles Walters, who was engaged in transferring powder from one truck to another, and the explosion blew the end gate out of the truck he was using and knocked him down, shocking and stunning him. When the explosion occurred every part of the frame structure of the building was blown off the ground. The timbers went up in the air a height of over 100 feet and descended in a shower to the ground. The ground was littered with the fragments of the building, the branches of neighboring trees, and the leaves blown from the branches by the concussion. The wonder was that no one was hurt by the flying debris. Pieces of timber were blown 300 yards or more, and a steel rail 3 feet in length was thrown a distance of 300 feet....McGinnis, who was killed, is 33 years of age and has two children. He lived with his parents at East Alton, of whom he was the support. At East Alton the whole village was shaken by the explosion. Windows were broken and the entire front of the millinery store of Mrs. August Kitzenberg was blown out. There was much terror in the village and a general rush for the powder works when the shock came. A cloud of smoke rose over the plant looking like a storm and hung there for some time. The body of McGinnis was taken in charge of Coroner Streeper, who will prepare it for burial. An inquest will be held at once.

 

McGINNIS, GRACE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1905
Miss Grace McGinnis, daughter of Contractor Thomas McGinnis of North Alton, died at her home this morning at a quarter to one o'clock, after an illness of several months from a complication of diseases. She was 17 years of age last February, and leaves to mourn her untimely taking off, her father, three sisters (Misses Elizabeth, Gertrude and Mildred McGinnis) and two brothers (Louis H. and Thomas McGinnis Jr.). She was a bright, lovely girl and won friends as rapidly as she came in contact with people, and retained that friendship throughout. She was deeply and sincerely religious and recognized last night before any of the watchers at her bedside, that the inevitable and eternal change was about to come to her, and she bade them all goodbye in a cheerful and resigned tone. Consciousness did not leave her until the last. The funeral will probably be Friday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral, although that is not definitely decided upon, owing to the absence of one of her brothers.

 

McGINNIS, THOMAS/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 13, 1847
Died near Upper Alton on the 7th inst., Mr. Thomas McGinnis, aged about 26.

 

McGINNIS, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 21, 1904
Mr. Thomas McGinnis Sr., of North Alton, died Tuesday night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Mary Degenhardt, 1119 State street, where he has been the past ten days. Like a bird winging its way homeward after the long, worry-laden day did his soul leave its earthly tenement for its place among the Immortals. The end was very peaceful and came without a struggle. He was about 91 years of age and has been a respected citizen of Alton for 53 years. For many years he was engaged in contracting and many of the early day residences and buildings of a quasi-public character including the Cathedral on State street, were built in part or wholly by him. He also put up the first house in every town between here and Springfield, the first house being a section house erected for the use of section crews of the road. He retired from business in 1875 and took a trip to the old country, and since then while always active, he has spent his time in informing himself in the world's history and in church and charitable matters. He was very religious and lived his religious belief in as far as mortal can. He was a good father, a worthy and energetic citizen and a good man in all respects, and the family has the sympathy of the community. But death, while always hard, in his case came as an agent of Nature merely and the passing of life was as the going from the supernal life to the eternal one and was more in the nature of a reward for a well spent life. Up to three weeks ago when carbuncles made their appearance on his neck, Mr. McGinnis, despite his great age was active and filled with interest in current doings of the city and of the world, but these carbuncles eventually caused complications which ended in death. He leaves five children, Attorney John F. McGinnis of Alton, Thomas McGinnis of North Alton, Mrs. Mary Degenhardt, and Mrs. Eliza Hale of Alton, and Mrs. James T. Callahan of North Alton, and twenty-eight grandchildren. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral to Greenwood Cemetery.

Alton Evening Telegraph, December 23, 1904
There was a very large attendance Friday morning of friends of deceased and of the family at the funeral of the late Thomas McGinnis Sr., and some very beautiful floral offerings were made by those who knew and respected Mr. McGinnis in life. Services were conducted at the Cathedral and at the graveside. At the church, a Requiem High Mass was celebrated by Rev. E. F. Spaulding, rector of the Cathedral, assisted by Rev. Frs. Fennessey and Tarrant. In Greenwood cemetery, where interment was made, brief services were conducted by Rev. Spalding and Rev. Fr. Fennessey. The pall bearers were five grandsons: Messrs. C. H. Degenhardt, Thomas and Charles Hale, Louis and Thomas McGinnis and a nephew, Mr. Hugh Black.

 

McGINNIS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1904
Mr. William McGinnis, whose serious illness was noted by the Telegraph a few days ago, died Tuesday morning at 10:35 o'clock of heart trouble at his home at the corner of Third and Market streets. He was a native of Ireland, and came to Alton in 1844, and with his brother, Patrick, engaged in the draying business and both accumulated considerable fortunes. The latter died a few years ago, and his death was a hard blow to William, as the brothers were inseparable and devotedly attached to each other. William was about 86 years of age, and leaves a sister, Mrs. Catherine McHugh, and nieces, Mrs. Dr. A. C. Barr and Misses Mollie and Katie McHugh. Funeral arrangements are not perfected.

 

McGINTY, PATRICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 11, 1901
Patrick McGinty died Tuesday at the county hospital, Edwardsville.

 

McGOWAN, FRANK/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 13, 1861
Died in Alton on the 11th instant, Frank, son of Mr. Patrick H. and Mrs. Hannah McGowan, aged about two years.

 

McGOWAN, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 8, 1917
Decapitated Body of Harry McGowan Found Near Madison, IL
The decapitated body of Harry McGowan, 30 years old, of Venice, was found near the Baltimore and Ohio tracks half a mile south of Madison at 4 o'clock Sunday morning, a few hours after McGowan had escorted a young woman home from a dance at Madison. The police at Madison have not come to a decision as to what might have been the circumstances of McGowan's death. A gang of track laborers found the headless body and notified the police. A search was then made and the head found some distance from the body. In their investigation, the police found that McGowan had been at Winklemeyer's dance hall in Madison until after midnight, and had departed with a young woman, whose identity has not been learned.

 

McGRATH, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 14, 1918
Another well known and aged Altonian passed away last evening at 6 o'clock, when the death of Mrs. Margaret McGrath occurred at the home on State street, where the family moved shortly before Christmas. Mrs. McGrath had spent the greater part of her life at 706 Belle street, and was the last of a large number of old families who resided in the 700 block on that street. For years the family wanted to move when one after another of their neighbors left, but it was only a few months ago when Mrs. McGrath would consent to sell the home where she had known so many happy days and go to another place. For years Mrs. McGrath had been in very poor health, and did not live long enough to enjoy the pleasures of the new home. Mrs. McGrath was the widow of Daniel McGrath, who died many years ago. She is survived by one son, Thomas J., and two daughters, the Misses Mary and Margaret. Mrs. McGrath was a member of the Cathedral parish, and was a member of several church societies. Mrs. McGrath was born in Ireland, but has resided in Alton for the past sixty years. Besides her son and daughters, Mrs. McGrath leaves one sister, Mrs. Mary O'Meara, of East Alton. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning from the Cathedral. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

McGRATH, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 18, 1908
Michael McGrath, a former well known glass mixer at the glass works, died last night at St. Joseph's hospital where he was taken several weeks ago from his home at Second and Plum street, suffering from acute stomach troubles. He was 65 years old and had lived in Alton twenty-five years. His wife survives. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Patrick's church. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

McGRATH, MIRIAM JOSEPHINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 27, 1903
Hospital Baby Dies
The "hospital baby," Miriam Josephine McGrath, who was adopted by the members of the ladies aid society of the St. Joseph's hospital, died Sunday morning after a brief illness with infant's diseases. The child was the pet of the hospital and was generally known as the "hospital baby." When the child opened its eyes on earth eight months ago, her mother was unable to care for her and her father was in an insane asylum. Under such circumstances, the hospital aid society took charge of the child, adopted and had her christened Miriam Josephine, in honor of the hospital. The ladies agreed to be responsible for the future of the child, and were ever solicitous as to its welfare. Miriam Josephine was buried today in Greenwood cemetery.

 

McGRATH, PATRICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 16, 1922
Patrick McGrath died this morning at St. Joseph's Hospital from the wound inflicted last Saturday night by a negro named Robert Harris, in East End place. McGrath had shown a wonderful strength after he was shot. The bullet had made six perforations of his intestines and he was operated on and the wounds sewed up. It was not believed he would live, but McGrath kept showing much better symptoms than could have been expected. The end came this morning. Harris, the man who shot him, has been taken to the county jail. The story told by McGrath was that he was interfering in a fight between two boys, as peacemaker, when Harris took a shot at him, hitting him in the abdomen. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery, from the home of his mother, Mrs. Emma McGrath, next Monday morning.

 

McGRATH, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 5, 1914
Killed By Interurban Express Car
Peter McGrath, aged 72, was killed instantly at Wood River last evening when he mistook an interurban express car for a car to Alton, and stepped out in front of it as it was speeding by. According to the evidence given at the coroner's inquest held in Alton last evening, McGrath had been peddling shoestrings in Wood River and was waiting for the car to Alton. It is thought that the old man hearing the sound of the approaching car thought it was the interurban to Alton and rushed out of the waiting room directly in front of it. The interurban express car does not stop at this point. He was knocked for a distance of several feet and was killed instantly. The accident occurred at four thirty, and ten minutes later Coroner J. MOrgan Simms happened to be passing Wood River on his way back to Collinsville. Simms brought the body back to Alton, where an inquest was held last evening. A verdict of accidental death was returned. It is said McGrath was formerly a saloon keeper in Jerseyville, and at one time was well-to-do, but lost his money and was selling shoestrings to make a living. Deputy Coroner John Berner has been informed that he had a son in St. Louis, and efforts are being made to locate the son.

 

McGUIGGAN or McQUIGGAN, MARGUERITE (nee HOHMAN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 19, 1920
Bride Killed on Honeymoon in Chicago - Married in Alton
Mrs. A. M. McGuiggan, nee Marguerite Hohman, was fatally injured in Chicago Sunday, while honeymooning there. Her husband was hurt, but not seriously. The couple were struck by a mail motor truck which crushed them against a street car as they were crossing a downtown street in Chicago. Mrs. McGuiggan died some time later in a hospital. The tidings of their daughter's injury came during the night to Mr. and Mrs. Hohman, but did not tell of her death. That information was received later by them. Mr. Hohman and son Victor, departed this morning for Chicago. They did not know on their departure where the daughter's body was, nor in what hospital she had died. The death of Mrs. McGuiggan, who was married in Alton last Wednesday, shocked a large number of Alton people who had known and admired the young woman. There was much interest in the announcement of her engagement. The young couple started away last Wednesday night on their honeymoon trip to Chicago, and were to have been back home in a few days. The shocking tidings that came early this morning that their daughter had been seriously hurt, was sent over the name of Mr. McGuiggan, but it is believed that he merely dictated the message, owing to a confusion of the name. Mrs. McGuiggan was a charming young woman, and had a very large circle of friends in Alton. She was an interested worker in the Evangelical church and Sunday School. She was born and reared in Alton, and was 24 years of age. Her parents have only one other child, their son. Ever since the Y. W. C. A. was organized, Mrs. McGuiggan had been very much interested in its work and she had been one of the most efficient workers in its behalf. She was a bright, charming girl of a very religious character. Mr. McGuiggan has been a resident of Alton about seven years. He served in the army, and after his discharged returned to Alton and resumed his work in the Wood River refinery of the Standard Oil Co. A message received this morning said that Mrs. McQuiggan died at 7 o'clock this morning. Her death had not taken place, at was said, at the time the first message was sent. The message also said her husband's foot had been crushed, but did not mention other injuries he received.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 20, 1920
The body of Mrs. A. M. McGuiggan, accompanied by Mr. McGuiggan, Henry Hohman, father, and his son, Victor, arrived in Alton this morning on the 5:40 C. & A. train, and was taken to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hohman, 1027 Gold street. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock from the Evangelical church. Rev. O. W. Heggemeier, who married the young couple last Wednesday night, will officiate. Interment will be in the City cemetery. According to the story told by Mr. McGuiggan, he and Mrs. McGuiggan were at a street crossing, downtown in Chicago, and started to cross the street as the traffic cop's whistle blew. Before they reached the other side, the second signal was given, and traffic started in the opposite direction. The couple stepped back out of the way of a passenger car, and were struck by a mail truck. Both were thrown to the pavement. An ambulance was called, and Mr. McGuiggan picked up his wife and placed her inside, little thinking that her injuries were serious. Mrs. McGuiggan died enroute to the hospital. Her ribs were crushed against her heart and she sustained other internal injuries. Mr. McGuiggan's heel was injured, but otherwise he was not hurt. Very few of the details were accurately known until the arrival of the party this morning from Chicago. It was believed until they came that Mrs. McGuiggan had lived some time after being hurt, but this impression was conveyed in the first telegram apprising her parents of the accident. Instead of telling them she had been killed, the message merely said she had been seriously hurt and later they were told of her death. The Chicago Tribune today contained the following account of the inquest into the death of Mrs. McGuiggan: "The inquest into the death of Mrs. Marguerite McGuiggan, a bride of four days, who was killed by a motor truck Sunday night at West Madison and Clark streets, was continued yesterday until April 27, to allow the police more time to investigate. The husband limped into the room where the inquest was being held. The police handed him the wedding ring and other articles of jewelry his bride had worn. Undertaker William Bauer, who accompanied Mr. Hohman to Chicago to bring home the body of Mrs. McGuiggan, said that when the fact became known through the newspapers that an Alton girl had been killed while on her honeymoon in Chicago, many former Alton people called at the hotel and offered their services to do anything that might need to be done to make it easier for Mr. McGuiggan.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 21, 1920
The Evangelical church at Eighth and Henry streets was filled to capacity this afternoon at 2 o'clock, when funeral services were held by Rev. O. W. Heggemeier, over the remains of Mrs. A. W. McQuiggan, a bride of four days, who was killed in Chicago Sunday night. The choir rendered beautiful selections, and a touching sermon was preached by Rev. Heggemeier, who spoke of the beautiful life of the young wife, who was one of the most active workers of the church. The body was interred in City Cemetery. The grave was covered with beautiful floral offerings. The pallbearers included Ira Oertli, Ernest .......... David Reed, of Laflin, Mo ....... [unreadable] [note: her name was spelled two ways...McGuiggan - McQuiggan]

 

McHENRY, CORNELIUS J. JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 15, 1914
Young Musician Dies
Cornelius J. McHenry Jr. died this morning at 9 o'clock at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. J. McHenry, 1001 Washington avenue, Upper Alton. The death of the young man, while not unexpected, came rather sudden to the family. He was 30 years old on the third of last December. The death of the young man is the tragic close of what he had hoped would be a happy event in his life. He was engaged to be married and at the time he was obliged to give up his work he was planning to get married and was seeking a house for himself and his bride. He was as much surprised as anyone when the specialist who examined him ordered him to discontinue work and give up his plans for marriage, at least for the time being. The death of Niel McHenry comes as a sad shock to a large number of friends of the family in Alton. It was known the last two weeks that he was failing rapidly, and that the end was not far off....The young man was unmarried and had lived with his parents and eight brothers and sisters all his life. He was a glassblower by trade, but had not worked at the trade since serving his apprenticeship. He learned the trade with his father in the Illinois Glass Works, and served his apprenticeship, but when his time was served he retired from the trade and had devoted his entire time since to music. Niel was a musician of much ability. He had learned to play the cornet when a very small boy, and at the age of 12 years he played with the old Standard Band of Alton. A short time later, when the White Hussar Band was organized he went into that band where he made a mark as a cornet player. When this famous Alton band made the trips that gave the band its reputation, Niel McHenry was one of the important musicians of the big band, although he was under 20 years of age. In 1901 he took a place in the Temple Theater orchestra, and since that time he has played regularly, either in the theater, Airdome or Hippodrome, with the exception of two or three seasons when he was away from Alton following vaudeville work. In 1909 he left Alton, taking a position with a traveling company, and as he was a good piano player he soon learned to play the steam calliope when a player was needed with his company. Two years ago a steamboat passed Alton carrying the company with which Niel was traveling, and as the boat sailed down the river he went on deck and played a serenade to Alton on the calliope. Later, he and his brother, Tom McHenry, traveled two years as "The Musical Macks," putting on a vaudeville act of playing many different instruments. On January 21, two years ago, the two McHenry boys played their last act in Edwardsville. Niel was sick, and he came home where he underwent an operation in St. Joseph's Hospital. It was stated at that time that his illness had developed a tubercular nature, and since the operation he never fully regained his health. He played in the Hippodrome orchestra, however, from the time that amusement place was opened until this fall, when his health completely gave out. In November his father constructed an out-of-doors room for him at the McHenry residence, and the young man lived in it exactly two months. He went into the open air home the 12th day of November and last Monday, January 12, he was taken into the house as it became evident that he could last only a few days more. He never gave up hope of recovery, and when he was taken back into the house Monday, he believed it was only because the weather promised to be too severe for him to stay out longer. Even up to the time of his death he did not realize that his end was approaching. He leaves beside his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. J. McHenry, three sisters and four brothers, all of whom were with him at the time of his death. They are Mrs. Nellie Million of Springfield, the only one of the family who married; Misses Cora and Mamie; and Tom, Will, Edward and Charles McHenry. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church to Greenwood Cemetery.

 

McHUGH, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 20, 1905
Mrs. Catherine McHugh, a resident of Alton for sixty years, died Friday morning at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. A. C. Barr, on State street, a few minutes after midnight, after two weeks illness with la grippe. Mrs. Hugh had not been in her usual good health two weeks ago when she attended the funeral of Miss Kate Clifford, and there contracted a cold that resulted fatally. She was 67 years of age, and is survived by three daughters, Mrs. A. C. Barr, and Misses Mollie and Kate McHugh. Mrs. McHugh was born in county of Fermanagh, Ireland. She was a member of a family consisting of five sons and two daughters. With her mother, she came to Alton when seven years of age and lived here until after her marriage, forty seven years ago, to James McHugh, who was then engaged in the grain and feed business in Alton. Afterward she went to Baton Rouge, La., to make her home, where her husband died 23 years ago, and she came back to Alton to live with her two brothers, William and Patrick McGinnis. She was the mother of three daughters and five sons, all of her sons having died. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter's and Paul's Cathedral.

 

McINERNEY, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1909
The funeral of Mrs. Anna McInerney, the pioneer resident of East Alton, was held Monday morning from St. Patrick's church, where a requiem mass was said by Rev. Francis Kehoe in the presence of a very large number of relatives, friends and neighbors of deceased and of her family, many of these coming from St. Louis, Litchfield and other places. Floral offerings were numerous and burial was in Greenwood cemetery. The pallbearers were J. J. Hammond, Martin Hastings, Thomas Downes, James Mahoney, Mathew McInerney, and Edward Downes.

 

McINERNEY, AUSTIN J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 15, 1909 Y
oung Reporter/Editor - Son of James J. McInerney (Owner of Alton Sentinel Democrat)
Austin J. McInerney died at 5 o'clock Monday morning at San Antonio, Texas, where he had been staying for some time for the benefit of his health. His father was with him at the time of his death and sent a message saying that he expected to be home Wednesday morning. "Austie" McInerney was born November 8, 1883, in Alton, and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. James J. McInerney. He was connected with the Sentinel-Democrat, of which his father is president and managing editor. He was first a reporter on the paper and afterward took charge of the city news end of the work, and was for a time in the post of acting managing editor during the absence of his father from the office. He remained in active charge of the paper until ill-health, due to close confinement in the office, caused him to give up his work. He was advised to make a trip to Texas in the hope of benefiting his health, and remained for a long time at Denison, Texas with his uncle, afterward going to San Antonio where his father stayed with him when he began to show signs of a complete collapse. He was possessed of much ability as a news gatherer and writer, and was a hard worker when at his post of duty. Too continuous confinement at his desk is believed to have been responsible for his breakdown. He had a vein of humor in his writings which was very pleasing, and had his health and life been spared he would doubtless have accomplished much in the newspaper work. For eight years he served as city editor of the Sentinel-Democrat. He had a very large circle of friends and much solicitude has been manifested by them for his welfare during the time since his health began to fail. His death caused deep sorrow both in his family and among his friends. He was the oldest son and the main stay in his health of his parents, with whom the sympathy of the entire community will be in their heavy affliction. The funeral may be held Wednesday morning from the Cathedral, directly after the arrival of the body from San Antonio, but announcement of the funeral plans will be made later.

 

McINERNEY, HELEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 23, 1906
Helen, the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. McInerney, died Monday evening at 7:30 o'clock after an illness of ten days with quinsy combined with diphtheria. The child was taken ill one week ago last Thursday with a severe case of sore throat. She seemed to be getting along satisfactorily until Sunday, when she took a relapse, and on Monday all hope of her recovery was given up. Helen was eleven years old last August. She was a bright, happy child, and being the only child of her parents her death comes with crushing force to them. She was loved by all who knew her, and in their hour of affliction the family will have the sympathy of the entire community. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

Photo of James J. McInerneyMcINERNEY, JAMES J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 4, 1909
Managing Editor and Proprietor of "Alton Sentinel Democrat" Dies
James J. McInerney, managing editor and proprietor of the Alton Sentinel Democrat, died this morning at 1:30 o'clock at his residence on Common Street, after an illness that began nearly three years ago. His friends had long ago given up any hope that he would recover. The great vitality he showed even when it was considered impossible for him to get well was the wonder of those who attended him. Mr. McInerney's illness was undoubtedly due to the bitter cup of sorrows he was compelled to drink during the last three years of his life. To those who were intimately acquainted with him, it was known that he had been bowed down by grief from which he could not recover. The death of his son and chief assistant, Austin J. McInerney, was the most bitter dreg in the cup. He forgot his own condition when his son became ill and endeavored to do everything he could to save his son's life. He brought his son home from the south after hope had proved in vain, to be buried in Greenwood Cemetery. When death was nearest to the father during the last day, when his mind was no longer conscious, he called continually for Austin and seemed to feel that his son was near him. In 1906 McInerney was the Democratic nominee for congressman, and was defeated by Congressman Rodenberg. The following spring, he was a candidate for the office of Mayor of Alton, and was defeated by Mayor Beall. These two elections were a heavy strain upon him, and afterward he was able to be out but little. He was never able from that time on to undertake any ordinary tasks that would be incident to the management of his paper. His paper was the object of his greatest interest outside of his family, and it was a great sorrow to him that he was unable to direct it. He attempted a number of times to assert his physical strength, but failed. About a year ago he was stricken with what appeared to be a paralytic stroke, while he was downtown. Afterward he had several other strokes, the last coming a short time before his death. During the last week Mr. McInerney was unconscious most of the time, and members of his family were almost constantly in attendance. James J. McInerney was born in Alton November 23, 1853. His parents were natives of county Clare, Ireland, and came to Alton in 1852. He completed his course of study in the Cathedral schools at the age of 13, and began working as an apprentice at the printer's trade in the office of the Cumberland Presbyterian, afterward working on the Alton Telegraph until he was 17 years of age. In the spring of 1876 he entered upon his first newspaper venture, starting the Morning News, which proved short lived. In 1879 he opened a job printing office, and in October of that year began the publication of the Alton Sentinel - a weekly paper. A few years later he started the Morning Sentinel, which was later merged with the Alton Democrat, then owned by Perrin and Smith. Subsequently, Mr. McInerney purchased the interest of Perrin and Smith and became the controlling factor of his paper. He was always Democratic in politics and was the central figure in many stern factional fights in the party. He was always outspoken with his views, and at one time he was fined for contempt of court for speaking his opinions on matters arising from political factional fights. However much they may have differed in life, the approach of death hushed all, and when the great silence fell upon Mr. McInerney, his one time political opponents are perhaps in a better position to weigh his real worth to the community. A man with as positive convictions as he had made many enemies, and he also made many good friends who have rallied to him and his enemies have in a great measure forgotten. They regret that the declining days of a man who attempted as much for his own city should be filled with so much sorrow. They recognize that for many years he advocated many big enterprises and saw some of them become successful, to the everlasting benefit of the city. He was one of the advocates of building associations of the early day, and always claimed to have been the first man who advocated the Louisiana Purchase Centennial exposition held at St. Louis in 1904. Mr. McInerney was married to Alice Mullen, daughter of John Mullen, in Alton in 1881. He leaves beside his widow, one son, Felix, and five daughters - Sister Aurelia, who is in a convent at Dallas Texas, and Misses Katibel, Vernie, Lucy and Loretto. He leaves also three brothers, Thomas, Matthew, and Austin J. McInerney, all of Alton. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral. [Burial was in the St. Patrick's Cemetery in Godfrey.]

 

McINERNEY, MARIAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 19, 1914
Mrs. Marian McInerney, wife of Thomas McInerney, died Tuesday afternoon at the family home, 2212 Central avenue, after a brief illness. She was supposed to be improving slowly in condition, but the improvement was only apparent. The acute stage of her illness due to an attack of pneumonia was passing and was believed to be really no longer a cause for immediate alarm, but there were complications which had been of longer duration, and these caused her death. Mrs. McInerney was a woman well known in Alton, and identified with many public enterprises. Whenever there was any need for personal effort to promote some worthy cause, either of a religious or philanthropic character, or some public enterprise, Mrs. McInerney could be relied upon to give valuable help....Her illness began with an abscess on the liver, and during that sickness pneumonia developed. She was supposed to be in a dying condition ten days ago, but she recovered much of her strength, and there was hope that she would get well. However, the malady was deeper seated than at first was hoped, and resisted the efforts to give relief made by those attending her. She was born in Alton October 26, 1861, and lived here all of her life. Mrs. McInerney leaves her husband, Thomas McInerney, and one brother, Harry Fish, who has been in Alton for the past two years; also a foster brother, William Fish. She was a member of the congregation of SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, where she was deeply interested in the work of the church societies, and where she will be greatly missed. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, and burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery. It is expected that some members of the family of the late J. J. McInerney will be here from Texas to attend the funeral.

 

McINTOSH, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 22, 1905
Old Civil War Soldier Dies
Frank McIntosh, an old soldier, died at his home in East Alton Friday evening at 7:30 o'clock after an illness of eight days with pneumonia. He was 65 years of age and had lived many years at East Alton. He was a veteran of the Civil War, and his funeral will be under the auspices of the G. A. R. The services will be held Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the family home, Dr. D. Gibson officiating. Mr. McIntosh is survived by two daughters and two sons, Will and Hosea and Miss Agnes McIntosh and Mrs. Alice A. Teipel.

 

McINTOSH, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 21, 1919
The funeral of Frank McIntosh will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Union Mission church in Wood River and the services will be conducted by Rev. Theo Cates, pastor of the Upper Alton Methodist church. Deceased is 22 years old and is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Will McIntosh, former well known residents of the American Bottoms. Frank McIntosh was born in East Alton and lived there almost all his life. His death followed an operation in a St. Louis hospital for the relief of a tumor. Besides his parents he is survived by three sisters, Mrs. John Wickenhauser, Mrs. Fitzgerald, and Mrs. Josie Wahl. His only brother, the late Leslie McIntosh, was killed a year and a half ago at the foot of Milton Hill when he was struck by the Big Four Flyer when riding a motor cycle. Following the services at the Mission church in Wood River, the body will be taken to Mt. Olive cemetery for burial.

 

McINTOSH, LESLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 5, 1916
Boy Fatally Injured by Train
A few days after his mother dreamed at her home in Portland, Oregon, that he would be killed, the dream was verified in the fatal injury of her son, Leslie McIntosh, at Wood River. Leslie McIntosh, aged 15, was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital in a dying condition today following his being struck by the Big Four Flyer at East Alton, while he was riding a bicycle. The accident occurred at the public road crossing on the east side of the Big Four Yard line at East Alton, shortly after nine o'clock this morning. The boy died shortly before noon. There were very few witnesses of the accident. None of the trainmen saw the boy until after the accident had occurred. He was riding a bicycle at the time and started over the track at the same time the train approached the crossing. The boy evidently did not notice the train on account of the rain, and ran directly into it. The men on the train picked up the injured lad and hurried him to Alton. He was taken at once to St. Joseph's Hospital in the city ambulance, and the Big Four doctor gave him surgical attention at the hospital. Both of his legs and one arm were broken, and there were internal injuries. He was not knocked unconscious at the time of the accident and was in great pain. All the way from East Alton to Alton he begged that someone would put him out of his misery. "If I were only dead," he shouted over and over to the men who were in charge of him. On account of the pain which the lad was suffering, it was necessary for some of the men who were on the train to hold him down on the stretcher. The accident happened at the railroad crossing, south of East Alton. At this point the wagon road leading to Wood River crosses several tracks and it is considered one of the most dangerous crossing in the vicinity. Numerous accidents have happened there within the past few years. Railroad men who were on the scene shortly after the accident say that the McIntosh boy was riding southward on his bicycle, returning to his home in Wood River after having been in East Alton on an errand. The C. B. & Q. freight train, southbound, had just pulled past the crossing and the caboose had just entered the crossing. The train was almost at a standstill with the Big Four Flyer speeding northbound on the opposite side of the crossing as the boy on the cycle. Thinking that the track was clear after the C. B. & Q. train had passed over, the boy rode ahead in the blinding rain and was struck squarely with the front of the Flyer engine. The boy was knocked to one side of the track .... [unreadable] the wheel was carried along .... broken up for a distance of a half block on the pilot of the engine. The boy is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William McIntosh, who formerly lived on the farm between East Alton and Wood River. The McIntoshes are said to be separated, and the father is at .... living with his married daughter, Mrs. Ed Walls, on a farm at Fisher .... The mother is at present in Portland, Ore. The three unmarried children, Leslie, Frank and Miss Eula McIntosh, a Bell telephone operator at the Wood River central office, are living with their sister, Mrs. John W. ..... in the McIntosh place at Wood River. Leslie was going to school until before the holidays, when he decided to quit and go to his father's home in Fisher, Ark. Leslie's birthday would have occurred in a few days, when he would have been fifteen years old. The five children were Mrs. Ed Walls of Fisher, Ark.; Mrs. John Wickenhauser of Wood River, Frank, Leslie and Miss Eula McIntosh. About two years ago the family home in Wood River was destroyed by fire. It was rebuilt and this is the house in which the three McIntosh children were living with their married sister, Mrs. John W. Wickenhauser. .... [the rest is unreadable].

 

McKEE, ALBERT B. (DOCTOR) AND CHARLES S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 17, 1903
Double Suicide at Edwardsville - Brothers Take Morphine Route
Edwardsville is in the throes of a great sensation as the result of a double suicide which was discovered this morning. Dr. Albert B. McKee, a prominent practitioner of the county seat, and his brother, were found Tuesday morning at 7 o'clock in the barn at the rear of Dr. McKee's office. Dr. McKee was dead, and Charles McKee died an hour after being found, without regaining consciousness. There are attendant circumstances in this case which make the suicides double sensational. Dr. McKee was 40 years old and married. His brother, a traveling man, was two years his junior. Last Friday Emma Rowekamp, daughter of Charles Rowekamp, swore out a warrant charging that Dr. McKee took improper liberties with her in his office, she being a patient of his. Dr. McKee was put under $1,500 bond and was to have been given a hearing Saturday. It is supposed that Dr. McKee killed himself on account of the charge being made, and that his brother killed himself through sympathy. The girl who made the charge is said to be a most estimable young woman, and it is also said that her father insisted upon the strictest enforcement of the law against Dr. McKee. Monday evening Mr. Charles S. Cotter called at Dr. McKee's office and found him very much agitated. Dr. McKee was pacing the floor, and in his excitement declaring he was innocent of the charge. No other information concerning the affair could be obtained except what he told Mr. Cotter. Monday evening Dr. McKee went to Worden to make a call and returned at 8:15 o'clock. He sent his man, Jacob Klein, out of the office and told him he would close the office for the night. Tuesday morning Klein went to the stable to groom Dr. McKee's horse and found the two brothers there. Dr. McKee was sitting on a blanket thrown over a pile of hay, with his face in his hands, and was dead. Charles McKee was dying near him. Morphine tablets had been used by both the men, and Dr. McKee's legs showed where he had repeatedly injected morphine with a hypodermic needle in his efforts to make a sure thing of his suicidal attempt. A graduate containing a solution of morphine was found nearby. The only explanation is that shame drove Dr. McKee to suicide, and his brother agreed to kill himself too, from sympathy. Dr. McKee has a wife and one child, and the wife is prostrated. Charles McKee was unmarried. Dr. McKee was formerly in Dr. Pogue's office at Edwardsville. A coroner's inquest is being held this afternoon over the bodies of the brothers.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 22, 1903
Mrs. Julia McKee, the aged mother of the McKee brothers who committed suicide in Edwardsville several weeks ago, has been adjudged distracted by a jury in the county court, and pronounced incapable of managing her property. Her daughter, Miss Nancy McKee, was appointed her conservator. The aged woman has been ill for several years, and the shock of her sons' untimely end left her in a pitiable condition.

 

McKEE, JOHN M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 29, 1910
Civil War Veteran
John M. McKee, in his 78th year, died Thursday morning at 3 o'clock at his home, 1010 Union street. Mr. McKee had been in failing health for a long time. He had an attack of pneumonia, and failed to recover from it. Recently he had been suffering from hemorrhages of the lungs. He was born in Ohio and came to Alton in 1865, after serving through the war. He was in the 13th Illinois cavalry, Co. F, enlisting at Duquoin. He worked for 16 years for one firm in Alton as a cooper. Afterward he became janitor in Humboldt school, and later was at Washington school, until age compelled him to give up the work. He was an active member of the Twelfth street Presbyterian church, and had been a member of the Presbyterian church for fifty years. He leaves two sons and two daughters, Cassins of Alton, Frank of St. Louis, Mrs. Frank Yoder and Mrs. Frank Moyer of Alton. His wife died last year. Mr. McKee was one of the Telegraph's oldest and most regular subscribers. The funeral will be held tomorrow from the home, Rev. G. L. Clark officiating.

 

McKEE, MARY MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1919
Mary Margaret, the 3 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur McKee of 441 Belleview avenue, died this morning after an illness of three weeks. The child had been sick with influenza, which had attacked the whole family. She was the first to take the malady and the first to recover apparently. She was up and around and suffered a relapse which developed complications. The past week she had been in a very bad way. She is survived by her parents and two brothers. The funeral of the little one will be held from the home Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. F. H. Brown officiating. Interment will be in Melville cemetery.

 

McKEE, RACHEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 29, 1905
Mrs. Rachel McKee, wife of John M. McKee, died at 10:45 o'clock Thursday night at the family residence on Union street from pneumonia. Her death came at the close of the fifty-first year of her married life, and ended a life that was full of the beauty of Christianity's teachings. She was 67 years of age and had lived in Alton thirty-nine years, during thirty of which she was connected with the Cumberland Presbyterian church. Mrs. McKee's illness was of short duration. Her son, Cassius McKee, is very ill at the family home from the same malady. Mrs. McKee was born in Columbiana county, Ohio. She was married February 1, 1855, and with her husband came to Alton thirty-nine years ago. She was a devoted Christian, a good mother and was most honored and revered by her children. Her aged husband, with whom she had passed more than a half century, is left alone in the declining years of his life.

 

McKEE, RICHARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 6, 1900
Richard McKee, 72 years old, died this afternoon at his home at Nineteenth and Market streets. He lived in Alton many years. The funeral will be tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

 

McKEE, ROBERT G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Friday, June 30, 1899
Robert G. McKee, aged thirteen years, died at five o'clock this morning from tetanus, resulting from an injury self-inflicted, accidentally, about one week ago. The lad lived at the home of his stepfather, David B. Bogue, at 916 Belle street. While playing with a toy pistol loaded with a blank cartridge, one week ago, the pistol was accidentally discharged and the boy's hand was badly cut and burned. The injury was not considered serious, but the wound did not heal and a few days after began to show alarming symptoms. Lockjaw set in and the little fellow died after great suffering. His death occurred on his thirteenth birthday. The funeral will be at 10 a.m. Saturday from the home.

 

McKEE, W. H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 7, 1900
Killed in Waverly by Bluff Line Train
W. H. McKee, of East End Place, was killed at Waverly, Illinois this morning by Bluff Line train No. 48, upon which he was brakeman. No particulars as to McKee's death could be obtained, and the only information received was a message from headquarters to the local office of the Bluff Line requesting that Mrs. McKee be informed of her husband's death. It was supposed that he fell from his train or was run over at Waverly while at work. McKee was 20 years of age and with his wife, boarded at the home of George Copley. Mrs. McKee was informed of her husband's death and she went to the local office at once to inquire for particulars. She showed no emotion and apparently did not realize her husband was dead, as she received the message with stoicism and remarked that she always told her husband to not go railroading but that he insisted on doing it. McKee was 30 years of age and had been married one year. The body will be brought home this evening.

 

McKENZIE, A. G./Source: Alton Weekly Courier, February 23, 1854
We learn with deep regret that A. G. McKenzie, Esq., merchant of this city, died on Saturday morning, at the Sisters' Hospital, St. Louis, from the injuries he received by the explosion of the Kate Kearney. Thus is added another to the long catalogue of deaths, resulting from this terrible explosion, and it is impossible to say how much longer the list may yet be swelled. Mr. McKenzie emigrated from the North of Scotland to this country seven or eight years ago, and for several years past, he has resided in this city. He was about 32 years old, of industrious and strictly temperate habits, and his intercourse with our citizens had been such as to win for him general confidence and esteem. Some months ago he commenced business as a bookseller and stationer on Second street, and had succeeded in building up a handsome business. Mr. McKenzie received every attention which his situation demanded. From the time of the accident until his death, J. A. Ryrie, Esq., of this city, himself wounded, generously devoted himself to the relief of his sufferings, and it will be a great consolation to the relations of Mr. McKenzie to know that in his last moments, he was attended by kind and sympathizing friends, and that though he was a stranger, he was not among strangers, but among brothers.

 

McKEON, MARGUERITE EILEEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 29, 1903
Marguerite Eileen McKeon, the bright little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John McKeon, died Wednesday morning at the family home on Beacon street, after an illness of three days with cholera infantum. She was 3 years and 9 months of age and is the fourth of Mr. and Mrs. McKeon's children to be claimed by death. Another child - the baby - is seriously ill with the same trouble. The sorely afflicted parents are prostrated, and the sympathy of the community will go out to them. Death is always cruel, and partings made by it are heart rending and resignation can only come when time give new growth to Hope in pain-filled hearts. The funeral will be held Thursday evening at 5:30 from the Cathedral.


McKERGAN, BENNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 7, 1907
Dies From Over-Joy
Bennie McKergan, an old fisherman familiarly known as "Crap___ Freshfish," died very suddenly Saturday evening while seated on a chair on the fish dock of ____. McKergan was an old glassblower who had given up his ____ and followed that of peddling fish. His big tenor voice aroused many a sleepy Alton man at early hours in the morning as he pro____ his wares and he claimed to be the "champion fish peddler of the United States." He sold a large assortment of fish every week. He was ___ size and as he would stagger along under the burden of his ____ baskets he attracted much attention with his cry of "fresh fish." Saturday afternoon he was especially interested in the coming of the new ferryboat "Minnie." His ____ Jim McCormick, had his best ____, and when Jim came up the _____ with the boat "Crappie" was one of the first on the deck to greet him. He could not contain himself ____. Afterward he went back to the Joest dock, and there he expired from heart failure. Saturday morning Bennie insisted upon helping a blind man who was playing an accordion at the northeast corner of the city building. He sang ____ the blind man, refusing to ____ any assistance, shut up the en______ and told Bennie to move on. The song Ben sang was ____ Flower from My Angel Mother's ____, and as he had a good voice he attracted much attention. The glassblowers' union took charge of his body and tried to notify his family. It was said he had a wife in Atlantic City, N. J.      [note: this was extremely hard to read....some parts missing]

 

McKERNAN, MICHAEL JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 8, 1922
Michael McKernan, aged 51, well known transfer man, died this morning at 3:30 o'clock at his home, 339 Dry street. His death was due to pneumonia. He was taken sick Saturday morning at his home and his case was regarded as grave from the very first. He had done a hard day's work on Friday, moving books for the public schools, and it is supposed that he overdid himself and was in no condition to withstand the assault made by pneumonia. He had been a strong, healthy man, and used to an active life out of doors. There was very little hope held out for his recovery from the very first. Yesterday morning he seemed a little better but the disease made rapid progress afterward and the end came this morning. The death of Mr. McKernan, culminating his sickness, was the cause of widespread regret in Alton and vicinity. He had been engaged in the business of baggage hauling for a long time, and he was recognized as a man of the best character. He came to Alton to make his home twenty five years ago. He was reliable in his business and a man whose word was absolutely dependable. With the men who are engaged in the same line as he was, he stood high and all of them regarded him as a good friend more than a business competitor. When they learned that he was seriously ill, there was a general manifestation of concern over him among those who were his rivals in business, and not one of them failed to express the sincerest hopes that the fears that his illness would be fatal would not be borne out. Mr. McKernan was conscious of his approaching end. He insisted upon giving directions for the disposal of his business, made some arrangements for his funeral, indicated the kind of a casket he wanted, and manifested the closest concern about seeing to it that all his business affairs were settled. He sent for his competitor, Harry Collins, and to him entrusted the collection of certain debts due him. When attempts were made to persuade him to desist, he insisted that he knew that he would soon be gone and that it was necessary for him to be prepared. The closing hours of his life weere devoted to giving good counsel to members of his family. Mr. McKernan leaves a wife and three children, one son and two daughters, Paul, Katherine and Helen. He leaves also four brothers and two sisters, John, Bert, Frank and Joe; and Misses Anna and Katherine McKernan. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from SS Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

McKINLEY, GEORGE/Source: Alton Telegraph, January 15, 1842
Died, near Clifton, on the 4th inst., George, infant son of Mr. Robert McKinley.

 

McKINNIE, EVELYN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1902
Evelyn, the 3 year old daughter of Rev. and Mrs. S. L. McKinnie of the Cherry street Baptist chapel died last evening at 7 o'clock after an illness of a few days with scarlet fever. From the beginning of the illness the parents of the child have been alarmed as the symptoms seemed dangerous ones. In their affliction the parents will have the sympathy of everyone in the community. The body was taken to Decatur this afternoon for burial.

 

McKINNEY, ABNER R. (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 28, 1910
Old Time Insurance Man
Dr. Abner R. McKinney, Dean of the local insurance agents, secretary of the Millers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and head of the well known McKinney agency, died suddenly in his office shortly before 9 o'clock Thursday morning. The cause of death was apoplexy. Dr. McKinney had made the trip down town on the car arriving at 8:30 o'clock, and had been around the street shaking hands with friends and greeting them, and seemed to be in good health and his usual jovial spirits. He went to his office, and while in a back room with Albert Ernst and A. J. Kellenberger, he must have felt that he had been stricken with some fatal attack, as he called to Albert Ernst, and that young man turned to assist him. Mr. Kellenberger and Mr. Ernst noticed that his face was white and that he was about to fall, so they caught him, and he collapsed at the same instant. They lifted him to a chair, but he evidently was dead before he was put in the chair. His son, G. A. McKinney, who was his assistant, was in the next room, and he called Dr. Fisher, who arrived in a few minutes and pronounced Dr. McKinney dead. Coroner Streeper was summoned and empanelled a jury consisting of W. H. Joesting, H. B. Sparks, L. M. Carr, Ralph Green, J. J. Hammond, and P. B. Cousley, and an inquest was held. A verdict in accordance with the statement of Dr. Fisher was given that a cerebral hemorrhage producing apoplexy was the cause of Dr. McKinney's death. Later the body was removed to the quarters of A. I. Keiser, and subsequently taken to the home. Dr. McKinney's death was a sad shock to a very large circle of friends. He was a man given to making people cheerful. During recent years he had not given close attention to work in the company's office, merely exercising a supervisory interest in the work. He put in much of his time spreading good cheer, and always believed in saying a kind word and lessening the unhappiness of those he met in his daily walks. The world will be a sadder one that Dr. McKinney has gone. Old and young succumbed to the pleasant influence of his friendly greetings, and everyone who transacted any business with him was a friend and had a good word to say for him. In his business relations, he was absolutely upright. Any person who had an insurance policy with Dr. McKinney could feel safe in event of loss by fire. Dr. McKinney knew his customers, and when an insurance company would take it for granted that one of them was trying to get too much for a loss, Dr. McKinney would take the part of the policy holder, where he thought it was right. He would insist upon a fair settlement being made. He never had a dissatisfied client, so far as he knew, because he saw to it there was satisfaction all around. He was known to tell a company that he would not serve as agent unless a proper settlement was made. Dr. McKinney was born in Readsville, Pa., and was 67 years of age, March 10. He came to Alton about 40 years ago, and at first settled down to the practice of medicine, but gave that up and went into the insurance business. He became secretary of the Millers' Mutual Fire Insurance Co., then a four year old company with small business, 29 years ago. He built up the business of the company until today it is a fine institution doing a tremendous business, with wide interests and unquestioned reputation for good dealings. The Millers' Mutual was the pride of his heart. Annually he would be re-elected as secretary, and occasionally he would go away on business trips to help out. His old friend, Capt. D. R. Sparks, who died two years ago, was associated with the company about as long as Dr. McKinney. Dr. McKinney was city treasurer several terms, and was also a member of the Board of Education for many years. He was repeatedly urged to run for mayor, but always declined to do so. It was said today by his son, G. A. McKinney, that his father had difficulty in going to sleep Wednesday night because of the intense heat. He suffered considerably from the hot weather, and this may have been a contributory cause of his death. He had suffered from his stomach too. H. B. Sparks said that at the last meeting of the executive committee of the company, Dr. McKinney seemed to be about to collapse, and at that time he was much alarmed for Dr. McKinney's safety. Dr. McKinney is survived by his wife and two sons, Lewis R. McKinney and George A. McKinney. Dr. McKinney was kind to his family, as well as to his friends, and his death is a sad blow to them. A. R. McKinney was born at Readsville, Pa., March 10, 1843. He moved to Earlville, Ill., in 1856, and graduated later from the medical school at Cincinnati and Rush college in Chicago. He was married at Alton to Mary E. Kellenberger, June 17, 1868, and she died April 3, 1899. He was in the drug business at Hillsboro for a while and later at Sterling. He came to Alton to live in 1869, and went into the insurance business with Louis E. Kellenberger in 1873. This agency was established in 1849 and is the oldest in Illinois. Mr. McKinney was married to Louise E. Bull, July 24, 1901. Beside his wife and two sons, he leaves two brothers, Samuel of Gilroy, Cal., H. T. McKinney of Albuquerque, N. M., and a sister, M. C. McKinney of Earlville. He leaves also two half-brothers, Charles McKinney of Cape May, N. J., and Joseph in Lewistown, Pa. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

 

McKINNEY, DELLA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 20, 1907
When Madison McKinney, colored, living at Nineteenth and Market streets, retired last night at 10 o'clock, he left his wife, Della, sitting in a chair near the stove. They had been chatting all evening and she had not complained, it is said, of feeling sick. At 2:30 o'clock this morning he awoke and finding that his wife was not in bed arose to look for her. He found her sitting as he had left her in the chair by the stove and she was dead. She was cold and had been dead for some time, apparently. An inquest is being held this afternoon by Deputy Coroner Keiser. Mrs. McKinney was 35 years old, and the funeral will be held Sunday morning. Services will be conducted by the Rev. Mr. Stone.

 

McKINNEY, MARY ELIZABETH (nee KELLENBERGER)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Monday, April 3, 1899
Mrs. Mary Elizabeth McKinney, wife of Dr. A. R. McKinney, passed away Sunday night shortly after midnight, after an illness whose beginning dates from a paralytic stroke which rendered her helpless January 9. Since Mrs. McKinney was first stricken with the fatal stroke, her condition has been such as to enlist the sympathy with the interest of everyone in Alton who had known her. Hers was a life that was a beautiful one. In her home she was a mother in the best sense of the word and always did she devote her time and energies to making home more happy for her family. By her friends she was valued as a true friend and a highly estimable woman. When she was first taken ill, everyone was interested and reports of her condition were eagerly sought. When she gave signs of rallying from the stroke and her family persuaded itself to the belief that she would at last recover her health and be able to resume her old place in the home and among her friends, there was sincere thankfulness upon the part of all. It was about ten days ago that decline set in and she sank steadily until Sunday at midnight, 12:45 o'clock, when the feeble flame of life burned out. Mary Elizabeth Kellenberger was born in Alton, March 3, 1842, and was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Kellenberger. She leaves besides her husband, Dr. A. R. McKinney, two sons, Lewis R. and George A. McKinney. She was a member of a large family of brothers and sisters also living: Mrs. Joseph Hamill, of this city [Alton], Messrs. A. J. Kellenberger of Alton; Ed Kellenberger of Piasa; Harry Kellenberger of Godfrey, and Charles Kellenberger of San Francisco. Mrs. McKinney was married to Dr. A. R. McKinney June 1868. Mrs. McKinney had an only daughter, Miss Gertrude McKinney, whose sad death last summer so bereaved the community and hastened the death of the mother, whose life's light seemed taken with the death of her daughter. She was almost a life-long member of the Presbyterian church, and was one of the most active ones in church work. She was treasurer of the Aid Society of the church for many years, and to this society her death will be a sad loss. Few women in Alton passing away could have left a larger circle of sincere mourners outside of her own family. Of a quiet and retiring disposition, with strong affections, she won a place in the hearts of all who knew her. Once having formed a friendship, it was not easily broken, and the parting leaves tears and regrets on all sides. A faithful wife and mother, a true sister, an excellent friend, and a humble and consistent believer and follower of the Savior of men, has entered into the rest provided for the people of God. The funeral will take place on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family residence on Grove street.

 

McKISSOCK, HANNAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 25, 1900
After a long and painful illness, Hannah, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John McKissock, passed away at 3:30 o'clock this morning at her home. Miss McKissock was born in Alton in 1868, where she was loved and admired by a large circle of friends, who will deeply regret to hear of her death. The deceased leaves beside her parents, three sisters and one brother, Mrs. F. N. Goulding of Chicago; Mrs. J. G. Rodgers; Miss Emma and Robert McKissock, of this city. The funeral will take place from the family residence, Friday, July 27, at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

McKISSOCK, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 6, 1901
John McKissock, an old resident of Alton, died yesterday morning at his home on Piasa street after a long illness, aged 66. He was well known in railroad circles, having been hostler at the C. & A. roundhouse many years until the time of the A. R. U. strike in 1894. He leaves his wife, three daughters and one son. The funeral will take place Friday afternoon from the family home at 2 o'clock, and services will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing.

 

McKISSOCK, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 5, 1919
Robert McKissock, aged 44, died Saturday night at 8 o'clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. James Foreman, after an illness which began two and one half years ago. McKissock was a well known machinist but has not been able to work at his trade for some time. He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. John McKissock of Alby street, and a brother of Mrs. James Rodgers of Alton, Mrs. Frank Goulding of Chicago, and Mrs. James Foreman. Mrs. Goulding is here to attend the funeral. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Foreman home at 643 East Broadway. Services will be conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing of the First Baptist church, and by Rev. S. D. McKenney of the Cherry Street Baptist church. Interment will be in the City cemetery.

 

McKISSOCK, SARAH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 5, 1909
The funeral of Mrs. Sarah McKissock was held this afternoon from the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Rodgers on Alby street. There was a large attendance of friends and relatives at the services, which were conducted by Rev. M. W. Twing of the First Baptist church. The pallbearers were Joseph and John Runzie, William Little, David Walsh, Walter Roper, Edward Needhem. Among those who attended the funeral from out of the city were Mrs. Joseph Kessinger and John McCallum of Raymond, Ill.; Mrs. R. S. Deardorss of Morrisonville, Ill.; Mrs. Phoebe Jenkins of Springfield. Burial was in City Cemetery.

 

McKITTRICK, NELLIE/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 29, 1895
Nellie, the bright-eyed little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James McKittrick, died at noon today. She took sick about a month ago with whooping cough and was nearly well when a week ago Friday, an abscess formed on her right side. Last night Dr. Joseph Pogue performed an operation for appendicitis, removing the obstruction. The child seemed to improve afterwards, but took a change for the worse at six o'clock this morning, and sank until death brought her young life to a close. She was an only daughter, the treasure of her parents and a pet of all, and her death has spread a gloom over the happy home. The funeral will take place from the family residence on Center street Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. Services will be conducted by Rev. W. E. Ravenscroft. The body will be laid to rest in Oaklawn cemetery on the Troy road.

 

McKNIGHT, EUGENE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 2, 1914
Eugene McKnight, humorist, philosopher, editor, publisher of the Madison Republic, was found dead in bed this morning after his third stroke of paralysis. He was 40 years of age. McKnight was known as the leading citizen of Madison. He claimed to make his paper the most perfect typographically, and to use the best quality of paper of any paper in Madison County.

 

McKOWN, J. E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 30, 1912
The death of J. E. McKown of 921 Belle street, occurred at an early hour this morning at his home. He was 26 years of age. He had been suffering from an attack of lead poisoning from working at the lead works. He leaves a wife and two small children. The funeral arrangements have not yet been made. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert McKown, live near the brick plant in NOrth Alton. He leaves one brother, John, and a sister, Mrs. Chris Rain.

 

McLAIN, BIRDIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 26, 1900
Birdie McLain, the little daughter of Mrs. Edward McLain, died this afternoon after a four days' illness of pneumonia. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home on East Third street, between Walnut and Cherry streets. Rev. H. K. Sanborne will conduct the services. The child's father was accidentally killed about one month ago while hunting near Edwardsville Crossing.

 

McLAIN, CAROLINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 23, 1906
Mrs. Caroline McLain, widow of Louis McLain, died Thursday evening at 10:45 o'clock at her home, 908 Highland avenue, after an illness which began four years ago. Mrs. McLain's death was unexpected as she was not considered as being very much worse until yesterday. Although she had been suffering for four years, she had not been confined to her home constantly until one year ago. The past week her case became much worse and yesterday she collapsed. Her death was due to a complication of diseases. Mrs. McLain was born in Cincinnati, Ohio and was 68 years of age last November 15. She came to Alton forty years ago after her marriage, and she lived here with her husband until his death six years ago. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Anna Bickel and Miss Lucinda McLain, a teacher in the Alton public schools.

 

McLAIN, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 12, 1900
Man Accidentally Shoots Self
Edward McLain, son of Louis T. McLain, was instantly killed near Edwardsville Crossing Sunday afternoon while walking from Grassy Lake to the Illinois Terminal station at the Crossing to come home. He stopped on the way to wash his rubber boots in a ditch beside the railroad track, and had laid his shotgun upon a pile of railroad ties, with the hammers down, resting on the ties. As he turned to raise the gun, he accidentally dragged the hammers on the ties, discharging the load. The shot entered his right side and struck his heart. Edward McLain went duck shooting Sunday morning at Grassy Lake with John Rost of this city. The accident happened at about 3 o'clock and was witnessed by Mr. Rost, who was standing near, waiting for his companion to finish washing his boots. Mr. Rost says McLain fell to the ground without uttering a word and was dead when he reached him. The shot was No. 5, and it tore a great hole in McLain's right side, going through his body to the heart, and ranging upward through his lungs. A message was sent to Coroner Bailey, and Deputy Coroner Bauer was sent to bring the body to this city. McLain was 28 years old and leaves a wife and three children. His wife learned of the accident that befell her husband by overhearing a conversation of two men as she was passing along a downtown street. Her grief was pitiable. Mr. McLain had lived in Alton all his life and was known as a most industrious man. He was boss-packer in No. 5 at the glassworks and was well liked by the men who worked under him. He was a brother of Miss Lucinda McLain and Mrs. Anna W. Bickel of this city. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home on Seventh street, between Belle and Piasa streets.

 

McLAIN, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 17, 1900
Louis McLain died Wednesday morning at his home in Highland park after an illness of six months with cancer. He was in his sixty-ninth year, and had lived in Alton forty years. For many years he was foreman of the blacksmith shop at the Rodemeyer carriage factory, and was one of the best known citizens of Alton. The death of his son Edward, who was accidentally killed while hunting last spring, weighed heavily upon him, and he went into a decline, passing away this morning at 6:30 o'clock. He leaves a wife and two daughters, Miss Lucinda McLain and Mrs. Anna Nickel. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and services at the family home will be conducted by Rev. H. K. Sanborne.

 

McLAIN, UNKNOWN CHILD OF LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 20, 1913
The little daughter of Mr. Louis McLain died at the home of its grandmother, Mrs. Elizabeth McGarrahan, 2324 Edwards street, Upper Alton, Tuesday evening at 7:55 o'clock. The little one was taken suddenly ill on her birthday, Tuesday, August 12th, and a week from that day she died. She was one year and one week old. Her mother died last January, and from that time she had made her home with her grandmother. Burial will be at 9 o'clock Thursday from the home of Mrs. E. McCarrahan to Oakwood Cemetery, beside its mother, who was the oldest daughter of Magistrate Lessner.

 

McLAUGHLIN, ELLEN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 3, 1901
Mrs. Ellen McLaughlin, aged 74, died yesterday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William Redmond, on Court street, from general debility. Mrs. McLaughlin has made her home with her daughter in Alton since the family came to this city to live. Mr. Redmond is superintendent for the Metropolitan company. Mrs. McLaughlin was a most estimable woman and had a little circle of interested friends who will be grieved to learn of her death. The body was taken to East St. Louis this noon, and burial will be there.

 

McLEAN, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 14, 1904
Robert McLean, an old resident of Alton, died this morning at St. Joseph's hospital from senile debility, aged 88, He was unmarried and leaves no relatives. He had made his home at the hospital many years, living on his pension. The funeral will be held from St. Patrick's church Friday morning at 8 o'clock. [Internment was in Greenwood Cemetery]

 

McMAHON, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 3, 1908
James McMahon died Saturday evening at 8:22 o'clock at his residence on West Brown street. His death had been expected at any moment for about a week. Mr. McMahon had been suffering from stomach and liver troubles for the past few years, but he would become better at times. Several weeks ago the last attack commenced, and he realized the fact that he would never recover from it. His relatives have most all been with him for several days and up to the time of his death. James McMahon was one of the best known stone masons in Alton. He was noted as an intellectual man and was one of the best posted citizens on all questions of local and national interests. He was born in Ireland and was 62 years old. He came to America when he was 3 years old and spent his boyhood days in New York state, and attended school at Rochester. He came to Upper Alton in 1881, and had lived there ever since. He leaves besides his widow, four sons and four daughters, viz: Nellie, Elizabeth, Amelia and Anna McMahon, and John F., Jeremiah, Edward and James McMahon. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church in Alton.

 

McMONIGLE, GILBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1921
Two Men Killed in Ice Plant by Electric Shock
George Downey, aged 55, and Gilbert McMonigle, aged 19, were found lying dead together in the refrigerating room at the plant of the Sulivan Coal Co., at Wood River yesterday morning. Marcus Paddock, a milk man, who had gone to the ice plant early in the morning for some ice to chill his milk, failing to arouse anyone, looked into the building and saw the two men lying between a pile of ice and the dumping machine. Realizing that they must be dead, as the air was filled with the odor of ammonia, he went for help and called out Percy Rice, who made an investigation. Mr. Rice, covering his face with cloth, rushed into the building and dragged both of the men out, little thinking of the danger he was going into as the electric wire which had caused the death of the two men was still lying on the floor. It is supposed that the current, 200 volts, carried on the line which caused the death of the two men, was made fatal to them by the fact that the men were standing in a wet place on the floor, which made a perfect ground. From the appearance of the two bodies, McMonigle must have been caught first and Downey went to his assistance. McMonigle was removing cakes of ice from the cans and had carried an extension cord from the office to the dumping plant where he was at work. The cord he had laid over some ice and over the iron cans of the dumping machine and the water soaking through doubtless started the deadly work of the current. McMonigle was badly burned. It appeared that Downey, going to help him, had received the fatal current himself and died. He was found lying at the feet of the younger man. Manager Rice said that the accident must have occurred between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m., and it was fully four hours before the men were found dead. They go to work at 11 o'clock and eat lunch at 1 o'clock and their lunches had not been touched. The current had burned out the socket and the lamp and the wire had been burned in two and was lying on the floor. Manager Rice found the ice plant machinery idle when he arrived. The men in charge of the plant being dead it took only a short time for the machinery to stop. Considerable ammonia escaped before the safety appliance operated and checked the flow. Mr. Downey lived with his family at 1224 East Broadway. McMongile lived across the street from the place where he was killed. Manager Rice was inclined to believe that a bolt of lightning had caused the death of the two men, but that was no indication of lightning in the place. It is said that where there is perfect connection such as would be formed by a man being in water, as these were, a low voltage, such as that on the deadly wires, would prove fatal.

 

McMURTRY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 20, 1914
John McMurtry, aged 62, died yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. W. D. Wilson, at 426 East Ninth street, from hardening of the arteries which started in a nervous disorder several months ago. After McMurtry became ill, he was brought to Alton to be treated by a St. Louis specialist and an Alton doctor, but the nervous disease developed into a hardening of the arteries causing a malnutrition of the blood. McMurtry was a merchant at Gossett, Ill., and leaves his wife and one son, Charles McMurtry of Gossett, Ill. The body was shipped to Gossett today at noon, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson accompanying the body. The funeral will be held at Gossett Sunday.

 

McNALLY, BRIDGET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 18, 1901
At 8:45 Friday night, Mrs. Bridget McNally, who has lived in this vicinity fifty of her 83 years of life, passed away at her home on upper Alby street in North Alton. She had been sick for three years with dropsy and complaints growing out of that disease. She was a good woman with many kindly charitable deeds to her credit. She leaves three children, James of Winchester, Ill.; John of North Alton; and Mrs. John McGee of Alton.

 

McNAMARA, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 5, 1902
Mrs. Mary McNamara died Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. N. J. Monks on Ninth street. Mrs. McNamara had been ill only a week and had been suffering from heart trouble. She came here from Peru, Ill. seven years ago to make her home with her daughter. The body will be taken to Peru tomorrow morning for burial.

 

McNEAL, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 12, 1914
Harry McNeal, aged 65, died at Wood River last evening after a lingering illness. McNeal is a bachelor and has been making his home in Wood River for several years. He was employed there as a car repairer. The body will be shipped to Bellecenire, Ohio, tomorrow morning, and the funeral will be held there on Monday.

 

McNEIL, DAVID/Source: Alton Telegraph, March 4, 1864
Died in Alton on the 26th inst., after a lingering illness, David McNeil, aged about 50 years.

 

McNEIL, ELIZA/Source: Alton Telegraph, April 1, 1864
Died in Alton on the 29th inst., Mrs. Eliza, consort of the late David McNeil, aged about forty years.

 

McNELY, CLIFFORD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 7, 1914
Clifford McNely, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest McNely, died at St. Joseph's Hospital this afternoon following a surgical operation for the relief of appendicitis. The operation was not performed in time to be of any benefit to the child. The family lived at Central avenue and Union street.

 

McNULTY, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 26, 1902
The remains of Mrs. Anna Maria McNulty were brought to Alton from St. Louis this morning in a special car provided by the Big Four, and taken to the Cathedral which her father, brother, and uncle, Sebastian, Joseph and Peter Wise, were so largely instrumental in building, where a Requiem High Mass was celebrated by Rev. Fr. E. L. Spalding, and tender words of hope and consolation to mourning ones was spoken by the officiating clergyman.....Interment was in Greenwood.

 

McPHILLIPS, ISABEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 2, 1912
Mrs. Isabel McPhillips, aged 75, died Friday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George Rain, in the North Side, after an illness with paralysis. Mrs. McPhillips was a long time resident of Alton and vicinity. She was the widow of John McPhillips. She was born in Scotland, January 1, 1837, and came to America when she was six years old, living at McKeesport, Pa., until the family came to North Alton in 1850. About twenty years she lived at Plainview, and the remainder of the time she lived in what is now Alton. She was the mother of four children, Henry and Edward McPhillips, and Mrs. George Rain. She was also the mother of the late Peter Robertson. She leaves 17 grandchildren. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home of Mrs. Rain.

 

McPIKE, A. (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, January 17, 1873
 Proprietor of Alton City Mills Dies
Captain A. McPike, of the firm of Farber, McPike & Co., proprietors of the Alton City Mills, died on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock on his plantation at Edward's Point, Mississippi. Captain McPike was married twice. His second wife is likewise deceased. He leaves four children to mourn his loss. He was largely interested in, and at one time President and Superintendent of the Quincy and St. Louis Packet company. For some years he had been an extensive stock dealer and had also engaged in other business operations, in all of which he showed himself a shrewd financier, yet withal an upright, fair dealing and honest man. Captain McPike was a native Missourian, having been born in Pike county. He was about fifty years of age. He was highly respected and esteemed by all, both in his business and social relations.

 

Photo of Henry Guest McPikeMcPIKE, HENRY GUEST/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1910
Former Alton Mayor Dies - Was a Personal Friend of Abraham Lincoln
Henry G. McPike, mayor of Alton from 1887 to 1891, died Monday morning shortly after 6 o'clock at his residence, Mt. Lookout, Twentieth and Alby street, after an illness of less than a week. Eight days before his death he arrived home with his wife and youngest daughter, Miss Moreland, from a winter trip to Florida and Cuba. During the trip he had enjoyed perfect health, and came home in the best of spirits, strong and vigorous. His family were well pleased with the showing of strength he made after coming back. He was around the street for several days, and on Thursday was taken very ill at his home. His condition was known to be serious because of his age. Sunday it was said that his condition was extremely grave, and his death was no surprise to his family. Mr. McPike was born at Lawrenceburgh, Ind., July 6, 1825. He came to Alton in 1847, and lived in Alton continuously since then. He came of a family of Revolutionary fame, and has a long line of ancestors, all long lived, who were Americans. In young manhood Mr. McPike began to make his mark in Alton. He was active in the development of the City of Alton, and also in its political affairs. He served for many years as a member of the Alton city council, and culminated his service to the city by being elected mayor for two terms, the first beginning in 1887. Notwithstanding the fact that advancing age might have made most men give up their interest in public affairs, Mr. McPike never did. He was prominent in the councils of the leaders in his city always, since he settled in Alton, and he had an interesting life. It is said of Mr. McPike that he never had a satisfactory picture taken. His being was fired with a zeal and energy when in action that made him very different from his repose. He was a patriotic American citizen from boyhood to old age. He served as deputy provost marshal for his congressional district during the Civil war. During his long career in politics he was a constant attendant at Republican party conventions, and during a long period Mr. McPike was the recognized Republican leader in Alton whose approval was necessary before endorsements were given in Washington. He was personally friendly with the great men of four to six decades ago - Richard Oglesby, Richard Yates, Abraham Lincoln, Lyman Trumbull, and other great men. HisHenry Guest McPike reminiscences of the times long ago were entertaining. He was the only survivor of the committee who had charge of the plans for the Lincoln-Douglas debates of 1858, and as such was honored at the semi-centennial celebration. During his term of mayor, the first street paving ordinance was passed by the city council - for paving Third street from State to Piasa streets. In his whole life he was interested in real estate, and died possessed of much land he had held for many years. He was agent for the tract laid out as O. M. Adams addition to the city of Alton. Early in the sixties he bought the place where he spent the remainder of his life, and in 1869 he completed and moved into his residence. His place he converted into a beautiful garden. He was a great admirer of flowers and a developer of fruits. He contributed much to the knowledge of fruit propagation, and probably the most distinguished service he rendered was in developing the grape that bears his name, and which made a clean sweep of prizes wherever exhibited. His special pastime was working about his home place, and Mt. Lookout, as he called it, was a place of beauty in the spring and summer time. He was deeply interested in the Alton Horticultural society for over fifty years. One of the most striking features of Mr. McPike's life was the remarkable good state of reservation of his strength and health. He could read without glasses up to the time of his death, and walked with an active stride and had a hearty grip of his hand up to the last. He had a special interest in the younger generation, and had replaced with them the friends of his own age who had died before him. He leaves four children, Mrs. W. R. Wilkinson of St. Louis, J. H. McPike and Miss Moreland McPike of Alton, and Eugene McPike of Chicago. He leaves also his wife, Mrs. Eleanor McPike. He leaves also nine grandchildren. Perhaps there was no man in Alton in his day who had so many friends, and who could command such support as he in a political way in Alton. Active, affable, a born politician, Mr. McPike could have anything in the gift of the people he wanted, but he wanted little and got that. At one time he was head of two thriving fire insurance companies, which were rapidly growing institutions in the city. His later years were devoted to the culture of fruit and flowers, and he gave some attention to real estate. He was careful, frugal, a good business man, and he made a success of life. To his family he was kind and considerate, and by them he was repaid in love and devotion. The funeral plans are not complete. It was said today that if the weather was favorable, the services would probably be held Wednesday afternoon at the family home on Alby street, and that if the weather permits the service will be held on the lawn under the grove of fine trees he had cared for so many years.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 20, 1910
The funeral of Henry G. McPike, former mayor and for many years a leading citizen of Alton, was held this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the family home. The services were conducted by Howard MacQueary of St. Louis, who has been filling the pulpit of the Unitarian church in this city. There was an immense attendance of friends of Mr. McPike, attesting the esteem in which he was held. Among those who were present were many who followed the public life of Mr. McPike, and who had regarded him as their leader. Many former city officials who had been associated with him were present also. The floral offerings were numerous and rich. The pallbearers were A. J. Kellenberger, Cleveland Bierman, H. S. Dorsey, H. M. Schweppe, Col. A. M. Jackson, C. F. Sparks. Burial was in City cemetery, and was attended by the relatives and a few intimate friends. Among those who were present were W. C. McPike and daughter, Miss Genevieve of Kansas City, the former a brother of Mr. McPike. His other brother was unable to be present. Others were Mrs. W. R. Wilkinson of St. Louis, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene McPike of Chicago, Mrs. Long of St. Louis, Mrs. Bartels of Bunker Hill.

Source: Transactions of the Illinois State Horticultural Society
Henry G. McPike was born at Lawrenceburg, Indiana July 6, 1825 and died April 18, 1910. Mr. McPike came to Alton in 1847, and continued to reside there until his death. He served as a member of the city council of Alton for many years and was mayor for two terms beginning in 1887. Early in the decade of 1860, he became interested in real estate and bought the place where he resided so many years, converting it into a beautiful orchard and garden, propagating many plants and flowers, most notable among which was the McPike grape which he originated and which bears his name. For about half a century he was an active member of the Alton Horticultural Society and was a constant attendant at its meetings and he was a source of inspiration and knowledge.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 24, 1910
H. G. McPike's Will Probates - All Heirs Consent
The will of the late Henry G. McPike was probated yesterday in the county court, all the heirs having signed their waivers and all consented to immediate probating after the will was filed. The widow, Mrs. Nellie McPike, and Mr. McPike's son, J. H. McPike of Alton, are named as executors without bond. The document filed in the County Court is a remarkable one in that it was the work of a man who was well past 80 years of age. It was written in the handwriting of the testator, and was his own work. It was witnessed by Frank Fisher and C. S. Leech, and dated August 18, 1908. The will disposes of about 100 separate pieces of real estate. Mr. McPike had for many years been a large holder of Alton realty, and his estate consists principally of houses, lots and land. In lieu of any homestead and dower interests in the estate, Mrs. McPike receives the business building at Second and Piasa streets, occupied by the Boston store, in addition to other property that Mr. McPike had given to her in his lifetime and grouped under the head of life insurance, building association stock, etc. The building occupied by the Lyric theater on Second street is divided between Eugene McPike and Mrs. Jennie Wilkinson. McPike's island, opposite Alton, is given to J. H. McPike, who gets half, and two daughters of James McPike, deceased, who get the other half. In the distribution of his homestead, Mr. McPike divided it into four parts and it goes to his living children. Mrs. Wilkinson gets the south end of Mt. Lookout park, as it is named in the will; J. H. McPike receives the house and a tract of ground connected therewith; Miss Moreland McPike receives the north end of the home place; and Eugene McPike of Chicago receives the part situated on Belle street. The remainder of Mr. McPike's property consisting of numerous lots and tracts of Alton, some of them very valuable, are distributed among the heirs, the children of James McPike receiving their deceased father's share. Probably 100 pieces of property are mentioned in the will, all of them completely described. In making his distribution, Mr. McPike appeared to be actuated by a sense of fairness, dividing his more valuable property and his less valuable property so that all would have a just and equitable share of the estate. How well he succeeded is shown by the fact that all of the family agreed to an immediate probate of the will. In making up the legal descriptions of the property, Mr. McPike had a big job on his hands. The will was neatly made and couched in legal language. Among his personal belongings were many family heirlooms and curios and articles which had been Mr. McPike's, which he valued highly. These he distributed to his children according as he thought they might value them. In closing his will, Mr. McPike refers to the McPike grape, and gave instructions that the proceeds from this grape he propagated be divided in six equal parts among the heirs mentioned in the will.

 

Photo of William Cowper McPikeMcPIKE, WILLIAM COWPER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 4, 1911
Brother of Former Alton Mayor, Henry Guest McPike, Dies in Kansas City, Missouri
William C. McPike, a brother of the late former Mayor H. G. McPike, died at his residence in Kansas City, Mo., yesterday after an illness of one week from pneumonia, combined with diabetes. Mr. McPike had been about his place of business as usual until a week before he died. He was the head of the largest drugstore in the western country, located in Kansas City, and was known as one of the wealthiest residents of Kansas City. Mr. McPike started in his business career as a druggist in Alton. He left Alton many years ago, but was a frequent visitor back here, being strongly attached to his brother in Alton. He was married in Alton to a Miss Kate Avis, who survives him, and he leaves also four daughters and one son, Avis McPike; Mrs. W. T. Bland; Mrs. Robert McQueen; Misses Blanche and Geneveve McPike. His relatives in Alton have no definite information about his funeral, but they suppose burial will be at Atchison, Kansas, where the family lived for many years before going to Kansas City.

 

McREYNOLDS, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 3, 1901
Mr. John McReynolds, an old resident of Upper Alton, died this morning at 9:45 o'clock at the family home. Mr. McReynolds has been a resident of the village for many years and was in his seventy-third year. He was a blacksmith, working in the shops of R. R. McReynolds & Son. He had been suffering from heart trouble several years but it was not until two months ago that he was forced to retire from business. Since then he has suffered from Bright's disease. The funeral will be Wednesday and will be conducted by Rev. W. H. Bradley.

 

McTEER, ANDREW/Source: Collinsville Herald, July 30, 1920
Andrew McTeer, a Civil War Veteran and retired farmer aged 82 years, 8 months and 2 days, died last Thursday, July 22, in the Soldiers and Sailors home at Quincy where he had resided for the last few years. The body was brought here Saturday and funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon from the residence of his sister Mrs. Hugh McHugh to the Methodist church. The Methodist minister, Rev. T. B. Sowers, preached a funeral sermon, and the services were under the auspices of the G.A.R. post, of which Mr. McTeer was member. Sons of Veterans acted as pallbearers and fired a salute at the grave. Burial was in Caseyville cemetery. Mr. McTeer was born in Bluff [Blount county, Tenn., Nov 20, 1833 [20 Nov 1837]. He moved to Illinois during the Civil War and enlisted as a volunteer in the 144th Illinois Infantry. Most of his service was spent guarding the military prison at Alton. He was married July 20, 1867 to Mary James, now deceased. They were the parents of seven children of whom six survive, all living in the West. There are nine grandchildren and eight great grandchildren, one sister, Mrs. Hugh McHugh, surviving.

 

McQUIGG, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 3, 1908
Charles McQuigg died at his home at 1321 East Fourth street at 2 o'clock this morning. He leaves a wife and three children. McQuigg was a glassworker and has resided here several years. The funeral will take place from the home at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

 

MEDHURST, EVA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 12, 1922
Mrs. Eva Medhurst, 21, wife of Earl Medhurst, died Sunday morning at twelve o'clock at the Medhurst home at 521 East Tenth street, following a prolonged illness. For the past two weeks she has been confined to her bed and remained in a very weakened condition. She leaves to mourn her death her husband, and one daughter, Katherine, three years old, one brother, Walter Jones, and one sister, Miss Grace Jones, both of this city. She was a member of the Upper Alton Pentecostal Church. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home and 2:30 o'clock from the Upper Alton Pentecostal Church. Interment will be in the City Cemetery.

 

MEEDEN, TILLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 5, 1903
Miss Tillie Meeden of Fosterburg, who went to Denver five weeks ago in search of health, died in that city Tuesday night. The body will arrive tonight and the funeral will take place Saturday morning from the Presbyterian church in Fosterburg. Miss Meeden was 28 years and six months of age, and was a lady of lovable character. She leaves her mother, Mrs. R. Meeden, four sisters, Miss Minnie Dickmann of Alton; Mrs. August Strohbeck of Brighton; Mesdames Frank Bardtlow and William Hess of Foster township; and three brothers, Henry and Everett of Fosterburg, and George Meeden of Brighton.

 

MEEHAN, DAVID/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 15, 1905
The body of David Meehan arrived from East St. Louis this morning at 8:15 o'clock and was taken to SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, where a Requiem High Mass was celebrated. The body was accompanied by the five sons of the deceased and other members of the family. There was a large attendance at the funeral services, and many friends of Mr. Meehan followed the body to Greenwood cemetery, where interment took place.

 

MEEHAN, MAURICE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 2, 1913
Two Die From Auto Accident
Two are dead and two men are held to the grand jury in connection with the automobile accident of Monday afternoon near Second and Cherry streets. Miss Amelia Rotsch died at the home of William Penning in Upper Alton Monday night at 10:10 p.m., and Maurice Meehan died Thursday morning at 3 o'clock in St. Joseph's hospital. The death of Miss Rotsch was unexpected. She was not believed to be seriously injured. Not a mark that was given in the wreck was on her person, the only bruise being due to a fall on a table after she had been carried into the office of the Sweetser Lumber Co. She had not even been thrown from the car when the wreck occurred, and was lifted from the tonneau where she had slipped down in a faint after the collision. It was supposed she was suffering from nervous shock and would recover in a few days. Surgeons had pronounced her case not to be of a serious nature. Monday night she collapsed about a half hour before her death occurred, and her mother, who had been with her all day, had gone to the family home in Bethalto. Her death was a great surprise to everyone. Miss Rotsch was 25 years old, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Rotsch of Bethalto. She had taught at the Brushy Grove school and had been transferred to the East Alton school where she was teaching. The theory of Miss Rotsch's death is that when the collision occurred, one of the men in the Granite City car was hurled at her and struck her on the breast and head, as one of the men was lifted out of the Clark car where he was hanging after the accident. Maurice Meehan's death occurred Thursday morning at 3 o'clock. He had regained consciousness only a few minutes during Wednesday, but at the time he was conscious he began to show certain indications of dissolution, and the surgeons gave it out that he could not last 24 hours. He continued to sink steadily. His wife attended him constantly from the time of the wreck. Meehan was 43 years of age and leaves his wife. He had conducted a saloon in the city of Madison, Illinois.

 

MEEK, JOHN/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, Monday, October 11, 1920 - Submitted by Sharon Inman
John Meek, well known farmer living on the Fangenroth road west of town died at 12:20 o'clock this morning from an attack of septicemia with which he had been ailing since last Wednesday. His condition became critical yesterday and he sank rapidly during the last few hours. Last Wednesday Mr. Meek was complaining a good deal about his condition and went to bed. For a day or two it appeared that he would recover from the heart attack. Mr. Meek was also bothered with an abscessed tooth and felt able to come to Edwardsville Saturday to have the tooth extracted. The extraction in no way affected him but he appeared fatigued from the trip and went to bed. It was only a few hours until the turn for the worst. Mr. Meek was a native of Edwardsville and was a son of John Meek. The date of his birth was April 2, 1870 and he was 50 years, 6 months and 8 days old at the time of his death. He followed farming during his life and has lived at the present home for a number of years. On February 23, 1897 he was married to Miss Maggie Epping. The widow and 10 children survive. The children are Mrs. Mary Tosovsky, Emma, Albert, Marjorie, John, Leonard, Stella, Elsie, Edna, and Florence Meek. Mr. Meek was a trustee of St. Mary's Catholic Church and for many years had been active in the affairs of the parish. Plans for the funeral are being arranged today. Services will be held Wednesday morning from the church, Rev. C. A. O'Reilly officiating. Burial will be at St. Mary's Cemetery.

 


MEEK, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1901
Commits Suicide Over Young Woman
William Meek, a young man residing with his parents on the Valley View farm just north of Edwardsville, killed himself Sunday morning. It is said that he desired to marry a young girl to whom his relatives objected. He went to church in the morning and on returning home shot himself three times, dying almost instantly. An inquest was held last night by Deputy Coroner Herman Ritter.

 

MEENACH, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 3, 1899
Catherine Meenach, a venerable resident of Alton, died January 1, 1899, Sunday afternoon at her home on East Third street after a long illness, at the age of 77 years. Mrs. Meenach was the widow of Mitchell Meenach, who at one time was a well-known business man of Alton. She was one of the prosperous residents of Alton, and was quite well known among the older residents. She had been in feeble health for some time, and had been confined to her home for several months with infirmities of old age. She leaves a family of two sons, U. G. Meenach and George Meenach, and an adopted daughter, Miss Annie Morley. The funeral was at two o'clock this afternoon from St. Patrick's church, and interment was in the City Cemetery beside her husband.

 

MEES, NICHOLAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1901
Nicholas Mees, a bachelor, aged 75, died last evening after a long illness at the residence of William Flori, 925 Pearl Street. He had lived in Alton a long time and had many friends here. He leaves one sister, Mrs. Flori, and a brother, William Mees. The body will be sent to Carlinville tomorrow morning for burial.

 

MEGOWEN, CLYDE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1915
The funeral of Clyde Megowen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Megowen, was held today at Granite City, Ill. The body was taken to Granite City yesterday, where the family lived until their recent moving to Alton. In every detail the law laid down by the State Board in such cases was observed, it being the first funeral at Alton conducted under the state board's new regulations.

 

MEGOWEN, ELIZA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1925
The funeral of Mrs. Eliza Megowen, one of Upper Alton's oldest and most respected residents, was laid to rest this afternoon in Oakwood Cemetery beside members of her family who preceded her to the grave. A service conducted by Rev. Theodore Cates was held at the home, 1913 Main Street, at 2:30. "I'm a Child of the King," and "Saved By Grace," were sung by a quartette composed of H. C. White, Russell Terry, Mrs. Frank Coulter, and Miss Nellie Williams, who were accompanied by Miss Lulu Rhoads. The pallbearers were Arch, Lee, Walter, Claude, Oren and Carl Megowen, all grandsons of Mrs. Megowen.

In the passing of Mrs. Megowen, Alton has lost one of her most respected and useful citizens. In spite of her age, she, during the World War (I), worked for the Red Cross all of her time. She has knitted one pair of socks in a day, and during the time the United States participated in the war, knit more than one hundred pairs of socks in addition to a number of sweaters and other garments. She lived in the early history-making days of Upper Alton, and her reminiscences are most interesting. It was in her yard that the famous gathering of Union soldiers was held during the Civil War, that resulted in Upper Alton being given the name "Pietown." At that time, the soldiers were encamped on the ground owned by John Smith, at the corner of what is now know as the Ford farms, at the corner of Humbert and Claire Streets. She lived directly across the street, and the famous gathering was held on her home ground. There are only a few of the early settlers left, and it is with regret that we note the passing of Mrs. Megowen.

 

MEGOWEN, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 27, 1911
The funeral of Lewis Megowen Sr., was held this afternoon from the Methodist church, and the building of the organization of which the deceased had been a member many years, was filled to its capacity with the friends who paid a last tribute of respect to the departed old resident. The casket was not opened at the church, but many friends called at the Megowen homestead on Salu street, between noon and 2 o'clock, during which time the body lay in state. The floral offerings sent in by friends were very beautiful. The service was conducted by the pastor of the church, after which Rev. S. Hussey made a few remarks concerning the life of Mr. Megowen, and he gave a most beautiful tribute to the departed one. After the service at the church, the funeral cortege proceeded to Oakwood cemetery, where interment was made.

 

MEIKAMP, EDNA/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, April 18, 1919
Six members of the confirmation class of Miss Edna Meikamp were pallbearers yesterday afternoon at her funeral, and four girlfriends from the class membership were flower bearers. Miss Meikamp, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Meikamp of Pin Oak Township, died Tuesday with pneumonia. The services were conducted by Rev. A. F. Ludwig, a short service at the residence at 2 o'clock, and thence to the Immanuel M. E. church. Many friends and acquaintances were present. The pallbearers were Gilbert Dude, Rudolph Stolte, George Weber, Arthur Miller, Melvin Spitz, and Courtney Sickbert. The flower girls were Misses Verna Friedhoff, Ethel Prott, Lenora Kriege and Dora Bohm. Burial was at Woodlawn cemetery. The mother, who has been seriously ill the past several days, was unable to attend the funeral. "She is NOt Dead but Sleeping," was the topic of Rev. Ludwig's sermon. It was from Mark 5:39.

 

MEINERLING/MINERLING, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 24, 1906
Mrs. Margaret Minerling, aged 70, died at Nameoki yesterday afternoon. The funeral will be at St. Elizabeth's church at Mitchell, and burial will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery at Alton. [According to records, her name is spelled Meinerling, and her maiden name was Zagenschneider. Source: Beverly Porter, great-great-granddaughter]

 

MEISENBERGER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1916
Aged Man Killed by Train
John Meisenberger, aged street sweeper in front of the Hippodrome, died on his way to the St. Joseph's Hospital this morning after he had been crushed between a box car and a pile of lumber in the rear of the Hippodrome. The life of the aged man was snuffed out because he was too proud to go to the County Poor Farm when he was ill. Meisenberger had been ill for some time and had been confined to the St. Joseph's Hospital. His condition there improved but he was still sick. It was decided that so Madison County might save money, he should be taken to the County Poor Farm. For a number of years Meisenberger had confidently believed that he was heir to an estate in Baltimore, and his pride rebelled at being taken to the poor farm. He said he would rather return to his old haunts at the Hippodrome. This morning he was ill and he went to the rear of the building and sat upon a pile of lumber on the Smith track with his head down. In the meantime, the switching crew of the Illinois Terminal wanted to take an empty car off the Smith track so they might spot a car of oats for the Struif Feed Co. They did not know Meisenberger was on the pile of lumber in back of the empty car and when they coupled on to the car the car ran into the pile of lumber. Meisenberger was caught between the two and was crushed. He was hurried at once to the St. Joseph's Hospital, although it was easy to see that he had little chance to recover. He died as he was being taken into the hospital. Meisenberger was about 54 years of age. He lived the greater part of his life in the city of Alton, and was well known here. In the old days he worked in the tobacco factory. For the past few months he has been working at the Hippodrome. It is said that he has a brother working on a railroad in Missouri, and that he is survived by a daughter who lives in St. Louis and works in a department store there. Deputy Coroner John Berner took charge of the body this morning and will make every effort to locate some of the relatives of the man.

 

MEISENHEIMER, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1906
Mrs. Elizabeth Meisenheimer, widow of Philip Meisenheimer, died suddenly from heart disease at her old home near Fosterburg Friday evening. Mrs. Meisenheimer's death occurred while she was out in the yard, and when she failed to return to the house a search was started which resulted in the finding of her body. It is supposed she started out to the barn to gather some eggs. Her family, thinking she might have gone to a neighbor's house for a brief call, did not pay any attention to her absence until she remained away after dark, then they began a search. They found her lying half way between the house and the barn, where she had died peacefully and apparently without any pain whatever. Prior to her death Mrs. Meisenheimer's health was very good and the announcement of her sudden death caused great surprise. She had lived in the vicinity of Fosterburg for nearly sixty-five years, and she was widely known in that part of the country and highly esteemed as a good neighbor and a faithful friend. Everyone who knew the aged lady respected and revered her and there is general sorrow over her death. Mrs. Meisenheimer leaves five sons: Jacob of Bunker Hill; John of Godfrey; Charles of Fosterburg; Philip of Alton; Fred of Witt, Ill. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Presbyterian church.

 

MEISENHEIMER, JACOB/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 7, 1914
Died From Fatal Injuries When Wagon Was Struck by Train
Jacob Meisenheimer, who was injured when the Big Four Flyer struck a wagon belonging to Albert Schott, at the Milton Crossing early this week, died at St. Joseph's Hospital Thursday evening at 5 o'clock, from his injuries. He had been in a bad way for several days, internal injuries having developed. Mr. Meisenheimer leaves a daughter, Mrs. Samuel Nichols, in Upper Alton, with whom he made his home; and a son, Edward Meisenheimer, who is employed at the plant of the Western Cartridge Co. Mr. Meisenheimer was 59 years of age. The accident in which Mr. Meisenheimer received fatal injuries also resulted in the death of the team that was drawing the wagon on which Mr. Meisenheimer was riding with Mr. Schott, and the wagon was demolished. The cause of the accident is the screened condition of the Milton Crossing, which is so situated that without any watchman or crossing bells there is made a regular death trap, which has claimed many lives in the past.

 

MEISSNER or MIESSNER, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 30, 1911
Mrs. Annie Meissner, widow of the late Emil Meissner, died Sunday night at St. Joseph's Hospital from cancer. She had been suffering many years from cancer, and submitted to a surgical operation eight months ago for relief. The relief was only temporary however, and several days ago she was removed from her home in Spring street to the hospital, and another operation was contemplated. She was too feeble, however, and died without having it performed. She was 52 years old and leaves no relatives here. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the home of Mrs. C. Unterbrink in Spring street. Mrs. Miessner was born in Alton in June 1858. She leaves one sister, Mrs. Mary Redding, of Marine, her only known relative.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 11, 1911
An interesting fact was lost sight of in the recent death of Mrs. Annie Miessner, and it was called to mind only when it became known that she left an estate valued at nearly $10,000, which she left to good friends who had been kind to her. Mrs. Miessner, although she possessed the sum of money mentioned, none of it represented by real estate, was engaged at the occupation of laundress. She did weekly washings for people until the trouble which caused her death, cancer, made it impossible for her to use one of her arms. She had suffered for several years with a pain in her arm which she attributed to rheumatism, but she kept on doing her washing until a comparatively short time before her death. There are few women following the occupation of laundresses who have such a sum of money as Mrs. Miessner had. She worked not from necessity, but because she was pleased to do so.

 

MEISSNER, JOSEPHINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 17, 1906
Mrs. Josephine Meissner, aged 84, died yesterday morning from old age at her home, 1217 east Sixth street. Mrs. Meissner was a native of Germany, but had lived in Alton almost fifty years. She had been in ill health for a long time, and her death was expected. Mrs. Meissner leaves five children: Adolph of Springfield; Charles of St. Louis; Henry of Indiana; Mrs. Lena Maas and Mrs. Theresa Maul of Alton. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

 

MEISSNER, UNKNOWN WIFE OF EMIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 5, 1901
Mrs. Emil Meissner, aged about 38, died Saturday night at her home on West Second street, after a lingering illness. She was the wife of Emil Meissner, and both herself and husband have numerous friends in the city who will greatly miss her and who sincerely mourn her demise. The funeral took place this afternoon from the home to the City cemetery. Rev. Theo Oberhellman conducted the services.

 

Joseph G. Melling, 1893MELLING, JOSEPH G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1922
Well Known Printer
Joseph G. Melling, senior member of the firm of Melling & Gaskins, died Tuesday morning, a half hour after midnight, at his summer cottage at Chautauqua. His death was very unexpected. He had been in a bad way for a long time, but those closest to him accepted Mr. Melling's judgment that he was improving steadily and they thought that it would be a matter of not a very long time before he would be nearly normal again. He had been suffering from goiters, and he had gone to St. Louis to undergo a surgical operation there in a hospital. He underwent two of them, both of very serious character. On his return home he was gradually able to get around and took short walks in the country, but never was able to get back to his work in his office. This return to work he was deferring until he would be stronger. Never in his life had he taken any extended period of vacation from work. Two weeks ago he went to Chautauqua to spend the summer. The family were planning for a happy Fourth of July there. Late Monday night, after he had been up and around the house all day, Mr. Melling retired to an easy chair on the porch. He had been experiencing trouble with his breathing and found it easier to sit up at night. Members of his family heard some unusual sound on the sleeping porch a few minutes after he had made himself comfortable for the night, and going out to investigate found that it was all over with Mr. Melling. The death of Joseph G. Melling marks the passing of one of the best known business men in Alton. Not only was he well known, but he was generally loved. He had spent the whole of his fifty-nine years of life in and close to Alton, living just on the edge of the city. He was the son of Justice J. G. Melling. He learned the printing trade in the old Sentinel Democrat office, and thirty years ago formed a partnership with Eugene Gaskins, his co-worker in the same shop. Mr. Melling was a printer of high artistic ability. Mr. Gaskins was pressman of the same high order. It made an ideal combination in the job printing business. The scrupulous exactness of Mr. Melling was known to everyone. He was particular in all his work, and there was nothing of a slovenly, careless character in any of the work he would turn out. A typographical error in any job of work after he had read proof on it was unknown. Work did not come up to his requirements until it had been laid out in the most artistic manner. He was a careful student of what is real art in printing and his own work contributed much to establishing standards of art in that line. Mr. Melling was kindly, thoughtful man. His intimate friends believe that he never wounded the sensibilities of anyone in his life as he was habitually pleasant in his manner. When he spoke there was always a friendly twinkle in his eye. He had opinions on all subjects, and they were always sound. Among the men who worked for him he was respected and admired. His was the final authority with them against which there was no questioning. Of late years he had been in charge of the business office of his firm. Mr. Melling was an ardent sportsman. He owned a half interest in a yacht, and he would make trips up the river in hunting season. He was one of the best camp mates, the true test of a man's good qualities. His best friend was his business partner. The two men were unlike most business associates, who see enough of each other in business hours. They had their recreation together, took their outings together, and were inseparable out as well as in business hours. He was a devoted, self sacrificing husband and father, and up to the time of the death of his aged father he was the chief reliance of the father. Mr. Melling is survived by his wife, three sons and one daughter. The children are Emmett, an Ensign in the United States Navy; Joseph G. Jr.; Eugene and Miss Mayme Melling. Ensign Emmet Melling was at Maro Island, California when his father died, and his arrival here, which will probably be Saturday, is being awaited before the setting of the time for the funeral.

 

MELLING, PATRICK J. (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 14, 1917
Old Time Justice of the Peace Dies
Capt. Patrick J. Melling, former coroner of Madison county, postmaster of North Alton for many years, and a justice of the peace for thirty-six consecutive years, died Saturday morning at the home of his son, Joseph G. Melling, on Delmar avenue at State street, from old age infirmities and disabilities. He was born in County Down, Ireland, and came to Alton in 1850. He had been here since, and was always prominently identified with public affairs. He was coroner of Madison county some years ago, and served North Alton as postmaster for several years. This month he completed thirty-six years continuous service as a justice of the peace, an unusual justice of the peace at that. He pleaded with intending litigants always to settle differences out of court, and his pleading won more times than it lost. He lost fees and business, but he saved money for the wound be litigants, and made friends again of them, and that was all the compensation he asked or cared for. He was a courtly, kindly gentleman, and numbered as his firm friends all acquaintances, and there will be sincere sorrow throughout the city and county because of his death. He was 88 years old, however, and his passing was peaceful, and in keeping with the decrees of Mother Nature. He had lived a long life, and has merely fallen asleep at the end of a long day. In 1860 to was married to Mrs. Sara Clifford, and they lived happily together for several years until death called her. Two children born of that union survive: Joseph G. Melling of Alton, and Robert Emmett Melling of Kansas City, to whom the sincere sympathy of all friends will be extended. Three years ago Capt. Mulling fell at his home and broke a bone in one of his hips. This injury has kept him in the house, and in his room most of the time since. The funeral will be Monday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

MERIWETHER, EDWARD G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 14, 1919
Edward G. Meriwether, well known Alton lawyer, died at St. John's Hospital in St. Louis Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from kidney trouble. His death was unexpected, inasmuch as Mrs. Meriwether, who was attending him, had believed him much improved this morning and had so telephoned her family in Alton. Mrs. E. B. Meriwether, the aged mother, was on the way to St. Louis with her granddaughter, Miss Katherine Meriwether, to see her son, but arrived too late. Mr. Meriwether was known to be in a bad way. He had been exhibiting some very bad symptoms and about a week ago went to St. Louis to have a thorough examination made by specialists. He was told to go to the hospital and remain there. He was apparently much improved up to a few days ago, but on Monday some disquieting word was received from him. However, the family's anxiety was somewhat relieved this morning by word from his wife that he seemed better, and the members of the family were wholly unprepared for the word that came later that he had died. Mr. Meriwether was born in Shipman, Ill., and grew up there. He came to Alton to make his home and after coming here he began the study of law. He completed his studies and passed a bar examination, afterward opening an office for the practice of his profession in Alton with William P. Boynton, who was also just graduated from a law school. He later opened an office for himself. He had been very successful in the law and at the time of his death was attorney for the Home Building and Loan Association. The day he was obliged to go to St. Louis he had just completed moving his office to the new place at the Home on Third Street. Mr. Meriwether leaves beside his mother and his wife, four children, Misses Sadie and Katherine and two sons, Edward and Clement, the latter being in the United States Military Academy at West Point. He was a member of Belvidere Commandery, Knights Templar, and the funeral will probably be under the auspices of that organization. He was deeply interested in the work of the Unitarian Church. Mr. Meriwether was 57 years old. The body will be brought here late this afternoon. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

 

MERIWETHER, LUCY A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1920
Mrs. Lucy A. Meriwether, widow of Edward B. Meriwether and mother of Edward G. Meriwether, died at the age of 87 years Sunday afternoon at 5:10 o'clock at her home, 1717 Central avenue. It was undoubtedly the death of her only child, the late Attorney E. G. Meriwether, that brought about the collapse of the aged woman, and her death. From the time she learned of her son's death, she had expressed the thought that it would have been better for her to have been taken and that she would gladly go to join him. She had been suffering for a week from various troubles, but there was no particular cause of her death, except her grief over her son, and her desire that she should not survive. She would not express any hope to recover and her departed son was most in her mind. Mrs. Meriwether was born at Ossiuing, N. Y. in 1832, and she was in her eighty-eighth year. She came west when a young girl and was married Sept. 27, 1856 to Edward B. Meriwether, with whom she had gone to school in childhood. There was but one child born to her, and in him after her husband's death all her devotion was centered. She came to Alton twenty seven years ago to make her home. She was a devoted member of the First Presbyterian church. The funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock and services will be conducted by Rev. Edward L. Gibson. The body will be taken to Shipman on Wednesday for burial there beside her husband and son.

 

MERKLE, J. W. JR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1906
Prominent Young Business Man
J. W. Merkle, Jr., a well known grocer doing business at 650 East Second street for the past 8 years, died Thursday afternoon at 1:50 o'clock at his home in North Alton from pneumonia. He is survived by a father and a couple of sisters. "Will" Merkle, as he was familiarly known, was a most genial man, with a great kindly, charitable heart, and there will be widespread sorrow over his demise. He was an excellent business man also, and a prominent and energetic member of the Retail Merchant's Association, and was always ready to do anything in his power for the betterment of Alton or the alleviation of the sufferings of others. He was 32 years of age, and a life-long member of St. Mary's Catholic church, and his funeral will be held from that church Saturday morning at 9:30 o'clock.

 

MERRIMAN, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 8, 1914
Charles Merriman, aged 53 years, well known farmer in the Godfrey district, died at the home of his brother, Ben Merriman, near Godfrey, at 7:00 o'clock this morning. Mr. Merriman had been ill for a long time, and two days ago, because of the seriousness of his case and the fact that his wife is an invalid, he was removed to the home of his brother for better care. This morning he had a sinking spell, and death came. Mr. Merriman suffered from tuberculosis, and has made a brave fight for his life. Mr. Merriman had lived all his life in Godfrey township, being born there January 20, 1861, and he was one of the best known farmers in the township. He had a very large circle of friends who have been deeply interested in his condition, and who regret that the end has come. He leaves beside his invalid wife, who has suffered a severe shock from the death of her husband, two sisters, Mrs. P. H. Gray of St. Louis; and Mrs. Edith Kirby of Jerseyville; also five brothers, Edward of Calgary, Canada; John and Andrew of St. Louis; Louis, who is in Utah; and Benjamin of Godfrey. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock from the home of Mr. Merriman, where he was taken immediately after his death. The funeral cortege will go to the Godfrey Congregational Church, where services will be conducted at 2:30 o'clock by Rev. F. H. Brown, and burial will be in the Godfrey cemetery.

 

MERRIMAN, WILLARD WELLS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1921
Willard Wells Merriman, 32 years old, died at his home 3229 east Brown street at 1:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon, after an illness of two years. Merriman, who, before his illness, was a foot specialist, was a victim of the flu when an epidemic of the disease raged here two years ago. His siege was very severe, and he never completely recovered from the attack. After a partial recovery, the disease developed into tuberculosis which proved fatal. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Ethel Merriman, and daughter Rosamond, aged 7; his parents Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Merriman, who live at the Brown street address; three brothers Leroy G. and Harvey W. of Elyria, O., and Edwin of Sandusky, O., and one sister, Mrs. Gertrude L. Thompson of St. Louis. Merriman was born in Godfrey and had lived in Alton 18 years. Burial will take place Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, from the residence to Upper Alton Baptist church, where Rev. Magill will conduct the services. Interment will be in Godfrey cemetery.

 

MERKLE, BARBARA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1905
Mrs. Barbara Merkle, wife of Joseph Merkle, aged 58, died Saturday just before midnight after an illness of ten days from pneumonia resulting from an attack of bronchitis and asthma. Mrs. Merkle had lived in Alton about 43 years and married in this city 41 years ago last February 8. She leaves a family consisting of her husband and nine children, Mrs. Mary Dicke, Mrs. Barbara Winter, Mrs. Katie Klebolt, Miss Emma Merkle, Messrs. John, Will, Frank, Joseph and Leo Merkle. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

 

MERKLE, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 6, 1908
Joseph Merkle, aged 66, a resident of Alton and vicinity since boyhood, died Friday afternoon at 5 o'clock at his home on the Vandalia road and Shields street after an illness of three years. Mr. Merkle had been in bad health ever since the death of his wife three years ago. He began to decline in health then, and became a victim of Brights disease. He was not confined to his bed until about two weeks ago when he became unable to get around. He leaves a family consisting of five sons and three daughters, Messrs. Joseph, John, William, Frank and Leo Merkle, and Mrs. Barbara Winters, Mrs. Frank Kiebolt and Mrs. Will Dickey. Mr. Merkle was well known throughout the city as a market gardener. He was very successful in the business and he supplied many an Alton family with their garden truck for many years. Mr. Merkle was born in Baden, Germany in 1839, and came to America ten years later, settling at Dayton, Ohio. He came to Alton in 1859 and went to live at the place where his death occurred, in the year 1853. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church of which he was a long time member.

 

MERKLE, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 12, 1920
Many friends gathered at St. Mary's church this morning at 9:30 o'clock to attend the funeral of William Merkle. Rev. Joseph Meckel was celebrant of the Requiem High Mass, with Rev. Schenlton as Deacon and Rev. Fallow as sub-deacon. Interment was in St. Joseph Cemetery. The pallbearers were George Steigler, John Klasner, Vincent War____, John Schmide. The deceased belonged to the Western Catholic Union, and the pallbearers were chosen from that organization.

 

MERKLIN, MRS. C./Source: The Edwardsville Intelligencer, March 23, 1892 - Submitted by Terri Ryan
Mrs. C. Merklin, an aged and highly esteemed lady, of this place, died, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Anton Ulrich, after an illness of several months. Deceased was born in Germany. She leaves a son and two daughters to mourn her demise. The remains were followed by a large concourse of friends to the Marine cemetery, where the interment took place. Rev. Carl Kurz conducted services. March 22nd.

 

MERRIGAN, UNKNOWN WIFE OF TIMOTHY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 4, 1911
Mrs. Timothy Merrigan of Bethalto, a well known woman, arrived at her home today a corpse, after having gone to Cobden, Ill., to attend her sister's husband, who was very ill and died after Mrs. Merrigan arrived. While she was assisting in caring for her brother-in-law during his illness, Mrs. Merrigan contracted pneumonia and died herself. The body was sent back to Bethalto from Cobden for burial. Mrs. Merrigan's death was a great surprise to her friends at Bethalto. She was in the best of health when she went to assist her sister in her trouble. Mrs. Merrigan leaves her husband and five children, all grown. Mrs. Merrigan was 53 years of age. She had been away from home about ten days when she was brought back dead. The funeral will be Saturday morning at 10 o'clock and burial will be in the Bethalto cemetery.

 

MERRILL, PETER/Source: Alton Telegraph, April 16, 1847
The body of Mr. Peter Merrill, late Postmaster at this place, was found on Tuesday afternoon among some driftwood, about twenty yards from the bank of the Mississippi River, and nearly opposite the mouth of the Missouri, where it had been carried by the force of the current. The deceased, who manifested strong symptoms of mental derangement about the first of this month, disappeared suddenly on the evening of the 2d. But although fears were entertained that he might have come to an untimely end, it was supposed by most of his friends that he had taken passage, as he had talked of doing, onboard of some boat going up the river, and this hope continued to be cherished until the above discovery removed every doubt as to his fate. Mr. Merrill was a man of vigorous intellect, and much information. But his usefulness as a member of society was somewhat impaired by irregular habits. He was in the prime of life, and had resided in this county several years. We understand that he was a native of Western New York, where his relatives reside, but he never was married. An inquest was held over his remains on Tuesday evening by J. B. Hundley, Esq. of this city, after which they were removed to Upper Alton for interment.

 

MERRIMAN, CHARLES B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 14, 1900
Charles B. Merriman, aged 64, a long-time resident and prominent farmer living near Godfrey, died at the home of his daughter in St. Louis yesterday, where he was undergoing treatment by a specialist. The body will arrive here at 11:50 a.m. Thursday, and interment will be in the Godfrey cemetery at 1:30 p.m. Rev. H. M. Chittenden will officiate. He leaves seven children: Mrs. Gray, Charles and Ben R., of St. Louis; Edward in Minnesota; and Andrew and Edith at Godfrey.

 

MERRITT, FRANKLIN/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 13, 1846
(From the Madison County Circuit Court) The People vs. Israel Mayfield for the murder of Franklin Merritt. Defendant found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to eight years in the [Alton] Penitentiary.

 

MERRITT, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 4, 1914
Boy Drowns While Doing "Banters"
Fred Merritt was drowned Saturday evening while at play on the braces of the shore protection fence just above the Alton bridge. With some boy companions, Andy Miller, Cecil Calvert and Clarence Middlecroft, the lad had been fishing and tiring of that, the boys began doing some "banters." Behind the heavy fence that lines the dike above the bridge, there is a zig zag series of braces which are connected, and the top of which is about one foot wide, affording a good footing. It was along this series of braces the boys were running. It is said that one of the boys tripped the Merritt boy, either by accident or in play, and that the Merritt boy plunged off the narrow footboard and fell into the water, which was about 8 feet deep at that place. The distress of the little boys attracted the attention of Louis Whetzel, who gave the alarm and soon help was summoned. Some of the men on the steamer Illinois, and a crew which rushed down from the Fluent dock, got busy. Oscar Schafer recovered the boy's body from the water, but the little boy was dead.....Mrs. Merritt, the mother, has two daughters and another son. During the time the efforts were being used to revive the boy, two of the sisters of the drowned lad arrived, but they were sent away, as it was not desired that they witness the efforts to save their brother's life. The coroner's jury after hearing all the evidence in the case returned a verdict of accidental death by drowning.

 

MERSINGER, FRED/Source: Troy Star, April 19, 1894
Fred Mersinger, an old resident of Black Jack, died Monday night in his 58th year. He had been sick for some time. He leaves a wife and several children to mourn his death. The funeral occurred yesterday at 10 o'clock A.M. from the Black Jack Catholic church, and was largely attended.

 

MERTSCH, ALVINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 28, 1902
Alvina Mertsch, 17 years old daughter of Mrs. George Mertsch, died Sunday morning at the family home, 916 East Sixth street, after an illness with stomach troubles. She was a member of the Congregational church and was much interested in church work. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and services will be conduced by Rev. J. H. J. Rice.

 

MERTSCH, OTTO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 13, 1903
Otto Mertsch, residing at 915 East Sixth street, was drowned in the Mississippi back of the glass works Sunday afternoon about 2 o'clock while swimming. The young man was 21 years old. He was in the water with two friends, John Feldwisch and William Arnold. His two companions were good swimmers and started to swim toward deep water. Mertsch, who could not swim a stroke, started to follow them and was drowned. His companions first noticed his plight when he had disappeared for the last time. Two hours later the body was recovered by Mr. W. H. Bauer, and Sunday night it was taken to the family home. The drowning of young Mertsch is unusually sad in that he was the sole support of his mother, who is a widow with two little daughters. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the family home on East Sixth street. Burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

MESSERSCHMIDT, DOMINECK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 23, 1904
The funeral of Domineck Messerschmidt took place Sunday afternoon from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Theodore Michaels, on Cherry street, and was attended by a large number of neighbors. Interment was in City Cemetery.

 

See also Metcalfe

METCALF, LOUISE/Source: Alton Telegraph, November 8, 1861
Miss Louise Metcalf, sister of L. S. Metcalf, Esq., died suddenly this morning. She had been down in town shopping, and in less than half an hour after leaving the street, she was dead, hardly living until she reached Captain Hawley’s, whither she was going. Her health had not been good for some time, and she is supposed to have died of heart disease.

 

METCALF, MARY D./Source: Alton Telegraph, December 5, 1862
Died on Tuesday, December 2, Mary D. Metcalf of Alton, aged sixty-two.

 

METCALFE, A. W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 26, 1903
A. W. Metcalfe, aged 76, for many years a very prominent attorney of Madison county, died at his home in Edwardsville Thursday night. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon.

 

METCALFE, ALLAN D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 11, 1903
Mystery Surrounds Death
The Edwardsville Intelligencer prints the following account of Allan D. Metcalfe, the young Edwardsville lawyer-journalist who has hundreds of friends in Madison County, who will not be satisfied until more is known: "The body of Allan D. Metcalfe was found in a clump of bushes on the bank of the Big Goose, about two miles from this city, Monday morning. A bottle of morphine was found on the body. A close examination showed no violence which might indicate murder. This being the case, the coroner's jury returned a verdict of suicide. Papers showed that the man received an honorable discharge from the One Hundred and Fiftieth Coast Regiment on June 20. On his person were checks for luggage now at the depot. There were also letters from relatives at Edwardsville, Illinois. He came here July 1 and probably died soon after. Buried on the 12th at county's expense. .... information was sent by ..... of Sheridan, Wyoming."

 

METCALFE, UNKNOWN WIFE OF A. W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 29, 1904
The widow of A. W. Metcalfe died in Edwardsville Tuesday. She was a well known lady, and had scores of acquaintances in various parts of the county. The funeral will take place on Friday. Mrs. Metcalfe was the aunt of Hon. Charles S. Deneen, the Republican candidate for governor. Mr. Deneen cancelled all his speaking engagements to attend the funeral of his aunt, the only sister of his father.

 

METCALFE, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1904
Mrs. James Metcalfe, aged 87, whose first husband was Caleb Stone, and who lived in Alton many years ago, was buried in City Cemetery Monday morning beside the body of her first husband. Mr. Stone was buried there forty-seven years ago, and during the years which have elapsed a massive elm, eighteen inches in diameter, which started in the grave of Mr. Stone shortly after he was buried, has spread its lofty form high above the grave, with its roots drawing their strength from the mound beneath which Mr. Stone was buried near a half-century ago. Mrs. Metcalfe was a well known resident of Alton many years ago, but she lived to see every member of her family buried, and was borne to her resting place by absolute strangers whose only tie was that of a former acquaintance. Three weeks ago Mrs. Metcalfe came here from Arcad____ where she made her home. ....see it interred. When she visited Alton the last time she called upon Mr. Samuel Pitts, whom she remembered as an old time member of the Alton cemetery board, and who had helped bury her first husband forty-seven years ago. Mrs. Metcalfe handed Mr. Pitts $10 and told him she desired that he see to it that her grave was kept green in City Cemetery, as she expected to be buried there before long. Mr. Pitts accepted the trust and will now see to it that her request is fulfilled. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. M. Chittenden of St. Paul's Episcopal church. As there are but few people left who remember the family and no relatives, the attendance was confined to the few persons who had been asked to serve as pallbearers and several others. Almost unmourned and without a single living relative to perform the last duty for her, this aged woman, who had outlived her time and her people, was laid .... and closed the history of a .... the well known Alton family.

 

METTER, ADOLPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 18, 1910
A large number of Altonians went out to Fosterburg today to attend the funeral of Adolph Metter, the former Altonian who died in Tuscon, Ariz., several days ago, and whose body arrived yesterday. The funeral was attended by a very large number of the residents of Foster township, and burial was in Ingersoll cemetery.

 

METTERS, SUSAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 13, 1904
Mrs. Susan Metters, relict of a former well known Foster township farmer, died at her home two and one-half miles northwest of Fosterburg, Thursday afternoon, after a long illness. She leaves four sons. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, and interment will be in the Ingersoll Cemetery. She was 84.

 

METTHAY, FREDERICK (FRED)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 9, 1900
Frederick Metthay, a resident of the Grafton road for over 40 years, died Tuesday night at his home after a short illness with heart paralysis. He was 75 years of age and was one of the best known farmers of the vicinity of North Alton. He leaves a daughter, Mrs. A. Volper, of this city, and a son, George Metthay, with whom he lived up to the time of his death. He was a native of Switzerland. The funeral will be Thursday at 1 p.m. and the services will be conducted by Rev. Theodore Oberhellman. Interment will be in the Upper Alton Cemetery.

 

METZ, FRANK G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 24, 1916
Frank G. Metz, assistant superintendent of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. for the Alton district, died at his residence, 115 East Sixth street, Friday morning. His death followed an illness that began two weeks ago last Tuesday. He had been hard at work up to the time he was prostrated, and his case was regarded as being very bad from the beginning. Pneumonia developed and complicated an already bad condition. Mr. Metz's death, some of his friends believe, was due to over work. He was one of the best men in the employ of the insurance company to which he gave very faithful service. He had been interested in a business getting contest for a few months, and he had devoted more than his usual amount of time, and had made a very fine showing. After the close of the contest, Mr. Metz collapsed, and as he had very little strength left to build upon, the physicians in attendance realized at once that he had no chance for recovery. Pneumonia set in, removing the last straw of hope. Mr. Metz was 36 years of age. He came to Alton five years ago with his family. The family lived on Summit street for a while, then moved to Alby street, and later to the place where Mr. Metz died. He leaves his wife and two little children. He was a man of the best habits, and he was highly esteemed by the company for which he worked, and by everyone who had any business dealings with him. The body will be taken to Carlinville for burial. Mr. Metz was born in St. Louis and reared there. He went to Carlinville when a young man, was married there, and later moved to Alton. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at Carlinville. The body will be taken to Carlinville Saturday noon after brief services are conducted at the home on Sixth street. The services in Carlinville will be at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon.

 

METZ, HERMAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 26, 1903
Sheriff G. F. Crowe has offered a reward of $500 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person who murdered Herman Hetz, the Pin Oak farmer, the remains of whose body was found in the pasture on his place on April 24. The reward is sanctioned by August Metz of Troy, administrator of the estate.

 

METZ, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 10, 1916
"Mike" Metz, popular agent of the Metropolitan Insurance Co., is dead. His end came this afternoon at St. Joseph's Hospital, where he was taken on his forty-ninth birthday, Christmas, by his friend, William Gschwend. Mr. Metz had been in failing health for a while, but continued to work up to December 18. His condition had become so bad a week later that it was found necessary to move him from his home, 724 East Fifth street, to the hospital. He had worked with the Alton agency for six years. Mr. Metz and his wife, who survives him, came from Alsace-Lorraine. He had been in this country about twenty years. He had hosts of friends, was a hard working, saving man, and was regarded as a high grade insurance men. He leaves no children.

 

METZLER, CHRIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 26, 1921
Passes Away After Sleeping One Week
Chris Metzler died at his home on the Milton road this morning, between Alton and East Alton, the first victim of the so-called "sleeping sickness." Mr. Metzler had been asleep almost a week when the end came. The Tuesday preceding the new phase of his illness he was stricken with what appeared to be a blindness, which made it exceedingly difficult for him to get to his home, but he finally managed it, aided by his trusted team of horses. Arriving home, the failure of vision became more intense and after two days he fell into a deep sleep from which he could be roused only for periods long enough to administer medicine to him. Of all the cases of sleeping sickness in Alton, he being the fourth reported recently, Metzler was the most serious from the beginning. Dr. J. P. Hale, who was called to attend him, said at the outset that Mr. Metzler was a very sick man. He diagnosed the case as the so-called sleeping sickness, following an attack of what Metzler had believed was a heavy cold, but which Dr. Hale said must have been the grippe, though he did not see him at the time he was suffering from it. He had apparently recovered from the attack when the fatal phase showed itself. Mr. Metzler was for many years a well known market gardener. He sold vegetables of his own raising, throughout the city, and he had a wide acquaintance. He was a devoted member of St. Mary's church and a regular attendant there on Sundays. Members of the church recall that Mr. Metzler always wore a Prince Albert coat when he went to church. He would put on the fine suit he had bought years ago for his best, and of which he took the best of care, and Sundays he would drive to church. He had a large number of friends and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. His is the first fatal case of the malady which doctors say is an inflammation of the lining of the brain due to pernicious activities of the germ of the influenza. He is survived by his wife and three children, Peter and Lawrence Metzler of this city, and a daughter that is a nun in a Quincy convent. He had reached the age of sixty-two years. Funeral arrangements are incomplete, but it is expected that the funeral will take place Friday morning at 10 o'clock.

 

MEYER, ANTHONY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 10, 1919
The funeral of Anthony Meyer was held this morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery. Many friends attended the requiem mass and accompanied the remains to its last resting place.

 

MEYER, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 15, 1906
Mrs. Catherine Meyer died at her home in North Alton, Monday morning shortly before 11 o'clock, after an illness from a complication of diseases that began three months ago. She and Mrs. M. Walter, who died Sunday night, were girlhood companions and life-long intimate friends, and only a few weeks before the fatal illness of each began, the prediction was made by both that the end would come to both together, or practically so. She resided in North Alton for more than 30 years and reared a family of six children. She was twice married, her first husband, August Sampson, dying many years ago. Her second marriage was with Albert Meyer, who survives. The children are: Frank Sampson of Omaha, Nebraska; August Sampson of Ottawa, Kansas; Albert Meyer of Portland, Oregon; Fred Meyer of Paducah, Kentucky; Otto Meyer of Upper Alton; and Miss Anna Meyer, who lived at home. The sons are all absent from home and the funeral arrangements will not be complete until they are all heard from.

 

MEYER, EKA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 14, 1905
The funeral of Mrs. Eka Meyer was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the German Evangelical church, Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann officiating. The funeral party left the family home in Godfrey at 1 o'clock, arriving at the church at 2 p.m. There was a large attendance of friends and relatives at the funeral. Burial was in the City Cemetery.

 

MEYER, ENA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 12, 1922
Miss Ena Meyer, an invalid from birth, died Wednesday at her father's home near Bethalto, aged 38. She had never walked in her life, and until the death of her mother a few years ago, the mother had taken complete care of her. Then the aged father took charge and he continued to look after her until he was stricken with paralysis and became helpless. Then Mrs. John Ryan was secured to take charge of both the helpless people. The father, who is 85, will probably go to St. Louis to be with his son, Fred, a druggist. The funeral of Miss Meyer was held this afternoon, from the home. Mr. Spencer having charge.

 

MEYER, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1918
Old-Time Barber Who had Trained Many Men in Tonsorial Art
Fred Meyer, aged 65, died at 2:35 o'clock Thursday morning at his home, 623 East Broadway, after a long illness with cancer. He had been bedfast for fourteen months, but his illness had extended over a much longer period. Mr. Meyer was known as the father of barbers in Alton. He had turned out of his shop more expert workmen than any other barber in the city. It is a known fact that the apprentices turned out by Fred Meyer were men of unusual skill in handling the tools of their trade. He took much trouble with his pupils and he did not give his approval of them until they were surely artists in their profession. Some of the most successful barbers in Alton passed through the course of instruction in his shop. He was born in Centralia and came to Alton thirty-five years ago from Edwardsville. During the time he lived in Alton he continued in business in one neighborhood, in the stretch of street on Broadway between Henry and Ridge streets. He was a musician of much talent and during his spare times in the barber shop the melodies of band instruments could often be heard floating from his place of business as the barber would be enjoying some of his favorite pieces. Mr. Meyer is survived by his wife and two daughters, Miss Anna Meyers and Mrs. O. J. Unterbrink. He leaves also two brothers and two sisters, and two grandchildren. He was a member of the Maccabees and also a charter member of the barbers' union. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Mary's Church, and burial in City Cemetery will be under the auspices of the Maccabees.

 

MEYER, HAROLD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 26, 1913
Harold Meyer, the eight year old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Meyer of Ninth and Easton streets, died at 2:15 o'clock this morning at the family home from a mysterious trouble which Dr. J. M. Pfeiffenberger, the attending surgeon, was unable to diagnose. It was known that the child's condition was due to a blow on the side of the head, inflicted at school, but what complications could have been entailed inside the boy's head is not known, so Dr. Pfeiffenberger refused to give a death certificate, and directed that Coroner Sims be notified to hold an inquest. The child was at school, and according to the story he told, about three weeks ago one of the bigger boys hurled a cinder, which struck him on the right side of the head, just back of the temple. He was taken sick in school and became afflicted with a temporary blindness. He was sent home, and after a few days he was apparently better. He continued to suffer from pains in his head, and occasional stomach sickness. Dr. Pfeiffenberger was called to attend him and visited the boy during the last four or five days of his life, but was unable to determine what was causing the trouble, nor just what effect the blow with the cinder had. The injury proved fatal. The parents do not blame anyone, and say that it was the very tragic result of a boy's prank at school. They do not desire that anyone be held responsible for the injury that resulted in the death of their little son. The story that has been related is that the boy did not get into line as fast as a larger boy thought he should, and the big boy threw the cinder to attract attention, not with any intention of injuring the little fellow. It was a chance that the cinder struck the child on the right temple, and that it was thrown with such force as to inflict the fatal injury. At least that is the way the parents are said to be inclined to view it. While sorely stricken at heart over the death of their son, they manifest a common sense that is unusual.

 

MEYER, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 16, 1902
John Meyer, aged about 50 years, died this morning at St. Joseph's hospital from tetanus. About two weeks ago while working at the Federal Lead plant, he accidentally cut his foot with an ax. The wound healed and nothing more was thought of it. Last Saturday tetanus developed and Mr. Meyers was taken to the hospital. He leaves a wife and four children. The funeral will be Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church to St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

MEYER, JOHN CHRISTIAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 13, 1901
John Christian Meyer, a well known and highly respected resident of Godfrey township, died Friday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock at his home after a long illness brought on by great age. Death was due to heart trouble, from which he suffered for a long time. He was 87 years and 11 months. Mr. Meyer was born in Germany but came from the Fatherland to Alton in July 1853. He settled near North Alton in Godfrey township, and there passed his remaining life in agricultural pursuits. He was a well-to-do farmer, and by thrift was able to live in comfort on the fruits of his labor. He raised a family of three daughters and one son: Mrs. J. Voumard of Fosterburg; Mrs. A. G. Henderson and Mrs. Henry Buckstrup; and Peter Meyer of Godfrey. Mr. Meyer was married August 9, 1853 to Miss Elka Bruns, whom he had known in Germany and who preceded him in coming to this country. The marriage was the result of the courtship begun in Germany, and the departure of his sweetheart for America was one of the reasons that caused Meyer to come here. Mrs. Meyer is still living. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at the home at 2 o'clock and in the Evangelical church at 3 o'clock.

 

MEYER, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 11, 1915
Peter Meyer, a retired farmer, died Saturday morning at 9 o'clock after an illness extending through several years. It was a complication of diseases, and although he made a brave fight and had the best, most expert of medical aid in that light, the combined maladies could not be overcome. Mr. Meyer was born in this vicinity and spent his entire life here. He was well, favorably and widely known, and there will be sincere sorrow felt wherever he is known at his death. His farm on the Brighton road near the brick plant was made to produce heavily for years by him, and it was also one of the most hospitable homes in the country. Several years ago he retired from farm life and moved to the North Side, where he built a fine home for his family on Elm street. He also bought a tract of land at the junction of State and Belle streets, and erected the big brick building now used by Bauer Bros. as a garage and machine shop, and by O. A. Meyer as a horse hospital and veterinary office. This he conducted as a feed and sale stable until his health broke. He was a lover of fine horses and some of the best livestock for miles around here are fine for the reason that he brought that kind to the country to serve the farmers. He was for very many years one of the directors of the North Alton school district and he was always active and eager to do something good for the good of the schools and the children.....Mr. Meyer was born 62 years ago within a mile of where he died, and is survived by his wife and five children - Chris Meyer; Superintendent Harry L. Meyer of the brick company; O. A. Meyer, the veterinary surgeon; and Misses Mildred and Verna Meyer. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the home to the German Evenagelical Church in Henry street, where services will be conducted by pastor Rev. E. L. Mueller.

 

MEYER, PIERRE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 4, 1910
Killed In Coal Mine ... Falls Down Airshaft
Pierre Meyer, aged 54, was fatally injured Saturday afternoon in a coal mine operated by the Meyer Brothers at Bethalto. He fell 16 feet down a ladder in the airshaft he was inspecting, and struck on his head and shoulders. The accident was witnessed by Will Brunton. Peter Meyer, his brother, carried the unconscious form of his brother a distance of 120 feet to the cage, and then hoisted it to the surface. The accident occurred at 3:30 p.m., and Meyer died at 7 p.m. Saturday without regaining consciousness. Meyer leaves his wife and two daughters. The funeral of Mr. Meyers will be held tomorrow morning at 9:30 o'clock from the Bethalto Catholic church, Rev. Fr. Meyers of Mitchell officiating.

 

MEYERS, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 30, 1911
Charles Meyers, a well known glassblower, aged 41, died at his home, Fourth and Oak streets, Monday morning after 1 o'clock. His death was sudden and unexpected. He had been suffering from a malady which had rendered it necessary for him to stop work. The attending physician told him he was very sick and advised him to go to bed and stay there, but Mr. Meyers insisted upon being up and around the house. Sunday he saw much company, friends and relatives calling on him, and it is supposed that this caused him mental excitement, which contributed somewhat to the sudden termination of his illness in death. A brother, Joseph Meyers, underwent a surgical operation and his condition caused Mr. Meyer some worry too. He is survived by his wife and one daughter; also his mother, four sisters and two brothers. The brothers and sisters are Joseph and George Meyers, Mrs. Harry Wentz, Mrs. George Miller, Mrs. Eugene Williams, Mrs. Lester Robinson. Mr. Meyer was a member of the German Benevolent Society, Maccabees and Modern Woodmen. The funeral will be Wednesday afternoon from the family home.

 

MEYERS, F. L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 13, 1916
F. L. Meyers, aged 85, died Sunday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William Stoehr, at Bethalto, after an illness of some time. He was well known in Madison County, having lived here since 1867, when he came to the United States from Germany. He has spent the greater part of his life in the vicinity of Bethalto, but for a number of years he worked in the cooper shop at the Sparks Milling Co., Alton. Mr. Meyers is survived by one son, Gus, of Louisiana, Mo., and three daughters, Mrs. William Stoehr of Bethalto; Mrs. Emma DeMurville of St. Louis; and Mrs. Henry Brash of Prairietown, Ill. The funeral will be held on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of his daughter, Mrs. William Stoehr of Bethalto. The services will be conducted by Rev. Brueggemann.

 

MEYERS, JOSEPHINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 9, 1901
Mrs. Josephine Meyers, aged 82 years, died at her home on Staunton street last evening after a sickness with kidney troubles coupled with old age infirmities aggravated by the heat. Deceased was long a resident of Alton and leaves many friends who will mourn her demise. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Henry Bunschen of North Alton, and the other is a sister of the Ursulines in the Alton convent. The funeral will be Saturday morning at 8 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

 

MEYERS, JOHN F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1919
Prominent State Street Grocer
John F. Meyers, aged 65, died Friday night at his home, 1902 State Street, after a lingering illness with Bright's disease. He leaves a widow, Mrs. Mary Meyers; a daughter, Mrs. O. D. Lemonds of Central avenue; and a son, Lieut. Harold Meyers, who is in military service. Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 p.m. from the home. Rev. M. W. Twing, pastor of the First Baptist church, will officiate. The entombment will be in the mausoleum in the City cemetery. Mr. Meyers was a native of Germany but came to America when he was 9 years old. For many years he lived at Delhi and came to Alton in 1900 since which time he has conducted a store at 1904 State street. He has a brother, Henry Meyer, living on Alby street, in the Charles Henderson original homestead. Deceased was a man who wished to make friends of all he met and he succeeded as a general thing. He was kindness itself, and if he ever did a wrong to anybody, nobody around Delhi or Alton ever heard of it. He was a good citizen in all respects and his family have the sincere sympathy of the community. For a few days after the arrival of his son, Lieut. Harold Meyers, from New York where he too was in a hospital receiving treatment after returning from overseas, Mr. Meyer rallied and relatives and friends thought he would recover. A relapse followed however, and for two days it has been known he could not survive.

 

MEYERS, JULIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 17, 1913
Mrs. Julia Meyers, wife of Fred Meyers, died very suddenly at her home, 421 East Second street, at 4:30 this morning. Mrs. Meyers, while 76 years of age, was still very active and did her own housework, and besides had several boarders at her home from time to time. Yesterday she seemed in perfect health and went to bed in the best of spirits. At 4:30 this morning her husband was awakened and found her in a serious condition. She passed away in a few minutes. Mrs. Meyers came to the United States when she was six years of age, and has been a resident of Illinois for forty years. She leaves, besides her husband, seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the home on East Second street.

 

MEYERS, LILLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 30, 1902
Lillie Meyers, daughter of Henry Meyers, was fatally injured Monday afternoon by falling down a flight of stairs at the family home on Belleview avenue. Miss Meyers was 19 years of age. She was moved to St. Joseph's hospital by order of Dr. H. R. Lemen, and she died there at 5 o'clock Tuesday morning without regaining consciousness. The young woman was descending a flight of stairs when she tripped and fell to the bottom, striking the back of her neck at the base of the skull on the sharp corner of the stone at the foot of the stairs. Mrs. Meyers was with her daughter and attempted to catch her, but failed and saw her daughter receive the fatal injury. Dr. H. R. Lemen was called to attend the young woman and found her suffering from a fracture at the base of the skull. Mrs. Meyers says that her daughter went upstairs to get several apples, and returning to the top of the stairs she tossed one down to her mother. The mother then returned to her work in the kitchen, and the next instant heard her daughter call, "Mamma, catch me." The mother ran to assist her daughter, who had evidently fainted and rolled down the nine steps in the flight, striking her head on a stone wall along the stairway as she rolled. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

 

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 2, 1903
The funeral of Lillie Meyers was held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home on Belleview avenue. Services were conducted by Rev. H. K. Sanborne of the Presbyterian church. Burial was in City Cemetery.

 

MEYERS, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 13, 1918
Louis Meyers died this morning at his home at 200A Elm street, after an illness of several days of influenza and pneumonia. He was 22 (or 29) years old and leaves a widow, Ruth Meyers. The body will be taken to Grafton for burial, but the funeral arrangements have not been completed.

 

MEYERS, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 19, 1910
Mrs. Mary Meyers, aged 77, a resident of Alton since 1862, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry Tisius, on State street, Friday morning after an illness from tumors for seven years. She had been bedfast for five weeks at her daughter's home. During her illness her children were most devoted to her and gave her every attention. Mrs. Meyers was a native of Loudon county, Virginia, and was married at the age of 16. She went from there after her marriage to Ohio, and thence to Davenport, Iowa. Her husband was a soldier during the Civil War, and she came to Alton with him. Six months later he died from smallpox. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Tisius and Mrs. James Coleman, and one son, Henry Meyers. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Tisius home, Rev. M. W. Twing officiating. Burial will be in City cemetery.

 

MEYERS, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 23, 1920
Mrs. Mary Meyers, aged 73, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George Miller, 833 East Broadway, at 11 o'clock this morning after an illness due to the weakness of old age. Mrs. Meyers was born in Baden, Germany, August 12, 1846. She came to this country at the age of 19 and four years later was married. Mrs. Meyers is survived by four daughters: Mrs. Harry Wentz; Mrs. George Miller; Mrs. E. E. Williams, all of Alton; and Mrs. L. L. Robinson of Mattoon. She had three sons, all of whom are dead. She leaves also five grandchildren. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of Mrs. Harry Wentz on Seventh street. Rev. O. W. Heggemeier will conduct the services.

 

MEYERS, MOLLIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 24, 1909
Mrs. Mollie Meyers, wife of William Meyers, a well known young farmer living about five miles north of Godfrey, was buried yesterday, and the funeral was attended by the people of the entire country surrounding. She was a bride of only a year and a half, and her death which occurred Tuesday was regretted by all who knew her. She leaves no family, except the husband.

 

MEYERS, RUTH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 27, 1903
Disastrous Fire In Schlueter Block - Ruth Meyers Burned to Death
One life was lost, eight other persons were badly burned or hurt and nearly $45,000 worth of property was destroyed Sunday morning by a fire that swept the Schlueter block at Second and Weigler streets and destroyed the Sweetzer & Wade lumberyard. Ruth Meyers, aged 26, of Rosedale, Illinois, was burned to death in an effort to save her clothes and some money in her room. The persons injured are Mrs. Sophie Meyers, burned on back, breast, arms and hands; Tony Stoltze, face and hands burned; Lawrence Nickley, face burned; Adam Wolf Jr., face burned; Louis Steiner, face and hands burned; George Aleain, head hurt by leaping from second story window; Miss Jennie Jones, face and hands burned; William Meissler, face burned.....The fire was doubtless of incendiary origin. It destroyed a new building in course of erection for C. A. Schlueter, and it is believed to have been started there; then it swept into the building occupied by the Alton Steam Laundry and Miss Jennie Jones' boarding house, then to Sweetzer & Wade's lumberyard, where great piles of lumber and the office building were consumed. The alarm was turned in about 1:45 o'clock Sunday morning. Fire Chief Hunt says that when his men arrived at the fire they could not tell where to begin fighting. Everywhere in the buildings destroyed the flames were roaring like a furnace. Shortly after the firemen arrived a big gas main broke in the Alton Steam Laundry, and the gas filled the buildings, exploding in a few minutes and adding to the horror of the situation. It was the gas explosion that caused so many people to be injured. Charles F. Hanze discovered the fire and started in to alarm the sleeping inmates of the boarding house. Miss Jones says there were in the building beside herself, Mrs. Sophia Meyers, Misses Annie and Ruth Meyers and nine boarders. All were aroused from sleep and fled in their night clothes. Some were cut off from the stairway and fled to the front of the building where they hung out of the windows until ladders could be set up. George Alcain leaped from the second story window and striking his head on the pavement sustained severe injuries. Mrs. Sophie Meyers and her daughter, Annie, were awakened and rushed out, but Mrs. Meyers returned to her room for her clothes and money. As she passed under a gas jet in the hall, the gas explosion occurred and she was enveloped in a blast of flame which caused her injuries. Miss Jones and Miss Ruth Meyers were sleeping in the back of the building. They were wakened and started to run in their night clothes to the portico on the front of the building. Miss Jones was taken down on a ladder, but Miss Meyer darted back in the burning building to save her clothes and $18 in money belonging to her. The gas explosion caught her and she was not found until after daylight when her charred remains were taken from the wreck. Her limbs were burned off and her head a charred knot. Later, her arms were found and clutched in one hand were remains of her clothing she had tried to save. Mrs. Meyers escaped down the stairs and her clothes were afire. Bystanders carried her to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Otto Unterbrink, across the street where she now is. Adam Wolf, Lawrence NIckley and Tony Stolze were burned trying to save some of the inmates of the building. All the injured men able to walk were taken to Dr. Bowman's office where Drs. Bowman, Shaff and Taphorn attended them. The firemen were powerless to extinguish the flames. They worked simply to confine them to the buildings destroyed, and were aided by a north wind. The yellow pine lumber in the lumberyard added to the heat and the men suffered intensely in their heroic efforts to get in close to play water on the buildings. When the gas exploded, they were compelled to retreat, but soon took up their stations again and continued the fight. A pathetic part of the fire was that Miss Meyers was engaged to marry Frank Kerns within a few weeks, and it is supposed she was trying to save part of her trousseau, and for that she lost her life. Kerns made heroic efforts to find her, but failed. Neighbors gave the sufferers clothing and offered them shelter. There is said to be conclusive evidence of incendiarism. Three times has the building of Mr. Schlueter, in course of erection, been found to be afire. Twice the flames were extinguished, but the third time the incendiary was successful. Saturday about midnight a boarder with Miss Jones, Fred Hart, was going home when he noticed a man dart out of the Schlueter building. All evening men had been carousing in there, drinking beer, and Hart thinking the man was pursued by someone, started to enter and learn the trouble. The fleeing man shouted a warning to him he would be killed if he entered. Hart went on to his room, and later the alarm of fire was sent in. It is supposed the man Hart met set the fire and warned Hart of danger to prevent the discovery being made then. The Alton Steam Laundry loss is heavy, but covered by insurance. Mr. Gaddis says he will resume business as soon as he can, and in the meantime will take care of his customers through a St. Louis laundry. Mr. Schlueter had his property well insurance, and Sweetzer & Wade also were well protected. Foreman Barney Osterman and John Beneze were standing on a pile of lumber when the pile fell, and Osterman was severely bruised. Deputy Coroner Streeper will hold an inquest this evening over Miss Ruth Meyers. The young woman will be taken to Grafton tonight for burial; services were conducted at 2 o'clock in St. Mary's church this afternoon. The theory of incendiarism will be investigated by the coroner at the inquest, and an effort will be made, if possible, to fix the responsibility. Mrs. Sophia Meyers, who was injured so badly Sunday morning, is at the home of her son-in-law, O. J. Unterbrink, East Second street, and is much better today. Her recovery is now deemed probably by the physicians.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 30, 1903
Jesse Terpenning, a carpenter living in East End place, was arrested Thursday morning on a warrant issued by Deputy Coroner C. N. Streeper, charging him with arson and holding him responsible for the death of Miss Ruth Meyers, who was burned to death in the fire in the Schleuter block Sunday morning, while she was trying to save some of her clothing and her money in Miss Jennie Jones' boarding house. After an exhaustive inquiry into the case, the coroner's jury impaneled Sunday reported a verdict Wednesday night saying in effect that Ruth Meyers came to her death in a fire in the Schleuter block due to incendiarism, and that Jesse Terpenning is held responsible for the fire. The verdict recommended that Terpenning be apprehended on a coroner's warrant and that he be held without bail to answer to a charge of arson and murder.......It is said that a grudge against Mr. Schlueter was held by Terpenning because of some labor trouble on the new building being erected for Mr. Schlueter at Second and Weigler streets, and that Terpenning was seen in the vicinity of the building several times the night of the fire. He was recognized by several persons. Since the fire, it is said, Terpenning's conduct and his conversation have been such as to arouse suspicion..........The fire, which Terpenning is accused of starting, destroyed about $45,000 worth of property, caused the death of Ruth Meyers, and the burning of eight other persons. All the injured persons are recovering.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1903
Chief Hunt was looking over the ruins of the Schleuter fire site yesterday evening, hunting for possible slumbering fire, and with him was the little dog mascot of No. 2 hose house, known as "Pinky," the property of Hugh Collins. This dog stopped at a pile of debris, began sniffing, and then commenced to dig with its paws. The Chief went to the dog and helped dig. Pretty soon was revealed portions of the arms, lower limbs and some pieces of flesh belonging to the body of the unfortunate Miss Ruth Meyers, who lost her life in the fire. The gruesome find was turned over to Undertaker Bauer for burial.

[Note: The Schlueter block (near the "Wedge") was located at Broadway and East Third Streets, where Jacoby's Furniture and the Princess Theater was later constructed. The Sweetser Lumberyard was on the southwest corner of Broadway and Ridge Streets. The Alton Laundry rebuilt after the fire, but the lumberyard and the boarding house did not. By 1909 the C. J. Jacoby Furniture Store was constructed on the block. Evidently Jesse Terpenning was not convicted of arson, for in 1904 he was in the newspaper again. His wife accused him of extreme cruelty and of stealing their daughter. They divorced, and in 1913 he was fined for contempt of court for not paying alimony.]

 

MEYERS, UNKNOWN SON OF ANTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 14, 1909
The four months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Meyers died Saturday night at the home in Belle street from infantile ailments and the funeral was held this afternoon. It was attended by many friends and neighbors of the family, and burial was in City cemetery.

 

MEYERS, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 26, 1902
The body of William Meyers was buried this afternoon. Services were conducted by Rev. Fr. O'Reilly of St. Patrick's, and burial was at Greenwood. The relatives of Meyers at Harvey, Ill. would not send for the body.

 

MICHAELS, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 15, 1914
Mrs. Mary Michaels, wife of A. E. Michaels, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Minnie Roach, in East St. Louis, Sunday, after a long illness from a complication of ailments. She went to East St. Louis about four weeks ago to visit her daughter, and in hopes the change would do her good. She was 77 years old and had lived many of these years in Alton. She is survived by her husband and five children, John, Frank, and Fred Michaels of Alton; Mrs. Roach and Miss Amelia of East St. Louis; a brother, Frank Overbeck, lives in Alton also. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon from the home at Second and Ridge streets at 2 o'clock and burial will be in City Cemetery. Services will be conducted by Rev. E. L. Mueller of the German Evangelical Church.

 

MICHEL, CORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 13, 1902
Mrs. Cora Michel, wife of Harry Michel of Bethalto, died Saturday at her home in Bethalto after a short illness. She gave birth last Friday to a 12 pound boy, and she was believed to be in good condition, but took a relapse Saturday and death ensued. She was 22 years of age. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and services will be conducted in the Baptist church at Bethalto.

 

MICHEL, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 20, 1900
John Michel was found dead Sunday at Edwardsville, after being absent from home two days. He was 65 years of age and was overcome with heat. He left home Friday morning at 11 o'clock and went to a neighbor's place. A search for him failed to discover his whereabouts, and he was found Sunday morning lying dead in a field where he had fallen. Deputy Coroner Ritter held an inquest.

 

MIDDAUGH, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 22, 1907
George Middaugh, a well known and generally esteemed glassblower, died Friday morning at his home, 912 east Fourth street, after an illness beginning Thursday evening about 6:30 o'clock, from stomach troubles. Mr. Middaugh continued to grow worse during the night and until death came to his relief at 8 o'clock this morning. He is survived by his wife and three children, two daughters and one son. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

 

MILES, ROSA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 23, 1919
Mrs. Rosa Miles, widow of the late Ben Miles, died last evening at 8:30 o'clock at her home on West Elm street, after an illness extending through two years She was born at Alton in June 1868, and spent most of her life in the city and vicinity, and she was regarded with esteem and affection by those who knew her best, and with respect by all who ever had her acquaintance. Recently her health became greatly improved and her sudden collapse and death last evening shocked not only the members of the family, but the entire neighborhood in which she lived. Shortly after the death of her husband she bought a lot in North Alton and had a comfortable, modern home erected for herself. Shortly afterwards she became ill, and later dropsy and complications developed and for many months she has been an intense sufferer, at intervals. She was uncomplaining through it all, and kept her disposition sweet and patient. She knew there was no hope for her recovery, but she met the knowledge smilingly, and her own fortitude was a great help to her grieving relatives. She is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Robert Snyder, and two grandchildren, Rosemary and Edward Snyder. She also leaves two brothers, Martin Luly of Alton and Jacob Luly of St. Louis, and several nephews and other close relatives. The funeral will be held from the home Friday morning, and a requiem mass will be said in St. Mary's church by the venerable pastor, Rev. Joseph Meckel. Burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

MILES, SUSAN WHITTELSEY/Source: Alton Telegraph, February 29, 1840
Died, on the 20th inst., in Monticello, at the residence of her brother-in-law, Mr. B. J. Gilman, Miss Susan Whittelsey Miles, in the 25th year of her age, daughter of David Miles, Esq. of Milford, Conn.

 

MILINICK/MILANICH, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 11, 1912
Slain Mysteriously at Benbow City
An ax covered with blood, and two deep gashes on the head combine to support the theory that John Milinick, aged 38, an Austrian of Benbow City, was murdered instead of falling from the 11 o'clock interurban car Saturday night as he is said to have stated before his death. Coroner C. N. Streeper is making a careful investigation of the matter, and by the time for the inquest this evening he may be in possession of something which will suggest a plausible motive for his murder. Milinick went to Granite City Saturday afternoon after his day's work at the Standard Oil refinery, and was picked up at 11 o'clock on the step of his home by his wife. He is said to have told members of the family he fell or was pushed from the interurban car. Dr. William Barton was called two hours afterward and found that he had two deep gashes running back from his forehead on the top of his head, another gash in the back of his head to the right, and a compound fracture of the wrist. Dr. Barton, after bandaging the man, left word that there was no hope for recovery, as the skull was crushed and death occurred seven hours afterward. The ax was found yesterday by Coroner Streeper and Dr. J. N. Ashlock in the storeroom of the Anheuser-Busch brewery, partly hidden behind some beer kegs. Streeper left the ax where it was found for the purpose of finding out whether it would be touched or not. The finding of the ax it said to strengthen the theory that he was murdered. An additional fact found today is that he was out of money Saturday, and wanted to assign his interest in his insurance policy to anyone who would make him some advances on it. It is believed he went to Granite City to get some money on the policy, and whether he got the money or not, it is considered highly probable that someone followed him up and when within a few steps of his home murdered him and left the few dollars that were found on him to hide the fact that the double crime of murder and robbery had been committed. The officials do not think that it is probable that anyone in the family could have committed the crime, but it seems that the throwing of the ax in the brewery depot might have been done by the murderer to throw some circumstantial evidence against the members of the family. Relatives of Milinick telephoned to Hannibal, Mo. today to get money from relatives to bury him. Milinick formerly resided in Granite City. He worked under Gus Eaton, labor boss at the Standard Oil refinery.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 13, 1912
Verdict of Murder
Coroner C. N. Streeper held an inquest yesterday on John Milanich, the foreigner who was believed to be murdered Saturday night. A verdict was returned that he came to his death by a blow on the head by some blunt instrument by parties unknown to the jury. Dr. E. D. Gottschalk was foreman of the jury. Among the witnesses were Mrs. Milanich and Peter Fekete, a friend of the family who was called in shortly after the finding of the body. Mrs. Milanich had to speak through an interpreter, as she claimed she could not understand. She told the details of carrying him into the house and calling for a physician as told before. She said he stated he had fallen from a street car. The matter still remains a deep mystery, and the motive for the murder stays in the dark. No explanation could be made as to the finding of the bloody ax. What little could be got out of the witnesses in regard to the bloody ax was that it was used for chopping soup bones. The members of the jury were all agreed that the soup bones must have been unusually full of blood and a great deal of soup bone smashing must have been done just shortly before the man was injured, but all these suggestions elicited nothing from the foreigners that would help to solve the mystery. Peter Fekete was able to talk English the best, and said that the members of the family consisted of Mr. and Mrs. Milanich, the wife's brother, and Mr. Milanich's sister and her husband. The feeling is strong in Wood River and vicinity that something ought to be done to the members of the Milanich family to get them to tell all they know about the murder, and sift the evidence to the bottom. This would necessitate a great expense, as one or two expert interpreters would have to be employed. According to the evidence now submitted, there seems to be nothing which would point to any definite motive or to any particular person as responsible for the man's murder.

 

MILLEN, AGNES/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 11, 1863
Died in Alton, December 3, of paralysis, Mrs. Agnes Millen, in the eighty-second year of her age. She was a native of Dalry, Scotland, but had been a resident of Alton for 26 years.

 

MILLEN, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 25, 1899
Mr. James Millen, an old and respected citizen, passed away very suddenly yesterday evening, while at his work in the blacksmith shop of Nic Seibold on Belle street. The exact time of Mr. Millen's death is not known, but it was between 4 and 4:30 o'clock. Mr. Seibold had gone out of the shop about 4 o'clock, leaving his son, Arnold, who is blind, and Mr. Millen at work, the latter having an anvil in the rear of the shop. Mr. Seibold returned at 4:30 o'clock and his son called his father's attention to the fact that Mr. Millen had stopped work. An investigation revealed that Mr. Millen had fallen down beside the anvil, with his hammer in his hand. He had been dressing a steam drill, and the drill was lying on one side of the anvil and Mr. Millen on the other. Aid was hurriedly summoned, but the helpless man was found to be quite dead, paralysis of the heart being given as the cause of his death. He had been in his usual vigorous health and the summons was sudden, indeed. The deceased was born in Dairy, Ayrshire, Scotland, November 20, 1834, and was therefore past 64 years of age. He came to American and Alton in 1850, and has been a resident here since that time, pursuing his trade of blacksmith. Industrious, warm-hearted and genial, Mr. Millen was well liked by all his acquaintances. Beside a brother and sister, Robert Millen of St. Louis, and Mrs. Elizabeth Fleck of Alton, he leaves a large family of children: Mrs. John T. McClure of Alton; D. W. Millen of Springfield; Mrs. Jennie Morris; Samuel and Miss Nettie Millen of Peoria; Hugh Millen of Chicago; Mrs. Mary Kattleman of Waterloo, Ohio; James, Andres, Herbert and Roy Millen, of Alton. Mr. Millen was a member of the Brethren denomination, under whose auspices the funeral will be conducted tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock, from the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. T. McClure, Seventh and Alby streets.

 

MILLEN, JANET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 6, 1904
Mrs. Janet Millen, aged 70, died suddenly from heart disease at the home of John Mitchell in North Alton this morning. Mrs. Millen's death occurred as she was eating a hearty breakfast. She fell to the floor and before Dr. Worden could be summoned she was dead. Mrs. Millen had lived at North Alton since 1862. She was a widow of Andrew Millen, and had only one son, John Millen, whose whereabouts is unknown. She had been living with Mr. and Mrs. John Mitchell, old Scotch friends of hers.

 

MILLEN, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 20, 1912
Mrs. Margaret Millen died this morning at 11:45 o'clock of a general breakdown from advanced years. She would have been 81 years of age in November. She was the mother of David and Robert Millen, business men on the corner of State and Fourth street, and of Mrs. Margaret McKee of Melville, Mrs. James Spair and Miss Lizzie Millen. The funeral has not been fixed as yet.

 

MILLEN, ROBERT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, Thursday, March 23, 1899
The venerable Robert Millen, for many years a well known and much respected citizen of Alton, died at 8:15 o'clock last night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Milnor Richmond in St. Louis. Mr. Millen has been gradually failing for several years, and his death came as the conclusion of a life well spent and of duties fulfilled. Mr. Millen has been residing with his daughter in St. Louis since the death of his wife, December 20, 1895. He was born in Dairy, Scotland, December 10, 1818; was married in Scotland March 30, 18?9, and with his wife came to America and Alton the same year. For many years he was engaged in the blacksmith business in Alton with his brothers. Mr. Millen was a man of strong character and firm disposition, and all acquainted with him entertained a high regard for his many good qualities of mind and heart. Of his immediate family, four daughters survive him: Mrs. Milnor Richmond of St. Louis, Mrs. Meredith Martin Jr. of St. Louis, Mrs. William H. Keith of Peoria, Miss Mary E. Millen of New York City, Mrs. Elizabeth Flech, of this city, is a sister. A brother, James Millen, died only a few months ago. The funeral will be in Alton, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock, from the Baptist church.

 

MILLEN, UNKNOWN DAUGHTER OF ROBERT/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 23, 1861
Between six and seven o’clock on Saturday afternoon, as the locomotive of the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago Railroad, used to switch the cars on the track, was moving up Piasa Street, it ran over a small girl about seven years of age, the daughter of Mr. Robert Millen, a highly respectable gentlemen of our city, instantly killing her and mutilating her body in a most shocking manner. There was soon quite a number of men collected, and the excitement was intense. The engineer who was on the locomotive at the time received two or three very severe blows from someone in the crowd, but not seriously injuring him. Some of our citizens attach much blame to the engineer, while others think that the accident was unavoidable. As we know nothing about the matter except what we have heard, and as a coroner’s inquest was held, the report of which will be found below, and as we learn that the engineer has asked for a legal investigation of the facts in the case, we shall not express any opinion, as to who was culpable in this most unfortunate matter, further than to say that unless something can be done to prevent similar accidents in the future, that our citizens will insist upon the track being removed from the public street.

Coroner’s Inquest. Alton, Madison County, Illinois. August 16th, 1861.
The subscribers, impaneled as a jury by George T. Allen, Coroner, to hold an inquest over the body of the daughter of Robert Millen, aged seven years, killed by switch engine No. --, Leader H. A. Glardner, at about half past six o’clock p.m. today, decide that said child was killed by said engine through the culpable carelessness of the persons in charge of the same. S. Pitts, Foreman, William I. Alsop, George C. Loar, William M. Hart, Robert Johnson, John Selnor, S. Mauzy, Joseph Gottlieb, F. W. Kersting, F. Wenderle, Elisha Hyer, C. Stigleman

Honorable Acquittal
Source: Alton Telegraph, August 23, 1861
The engineer who had the locomotive in charge on last Saturday afternoon, when the child was so shockingly crushed and killed, voluntarily surrendered himself up, and requested a legal investigation. The trial occupied most of the day yesterday, being very through and minute. The city attorney appeared in behalf of the people, and Seth T. Sawyer, Esq., for the defendant. A great number of witnesses were examined, and every means taken to elicit all the facts bearing on the lamentable and unfortunate affair. It was satisfactorily proved during the trial that the engineer was a competent, cautious, strictly temperate, and very trustworthy man; that the bell was ringing and the locomotive was moving slowly at the time; and that all proper attention was being paid by those in charge of the engine to guard against accidents. The evidence was so decisive, that the attorneys did not feel called upon to say a word after the examination, but submitted the case at once to the justices, who immediately acquitted the defendant from all blame or censure, and set him at liberty, to the great satisfaction of all who heard the evidence. We learn that the railroad company have placed a watchman on that part of the track running through the city, to keep it clear of pedestrians, wagons, &c. And if our citizens will now take some little pains to keep their children at home, instead of permitting them as many parents do, to loiter around the depot and on the railroad track, our feelings will not again soon be shocked as they were on last Saturday afternoon.

 

MILLER, ALFRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1918
Drowned Near Army Camp in Vancouver, Washington
A short time before he could be awarded his commission of Second Lieutenant, Alfred Miller, a former Alton boy, was drowned near his camp at Vancouver, Wash., when a canoe in which he was traveling from Vancouver to Portland upset. It has not been learned whether the body has been recovered, but plans are being made to hold the funeral at his former home town at Hamel, near Edwardsville. Indefinite word from the west would indicate that the body had been recovered. Miller was employed in Alton when he was drafted, but was sent from the Edwardsville Board instead of out of Alton. He went to Camp Taylor, and from there was shipped West. While in Alton he resided with his uncle, F. A. Miller, on Linden avenue, and was employed by H. A. Grabbe. He was 22 years of age. At the time of his death he was stationed in the electrical department of a plant which prepares spruce lumber for use in planes. He was crossing the Columbia river where the fatal accident occurred.

 

MILLER, ALMA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 31, 1903
Mrs. Alma Miller, wife of Louis Miller, aged 87, died Sunday at St. Joseph's hospital at 5:30 o'clock p.m., after a long illness. Mrs. Miller has been a sufferer from tumorous growths and submitted to a surgical operation a short time ago, from which she did not recover. She leaves beside her husband, who is a well known glassblower, two children. The body was moved to the family home, 1722 Bozza street. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

MILLER, ALONZO/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 16, 1909
Truant From School, 13 Year-Old Boy Falls From Freight Train
A telephone message was received last night by Coroner Streeper from Big Four representatives at Bunker Hill that a boy, supposed to be Alonzo Miller, son of W. H. Miller of Upper Alton, had been killed at Bunker Hill by falling from a freight train on which he was riding, and he was cut to pieces. The body was identified by a note the mother had given her son for the teacher at school in Upper Alton, excusing the boy's absence from school. The note was dated December 14, and was never given to the teacher by the truant boy. He had been staying away from school playing truant and promised to return to his studies Tuesday, but did not go. On Wednesday, it is supposed, he started for Bunker Hill where his family formerly lived, and took Big Four freight train No. . When the train was stopped at Bunker Hill, the lifeless body of the boy was found crushed under the wheels of a coal car. It is supposed the boy attempted to get off the train and slipping, fell under the wheels. Immediately when the note was found the message was sent to Coroner Streeper, who conveyed the sad news to the boy's parents. The accident occurred about 6 o'clock last night. The boy was a pupil in the room of Miss Kate B. Miller in the Upper Alton schools. He made a practice of jumping on and off moving trains and street cars. The body will be buried at Bunker Hill, the family's old home.

 

MILLER, ALVA PEARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 23, 1918
Alva Pearl Miller, aged 13, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Miller, died Friday night at the family home, 551 East Broadway, from pneumonia following an attack of pneumonia. The body was shipped to Middletown, Ill. this afternoon for burial. This is the second death in the Miller family within a week, a young daughter of the family having died, and was sent to Middletown for burial also. Three other sons also are reported very sick with the same malady and there is much anxiety in the home.

 

MILLER, ANN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1904
The funeral of Mrs. Ann Miller took place this morning from St. Mary's church, where services were conducted by Rev. Joseph Meckel, and were attended by a large number of friends of the family. Interment was in St. Joseph's cemetery.

 

MILLER, CECIL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 14, 1915
Child Dies From Mysterious Illness
The death of Cecil Miller, the ten year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Uhle of Douglas street, occurred last evening at 8:30 o'clock at the family home after an illness of two days duration. On last Friday Cecil attended his school duties at the Cathedral school, and the following Sunday was taken ill with severe pains in his head, and in less than forty-eight hours afterward was dead. The exact nature of the ailment was not definitely known. Besides his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Uhle, the deceased is survived by two brothers and two sisters. The funeral will take place Friday morning at nine o'clock from the Cathedral, with Fr. Costello officiating. Burial will take place at the Oakwood Cemetery.

 

MILLER, CHARLES H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 15, 1912
Charles H. Miller, conductor of the Big Four plug, running between Alton and East Alton, is dead. He died this morning at 6:15 o'clock following a short sickness of 36 hours. He came home from work Tuesday night feeling unwell, and gradually grew worse during yesterday, but with no bad symptoms present that alarmed the family until five o'clock this morning, when he showed signs of being very ill. Within a half hour after the signal of danger, he sank rapidly and was dead. Mr. Miller had been ruptured some time ago, and it is supposed that this trouble was in a large measure a leading cause in his death. Mr. Miller was one of the oldest employees of the Big Four. He had served 22 years in the employ of the road, and he was one of the best known and most popular men on the line. He leaves a wife and two daughters, Sophia and Adaline. Mr. Miller was born in Canal Dover, Ohio, in 1851, one of eight in a family of which all other brothers and sisters are now living. The two brothers are living in Pittsburg, Pa., James and George J. Miller. The sisters are Mrs. Croxton of Cleveland, Mrs. Anna Jones of Chicago, Mrs. P. Walley of Bethlehem, Pa., Mrs. K. Morrow of Washington, D. C., and Mrs. A. Bare of Atlantic City. No arrangements have been made yet for the time of the funeral, but the burial will be in the Alton cemetery. The news of the death of Charles Miller spread quickly over the town, and among the railroad men it came as a shock. He was of such a merry disposition that he won friends among all with whom he came in contact, and he met in the course of his run thousands who will sincerely mourn his death. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from the home on Second street. Mr. Miller is believed to have died from peritonitis and pneumonia.

 

MILLER, DANIEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 6, 1908
Daniel Miller, colored, aged 17 years, died Monday morning at the home of his mother, Mrs. M. Mayfield, 1324 Market street, after a severe sickness from stomach troubles. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the A. M. E. church.

 

Photo of Daniel MillerMILLER, DANIEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 16, 1915
Retired Buggy Manufacturer, Civil War Veteran
Daniel Miller, aged 82, died at his residence on Twelfth street in Alton at 12:30 o'clock Wednesday noon, from old age. Mr. Miller had been ill for several months from the effects of a general breakdown due to advancing age. The last three or four days he had been growing weaker steadily and rapidly, and the last forty-eight hours he was barely alive. He was attended by his wife and by his two daughters, Mrs. Frank M. Frush and Mrs. Scott Cunningham; and his son, William D. Miller. Mr. Miller came to Alton soon after the close of the Civil War. He had been confined in the Federal prison at Rock Island, after being taken captive in the Confederate Army by Union troops. When he was released from prison at Rock Island, he had a small sum of money which had been sent to him by some debtors in the south, and with this he paid his fare as far away from Rock Island as the money would carry him, which was to Belleville. He came over to Alton to secure a job in the Rodemeyer carriage shop, and before many months he had won the affection of the daughter of his employer, and he had married her. Mr. Miller was an expert buggy manufacturer and when he engaged in that business his reputation spread afar. Miller made buggies was a term that was synonymous with the best of workmanship and long lasting qualities. Alton buggies were made famous by Mr. Miller, and continued so. The business he established was a prosperous one until recent years when the automobile made such inroads on it, and the cheap buggy which Mr. Miller scorned to produce took up much of the remaining demand that the Miller-made everlasting buggy used to fill. Mr. Miller was a man of many excellent qualities. He was a kindly, friendly person, and he had a very large circle of intimate friends. Mr. Miller was born in Sembach, Germany, September 13, 1833. He came to America when he was 16 years of age in 1849. He enlisted as a soldier in the 50th Georgia Regiment of the Confederate army in 1861. He was captured at the battle of Missionary Ridge and was taken to Rock Island, Ill., where he remained in prison from December 13, 1863 to April 28, 1865. He came to Alton in 1868 and the following year he was married to Mary Rodemeyer. He lived in Alton ever after, and had a most affectionate regard for the city and for the friends he made here. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9:30 o'clock from the late home on Twelfth street, where services will be conducted by Rev. G. McCann. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

[Daniel Miller lived on the corner of Alton and Twelfth Streets, and formerly owned a Carriage Shop on Belle Street, between Fifth and Sixth Streets. This would be in the area of the William Beatty Federal Building.]

 

MILLER, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 19, 1904
The funeral of Edward Miller will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, 1011 east Third street, and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

 

MILLER, EDWARD J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 10, 1918
Alton Wayward Boy Died a Hero Soldier [World War I]
The death of Edward J. Miller, formerly of Alton, who was killed in France, recalled today to the minds of some of his relatives and friends that Eddie Miller, who had died a hero's death in the defense of his country, was a wild, wayward boy. There were those who predicted that Eddie would come to no good end. He didn't have much chance in life. His father died and his mother was married twice afterward. The first step-father the mother gave her son was kind, but he died, and then she married again, and the second step-father was not a man who would get the best out of a boy. Eddie went along his own wild ways. He just would not be controlled. The places where the bright lights burned knew him well. Once he was arrested in Alton charged with stealing a rifle at a boarding house where he stayed. He denied that he stole it, and he was not convicted. Relatives say that Eddie kept company that was not good for him, regardless of what was said to him by relatives. He was just an uncontrolled wild boy, who seemed to be going along without any guide to keep him in the paths of manhood. One day he ran away. He didn't have anyone who was very much interested in what he did. He enlisted in the army, and he was attached to Co. C, 9th Infantry. He was sent across the water and was there among the first of the American soldiers. Once in France he had his picture taken and he sent it back. It showed Eddie had found a guide for his life. He was standing there in full uniform, grasping the Stars and Stripes in his hand, with a prideful look on his face that indicated he was settled at last. He had something that interested him and something to work for. Today, Mrs. Annie Ennis, his aunt, showed the picture and a letter which Eddie had sent to his cousin, Alice Ennis, who was just Eddie's age. In part, the letter said: "I want you to drop me a line and let me know how you are getting along. I am sorry I did not write sooner, but I had too much to do and couldn't take the time. You know I am happy, but I wish I could see all the girls once more. I don't guess they miss me much. How is the old town? As lively as ever? I used to make it lively when I was there, but not any more. I am going to settle down now. I am through with the gay life." That was the last they heard from Eddie. He died in a blaze of glory, defending the flag he was clutching so tight in his fingers when he had his picture taken to send back to his cousin in Alton. He had talked from the time he was 11 years old of his being a soldier, and he died every inch a soldier, in far away France. Mrs. Ennis is interested to know more of the circumstances of his death, which she believes was that of a hero.

 

MILLER, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 26, 1864
Died in Alton this morning, Mrs. Elizabeth, consort of Addison S. Miller, and daughter of James and Mary Patterson, aged 23 years and 7 months.

 

MILLER, EMILY (nee GREEN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1916
Mrs. Emily Miller, aged 64, a life long resident of Bethalto, died at her home this afternoon at 2 o'clock from a tumor. She was in St. Joseph's Hospital for a while to be operated upon, but was too weak to undergo the shock. She was taken back home and there the malady proved fatal. She was the widow of Capt. John A. Miller, and a sister of the late Thomas Green of Alton. She leaves a brother and sister at Belleville: John Green and Mrs. Charles Nisbett.

 

MILLER, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 13, 1904
Fireman Dies of Exposure From Fire Three Years Ago
Frank Miller, aged 35, died this morning at his home, Seventh and Easton streets, after an illness of nearly three years duration brought on by exposure of himself at the fire which destroyed the Seibold livery stable and the John Snyder store, June 29, 1901. Frank was attached to a hose truck No. 1, at the time of the fire, and worked hard. His health broke down shortly afterward from a sunstroke he suffered at the fire, and he was able to be at his post in the fire department but little of the time subsequently. The city administration at that time, in recognition of his services, kept Frank on the payroll and he remained there until a few months ago, when he was taken off. He never learned, however, that his pension had been stopped at a time when he needed it most, and died thankful and in the belief that the city was appreciative of his services, enough to continue his pay. He leaves beside his wife and one son, three brothers, Gus, Charles and Louis Miller, and two sisters, Mrs. W. B. Rose and Mrs. Theodore Hoffmann, and his mother. His aunt, Mrs. Theresa Kesse of Indianapolis, Indiana, was with him at the time of his death.

 

MILLER, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 25, 1917
Two men and a horse were drowned in Wood River Sunday morning about 9 o'clock when they drove the horse attached to a buggy in which they were riding, into Wood River for the purpose of wetting the buggy wheels to tighten up the tires. Frank Miller, aged about 60, a junk dealer, and a negro named Joe Davis, who worked for Miller, were the men drowned. The accident was witnessed by a man who was fishing in Wood River. He said that he saw the men drive up to the edge of the water, and Miller drove the horse in farther and farther so that the wheels would be thoroughly wet. Suddenly the horse seemed to go over a step-off into deep water, and he dragged the buggy and its two occupants in too. The whole outfit disappeared under the water, and all that ever came to the surface was the hats of the two men. The witness of the drowning hurried to Wood River village for help, and men responding recovered the bodies of the two men from the buggy. It was said there was about 14 feet of water where the drowning occurred. The bodies were taken in charge by Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer.

 

MILLER, FRED/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, September 27, 1882
Last Sunday while hunting, a young man by the name of Fred Miller, living four miles south of here [Bethalto], accidentally shot himself with a gun, the charge taking effect in the groin and ranging up; he bled to death before a physician arrived.

 

MILLER, FREDERICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 22, 1902
Frederick Miller, aged 65, died Sunday morning at his home, Ridge street and Hoffman avenue, after a long illness. He was a well known cooper and the oldest working at the trade in Alton. During the last year he was in feeble health and was unable to work at his trade. Mr. Miller leaves beside his wife, two sons, Thomas and Jacob Miller, and six daughters, Misses Anna and Theresa, and Mrs. George Crowson, Mrs. William Leonard, Mrs. Arthur Stalder of Alton, and Mrs. Harry Herren of Denver. The funeral will take place from St. Mary's church Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock.

 

MILLER, FREDERICK F./Source: Troy Weekly Call, March 9, 1907
Ex-Mayor of Troy
Death claimed ex-Mayor F. F. Miller of this city at his home in the West End Tuesday morning at 7:30 o'clock after an illness of six weeks' duration. Although his condition had been serious, the end Tuesday morning came somewhat unexpected, as he was thought to be slightly improved and only a few minutes before his death told his wife he felt better and believed he would recover. The words had scarcely passed his lips when he sank back on his pillow and expired. Mr. Miller's illness began six weeks ago with an attack of pneumonia and soon both lungs became effected. This was followed by complications of kidney and heart trouble, together with dropsical symptoms, and all that medical skill and tender care could do was done to relieve the suffering of the patient. His condition was hopeless at times and at others seemed improved. Monday anti-toxine was administered and the patient rallied. His condition seemed decidedly improved Tuesday morning, but just after the conversation with his wife he was seized with a violent coughing spell which seemed to completely exhaust him and his death is believed to have been due to strangulation or heart failure. Frederick F. Miller was the eldest son of the late Fritz and Barbara Miller, who came here from Germany many years ago. He was born in this city on October 28, 1867, attended the public schools as a youth and grew to manhood here, practically spending all of his life in Troy. In 1893 he entered the law department of McKendree college at Lebanon and was graduated from that institution and admitted to the bar in Madison county on June 6, 1895. For several years afterwards he conducted a law practice in this city in partnership with C. E. Ritcher. During that time and since he plead law in the courts of both the city and county and became quite well known to members of the bar in Madison county. He was elected mayor in 1903 and served one term, being a candidate for re-election in 1905. His marriage to Miss Mayme Joseph of this township took place July 2, 1897. To their union were born five sons, three of whom survive, the eldest dying about two years ago at the age of seven years. Besides his wife and three sons, he is survived by one brother and four sisters who are: John Miller of Lincoln; Mrs. Lena Miller of Hopkins, Mo.; Mrs. Sophia Smith and Mrs. Dora Baker of Lincoln, and Mrs. Barbara Eiffert of Troy. Mr. Miller was a member of Neilson Lodge No. 25, I. O. O. F., of this city and also united with the Troy M. E. church on March 22, 1903. Personally he was a man of strong convictions, tenacious in his purposes and a hard worker in anything he undertook, yet possessed of kindness of heart and a sympathetic nature. He was what the world recognizes as a self-made man, having accomplished his later education and what success in life was his by hard and diligent application. He was a devoted husband and father and his greatest joy and comfort was in his home life where he will now be sadly missed. His many life-long friends unite in sympathy with the bereaved ones in their deep sorrow and affliction. The funeral took place Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the residence to the M. E. church and was very largely attended. Rev. J. W. Britton preached the funeral sermon, after which Neilson Lodge took charge and conducted the burial rite of the order at the Troy cemetery.

 

MILLER, HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 18, 1900
Harry, the nine year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Miller, died at the family home, 626 North street, this morning after a short illness with inflammation of the bowels. The funeral will be Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

 

MILLER, HENRY NATHAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 20, 1921
Henry Nathan Miller, aged 58 years, died this morning at ten o'clock at his home at 920 East Broadway after an illness of thirteen months, suffering from cancer. Mr. Miller was employed by the Alton Gas & Electric Co. for eleven years, when he was stricken by this illness. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Priscilla Miller, and one son, Andrew, 22 years old. The funeral arrangements have not been made as yet.

 

MILLER, HERMAN "DUTCH"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 15, 1909
Herman Miller, a farmhand around Moro and Bethalto, generally known as "Dutch" Miller, was frozen to death, or died from exposure during Saturday night. His body was found near a creek where it had rolled down a steep bank almost to the water's edge, when he became unconscious. Miller had been drinking and was on his way home. He sat down on the bank of a creek, and falling into a stupor, he rolled down the steep bank to the creek, where he lay until he died from exposure. He was about __ [unreadable, but looked like 50] years of age. Coroner Streeper took charge of the body.

 

MILLER, ISABELLA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 19, 1918
The body of Miss Isabella Miller, 30 years old, who was socially prominent and one of the most popular young women of Edwardsville, was brought to Alton this morning for shipment to Streator, Ill. The funeral party came by automobile, and a number of relatives and friends accompanied the body to Streator where the funeral will be held tomorrow at the home of relatives of the young woman. Rev. E. Safford of Decatur, Ill., will officiate. The death of Miss Miller occurred Sunday after a lingering illness. She was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Miller. Miss Miller had served for nine years as secretary to the law firm of Warnock, Williamson & Burroughs, but found it necessary to resign her position two years ago on account of ill health.

 

MILLER, JACOB/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 21, 1917
A large number of relatives and friends will attend the funeral of Jacob Miller, which is to be held from the German Methodist Church at Edwardsville tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. Mr. Miller, aged 78, died at the home of his son in Ft. Russell township on Wednesday. He was well known in this city.

 

MILLER, JAMES/Source: Alton Telegraph, December 8, 1898
Young Man Fatally Injured at Illinois Box Factory - Caught in Belt and Shaft
A horrible accident occurred at the Illinois Box Factory yesterday in the old building. James Miller, a lad of only twenty years, became caught on a rapidly revolving shaft which actuates a circular saw, used for cutting reeds for the demijohn department, and the unfortunate boy was horribly mangled before the machinery could be stopped. Miller was employed in the demijohn department of the glass works, and at the time he was hurt he was engaged at cutting the reeds to be woven about the glass bottles. The saw used for this purpose is in the basement of the old box factory building. While Miller was working at a revolving belt, his clothes caught on the revolving shaft and he was instantly drawn to it and his legs twisted around it. His left leg was torn almost in two below the knee, and the bone was broken in a half-dozen places between the ankle and thigh. His right leg was not so badly torn, but the bones were broken in several places. Both his arms were broken, one being fractured in two places. Luckily, the machinery was stopped before Miller was ground to death. When taken from the shaft he was a pitiful sight. His clothes were torn and he was bleeding from a half-dozen places. The ambulance was summoned, and he was taken to St. Joseph's hospital for surgical attendance. At the hospital it was found that his injuries were even worse than they were first thought to be. In addition to his having his four limbs so horribly mangled and crushed, it was found that he had suffered internal injuries that must prove fatal. His whole body was bruised and lacerated, so that his sufferings were intense. He pleaded for chloroform to relieve him of his suffering. Surgical attendance was given him at the hospital, and the broken bones were set, but it was apparent that he would not be able to survive the nervous shock, even though his injuries might not otherwise be serious. He died at 1 o'clock p.m. James Miller lived with his parents in the Kruse building on Second street [Broadway]. He was much thought of by his fellow workmen, and the news of the accident created a great sorrow among them. One young woman became hysterical and fainted, and it was several hours before she was revived.

 

MILLER, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 17, 1906
Joseph Miller, aged 35, died this morning at his home in the rear of 720 east Second street, after a long illness with lung troubles. He was a packer at the glassworks by occupation. He leaves his wife and two sons. The funeral will be held from the home, 722 east Second street, Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. S. D. McKenny officiating.

 

MILLER, JULIA W./Source: Alton Telegraph, December 21, 1844
Died, on the 12th inst., after a short sickness, Mrs. Julia W., consort of Mr. Washington T. Miller of this city. The deceased was a very worthy and admirable woman, and has left a deeply afflicted husband and four small children, the youngest only a few days old, to mourn their irreparable loss.

 

MILLER, LILLIE M./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 5, 1904
Mrs. Lillie M. Miller, wife of William D. Miller, the well-known carriage manufacturer, died Sunday morning at the family residence, Twelfth and Alton streets, after an illness extending back many months. She has been bedfast eleven weeks, but the beginning of her ill health was several years ago when she contracted the grip and failed to recover from it. The disease left in its trail other maladies, among them an acute heart trouble, and finally entailed a general breaking down of the system. Mrs. Miller lingered many weeks between life and death, and finally her weakened system gave away, at a time when her husband and other relatives had the greatest hopes, and she died Sunday morning. Mrs. Miller was 32 years of age and was the daughter of Charles Steizel of North Alton. She was married to Will D. Miller five years ago last April, and the wife's death is the first bit of misfortune which has entered their happy family circle. The funeral of Mrs. Miller was held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home on Twelfth street. There was a large attendance of friends and relatives of the young woman, and a long cortege followed the body to City Cemetery.

 

MILLER, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 31, 1901
Louis Miller, son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Miller of 1020 East Second street, died this morning after a couple of weeks illness with pneumonia. He was about 20 years of age.

 

MILLER, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 14, 1910
Louis Miller, president of the Frohsinn Singing society, died Monday noon at 12:00 o'clock at his home, 1722 Bozza street, after an illness that dated from last July 12. He was attending the glassblowers convention at Milaukee when he was taken ill and had a fainting spell. For a long time he was troubled with his eyes, and the main trouble seemed to be in his head. He was able to be around very little, and from the beginning he was considered as seriously ill. He had lived in Alton sixteen years, and during that time had made many friends, so there were few with a larger circle of intimate friends than he. He was one of the founders and leader of the Frohsinns, and was highly regarded by all the members. He was born in Ursch, province of Posen, Germany, and was 47 years of age. He leaves his wife and two children, George and Louis Jr., and a stepdaughter, Emma Wolf. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from the home to St. Mary's church.

 

MILLER, MARIA BUTLER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 3, 1905
Mrs. Maria Butler Miller, wife of George Miller, died Tuesday afternoon at 5 o'clock at the family home, 1024 Alby street, after an illness of eight weeks with a complication of diseases. Mrs. Miller was a member of a well known family named Butler of Metcalf, Ill., but had lived many years in Alton and had made many warm, devoted friends who will join with her husband and the members of her family in sincerely mourning her death. She was a woman of a kindly disposition, ever thoughtful of the welfare of others more than of her own, and she made and retained her friends easily. She led a quiet, simple life, but filled perfectly a place wherever there was need of a helping hand and sympathy among those with whom she came in contact. In addition to the other members of her family, she leaves a twin sister, Mrs. Jesse Miller, also of this city, and until long after both were married and had homes of their own they were almost inseparable. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, and services will be conducted by Rev. M. H. Ewers.

 

MILLER, MARY (nee SCHOCK)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 30, 1917
Mrs. Mary Miller, wife of George Miller of 259 Madison avenue, died Wednesday morning at 5:45 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital, where she underwent a surgical operation less than a week ago for the relief of a malady which had prostrated her. Mrs. Miller had been in poor health for two years. Her illness developed a bad phase about a week ago, and it was decided that a surgical operation would be necessary if she was to have even temporary relief. Her condition was not the best, yet her family continued to hold hope that she would recover until a short time before the end came. Mrs. Miller belonged to an old Alton family. Her maiden name was Schock, and she was a half-sister of William. Adolph and Fred Mohr of Alton, and a sister of Manuel Shock of St. Louis. She leaves her husband and eight children, three sons, George, John and Fred Miller, and five daughters, Mrs. Louis Schien of Virden; Mrs. John E. Schwaab; Mrs. Harrison Meyers; Mrs. William Herren; and Miss Leila Miller. Mrs. Miller was highly esteemed by her neighbors and was a good wife and mother to her family.

 

MILLER, MARY E. (nee SUDHOFF)/Source: Troy Star, March 28, 1895
Mrs. Mary E. Miller, nee Sudhoff, one of the oldest and most respected residents of Troy, died Friday, March 22, 1895 at 5:30 p.m. The funeral took place from the family residence on Sunday, March 24, 1895 at 1:30 p.m., to the Lutheran church, of which she was a member, thence to the Troy cemetery. Rev. L. W. Dornseif officiated. The pall bearers were: Messrs. R. H. Hoge, Fred Gerten, Charles Ressler, August Dierking, A. Beautel and Henry Gerfen. At the time of her death, Mrs. Miller was 81 years, 3 months and 9 days of age. Mrs. Miller has been a resident here since early in the fifties. Emigrated here with her parents from Belm, near Osnabrucke, Germany. Her husband, H. F. Miller, to whom she was married in 1855, died on October 17, 1893. Of this union, three children were born; two girls, who died in infancy, and one son, H. F. Miller, the survivor, a resident of this city. Mrs. Miller was an industrious and kind hearted lady. The funeral was attended by a host of friends, who sympathize with the bereaved.

 

MILLER, NETTIE MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 29, 1907
Mrs. Nettie Margaret Miller, wife of Charles Miller of 1019 east Third street, died this morning at 4 o'clock in St. Joseph's hospital after an illness from consumption. She was 23 years of age, and beside her husband leaves several children. The funeral will be from the family home.

 

MILLER, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1919
Coal Miner Shot and Killed During Quarrel with Constable
Peter Miller, 34 years old, a coal miner, was shot and killed during a quarrel with Constable Charles Kovala, 32, in a saloon at Livingston, near Edwardsville, at 10 o'clock Wednesday night. Kovala escaped following the shooting, and the authorities are searching for him. The police in the surrounding towns have been asked to aid in the search. Miller and Kovala were in the saloon of George Skimoka, and became engaged in a heated argument. The shooting followed.

 

MILLER, REINER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 11, 1906
Fatally Injured When Team Runs Away
Reiner Miller, aged 55, who lives with his sister, Mrs. Henry Balster at Bethalto, was fatally hurt Monday evening by being run over by a wagon heavily loaded with drain tiles. Miller was trying to climb up on the wagon to which a team of spirited mules were hitched. In doing so he stepped on the double tree, which turned over with him and allowed him to fall down behind the heels of the mules. The team began to run away, and before Miller could get out of the way the wheels of the wagon passed over his breast and left arm. The flesh on his left arm was stripped off, and the attending surgeons thought at first they would amputate the limb, but it was apparent that he could not survive so the operation was postponed. Miller was unmarried.

 

MILLER, SEBASTIAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1916
Sebastian Miller, aged about 34, turned off the power in the crane at the Laclede Steel Works this morning, and then dropped dead. He may have died from heart failure or from being overcome with the heat. It is evident that he felt the attack coming on him in time to stop the high crane just as he would have stopped it at the close of a day's work. When the crane failed to move his fellow employees made an investigation and found him unconscious in the crane box, fifty feet above the ground. They brought him to the ground and a physician was summoned at once. The latter pronounced him dead shortly after arriving, although every effort was made to restore him. He was burned slightly alongside the head where he fell on the floor of the crane and touched some electric wires, but those in a position to know say that these could not have caused his death. He went to work the same as usual this morning and took his place on the crane. All morning the work progressed as usual. No one realized that Miller was even ill until the sudden stop of the crane, shortly before eleven o'clock. He was removed to the C. J. Jacoby undertaking rooms where an inquest was conducted this afternoon by the Coroner. Sebastian Miller was born in Germany but has made his home in the United States for many years. About two years ago he moved from Greenfield to Alton and has been making his home here since. He worked for the V. I. A. on the sprinkling wagon last year and was well known throughout Upper Alton. He is survived by a wife and four small children. The family have been living at the corner of Main and Donald avenue in Upper Alton.

 

MILLER, SEBASTIAN J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 1, 1918
The funeral of Sebastian J. Miller was held this afternoon from the home, ____ (809?) Hawley avenue. The burial was in the Melville cemetery. The services were private, only those of the immediate family and friends attended.

 

MILLER, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 6, 1909
Fatally Shot By Accident
Thomas Miller, aged 28, a well known young glassblower residing on Salu street in Upper Alton, was fatally wounded, dying within 45 minutes, by the accidental discharge of a 22 caliber rifle, which was being carried by his brother-in-law, Chris Ledder, while a party including the two men were returning from a frog hunt. Miller, Ledder, and Herbert Rice were hunting frogs and fishing east of the Western Military Academy grounds just outside of Upper Alton. They had crossed the C. & A. cut off track, had gone down a steep embankment in Indian file and were winding along a patch with a growth of vines across it, when Ledder stumbled and fell. In attempting to arise, he accidentally discharged the weapon. The bullet struck Miller in the back of the head near the base of the brain, and he fell unconscious. Maj. George D. Eaton was having his horse and surrey hitched up, ready for an evening drive, when he noticed commotion a short distance away and going over to investigate he found Miller, lying unconscious. His companions had already sent for a doctor, and when he arrived the wounded man was removed in the surrey to his home. The doctor said he could not live an hour. Miller died within 20 minutes after he was taken home. Miller leaves a wife and five little children. Ledder, when he realized he had slain his friend accidentally, became so crazed he tried to take his life. He was restrained from jumping into the Western Military Academy pond and had to be cared for by two men while being taken home. He is still in a serious condition and may be mentally unbalanced by the affair. Cadet Bigelow of the Western Military Academy, who was sitting near the scene of the accident reading a book, corroborated the testimony of Herbert Rice that it was an accident. Bigelow heard the two men conversing in most pleasant tones just at the time the accident occurred. Coroner Streeper will postpone the inquest over the remains until Ledder is in better condition.

 

MILLER, UNKNOWN WIFE OF EARL S./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 30, 1919
The funeral of Mrs. Earl S. Miller, who died Tuesday evening at her home, 324 Bluff street, was held this afternoon from the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Dixon, 340 Bluff street. Services at the home were conducted by Rev. Robert Morris, pastor of the First Methodist church and interment was in Oakwood Cemetery. The pallbearers were: James Hyndman, George Gerbig, Isaac Hamer, Clifford Rain, Edward Dixon, Frank Welch.

 

MILLER, UNKNOWN WIFE OF J. B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 1, 1904
Mrs. J. B. Miller, wife of the State street grocer, died at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon at her home in North Alton, after suffering since June 16 from burns inflicted by a coal oil explosion. She was 28 years of age and leaves a husband and one child. She was a Miss Emily Meyers of Godfrey. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 2, 1904
The funeral of Mrs. J. B. Miller will take place Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the Cathedral in Alton; burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery. Death is almost always cruel, but this parting from a young child and husband in such a tragic way looks to be unusually so. The young couple were married three years ago in April, and the union proved a happy one. They were devoted to each other and to their home, and life seemed to hold everything good for them until the accident that caused her death happened. The sympathy of the people of all the Altons has gone out to the bereaved husband and motherless child left behind. Mrs. Miller never lost consciousness until the last; she knew she could never recover and made her own arrangements for her funeral. Her father is Navier Maier of Godfrey, and she has a brother, Frank, in Chicago. A sister, Mrs. Lawrence Slattery, also lives in Chicago and both will arrive today. Mrs. Lena Budde of Alton is her sister.

 

MILLER, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 3, 1910
Upper Alton Man Killed in Runaway ... Run Over By Wagon
William Miller of Upper Alton, a teamster working for Brooker & Grabbe, concrete makers, was fatally injured Wednesday morning by being thrown from his wagon at Front and Central avenue. His team were running away, and as they crossed the Big Four track at the foot of Central avenue they swerved sharply, and the lurch of the wagon caused Miller to be thrown off. He struck his head and shoulder on a rail, and the heavy wagon ran over his body, inflicting injuries from which he died a short time after the accident. The sharp turn the team made is accounted for by the fact that the concrete works of the firm owning the team was close by, and the horses were evidently trying to turn in there. After the accident, Mr. Miller was picked up and taken to the Nieuhaus residence close by and here was given such attention as could be given until a doctor could arrive. Coroner Streeper was summoned and he took charge of the body, moving it to Upper Alton. In connection with the death of Mr. Miller, his son was killed recently in a railroad accident at Bunker Hill. Mr. Miller was 44 years of age and leaves his wife and three children. Mrs. Miller seems to have had more than her share of trouble, beginning with the sudden death of her son at Bunker Hill. Her father died two weeks ago at Bunker Hill, and her mother is at the Miller home in Upper Alton suffering from paralysis. The body of Mr. Miller will be taken to Bunker Hill for burial.

 

MILLER, WILLIAM E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 17, 1919
Among those who attended the funeral this morning of W. E. Miller, which was held from the Cathedral, were business men, representatives of unions, and private citizens, and the total of those gathered to pay their last respects was very large. A requiem mass was said by Rev. Father Costello, and later he conducted brief services at the graveside in Greenwood Cemetery, where interment was made. Floral offerings were very numerous and very beautiful some of the designs being especially so, and the mound was covered deep with them. The pallbearers were Edward Feeney, H. C. Maddox, Bert L. VanPreter, Clark Shaw, E. J. Kleinpeter and Stephen Harmon.

 

MILLER, WILSON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 25, 1901
Wilson Miller, the well known colored pension agent, died this morning after a long illness with stomach trouble, aged 52. The funeral will take place Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and services will be held at the A. M. E. church.

 

MILLISON, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 23, 1903
Mrs. Margaret Millison died this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. L. T. Harris, on Tenth street, aged 81. She had been ill many months with cancer of the stomach.

 

MILLS, ARCHIBALD E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 4, 1903
Well Known St. Louis Business Man Dies at His Home in Upper Alton
Archibald E. Mills, aged 62, died at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning after a long illness at his home in Upper Alton. Mr. Mills' death has been expected at any time during the lst few weeks. He was suffering from a necessarily fatal disease for which medical skill had no remedy. A few weeks ago he underwent a surgical operation which he hoped would help his condition some, but the relief was only of short duration. His son, A. Q. Mills of Midway, B. C., arrived a few days ago to attend his father in his last moments. Mr. Mills was a native of Vermont and started out in life as a telegraph operator. He was born in Newbury, June 17, 1841. He came west many years ago and engaged in business in Kansas City, Mo., where he remained until he embarked in business in St. Louis. Mr. Mills was the senior member of the Mills & Averill firm in St. Louis, doing a fashionable tailoring business. He built up a reputation in St. Louis that was foremost among the makers of men's clothing, and the firm name is widely known. He was a capable business man, and until his health forbade active engagement in business affairs, he was always at his place of business during business hours. About fifteen years ago he purchased a residence in Upper Alton, and today his place is one of the finest homes in Alton or vicinity. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home, and Rev. George Gebauer of the Unitarian church is expected to return from Lithis, Ill., to conduct the services. [Burial was in Oakwood Cemetery]

 

MILLS, HARRY L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 25, 1904
Head Chemist of Union Cap & Chemical Dies in Mysterious Explosion
Harry L. Mills, head chemist of the Union Cap & Chemical Company at East Alton, a department of the Equitable Powder works, was instantly killed and his body horribly lacerated by an explosion at the fulminating house of the company's works Friday morning at 9:15 o'clock. The cause of the explosion will never be known, as when the fellow workmen rushed to the scene of the blow-up, they found Mr. Mills dead. The fulminating house is a canvass structure which is situated in a remote part of the grounds where any explosion would not cause damage to the remainder of the plant. The material made there is used for making the composition used in making gun caps, and is highly explosive and very dangerous. Owing to the character of the work Mr. Mills was engaged in, no one ever went to the fulminating house except himself, and he worked there alone, the composition being mixed under water. The materials used are mercury, potash and antimony, which when chemically combined make a fearful explosive. Mr. Mills was engaged as usual Friday morning in mixing the batch when the explosion occurred. The tent was demolished and everything in it blown up. The fellow workmen in the plant ran to the place where the explosion occurred, and the remains of Mills were picked up and cared for. They were moved to the undertaking establishment of Streeper & Wheeler in Upper Alton, and are being prepared for burial. Mr. Mills was 35 years of age and came here from King's Mills, Ohio, three years ago. He leaves his wife and one child, who live on Brown street in Upper Alton. Officers of the plant say Mr. Mills was one of their most valuable workmen, and a reliable man, always careful in his work in mixing the chemicals used in making explosives. The material loss to the company from the explosion was light.

 

MILLS, UNKNOWN DAUGHTER OF HARRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 1, 1904
The two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Mills died Sunday morning at the family home on Edwards street after an illness of several weeks with summer complaint. The funeral occurred this afternoon at 2 o'clock, and brief services were conducted at the home by Rev. L. M. Waterman, and there was a large attendance of sympathizing friends of the family. The body of the little one was laid to rest in Oakwood cemetery.

 

MILNOR, ALICE BOWMAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 31, 1909
Mrs. Alice Bowman Milnor, wife of George S. Milnor, died at Atlantic City, N. J., at 4 o'clock Saturday morning, after an illness of over one year, aged 27. She was attended by her husband and parents and her little son, over a year old, was there also. Mrs. Milnor's death ends a long period of suffering, during which she was brave and determined if possible to get well for the sake of her little family. She was taken to Atlantic City in the hope that the sea breezes and the change might strengthen her. Never during her long illness did she show that she had given up hope, and she was always manifesting an eager desire to be able to do for her little son what a mother most wants to do. She was patient and hopeful to the end of her life, and was looking forward to deriving great benefit from her eastern trip. She was very weak when she went away, and the change did not result in any permanent good. Her illness began over a year ago shortly after the birth of her little son. Complications set in and she was never able to be up and around her home without assistance. During her long illness she was given the most devoted attendance by her husband and her family. Her mother, Mrs. H. J. Bowman, gave up all other interests to look after her daughter and grandson. The battle which the young woman was fighting with a deadly malady was hopeless, however, notwithstanding all loving relatives and friends could do for her. The marriage of Mrs. Milnor three years ago was a big society event in Alton. The bride had been a very popular young society lady. She possessed a charming personality that made her the center of a very large circle of admirers, and her presence was always in demand in social circles. She was a charming hostess and a delightful guest, and her circle of acquaintances was a wide one. In her home she was the center, before her marriage, and when she went to her own new home after her marriage, it was the same there. Her death is a sad shock to all her friends as well as to her family, who had been keeping up hope notwithstanding the fact that there seemed little ground for looking forward to any permanent change for the better. A week ago her father, H. J. Bowman, was summoned to attend her as she seemed to be worse, and a few days ago she seemed again to be better. It was only the last rally before the end. Her husband wrote home that he expected to be home the first of the month, and that his wife might be able to return with him. The party will arrive home Sunday evening, bringing Mrs. Milnor, but not as had been fondly expected. The funeral party is expected to arrive here Sunday evening. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock from the residence of Mrs. Milnor's parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Bowman on Twelfth street.

 

MILNOR, CHARLES W./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 21, 1914
Well Know Man Found Dead, Seated in Chair at Madison Hotel
Charles W. Milnor was found dead in his room at the Hotel Madison shortly after 2 o'clock, Wednesday afternoon. The body was discovered by Joseph T. Quigley, a friend, who went to Mr. Milnor's room to pay him a visit. Mr. Quigley was informed at the desk that Mr. Milnor was in his room, but when he knocked on the door he received no reply. Thinking Mr. Milnor asleep, he pushed the door open and found Mr. Milnor dead, seated in a chair, with his head on the dresser. Two physicians were summoned at once, but they were unable to do anything and said that life had left the body some time before. Both were inclined to believe that he died of apoplexy. Mr. Milnor but recently returned from a trip up the Illinois River with Dr. W. A. Haskell and party, and was apparently in the best of health. He was on the streets yesterday and this morning. Shortly after 12 o'clock he returned to the hotel, and after spending several minutes chatting in the lobby, he went to his room. Later he was called to the telephone and seemed in the best of health when he left the desk of the hotel about 1 o'clock. Shortly more than an hour later, when the body was found, it was cold, indicating that he must have died soon after he returned to his room after answering the telephone. He had removed his collar and had substituted slippers for his shoes, but outside of this he was fully dressed. Some of the help of the hotel were on the same floor at the time he is supposed to have died, but they heard no sound. Mr. Milnor is survived by a brother, Frank R. Milnor of Litchfield. He was formerly engaged in the hardware business on West Third street, but retired many years ago and had been living a life of retirement since. He was well known throughout the city and his death will come as a great shock to a large number of his intimate friends. Mr. Milnor took up his residence at the Madison Hotel when it was first opened over thirty years ago, and since that time he has known no other home. The funeral services have not been arranged. Mr. Milnor was a native of Alton and spent his whole life here. He never married. He was 71 years of age. He was a well informed man, and he had served his city in several places of official capacity. He was a member of the board of review several times, and he served as a member of the Alton fire and police commission for a period of eight years. In that position he exercised the strictest control over the policemen who were under him, and held them to the strictest account to the rules the commission prescribed. He was an enthusiastic yachtsman and frequently went on outings on the river. His wide fund of general information and his geniality made his companionship much sought. He had many very sincere friends in Alton who will regret his death. However, they are glad that it came as it did, without suffering and with no warning. The funeral arrangements have not been made. Mr. Milnor was a member of the Masonic bodies in Alton for many years. He had no church affiliation.

 

MILOCHWICK or MILOCHWIEIR, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 14, 1908
Austrian Killed by Train
George Milochwick, an Austrian, was struck by the engine on train No. 46 on the north bound C. & A. at the gate of the Standard Oil refinery at Wood River last night, and was instantly killed. He was walking up from Granite City with two companions on each side of him. The other two heard the train in time to jump off of the track, but he not knowing which way to jump was caught. Every bone in his body was broken said Coroner Streeper, who was called to take charge of the body and who will hold an inquest tonight. Coroner Streeper found on him two handkerchiefs, a pipe and a sack full of tobacco. Coroner Streeper learned through an interpreter at Benbow City that the man had a wife and two children who were crossing the ocean to visit him, and were expected to arrive in a few days.

 

MIMNAUGH, MICHAEL/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, November 25, 1892
Murdered by Brother-In-Law
Yesterday afternoon about two o’clock, Lawrence (known as Larry) Farley went to the saloon of Michael Mimnaugh, 1030 East Second Street [Broadway], and shot him dead. Farley was a bartender at Richardson’s Saloon. He entered that place shortly after one o’clock, went behind the counter and took a pistol from the drawer. Some bystanders saw that Farley was very much intoxicated and evidently bent on trouble. It is said that Richardson attempted to disarm Farley, but did not succeed. After some detention at the saloon, and another attempt on the part of Richardson and his son on the street to disarm Farley, the latter went directly to the saloon of Mimnaugh, who was his brother-in-law. The latter, it is said, had been informed by Farley’s wife that Farley was coming with a pistol intending to kill him, and was urged to leave the premises. This, it is said, Mimnaugh refused to do, saying that he had done that often enough. Farley, on several occasions, had gone there and threatened and abused Mimnaugh, who was the older man and not nearly so large. The tragedy is the result of a misunderstanding between the two men.

Yesterday afternoon about 2 o’clock, Farley entered the saloon carrying a 38 caliber revolver, and without saying a word commenced firing at Mimnaugh, who was standing in the middle of the room. Three shots were fired – the first shot missed its mark, the second took effect in the left arm, and the third ball entered Mimnaugh’s heart. He fell to the floor. He lived about fifteen minutes after the shooting, but was unable to make a statement or speak. Farley, still holding the smoking revolver, staggered out of the saloon and remarked to a bystander, “Now I’m even with the _____ _______.” It is stated by persons who heard and saw him that Farley previous to the shooting bade several persons goodbye, saying he was going to kill Mimnaugh and was willing to be hanged. He was very much intoxicated. Officers O’Leary and Tonsor arrested him shortly after the shooting, and locked him up. When seen by a representative of the Telegraph, he was too drunk to make a statement, simply making a few incoherent answers to questions, and did not realize the seriousness of his terrible deed. The trouble that has existed between the men was substantially this:

About two years ago a ball was given by the glass workers for the benefit of Farley, who was troubled with heart disease and could not work. Mr. Mimnaugh acted as treasurer of the benefit. After the settlement, Farley claimed that Mimnaugh retained $50 which rightfully belonged to him. Mimnaugh, on the other hand, stated that every penny was paid to Farley. This trouble has been brought up on every opportunity. It culminated yesterday in the above related tragedy. The deceased was 55 years of age.

It is stated by those who knew Mimnaugh that he was a quiet man, not given to violence of any kind. As an evidence of his kindness, it is said that he has contributed a good deal towards the support of Farley’s family, while the latter was indisposed or out of work, and that Farley’s children were as much an object of affection to him as if they had been his own. Mimnaugh leaves only his wife, they being childless. Yesterday’s tragedy was without doubt the result of the drunken condition in which Farley was in.

Coroner’s Inquest:
Coroner Bonner arrived last night, and the following jury was empaneled this morning: Henry Tonsor, foreman; B. Fahrig, J. G. Kaeser, C. STritmatter, H. Schuelle, and L. D. Yager. The following witnesses’ testimony is the fullest and was corroborated by other testimonies. Andrew Miller, an eyewitness, says: “I was in the saloon on the afternoon of November 24, 1882, at about 2 o’clock. Mrs. Farley came in and told Mr. Mimnaugh to “look out as Larry was coming with a pistol.” Mimnaugh got his revolver out of a drawer and walked into the main part of the saloon. Then Farley came in and aiming the revolver at Mimnaugh, said, “I take you.” Then Farley shot the revolver. Mimnaugh fell backwards, and as he was falling shot his revolver, and the bullet went into the ceiling. Before Mimnaugh reached the floor, Farley shot again. Mimnaugh had his hands over his head when the second shot was fired by Farley. Mr. Mimnaugh did not say a word during the time that this trouble was going on. I have heard Farley say he would kill Mimnaugh. This was four or five months ago. The exact words were, “The _______ ________ I will kill him.” I went outside and Farley threw off his coat and said, “I will kill the other four eyed ______.” He referred to Mr. Frank Mimnaugh. After the shooting, Farley tried to get in at Frank Mimnaugh, but the door was locked at the saloon. Then Farley went down to his house, but came back in a few minutes with John Burke, and said, “I’ll give myself up.” Then he walked up toward the police headquarters. Mr. Frank Mimnaugh was behind the counter when the shooting was done.

Dr. Haskell swore that the direction of the wound was such as would carry the ball through the heart. One wound was in the left side, about 3 inches posterior to the nipple and 2 inches above the line of the nipple. There was also a wound through the left arm. Dr. Haskell held the post mortem examination and found it to be a ball shot from a 32 caliber revolver that killed Mr. Mimnaugh. The jury rendered the following verdict:

We the jury sworn to inquire into the death of Michael Mimnaugh, deceased, do find that he came to his death from a gunshot wound; said shot being fired from a 32 calibre revolver in the hands of Lawrence A. Farley. That said shot was fired in the saloon of Michael Mimnaugh in the city of Alton, county of Madison, and state of Illinois, the 24th day of November, A. D., 1892, at or about the hour of 2 o’clock p.m., and we further find that said Lawrence A. Farley was not justified in shooting the said Michael Mimnaugh.

Farley was formally arraigned before Squire Brandeweide and waived examination, and was committed to jail without bail. Deputy Sheriff Volbracht took Farley to Edwardsville this afternoon on the 4:20 train.

The funeral:
Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, November 28, 1892
The funeral of Michael Mimnaugh took place yesterday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock from St. Patrick’s Church. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Father Fallon with requiem mass. An immense concourse of friends followed the body to its last resting place at Greenwood Cemetery. The Flint Glassworkers’ Union, of which deceased was a member, attended the funeral. The pallbearers were members of the glassblowers union.

The Arraignment:
Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, March 22, 1893
Larry Farley, charged with the murder of Michael Mimnaugh last Thanksgiving Day, was arraigned in the Circuit Court at Edwardsville today, Judge Burroughs presiding. Farley pled guilty to the charge of murder, and threw himself on the mercy of the court. Judge Burroughs, at the time of going to press, was listening to evidence in the case in order to make up his mind as to the amount of mercy Farley was entitled to. It is said by gentlemen who were present in court this morning that Farley wept like a child, saying “that he did not know what made him do the terrible deed.” The murder of Mimnaugh was a most unprovoked one, and there was no excuse to be given other than Farley, having drank until his reason was dethroned, committed the act. But such a reason is not valid in law. Later, at 4 p.m., Larry Farley was sentenced to life imprisonment by Judge Burroughs.

[NOTE: At the trial, Lawrence Farley plead guilty to murder and was sentenced to life in prison, and sent to the penitentiary at Chester, Illinois. In 1896, family and friends petitioned the governor of Illinois for a pardon, citing Farley's ill health. In 1897, Farley's sentence was commuted by the governor to 10 years. He had already served 3. By 1899 Farley was back in Alton and opened a saloon. In 1903 he and his family moved to Kansas City, and I could find no more information on him.]

 

MINOR, NANCY A. HUNT/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 10, 1916
Mrs. Nancy A. Hunt Minor, aged 72, widow of James M. Minor, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. H. Mathus, on Highland avenue, this morning after a long illness. Mrs. Minor went into a deep sleep at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon after smiling to her relatives and friends and she never awoke. The attending physician said she was dead at 4 o'clock this morning. Mrs. Minor was known as a true optimist. She was always looking for the bright and cheerful side of life. It was one of her desires to die in Mt. Vernon, Ill., but when she came to know that she was slipping away from this life and was likely to die in Alton, she smiled and said to relatives, "I guess I can die here just as well as in Mt. Vernon." Mrs. Minor was born in Tennessee and moved to Illinois when she was sixteen years of age. She was married to J. M. Minor in 1865. Her husband died three years ago, but she continued to live in Mt. Vernon, Ill. until a few months ago when she came to Alton to make her home with her daughter, Mrs. J. H. Mathus. She is survived by her daughter and one son, William Minor, of Mt. Vernon. Mrs. Minor was a member of the First Methodist Church of Mt. Vernon, Ill. Short funeral services will be held at the home of the daughter at 7 o'clock this evening, and the body will then be shipped to Mt. Vernon, Ill., for burial.

 

MINSER, JESSIE P./Source: Troy Star, July 19, 1894
Died, Thursday, July 12th, 5:30 a.m., Jessie P., youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. John Minser of Glen Carbon, aged 1 year and 2 months. The funeral services were conducted at the M. E. church in this city by Rev. N. D. Sweeny. Mrs. Minser is a daughter of George Gates, of this city.

 

MISEGADES, LOUIS F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 8, 1915
Louis F. Misegades, who has been an invalid for three years since an injury to one of his feet started gangrene and necessitated the amputation of his foot, died Friday morning at 8:20 o'clock at his home on Burton avenue in Upper Alton, in his _5th year. Mr. Misegades was born in Cole Springs, N. Y., and he came to Upper Alton to make his home in 1860, and had lived there ever since. He had been in bad health ever since the injury to his foot and its amputation. Last Sunday he became very much worse. He leaves his wife and six children, Mrs. C. F. Summers of Brighton; Mrs. S. D. Buennemann of St. Louis; Fred of Auburn; Mamie, Lamar and Roy of Alton. He leaves also a brother, J. C. Misegades. The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home. Services will be conducted by Rev. C. M. McManis and Rev. Simeon Hussey.

 

MITCHELL, DAVID R./Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, August 2, 1877
From the Alexandria, Missouri Commercial
Murdered and Thrown Overboard
Among the saddest and most heart-rending occurrences that we have ever been called upon to chronicle during our journalistic career, are the mortifying circumstances connected with the murder and throwing overboard of the above named young man.

On the evening of the 11th, instant, the Belle of LaCrosse arrived at the levee in this city from below, carrying with her in addition to a large cargo of consignment of freight, about three hundred harvesters, who were destined for some point in northern Iowa, among whom was a negro and young Mitchell, who were, perhaps, the only two on deck possessed of money. During the sojourn of the Belle, which was about five hours, these designing and inhuman harvesters concocted an arrangement by which the two unsuspecting young men were to be robbed of their money and baggage, and then committed to the hungry waves, there to remain until discovered by the eye of a human being of a higher order in civilization than those that participated in the horrifying and lamentable murder. To that end, they procured a rope, encircled it around the negro’s body, and unceremoniously hurled him overboard; this was repeated several times in succession, the entreaties and lamentations of the negro to the contrary notwithstanding, until life was apparently extinct. He was carried on board in a senseless condition, and what disposition was afterwards made of him doth not yet appear, but suffice it to say that he today no doubt sleeps beneath the waves of the Mississippi.

During this tragic procedure, young Mitchell was lying on the deck, seemingly asleep, but evidently from sheer exhaustion of blood, which had been flowing from the wounded side for several minutes, as the floor of the boat was strewn with blood for several feet in circumference. These human vultures gazed intently upon the ghastly features of the prostrate man, whose unrapid pulsations told them that the soul they had wronged would soon ascend with the rapidity of light from this pale realm of shade to that house not made with hands eternal in the heavens. When the last faint spark of life had departed, and this young man was numbered with the dead, his lifeless body was carried to the margin of the boat, and by the hands of the vandals, assigned a burial place in the watery deep, where he remained unnoticed until Sunday evening last, when his body was discovered floating in Fox slough, about half mile south of this city. Acting Coroner Johnson was notified, who took charge of the body, summoned a jury, who proceeded to examine the body, and after mature deliberation, arrived at the following verdict:

“We, the undersigned jurors, impaneled and sworn on the 22d day of July, 1877, in the township of Vernon, in the county of Clark, and State of Missouri, by C. Johnson, a Justice of the Peace for and within said township, acting as Coroner, to diligently enquire and true presentment make, how and by whom, a certain person, whose body was found in Fox slough, on the 22d day of July 1877, came to his death. Having viewed the body, find a wound in the left breast, made by a knife or some other sharp instrument, which we the jury believe to have caused his death. Said wound was inflicted by some person unknown to the jury. Given under our hands, this 22d day of July, 1877. Signed Amos Payne, W. B. Huston, Thomas Curtis, Patrick Gibbons, William Phillips, and T. B. Deal.”

Young Mitchell was about 23 years of age, five feet five inches in height, light complexion, darkish hair and mustache, and gray eyes. He was, at the time of the unfortunate event, clad in a dark hat, coat and vest, and gray jeans pants. He was a son of Robert Mitchell, Prairietown, Illinois, and had started to visit an uncle, who resides at Givens, Givens Station, Iowa. He started from home with $30 in money, and his valise supplied with suitable clothing for the occasion, with the promise to his parents that he would go by rail, and why he went on deck with these mental dwarfs and uncompromising gutter snipes will ever remain a mystery.

At the time of the recovery of the body was found a receipt in favor of David R. Mitchell for his poll tax for 1877, also an envelope addressed to Robert Mitchell, Prairietown, Illinois, and a fraction over $3 in money, which was securely fastened to his right ankle.

Thus has a young man of brilliant promise, who bid an affectionate adieu to the loved ones at home for a week, been ushered into the jaws of death by pretended friends, but designing foes. May this case of murder, sad as it is, tend to illustrate to young men who contemplate leaving their homes, the misfortunes that often befall those who place too much confidence in strangers.

We understand that Mr. Robert Mitchell, the father of the unfortunate young man, will arrive in the city today, and remove the body from its present resting place on the island below town to his home, for proper interment.

Source: Alton Weekly Telegraph, August 2, 1877
The body of David Mitchell of Prairie City, in this county, who was murdered and thrown overboard from the steamer Belle LaCrosse, at Alexandria, Missouri, on the 11th inst., arrived here Friday last on the War Eagle, in charge of Robert Mitchell, father of the deceased. The funeral took place from the residence of Mr. James Mitchell in North Alton, at three o’clock Friday afternoon.

 

MITCHELL, ERIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 9, 1909
Mrs. Erie Mitchell, the aged crippled colored woman who was burned Wednesday night in her home, died this morning at 2 o'clock from the effects of the injuries she received. It has been learned that her burns were due to her practice of smoking her pipe in bed. When neighbors arrived they said that there was no fire in the stove that would ignite the house, and as it was known the woman was in the habit of lighting her pipe in bed, it is supposed that is how she set fire to her clothing. She was taken to the hospital last night about 6 o'clock, and lived eight hours. Neighbors had complained of the woman smoking in bed and had asked some interference as they feared that her house would catch fire and set fire to their homes.

 

MITCHELL, FREEMAN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 23, 1900
Killed in Coal Shaft
Freeman Mitchell, a brother of R. G. Mitchell, was killed in a coal shaft which he had been operating northeast of Prairietown last Thursday. He had been warned by a workman of the danger, but went on with his work and was caught by a fall of coal and killed instantly. The remains were interred at Upper Alton Saturday.

 

MITCHELL, JAMES/Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, May 2, 1889
Mr. James Mitchell, one of the leading citizens of North Alton, where he has resided for over forty years, died at his residence yesterday afternoon, aged 77 years. Mr. Mitchell was one of nature’s noblemen, an honorable, high-minded and warm-hearted man, possessed of unusual abilities which he developed by constant reading and observation. Very few men have clearer views of the great political, social and progressive questions of the day than had Mr. Mitchell. He was an ardent Republican and an earnest worker in that organization for many years. Mr. Mitchell was an extensive coal operated, and did more than any other man to develop the mining industries of Coal Branch. All who knew him held him in the highest esteem, and his death is a loss to the entire community. His last illness, protracted through years of suffering, was borne with rare patience and fortitude. The deceased was a native of Ayrshire, Scotland, born December 21, 1811. He first came to this county some 51 years ago, and then returned to Scotland for a time. In 1848 he returned and settled at Coal Branch, and has resided there ever since. Mr. Mitchell leaves a wife and four children: Mrs. I. Kay of East Portland, Oregon; Mrs. Mary Vine and John Mitchell of North Alton; and James Mitchell of Wood River. The funeral will take place from the family residence on Coal Branch next Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Rev. Dr. Bulkley officiating.

Source: Alton Daily Telegraph, May 6, 1889
The funeral of Mr. James Mitchell took place from his residence at Coal Branch yesterday afternoon, and the esteem and regard felt for the deceased was shown by the remarkably large attendance at the last sad rites. In addition to the friends and neighbors of North Alton, many were present from Alton and from a distance. Rev. Dr. Bulkley conducted the services, and in addition to an appropriate discourse, gave a biographical sketch of the deceased. The remains were interred in the Upper Alton Cemetery. The bearers were Thomas Hyndman, Robert Curdie Sr., David Ilch, Louis Winter, Andrew Millen, and Edward Reece. Among those present from a distance were Hon. John Carstens and family, and John Hughes of Nokomis; James Mitchell of Staunton; Mrs. Mary Mitchell of Prairietown; and Mrs. Watson of Nilwood. Mr. Hughes and the wife of Mr. Carstens are step-children of the deceased.

 

MITCHELL, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 27, 1911
Old Miner on the Coal Branch Dies
John Mitchell died Wednesday evening at 6:30 o'clock at his home on the Coal Branch, after several years struggle with a combination of diseases. He was born in St. Louis sixty-five years ago, his father moving here soon after the child's birth. He has lived sixty-two years in the same place, and was in his younger days during the prosperous coal mining times on the branch, one of the leading operators and miners. Later he devoted his time to farming, disposing of most of his land only a few years ago to the Alton Brick Company. He is survived by his wife and one daughter, Miss Margaret Mitchell, a well-known musician. A brother, James, lives in Brighton, and a sister, Mrs. M. Kay, lives in Alton. He has numerous other relatives here and in other parts of Madison and Jersey Counties. He was an honest, genial and accommodating man, and was well liked and generally esteemed. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon from the home, where services will be conducted by Rev. Dr. Lane of the First Presbyterian Church. Burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery.

 

Photo of John J. MitchellMITCHELL, JOHN J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 28, 1903
Prominent Former Alton Business Man and Owner of "City of Alton"
John J. Mitchell, a resident of Alton and a conspicuous figure in the commercial life of Alton 40 to 50 years ago, died Friday evening at his home in St. Louis. Mr. Mitchell was nearly ninety years of age. The Mitchell brothers, John J. and William H., came to Alton more than fifty years ago, and started in the milling and distillery business in Alton. They prospered, and soon embarked in the steamboat business. Between Alton and St. Louis they ran steamboats, carrying freight for the Chicago and Alton [railroad], which then had its terminus at Alton. They built and owned the City of Alton, the fastest steamboat that ever turned a paddle on the Mississippi River. At the outbreak of the Civil War, when it was threatened by Gov. Jackson of Missouri, to take possession of the Federal arsenal at St. Louis and turn it over to the Confederates, Col. Bornstein, with a regiment of Missouri militia, took possession of the arms in the arsenal, and loading them by night on the City of Alton, brought them here to be taken to Springfield. When Alton people came downtown in the morning they found the town full of soldiers and every man was pressed into service and required to help carry off the arms to a long line of freight cars standing ready to carry them to the State Capitol. Mr. Mitchell was a director of the Chicago and Alton railroad until the sale of the road a few years ago. All the old residents of Alton remember Mr. Mitchell well. The Mitchell brothers erected the residence on Mill street, owned by R. Garstang, which was the largest and finest residence in Alton in those days. Thirty years ago the brothers left Alton, John J. going to St. Louis and William H. to Chicago, where the latter is still living. John J. Mitchell Jr., a son of William Mitchell, is now president of the Illinois Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago. John J. Mitchell was several years an Alderman representing the First Ward in the Council.

 

MITCHELL, PHILIP/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 18, 1908
 Fisherman is Killed By Train Near Glass Factory
Philip Mitchell, a fisherman, residing back of the Illinois Glass Works was struck sometime Friday night by either a Big Four or C. & A. train as he was walking towards his home in the dark. His body was found Saturday morning at daylight by Charles Templeton, night watchman at the Glass Factory, and Charles Gilson, face upwards in the ditch between the Alton and Big Four tracks. From all indications he had been instantly killed by one or the other of the trains during the night. It is conjectured that he was struck by the 10:10 C. & A. as he was returning home. He was killed near the west gate of the factory. Deputy Coroner Allen Keiser took charge of the body and removed it to the Keiser-Morfoot undertaking rooms, where it was identified by the scars on the right side of his face where he had been cut once in an accident. He is 45 years old and leaves a wife and several children. He formerly worked for the Illinois Glass factory. Deputy Coroner Keiser will probably hold the inquest Monday evening. The funeral has not been set.

 

MITCHELL, ROBERT/Source: Alton Telegraph, September 20, 1883
Mr. Robert Mitchell died at his home in Prairietown, this county, last Friday, after a brief illness at the age of 62 years. Mr. Mitchell was an old and esteemed resident of this county, and was formerly in the coal mining business at North Alton, but had been engaged in farming for a number of years past. He was a brother of Mr. James Mitchell of North Alton. He was a man highly esteemed by all for his excellent qualities. He leaves a wife and six children. The funeral took place on Saturday, and the remains were buried in the Upper Alton Cemetery.

 

MITCHELL, WILLIAM H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 9, 1910
Great Financier and Former Resident of Alton Passes Away
William H. Mitchell died at his home in Chicago Tuesday night of pneumonia. It was the intention to have celebrated his 93rd birthday today, but sudden illness came and put an end to a long and busy career. He was a longtime resident of Alton, where he and his family lived until the seventies [1870s], when he removed to Chicago. In connection with his brother, John J. MItchell, he was engaged in various kinds of business, steamboating, railroading, land, etc., and became very wealthy during his residence here. While a resident of Alton he and his brother, J. J. Mitchell, were the leaders in a syndicate that built the portion of the Chicago and Alton railway extending from Alton to St. Louis. They also built that portion of the railroad running from Godfrey to Wann, known as the "Cut off." For many years the two brothers and their families lived in the large double house, which for many years past was known as the Garstang residence. Mr. Garstang purchased the property after the Mitchells removed from Alton. William H. Mitchell was for many years President after the death of Isaac Scarritt, of the First National Bank of Alton, afterward merged with the Alton National. Mr. Mitchell's brother, John J., died in St. Louis a few years ago. Mr. William Mitchell's son was named for his brother, John J. Mitchell. The son, John J. Junior, has been the very successful President of the Illinois Trust and Savings bank of Chicago, one of the largest banks in the country. The bank and its President have been a tower of strength in the financial world for many years. A year and a half ago it was stated authoritatively that President Taft offered the younger MItchell the position of Secretary of the Treasury in his cabinet, but he preferred to remain with his bank as President, and declined the appointment. Mr. Mitchell was married three times. By his first marriage he had two children, Mrs. Chauncey Black and John J. Mitchell. By his second marriage he had one daughter, Mrs. Bessie Adams, and by his third marriage he had three children, Guy Mitchell, Mrs. Maggie Sheriff, and Mrs. Acton. The last wife was a cousin of Mrs. Dolbee, deceased, of Alton.

 

MOEHRMAN, ANTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1920
The body of Anton Moehrman arrived this morning from Phoenix, Arizona, accompanied by Joseph Goeken, who had been in the west and when notified at Los Angeles of the serious condition of Mr. Moehrman, a brother-in-law of George Goeken, he started at once for Phoenix and made arrangements for bringing the body to Alton. Joseph Goeken had been in Los Angeles and was visiting ex-Mayor Beall at the time Mr. Beall was taken ill. He was there at the time of Mr. Beall's death, and after giving what aid he could to the Beall party, he started for Phoenix to look after his brother-in-law. The funeral of Mr. Moehrman was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Mary's Church and burial was in St. Joseph's Cemetery. The pallbearers were George Maguire, Martin Gradk, Albert Tegthoff, Fern Pieper, Joseph Goeken and T. Mensk.

 

MOHR, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 22, 1915
 Falls From Train; Fractures Skull on Bridge
George Mohr, aged 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Mohr, was killed Wednesday evening by falling from a moving Big Four train on Wood River bridge. He was one of a big train load of passengers coming home from the Western Cartridge Co. plant, where he was employed. Just how the accident occurred remained a mystery Wednesday evening, as it was impossible for a time to ascertain who was on the coach platform with him when he fell. It is supposed that he was fatally injured before he dropped into the river, as in falling from the platform of the coach he struck his head against the iron frame of the bridge and fractured his skull below the temple, and then he dropped on down into ten feet of water. The boys on the train did not report to the train crew. The Big Four train that brings in the cartridge works employees consists of nine coaches, and it is all the trainmen can do to collect the fares before the destination is reached. The trainmen learned of the accident on reaching Alton. On the platform with Mohr were some boys. The first of these whose name was secured was Daniel Purcell, son of John Purcell. He said at first that he did not know how Mohr happened to fall. He was sitting close to him and said that he did not know whether or not the boy was in a scuffle with other boys. He says he saw him after he started to fall. L. Rousseau, general superintendent of the Western Cartridge Co., was riding in his automobile along the highway at the Milton bridge when he saw the boy falling. He had not noticed what had preceded the fall. He was horrified to see the boy drop to the bridge, bounce off the iron framework, and then drop to the water about 15 feet below.....Efforts were directed to getting the boy's body from the water, as it was hoped his life might be save. In fifteen minutes the body was out. Three men, John Unterbrink, and two machinists from the cartridge works, dived into the water and finally dragged the body out with a hook. The boy was apparently dead, but efforts were made to resuscitate him. He was taken to the home of Roy Prather near by, after all hope of reviving him was abandoned. The surgeons who saw the boy said that his death was doubtless due to the skull fracture....The mother of the boy was attending a picnic at Rock Spring Park when the boy was killed. She was a member of a party of ladies who were taking supper at the park, and was sent after and taken to her home. The news was abruptly told to her by a boy, and the mother collapsed....The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning from St. Patrick's church, and burial will be to St. Joseph's cemetery. The inquest will be held tomorrow afternoon by Coroner J. Morgan Simms.

An inquest was held concerning the death of George Mohr. Six witnesses came forward and stated Mohr was stepping around on the platform of the rail car when he lost his balance and fell from the train. Mohr attempted to grab the handles of the coach as he was falling, but failed. The jury gave the verdict that he died when he fell from the train No. 304 of the C. C. C. and St. Louis Railroad, and that the accident might have been avoided had the rule of the railroad been enforced. They recommended that all passengers in the future be forced to ride inside the coaches.

The managers of the Western Cartridge Company, where Mohr worked, posted signs to the effect that riding on the car platforms is not safe, and they will not allow one of their employees to do it anymore. The notice stated that whoever attempted to ride on the platform either to or from work, will be discharged if seen by one of the bosses of the plant.

 

MOHR, JOHANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 22, 1908
Mrs. Johanna Mohr, aged 76, died Saturday afternoon at her home on Belle street after a long illness due to old age. Mrs. Mohr had suffered some from blood poisoning due to dropsy in one foot, and the trouble was complicated with other maladies. She had lived on Belle street many years and was known among her neighbors as a kind, thoughtful woman. To her family she was a good mother, and her death is sincerely mourned by a large circle of friends and acquaintances who will sympathize with the family in their affliction. Mrs. Mohr was a native of Wurtemberg, Germany. She came to America 53 years ago and had lived in Alton ever since. She leaves the following children, Mrs. George Miller, Emanuel Schock, Adolph, Fred and William Mohr. She leaves also twenty grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the family home, 1808 Belle street.

 

MOHR, UNKNOWN CHILD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 12, 1906
The funeral of the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Will Mohr was held this morning from the family home, Union and NOrth street, and burial was in St. Joseph's cemetery. Owing to the contagious nature of the disease that caused the child's death, the funeral was private.

 

MOLD, ANNA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 21, 1909
Mrs. Anna Mold, aged 73, died from paralysis Thursday afternoon at her home, 630 east Third street. Her condition had become so low the past two days that the members of her family were summoned to attend her, and all of them were around her when the end came. She was a native of Basle, Switzerland, and was born August 24, 1836. At the age of 17 she came to America and stayed two years at Pittsburg, afterward coming to Alton. She had lived in Alton over fifty-three years. Her husband, John Mold, died about twenty years ago. Mrs. Mold leaves one son, George Mold of East St. Louis, and four daughters, Mrs. Gus Gore of Denver; Mrs. H. W. Bauer, Mrs. Ed Bowman and Mrs. H. E. Starr of Alton. Mrs. Mold was known as a good mother, a kind and sympathetic friend and neighbor, and was highly esteemed by all who knew her. She was a member of the Ladies Aid Society of the Evangelical church. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from her home at 2 o'clock.

 

MOLL, EMANUEL P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 4, 1912
Emanuel P. Moll of 1305 east Fourth street, died at 2 o'clock Wednesday morning after a long illness at his home. He had been in a dying condition for several days, and his life lasted longer than the physicians thought it would. He had been a sufferer from kidney trouble. He leaves his wife, one daughter, Mary, and two sons, J. E. and F. C. Moll, all of Alton. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home, Rev. S. D. McKenny officiating, and burial will be in City Cemetery.

 

MOLLOY, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1904
North Alton News - Henry Molloy, whose illness at a Danville hospital has been mentioned in this column, died Sunday after an illness of several months duration - an illness which he bore patiently and with resignation, although he realized it must end in death. The body will arrive Tuesday and will be taken to the home of his brother, John Molloy on the Coal Branch. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Henry Molloy was a native of the Altons and lived in the vicinity most of his life. He was a State mine inspector under Gov. Altgeld, and was engaged in the coal mining and in the custom milling business here for some time. He was an industrious, upright, genial, charitable man who leaves many friends who will sincerely regret his demise. Besides his brother John, he leaves a sister, Mrs. A. J. Struif, and several cousins in Decatur and in St. Clair county. Henry Molloy, the well known pioneer coal miner of the "Branch," now of Decatur, is an uncle of deceased. [Burial was in Greenwood cemetery]

 

MONAGHAN, BRIDGET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1913
Mrs. Bridget Monaghan, aged 97, died at the home of her son, John Monaghan, 603 Washington avenue, Friday noon, from old age. Mrs. Monaghan was the widow of James Monaghan. She was a native of Athlone, Ireland, and came to America when she was twelve years of age. She lived over sixty years near Bethalto and about six months ago the aged woman came to Alton to be with her son, John. She leaves three sons, John of Alton; Thomas of Bethalto; and James of Gillespie; and two daughters, Mrs. Thomas Green and Mrs. Margaret Mullen. Mrs. Mullen had been taking care of her mother during her illness, and while she was in feeble health from old age. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

 

MONAGHAN, SUSAN ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1917
Mrs. Susan Elizabeth Monaghan, aged 65, died at her home at 1520 East Third street at seven o'clock last evening after an illness of one day. On Wednesday she celebrated her birthday. Yesterday she was downtown when taken ill. After being removed to her home she lived until 7 o'clock in the evening when the end came. At an early age she was married at the Cathedral to William Monaghan, who died several years ago. The wedding ceremony was performed by the late Bishop Janssen. Mrs. Monaghan is survived by two sons, James and Frank, and one daughter, Mrs. Theresa Stolze of Bethalto. Three brothers, John Faulkenberg of Medford, Okla., and Edward Faulkenberg of Caldwell, Kansas, also survive. The funeral will be held on Monday morning at 9 o'clock from the St. Patrick's Church to the Greenwood cemetery.

 

MONKS, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 13, 1913
Mrs. Mary Monks, wife of Patrick Monks, died Friday morning at 6 o'clock at the family home, 910 Royal street, aged 23. Her death was very sudden. She had been receiving attention from a doctor for valvular trouble of the heart, but was able to be up and about the home. She was engaged getting supper when she collapsed in the floor. Miss Florence Doughty, who was in the next room, heard her fall and went to aid her. She did not revive, and expired about an hour later. Mrs. Monks came from Ireland about six years ago to meet her fianc�, whom she had known in Ireland, and who came ahead of her to make a home here for her to come to. She leaves her husband and two children, one son of five and the other a daughter of 13 months. The funeral will be Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church.

 

MONROE, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 7, 1907
John Monroe, aged 21, a member of a family living on Second street in the utmost squalor, died at the family home last night from the effects of his being removed from the hospital in the face of protests of the attending surgeon and the assurances of the attendants in the hospital that he was too sick to be moved. The family were believed to be worthy and were in a very distressing condition. It is evidently a case of disinclination to work, as no one but the mother seemed to be able to stand up under hard work. Hermann Monroe, a son, was arrested for refusing to work and was given a $100 fine, with a man named Luster. Now it develops that nobody works in the family but mother, and she takes in washing when she is able. The father was given employment in the glass works, but he claimed he could not stand the smoke, and his son seemed to be unable to stand the work either. When the members of the family became ill, they were taken to the hospital. The mother got well, but the son, John, continued ill and the family insisted upon the boy being taken home. It is claimed by the police that they did this because charity was discontinued with the family when no one was sick any longer, and the family desired to have someone sick in the house so they could get charitable aid. They carried the sick boy from the hospital on a stretcher a few days ago, and the boy verified the predictions of the doctor by dying after the exposure. Hermann Monroe, a brother of the dead boy who was serving out his $100 fine, was discharged from custody this morning to attend the funeral of his brother with the understanding that he would return to serve out his sentence when the funeral was held.

 

MONTGOMERY, ADA (nee COX)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 13, 1915
Mrs. Ada Montgomery, wife of the late William Montgomery of Moro, died at her home at that place at 2:20 o'clock this afternoon after an illness of two days. She was affected with pneumonia, the result of a slight cold, and death came after two days suffering. Mrs. Montgomery was a life resident of Madison county, being born at Bethalto sixty years ago. Her maiden name was Cox. Her two sons, Reid Montgomery, who resided with her in Moro, and W. J. Montgomery, who has for a number of years been a resident of Alton, survive her; also one sister, Mrs. R. E. Wilson of Moro. The member of the family were at the bedside of Mrs. Montgomery when the end came. She was one of the highly respected women of Moro and of Madison county, and counted among her acquaintances and friendships persons in many parts of the county. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon from the home to the Presbyterian church where the funeral service will be conducted by Rev. C. Levi Shelby.

 

MONTGOMERY, ELIZA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1907
Mrs. Eliza Montgomery, aged 88, died Sunday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at her home, Seventh and Easton streets, after an illness of several weeks. Her death was due to the weakness of great age, combined with the effects of hot weather. Up to two weeks ago she was in remarkably good health. She insisted upon doing all her own housework and kept the home in order herself. In eight years she had a perfect record for attendance in the First Presbyterian Sunday school, church, and Christian Endeavor society. she was the oldest and the most faithful member of the church, and maintained a deep interest in every department of church work. In her home she was a good mother and as a neighbor she was kind and gracious, ever minister to those who were in need of comfort or material assistance. Hers was a practical Christianity, which made her do quietly and naturally whatever good that came to her hands to do. To those who knew her best, Mrs. Montgomery's death is a sad event. Her physical health was so good that until a few weeks ago it seemed that she would live many years more, as she had shown but few signs of breaking under the weight of years. Mrs. Montgomery was a native of Ireland, coming to Alton about fifty years ago. Most of her life since then was spent in Alton and she raised a large family of children, all but three of whom have died before her. She leaves one sister, Mrs. Jane Nisbett of Court street. She leaves also three sons, James of Alton and William and John, whose homes are in the far west. The funeral has been deferred until after their arrival, and will probably be held Thursday afternoon from the family home.

 

MONTGOMERY, HAMPTON/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 24, 1900
Hampton Montgomery, a well known resident of the vicinity of Alton, died Saturday at Mendon, Mo., where he had been making his home the last year. He was 60 years of age and had lived near Alton many years. Mr. Montgomery was a member of a well-known family, most of them which has died, and there are now surviving him two sisters, Mrs. T. W. Belk of Upper Alton, and Mrs. Nancy Barnsback of Edwardsville. The late Mrs. Z. B. Job was his sister. He leaves three children who are known in Alton also. The body arrived here from Mendon this morning, and the funeral will be tomorrow morning at Bethalto. Interment will be in the old Montgomery burying ground near Bethalto.

 

MONTGOMERY, J. H. "BUD"/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 3, 1913
Grandson of Madison County Pioneer Dies in Colorado
J. H. Montgomery, whose death occurred a few days ago in Denver, Colorado, was a son of Paris Montgomery, who owned a valuable farm between East Alton and Bethalto. Most of the valuable land in that part of Madison County belonged to the grandfather of J. H., who was a pioneer of Madison County. Boss Silver bought the original Montgomery homestead from Hampton Montgomery some years ago, and later gave it to his nephew, Gray Silver of Virginia. There was a fort on the place, and a pioneer cemetery is there too, and is being carefully preserved. J. H. Montgomery was known as "Bud" all during his boyhood days, and until after he broke into the gold mine operating class. He was a genial, companionable man, and there are many of his boyhood companions left in Wood River and Alton townships who sincerely regretted to hear of his death. Mining papers say that Mr. Montgomery has the distinction of having built the longest aerial tramway in the world, it being six miles from end to end. It is located at Koeler, Cal., where he operated a gold mine.

 

MONTGOMERY, JAMES/Source: Alton Telegraph, April 11, 1862
Died on the 6th inst., in Alton, James Montgomery, a native of Derry County, Ireland, aged 48 years.

 

MONTGOMERY, JAMES (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 12, 1905
Aged Riverman Ended Last Watch This Afternoon
Word was received in Alton today by Mrs. James Montgomery that her husband, the aged river pilot who has been very ill in the United States Marine hospital at St. Louis for several months, was in a dying condition. Death ended the last watch of the aged pilot at 3:05 o'clock this afternoon. Capt. Montgomery's ailment was a peculiar one. Just a few months ago he was boasting to a Telegraph reporter that his skill as a pilot had not waned, that his eyesight was good as ever, and that he was as reliable a pilot as ever he hadbeen after nearly fifty years at the helm. His partner on his last watch was Capt. Frank Tesson, and the two men were about the same age and had about the same length of experience. A few days later, while at the wheel, Capt. Montgomery was stricken with a temporary aberration of mind. He was lost as completely as would be a novice set adrift in the middle of the ocean. He rang the bell and summoned his partner on the watch. That was the beginning of the end of the long career. He was piloting on the Belle of Calhoun at the time. He had subsequent attacks and would not know where he was. He found it necessary to resign his post and admit that his usefulness was at an end. Finally he went to the United States Marine Hospital where his mind failed completely and his physical strength was soon exhausted. [He is buried in the Alton City Cemetery.]

 

MONTGOMERY, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 5, 1917
Former Alton Printer Dies at Seattle, Washington
Mrs. Sarah J. Duncan received word Sunday that her nephew, James Montgomery, died Saturday at Seattle, Wash., where he had been ill a long time. Mr. Montgomery had been a sufferer from Bright's disease and toward the end was stricken with paralysis. He will be remembered by many Alton people. For many years he lived at the corner of Seventh and Easton streets with his aged mother. Soon after her death he left Alton and went to be with his brothers John and William, in the West. It was at the home of his brother, John, he died. It is believed he will be buried in the West. Mr. Montgomery was a resident of Alton the greater part of his life time. He was born here and his mother was among the old time settlers of Alton. The family was one of the best known of the old time families. Mr. Montgomery at one time conducted a printing office in the Baker building in the quarters now occupied by the Central Union Telephone Company. Later he took a position with the Illinois Box Co., serving in a place where a printer's services were required. He was devoted to his mother and was her constant attendant everywhere the aged woman went. He never married and his intimate friends knew that it was his determination to remain with his mother as long as she lived that caused him to remain unmarried. He was a man of highest character, was a deeply religious man, and in every respect a good citizen. Beside his brother, John, he leaves another brother, William, of Silverton, Colo. Mr. Montgomery was past 60 years of age.

 

Photo of Nelson MontgomeryMONTGOMERY, NELSON/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, February 1, 1895
Madison County Pioneer, Farmer
Nelson Montgomery died Wednesday morning. Tuesday a week ago he saddled a horse and rode to the timber near his home place where he had men engaged in clearing. He gave some directions and started to return home. What happened immediately after no one knows. Shortly after he left the horse was seen without its rider. Search resulted in finding him on the ground with several bruises and unconscious. He was taken home and the best attention was given him, but his age and enfeebled condition and an affection of the heart made his condition serious. Tuesday night he began sinking and at ten minutes to one he breathed his last. Nelson Montgomery was a rugged character, one of the old school of pioneers, a man of strength and tenacity of purpose, of uncompromising uprightness and integrity. His ancestors were conspicuous in the earlier history of the country. His lineage extended back to before the revolution. His father, William Montgomery, was born in Virginia, November 29 1786 and removed with his parents to Kentucky in 1796. When he reached manhood's estate he moved to a still newer country and took up his home in St. Louis in 1809. Five years later he married Miss Sarah Rattan and came to Madison County locating on a tract of land on Indian Creek. Nelson Montgomery was the eldest of eleven children and was born August 1, 1815. He was reared on the old homestead. On March 22 1838 he married Miss Eleanor Kinder, daughter of George and Isabella Kinder. They were the parents of eight children, of whom those living are: Ann M. who married Francis M. Wood, Nancy J. wife of John F Jarvis, Mary Matilda wife of Henry C. Barnsback, Phoebe E. at home, Zephaniah J who married Lillie McKittrick, now dead, and Robert M. who married Maggie McKittrick. William T. and Sarah I are deceased. On March 22 1888 Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery celebrated their golden wedding. Mr. Montgomery has been recognized for many years as one of the wealthy farmers of the county. His home farm, four miles from Edwardsville consists of 573 acres of as rich land as their is in the state. The buildings on it constitute almost a small town. The St Louis and Eastern Railroad recently built runs through and has established a station called Montgomery. An elevator has been erected and produce can be loaded into cars from the field. Mr. Montgomery was a lover of horses and cattle and his stables were famous at county fairs in this and neighboring counties for many years. Besides this estate he owns over 1200 acres in Bates County Missouri, for which he declined an offer $45,000 some time ago and which has been improved since. His estate is valued at $150,000 - $200,000 and may well exceed that. Mr. Montgomery was never idle. He worked hard and understood how to husband his resources. He was, too, a man of generous impulses and enjoyed the company of friends. His home was noted for unbounded hospitality. He acquired wealth and what he had was the fruit of honest labor. The funeral will take place to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock from the family residence. Rev. James Osborne of Troy, who officiated at the golden wedding nearly seven years ago will preach the sermon. He will be assisted by Rev J. E. Nickerson of St. Johns church of this city. The body will be buried in the family lot in Oak Lawn Cemetary. The pall bearers will be I. A. Davis, J A Vance, R C Barnett, Wm H Cotter, George Leverett, Judge John G. Irwin, Maj Wm R. Prickett, and Judge Wm H. Krome.

Edwardsville Intelligencer, February 5, 1895
The funeral of Nelson Montgomery took place Saturday morning. The day was intensely cold and many were deterred from driving out, but the house was filled by friends of the family, and many stood on the outside braving the severe weather. The casket was surrounded by floral designs and flowers. A pillow with the lettering, "Husband," and another with, "Father," were tributes from the immediate family. Other designs were a wreath with the words, "At Rest," from Maj. William R. Prickett and E. P. Greenwood; a harp from Dr. Joseph Pogue; a cross from Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Jarvis. Two magnificent bouquets were sent by Mrs. Zeph Job and C. H. Button. Rev. J. M. Osborn, of Troy, and Rev. J. H. Nickerson of Edwardsville, conducted the services. Among relatives and friends present from abroad were: George W. Kinder of St. Louis; Leander Riggin of Chicago; Mrs. Zeph Job and son, Zeph of Alton; T. W. L. Belk and wife, Lee Belk and wife and Hamp Montgomery of near Bethalto, and Augustine Head and wife of East Alton. The body was laid to rest in the family lot in Oaklawn cemetery.

Edwardsville Intelligencer, February 15, 1895
The will of Nelson Montgomery has been placed on record. It is dated March 17th, 1894, and is attested by George Leverett and William H. Hall as witnesses. They also drew the instrument and Mr. Leverett was custodian of it. The body of the document is typewritten and consists of four pages usual legal cap size. The testator bequeaths to his wife Eleanor all household and kitchen furniture, a life interest jointly with her son Robert in lands in section 25, Edwardsville township, which includes all the homestead, about 210 acres. She also gets two policies in the Phoenix Life Insurance Company in the sum of $10,000. His son Robert receives a life interest with his mother in the homestead, a life interest jointly with his brother Zephaniah in the lands (about 1,000 acres) in Bates county, Missouri. He receives unconditionally a part of the timber land adjoining Fred Feldmeier's place in section 27. He is charged with taking care of his mother as long as she may live and his interests are subject to this provision. Zephaniah is given a life interest in lands in section 36 Edwardsville township, the old George W. Kinder place of 135 acres and a life interest with his brother Robert in the lands in Bates county, Missouri. He receives unconditionally a part of the timber tract in section 27. His daughter Phoebe is bequeathed unconditionally lands in section 36, 80 acres now occupied by Robert and known as the old Buck Kinder place. She also receives unconditionally part of the timber tract in section 27. Nancy Jarvis, a grand daughter, receives unconditionally a lot in J. F. Jarvis' add to Troy. On the death of Robert the homestead goes in fee simple to his son Thomas Nelson. On the death of Zephaniah the farm in which he has a life interest goes in fee simple to his son Nelson. The grandchildren - the children of Zephaniah and Robert - not including Thomas Nelson and Nelson, receive after the death of their parents Zephaniah and Robert, in fee simple the lands in Bates county, Missouri. The rest and residue of the estate real and personal is to be sold and converted into money within four years by the executors and after paying debts and expenditures distributed to the grandchildren living at the time of distribution. The value of this property will aggregate $12,000 and includes several small tracts of land, one near Troy, one near Glen Carbon and one near Carpenter. The writing states that his daughters Ann Wood, Nancy J. Jarvis and Matilda Barnsback each was provided comfortably during his life time. His son Robert and daughter Phoebe are named as executors. The bond in the sum of $14,000 was filed by the executors Wednesday with Mrs. Eleanor Montgomery their mother and Zephaniah Montgomery their brother, sureties. The heirs amicably arranged to carry out the provisions of the will and have retained Attorneys E. C. & W. F. Springer who were acquainted with the testator's affairs in his lifetime, to look after their interests.

 

MONTGOMERY, SALLY/Source: Alton Telegraph, March 19, 1847
Wife of Major William Montgomery
Died on Thursday the 4th inst., at her husband's residence in Rattan's Prairie, after a severe attack of inflammation of the brain, Mrs. Sally Montgomery, consort of Major William Montgomery, aged 50 years, 10 months, and 15 days. The deceased had resided in this county about 40 years, and has left a large family as well as many relatives and friends to mourn her loss.

 

MONTGOMERY, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 5, 1907
William Montgomery of Moro, representative in the legislature for the 47th Senatorial district comprising Madison and Bond counties, died at his home shortly before midnight, Wednesday, after an illness of two years with kidney troubles. He was 59 years of age. His death was expected for several weeks, as he had been failing rapidly and specialists could hold out no hopes of his rallying again. He had been near death's door several times in the two years he was ill, but from time to time he would rally and get up again. At the time he was last nominated for the legislature, it was known his condition of health was very grave and that he probably would not, if elected, fill out his term of two years in office, yet he was re-nominated without opposition and was elected by the biggest majority he had ever received. His last election in the face of his declining health, was one of the best tributes to the esteem in which "Billy" Montgomery was held. In his long career in politics he was never known to do a dishonorable act. His record was clear and clean from beginning to end. He filled the office of supervisor of Moro township for many terms, filled positions of trust and honor in his community, and was highly respected by everyone. In the legislature he sought to realize his ambitions to represent the people, and when he made this fact known to his political friends they one and all insisted upon his becoming a candidate six years ago....Mr. Montgomery was postmaster of Moro for many years and always gave the heartiest satisfaction. Mr. Montgomery held a commission as district deputy grand master of the Masonic order in the state of Illinois. He had previously held a commission as a grand lecturer of that body, and in all Masonic work he was regarded as an authority. His death will be a great loss to that fraternity. Mr. Montgomery leaves his widow and two sons, W. J. Montgomery of Alton, and A. R. Montgomery of Moro....Mr. Montgomery was born in Moro township September 30, 1848. He was a son of James Montgomery, and the great-grandson of a Revolutionary War veteran. He was a member of a family of nine children. His common school education was obtained in Edwardsville, and afterward he studied in the University of Illinois. He was married in 1874 to Julia A. Cox, a native of Bethalto. Her grandfather also was a soldier of the Revolutionary War. After a brief period of residence in Montgomery county, he returned to Moro, and in 1870 he bought out the general store of J. P. Smith, for whom he had been clerking two years. Since then he continued in business. He served two years as town clerk of Moro, three years as supervisor, and from January 1, 1880 until the present time, was postmaster at Moro, with the exception of about three and one half years. He served as school treasurer for many years, and for twenty years was a member of the Republican county central committee. He become a Mason December 19, 1887 in Bethalto lodge, and in 1890 was elected master. During most of the time from then he filled the office of master of Bethalto lodge. Three years ago he received a handsome gold emblem, a past master's jewel, as a token of esteem of the members of Bethalto lodge after serving eight years as master and filling almost every office in the lodge. In the death of Mr. Montgomery the county has lost a valuable citizen, his family have lost a good father and husband, and the district has lost a good and faithful officer. In Masonic circles especially will his death be felt. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from the Moro Presbyterian church.

 

MONTROY, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 4, 1901
An interesting person died Sunday night in Mrs. Mary Montroy, who died suddenly from heart failure at the place where she was living alone, 618 Belle street. Mrs. Montroy made her living by making baskets and mats. She had seen better days, as she was one time the mother of a family in a good home at Marshfield, Mo. When the terrible cyclone occurred at Marshfield, Mrs. Montroy, with her husband, was in the village, and her five children were at home. The home was wiped off the face of the earth and all the Montroy's belongings were blown away, the children being killed. Mr. Montroy died shortly afterward, and Mrs. Montroy lost all her property. Her illness was of a few hours duration. The funeral will be Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock and services will be in the Cathedral.

 

MONZEL, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 14, 1900
Charles Monzel, a well known glassblower, died at his home in Upper Alton on Main street, this morning after an illness of two months with quick consumption. He was able to continue at his work at the glassworks until taken down with his last illness. He was in his forty-ninth year and had lived in Upper Alton a long time. He leaves a wife and six children, a mother, two brothers and four sisters, all of whom except his immediate family live in St. Louis. He was a member of the green glass workers union and the A. O. U. W. The time for the funeral has not been set.

 

MONZEL, LAWRENCE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 17, 1919
Many friends attended the funeral of Lawrence Monzel, which was held this afternoon from the home of his sister, Mrs. Mary Monzel, on Main street, to St. Patrick's church. Services at the church were conducted by Rev. F. B. Kehoe. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MONZEL, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 9, 1922
Mrs. Mary Monzel of 1203 South Main street, died at 3:50 o'clock this morning, following a paralytic stroke which she suffered the first day of November. For the first three days Mrs. Monzel rallied and the family held out hopes for her recovery, but Saturday she lapsed into unconsciousness and remained in that condition until death came this morning. Mrs. Monzel was 68 years of age, being born in Wheeling, W. Va., in 1854. From childhood, and until 37 years ago when she moved to Alton, she resided in St. Louis. Mrs. Monzel's husband died twenty years ago in the home where the Monzel family still reside on South Main street. She is survived by two sons, John J. and Harry A., and three daughters, Mrs. William Gray, Mrs. J. West and Mrs. Mary Greenwood. With the exception of Mrs. Greenwood, who lives in Benton Harbor, Mich., the children reside in Alton. All the children were with Mrs. Monzel when she died. The funeral will be held from St. Patrick's church at nine o'clock on Saturday morning. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MOODY, ALMIRA E./Source: Alton Telegraph, September 13, 1845
Died on Monday, September 8, at the residence of her brother-in-law, E. Keating, Esq., Alton, Illinois, Almira E., daughter of Capt. George Moody, York, Main; aged 21 years. Lovely in life, she was beautiful in death. Never did one enjoy life more innocently, more happily - never did one rejoice more at the good fortune and happiness of others; or was more ready to yield the unhappy her sympahty; never did one endure pain, and confinement, more cheerfully or more patiently; never did one die more quietly, more resigned; and never, no, never, did one leave behind her, friends more attached, or relatives more closely united to her than the subject of these remarks. "They that have seen thy look in death; No more may fear to die."

 

MOOK, FRANCES CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 16, 1900
Frances Catherine, the sixteen-months old daughter of FMr. and Mrs. Fred Mook, died this morning at the family home, 620 East Eighth street, after a short illness. The funeral will be Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home. The little girl was one of twins that came to the Mook home sixteen months ago.

 

MOOK, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 31, 1911
Fred Mook, the well known printer, died Wednesday night at St. Joseph's hospital after an illness of several months' duration. Mr. Mook suffered an attack of jaundice, and it lead to a complication of diseases that caused him to submit to a surgical operation. Tuesday of this week a second operation was performed, and Mr. Mook sank rapidly, his strength having given out. Fred Mook was born in Alton June 20th, 1867, and was the fifth child of the family of the late Philip Mook. In his death three boys of the family of six sons are dead. Philip died in Florida in 1909, and the youngest son, Julius, was drowned in the river in 1893. Three brothers survive, Charles, the printer, with whom Fred had been in partnership for 24 years; James, living in Florida; and Emil, the artist. Three sisters also survive: Mrs. Ella Youngberg, Mrs. E. E. Rutledge, and Miss Flora Mook, all of Alton. His wife, who was Miss Francis Kirchoff, also survives with her six children. Fred Mook was widely known in Alton, being a member of many fraternal organizations. He was prominent in the Eagles, where he held office several years, and in the Knights of Maccabees. The partnership that existed between the two brothers in the printing business was one of such a perfect mutual understanding that it has for years been a source of comment along those who knew them well. The funeral will be held Sunday, and will be under the auspices of the Eagles and the Maccabees.

 

MOOK, PHILLIP/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 16, 1902
Phillip Mook, one of Alton's oldest and most highly respected citizens, died Sunday night, very suddenly at his home, 458 East Third street. Mr. Mook had been in his usual health. He spent the evening with a married daughter. On his return home he looked over a newspaper and then retired to his room. While in the act of undressing, a fit of coughing attacked him. To the query of his daughter he said it was simply a coughing spell. The coughing continued however, and his son, Emil, ran into the room and sat down beside him on the bed and threw his arm around his father to support him while he fanned him with the other hand. While in this act the father suddenly fell back and expired without a struggle. Two physicians were called, but the vital spark had fled before their arrival. Phillip Mook was born in Bergzabern, Germany, January 21, 1831, making him 71 years and almost 5 months of age. He came to Alton more than 50 years ago. He married here Miss Haagen, a sister of the late Louis Haagen, who bore him eight children who are now living, viz: Phillip G. Mook of Tampa, Fla.; Mrs. August Youngberg; Mrs. E. E. Rutledge; Charles Mook; Fred Mook; Miss Flora Mook; Emil G. Mook, all of Alton, and James A. Mook of Tampa, Florida. His wife died six years ago this month. Mr. Mook had been chief bookkeeper in the Alton National Bank for almost 35 years, and was a most valued employee of that institution. He was a public spirited and intelligent citizen, always abreast of the spirit of the times and ready to assist in Alton's advancement. The funeral will take place on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home, 458 East Third street. Rev. J. H. J. Rice will conduct the services.

 

MOONEY, MARGARET AGNES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 20, 1902
Margaret Agnes Mooney died Friday evening at the family home, Ninth and Alby streets, after a long illness from kidney trouble. Miss Mooney was a daughter of the late Thomas Mooney, and had lived in Alton all her life. She was a seamstress by occupation and was highly esteemed by all who knew her. Her death was expected, as she had been in declining health several months. She was 23 years of age. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock and services will be in the Cathedral.

 

MOONEY, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 22, 1901
Thomas Mooney, a well known resident of Alton, died this morning at 6 o'clock after a long illness with disease of the kidneys. He was born in Ireland in 1834 and came to this country when a man. For many years he conducted a grocery store at Ninth and Alby streets, and had lived in Alton a long time. He leaves a wife and three children. The funeral will take place Thursday morning at 9 o'clock, and services will be held in the Cathedral.

 

Photo of Captain Abel and Mary MooreMOORE, ABEL (CAPTAIN) and wife MARY/Source: Alton Democratic Union Newspaper, February 14, 1846
Died, on the 9th day of February, 1846 at his residence in the forks of Wood River, Madison County, Illinois, Captain Abel Moore, in the 63rd year of his age, and the 38th of his Christian life. His excellent wife, Mrs. Mary Moore, after a union of more than forty years, had preceded him to the grave but one day before. They both had a sure presentiment of their approaching death; and resigned this world with that perfect composure, and full assurance of future bliss, which religion alone can inspire, and have left behind them a numerous family of children and their descendants to imitate their virtues, and to deplore their loss. Capt. Moore was a native of Surrey county, North Carolina, and after he became of age, intermarried with Mary, the daughter of William Bates, of South Carolina, and resided one year in the last named State. He then removed, with his wife, to Lincoln County, Ky., where he remained for five years; and afterwards started with his own, and his brother's families, for the far West. Their destination was what is commonly called the Boone's Lick country in Missouri. But, on reaching the Mississippi they encountered obstacles and delays which determined them to stop for a time in Illinois. He and his brothers accordingly located themselves in the forks of Wood river, in the year 1808, where he has ever since resided. When he came to this place, all his property on earth was not more than could be carried on a single pack horse. Thus poor and destitute, he commenced life in the midst of an unbroken wilderness, and surrounded by savage foes, who inhumanly butchered two of his own and two of his brother's children, and the wife and two children of a near neighbor, almost within sight of his dwelling. Incredible were the trials, difficulties and privations which met them in their path for a long series of years. But these trials, difficulties and privations were met by this worthy and indefatigable man, and by his no less worth and indefatigable partner, with unconquerable spirit and resolution. They persevered with unceasing toil at the loom and the plow, in the ranging service during the last war with Great Britain, at the lead mines of Galena, and by various other methods of laborious industry, until they had acquired a large and valuable property. They had reared eight children, seven of whom were married, and each settled upon a farm given to them by their once poor, but now wealthy parents. At their decease there now remains to be distributed an estate of much value, earned and secured by their joint resolution. Of Mrs. Moore it may be said that no human being ever labored with more untiring industry, or with a more unceasing devotion to the welfare of her children. And of her too, it may justly be said that her heart was open as day to melting charity, and that her hand was every ready to extend relief and succor to those in distress. Capt. Moore was emphatically an honest man, "the noblest" work of God. And such was the integrity of his character that he could not forget, though he might forgive, the practices of dishonesty in whatever shape they might appear. He was a man of most exemplary habits, of persevering industry, of sound common sense, and great public spirit.

 

MOORE, CORNELIA/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 26, 1843
Died at Upper Alton, on the 23rd instant, Cornelia, infant daughter of Mr. C. A. Moore, aged 16 months. Sincerely do we sympathize with the afflicted parents in this severe visitation of Divine Providence upon them. They have been deprived of the society of an only child, in whom they had centered all their affections, and whose uncommon sprightness and sweetness of disposition had made it an object of unusual regard. They, however, should not mourn as those without hope. Its unsullied spirit has taken its flight from this world of sin and sorrow, to rest upon the bosom of Him, who has said, "Suffer little children to come unto me, for such is the Kingdom of Heaven."

 

Photo of Major Franklin MooreMOORE, FRANKLIN (MAJOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1905
Distinguished Cavalry Leader of Civil War Succumbs to Long Illness and Old Age
Maj. Franklin Moore, a distinguished cavalry leader on the Union side during the Civil War, died at 1 o'clock this morning at his residence in Upper Alton, after a long illness and from old age. Major Moore's death has been expected for several weeks. Members of his family were summoned to attend him because of his condition, but the old soldier had a wonderful constitution that withstood the attack of the last enemy until he was exhausted and finally he surrendered. The death of Maj. Moore marks the passing of one of the most distinguished residents of Upper Alton. He was a brave soldier, a daring cavalry leader, and he made a record during the Civil War that placed his fame high among the minor leaders on the Union side in the struggle. He was a vigorous, dashing fighter and a picturesque character in his way. Even when advancing age palsied his limbs and weakened his once gigantic frame, his mind was alert and keen and he was ever ready to resent any interference with what he considered his rights. In Upper Alton, his was a well known figure, and it was no less well known in Alton. He had many friends and he kept them close to him. His annual campfires which he held at his Upper Alton home to celebrate his birthday anniversaries were full of his characteristic hospitality, and on these occasions he would entertain hundreds and thousands of his old friends, and old soldiers on both sides would tell their war stories and fight their battles over gain. Maj. Moore's campfires were unique in that he had some of his best friends from the number of those he had fought during the four years of war time, and he frequently had them present to tell their side of it as well as to hear the Major's version of how it all happened. There was always the utmost good feeling among all the guests on such occasions. He counted as his friends ex-Confederate soldiers in all parts of the south, and in later years he frequently went south to visit his one-time enemies and to be entertained by them. Maj. Franklin Moore was born September 2, 1826, in the forks of Wood river on a place now owned by the heirs of George Cartwright. He was the son of Abel Moore and wife, the first white people who settled in this part of Madison county. The parents came to Madison county from Surrey county, North Carolina, having made the trip overland with their two sons, Joel and William, and all their possessions, traveling about the western country until July 1808, when they settled in Wood river township. The famous Wood river massacre, in which seven people were killed, occurred at the Moore home, 1814, and the two brothers, a cousin of Maj. Moore, and a woman and two children were killed. Maj. Moore's grandfather on his mother's side was married five times, and died at the age of 97. His grandparents on both sides were Revolutionary soldiers. His father was a noted Indian fighter, and went through several Indian wars. Maj. Moore was married in 1846 to Miss Talitha Elliott of Bunker Hill. He came to Wood river township the year following, cleared his own land and developed his farm. He continued to work at farming for a few years, and then engaged in the sawmill business, which he followed up to the time of the breaking out of the Civil War. Although in debt at the time, he gave up everything, raised a cavalry company, and was mustered in with Co. D., 2nd Illinois volunteer cavalry at Alton, July 19, 1861. Major Moore wrote a voluminous history of his life for the benefit of his family and friends in which he gave good description of many fights and recorded many interesting events. He was in the midst of many stirring events, and was the principal actor in many a war drama that kept him in danger most of his time. His campaigns were chiefly down the Mississippi river, and extended as far south as New Orleans. Major Moore leaves three sons and two daughters: Dr. Isaac Moore of Upper Alton; John Moore of Wichita Falls, Texas; and Mr. Frank Moore, Editor of the National Stock Yard Journal in Chicago; and Mrs. Ellen Preuitt of Lawton, Oklahoma; and Mrs. Mary Graham of Donner, California. He belonged to three organizations, the Masonic and Odd Fellows lodge and the Grand Army of the Republic. The funeral of Maj. Moore will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and services will be conducted at the family home on College avenue. Burial will take place in Oakwood cemetery. Friends and relatives of the departed soldier are expected to come from all parts of the country to attend his funeral. Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Simeon Hussey

 

MOORE, ISAAC (DOCTOR)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 19, 1914
Alton Physician Dies Within Two Days After Surgery
Dr. Isaac Moore of Alton, aged 67, died at the Deaconess Hospital in St. Louis Thursday noon, two days after submitting to a surgical operation for the relief of kidney trouble. His daughter, Mrs. William Shook, had gone to attend him after receiving a telegram stating that her father was sinking fast, and that the end was near. The body will be brought to Alton tomorrow by Undertaker W. H. Bauer, who was called to St. Louis to take charge. Dr. Moore is survived by one son, Frank, and two daughters, Mrs. Shook of Alton, and Mrs. Virginia Dougherty of Wichita Falls, Tex. Dr. Moore was a member of a well known Alton family. His father, Major Moore, was a striking figure hereabouts. The son, who was a soldier during the Civil War, had also seen plenty of excitement in the western country. He was a man who welcomed acquaintance with the rougher sides of life on the western plains, and in the bad days of the southwestern country, and he had a large fund of interesting incidents he could relate to a listener of deeds he had seen and incidents he had been acquainted with. He came back to Alton from Wichita Falls, Texas a number of years ago, and settled down to the practice of medicine in Alton again. He owned in Upper Alton an ancient stone house which was a historic spot in Upper Alton. Dr. Moore was for years a member of the board of pension examiners at Alton. He had a very wide acquaintance, and there are many people who will be deeply interested in learning of his death. When he left Alton over a week ago, he had evidently been considering that he would have a hard time coming through the operation, but he faced it courageously after bidding his friends farewell

 

MOORE, JOE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 17, 1906
Paroled Convict Shot and Killed by Proprietor of Pool Room
James Norval, proprietor of a pool room on the levee, west of Piasa street, shot and killed Joe Moore, a paroled convict who lived in Upper Alton. Moore died in the ambulance on his way to Upper Alton, and according to negro men who accompanied him, he died fighting as he made a mistake and thinking that his friends escorting him were his enemies, he attacked them in his death frenzy and they had a hard fight with him. He tore off the shirt of the driver of the ambulance, and after making his last supreme effort, he tumbled over dead in the ambulance. The trouble began between Joe Moore and a Chicago negro named Joe Robertson. The latter stabbed Moore on the face with a big hunting knife, and the stabbing so infuriated Moore that he seized a chair and began making light some room with it. He knocked Robertson down and broke the chair over his head, and then tried another chair and broke that, knocking Robertson down as soon as he would rise. Norval, the proprietor, ordered Moore to cease beating the man with the chair, and Moore made a move toward Norval, whereat Norval drew a revolver and shot Moore in the side, the ball passing almost through his body. The pool room was soon emptied as the negroes were frightened by the shooting. Norval has been known as a cool, quiet man, not easily aroused, and the negroes feared his wrath. Norval made no attempt to escape, and after Moore was removed in the ambulance in a dying condition, Norval surrendered to the police and was held without bond until the coroner's inquest. "Pony" Robertson, the negro who started the trouble by cutting Moore, was arrested Sunday afternoon where he was concealed in a room in the Armory building. His head was battered by the blows from the chair, and he required immediate attention of a surgeon.

 

MOORE, LYDIA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 18, 1904
Wife of Dr. Isaac Moore Found Dead
Mrs. Lydia Moore, wife of Dr. Isaac Moore, was found dead upon the floor of the Moore home in Upper Alton about 6 o'clock Tuesday evening by two of her children, Frank Moore and Mrs. Ellen Schuelle, who were returning from St. Louis. Mrs. Moore had been at home nearly all day with her 3 year old granddaughter, and so far as known had been in the best of health. When her son and daughter arrived home they entered the house and found their mother lying dead upon the floor, and the little child sitting beside her. The body appeared to have been dead several hours when found. Mrs. Moore was 48 years old and leaves besides her husband, three children: Mrs. Ellen Schuelle, Miss Ella Moore, and Frank Moore, all of Upper Alton. Her death is a sudden and severe shock to her family. Arrangements for the funeral have not been completed, but it will probably be held Friday afternoon. Relatives of deceased living in Dallas, Texas will come to attend the funeral. Deputy Coroner C. N. Streeper impaneled a jury this afternoon to inquire into the sudden death of Mrs. Isaac Moore. The jury gave a verdict of death from apoplexy. Dr. Moore said that his wife never suffered from heart trouble to his knowledge. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home, Rev. L. M. Waterman officiating.

 

MOORE, MILDRED G./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 30, 1912
The death of Mrs. Mildred G. Moore occurred Sunday afternoon, at 3:30 p.m. at the family home, 417 East Third street, following a weeks illness. The funeral service was held this afternoon at the home, Rev. M. W. Twing of the First Baptist church officiating. The body was shipped to Palmyra, Mo., from where it will be moved to Emmerson, Mo., the former home of the deceased, where the interment will be on Wednesday. Mrs. Moore was 57 years of age. She leaves five sons and four daughters.

 

MOORE, SAMUEL A./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 21, 1914
Son of Joshua Moore, Grandson of Abel Moore ... Member of Historic Family Dies At Home In Upper Alton
Samuel A. Moore, aged 77, died last night at his home on North Broadway street in Upper Alton after an illness of four months with dropsy. Mr. Moore was a member of one of the most historic families in Madison County, having been born on the Abel Moore farm east of Upper Alton, where the Wood River massacre occurred in 1814, and where a number of his relatives were murdered by the Indians. Mr. Moore had lived all his life either in Upper Alton or in the country close by. He went to war and served as a soldier until the Civil War closed in 1865. He leaves three sons, Edward, William and John, all of Upper Alton; and four grandchildren. He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. John S. Culp of Bethalto; and Mrs. Lizzie Gill of St. Louis; also two brothers, Lewis of Granite City; and Joseph of California. He leaves a half brother, Charles Schaefer of California, and a stepson, J. C. Campbell of Upper Alton. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock at the family home, and the services will be conducted by Rev. W. J. Crawford of College avenue, and burial will be at Short Cemetery, east of town.

 

MOORE, TROY (CAPTAIN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 14, 1909
Hero of Civil War, Prominent Citizen of Upper Alton Dies
Capt. Troy Moore, aged 91 the sixth of last August, died at 5 o'clock this morning at his home in Upper Alton after an illness of three weeks, from the debility of great age. He had been a resident of Upper Alton sixty-one years, and during that time had led a stirring life. Hero of many battles of the Civil war, promoted on the battlefield of Shiloh for conspicuous gallantry, and afterward the organizer of a company in the 152 Illinois volunteers, he had an active part in the Civil war. The most remarkable fact about the life of Capt. Troy Moore was the wonderful good state of preservation in which he remained until the very last. His eyesight was so good he could shoot a target rifle with accuracy; his brain was so clear he could read his Bible and his daily newspapers every day, and discuss them intelligently; his physical strength was so great that up to this year he had been able to mow the lawn at his home. Troy Moore was born at Waterloo, Illinois August 6, 1818. He was a son of James B. Moore, a noted ranger and Indian fighter who came from Virginia. He moved to Upper Alton in 1848, and engaged in the milling business and general merchandise business, and in 1850 he established a bus line between Alton and Upper Alton, the forerunner of the street railway system. He continued in the carrying business until the street railway company was formed, and he was assistant superintendent of that line for a while. In 1861 he enlisted as a private in the 32nd Illinois, and after the battle of Shiloh was made a second lieutenant for firing a gun he was loading at the moment the order to fall back was given. He rejoined his regiment after firing the charge from the cannon. After the fall of Atlanta, he resigned and returning home, organized company E, 152nd Illinois. He was in eight regular battles and the siege of Vicksburg. At the age of 15 he began the use of tobacco, but discontinued it at the age of 86, after seventy years. He said he did it because it was injuring his appetite. Twice a week he shaved himself, even up to the last. At the age of 14, he joined the Methodist church and was baptized by Rev. John Dew. He had been seventy-seven years a member of that church when he died. During his whole life he never missed a chance to vote, believing it was his duty as a citizen to exercise his franchise whenever he could do so. He was Republican from the birth of the party. He had four children, Mrs. L. Miller, with whom he lived, James Moore of Upper Alton, Ed Moore of St. Louis, and Mrs. Alice Booge of Sioux City, Iowa. His death had been expected for a week, and was looked for to occur several days ago. His strong constitution held out much longer than was expected. In his long life he was regarded as an exemplary citizen, a faithful church member, and he lived his religion in his every day life. He was married March 16, 1837, to Clarissa Patterson, and he lived with her 56 years. In a statement he wrote out before his death he said as follows: "I loved the Union and the flag of our Union, and risked my life for the defense thereof. I have spoken of the Union with my dear companion in life, and of the Union of the flag of our country. I will now speak of the Union with Christ and his church, with which I have been united from boyhood to the present time. I have found it a pleasant home and a great protection from evil habit. This union I loved most dearly, for in church privileges I rejoiced greatly, and not only so, but I rejoice that my name is written in Heaven and my citizenship is in Heaven, my home, where are those I love most and best, and I too soon shall rest there." The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon from the Upper Alton Methodist church at 2 o'clock. Friends are requested to omit flowers.    [Troy Moore was present at the Lincoln-Douglas debate in Alton, October 15, 1858. He is buried in the Upper Alton Oakwood Cemetery.]

 

MORAN, CARL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 30, 1909
Child Burned to Death at Fosterburg
Carl, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Micke Moran of Fosterburg was burned to death Monday. The child would have been five years old on Christmas Day. Mrs. Moran had left the little boy in the house with two little girls, his sisters, both younger than him, while she went to a neighbor's house, Jule Prager, to telephone an order for groceries. The mother was a quarter of a mile away from her own home when the accident occurred. The child got possession of the coal oil can and began pouring oil on the fire. He got some oil on his own clothes and his clothes caught fire. When the child began to feel the fire he started to run to where he knew his mother had gone, and after the quarter of a mile run, when he reached her, there was nothing left on his body but the collar band and the waist band of his underdrawers. His skin was burned almost completely off him. The child caught fire about 9:45 a.m. and died about 3 o'clock. The mother immediately summoned a doctor, but nothing could be done for the little fellow. Coroner Streeper instructed his deputy coroner, Hector Bassett, to hold an inquest over the body.

 

MORAN, WILHELMINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 13, 1905
Mrs. Wilhelmina MOran, wife of James Moran, died Tuesday evening at 6 o'clock at the family residence in Clement place after a long illness. She was in her fortieth year and had lived in Alton twelve years. She was born in Detroit, Michigan. Mrs. Moran's illness began about one year ago and she was a constant sufferer from that time until the time of her death. She bore her period of invalidism with patience and a fortitude that was an inspiration to those who were around her. Long ago she expressed a consciousness of the fact that she was hopelessly ill, and that the termination must be a fatal one very soon. She made all her plans for the approaching dissolution, advised members of her family as to what she wished to have done, and gave full directions on every point which she considered her family and friends might need information after her departure. The last six months members of her family knew that it was only a matter of a short time, and her death was expected any time during the time since last summer when she suffered the worst attack. She leaves her husband, James Moran, two children, Ruth and James, and one niece who made her home here, Hazel Howes. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family home, 709 Clement place. Services will be conducted by Rev. A. A. Tanner, assisted by Rev. D. E. Bushnell.

 

MOREFIELD, RACHEL/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, January 8, 1895
Mrs. Rachel Morefield died Friday evening at 6:30 o'clock, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Joseph Berger at the age of 79 years 11 months and 9 days. For twelve years she had been paralyzed, and totally helpless, this condition being the result of a broken leg. During the past three weeks she failed in health steadily and death came as a relief Friday evening. The funeral took place Sunday afternoon from the residence where where services were conducted by Rev. W. F. E. Ash. The remains were laid to rest at Woodlawn. The pall bearers were Ben Epping, W Z Schmidt, C W Wilkins, James McNeilly, Jacob Schneider and Charles Schwarz. Mrs. Morefield was born in North Carolina January 25, 1815. At the age of seventeen she was married to Sturgeon Morefield. Forty years ago they came to Edwardsville, and after residing here several years moved to Hillsboro and bought a farm later selling out and moving to Pana, where they lived on a farm for twelve years. While there, in 1882 they celebrated their golden wedding. Six years ago the aged couple was induced to sell their farm and come to Edwardsville and live with their daughters, Mrs. Amanda Berger and Mrs. Alice Pope. Mr. Morefield died on March 4, 1891. Their union had been blessed with thirteen children, of whom five survive, viz: Chas. Morefield of Pana, Mrs. Amanda Berger, Mrs. Charity Green, of Edwardsville, Mrs. Alice Pope of Venice. She also leaves to mourn her death 33 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. She had lived a good Christian life and was a member of the Baptist church for many years.

 

MOREHEAD, ELEANOR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 1, 1913
Eleanor, the 21 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Morehead of 1112 1/2 East Second street, died at 11:30 o'clock today from pneumonia. The funeral will be Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Patrick's church.

 

MORGAN, ELLA DORA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 20, 1909
Mrs. Ella Dorn Morgan, wife of Maj. James N. Morgan, died at 4:30 o'clock Wednesday morning at the family residence, Prospect and Summit streets in Alton. Mrs. Morgan had been ill several weeks with pneumonia. She was a sufferer from rheumatism for several years and was obliged to spend much of her time away from home, for the benefit of her health. While her family knew that the last illness was very severe, and the last two days it had assumed a dangerous phase, her death was a very unexpected to them. Mrs. Morgan was in her 54th year. She was married at Ft. Ringold, Texas while she was visiting her brother, Gen. E. D. Dimmick. She there first met her future husband, and it was during her visit that the acquaintance culminated in the marriage. The remainde4r of her life, until she came to Alton, she spent around military posts with her husband and family. Maj. Morgan was, until a few years ago, an active officer in the United States army, detailed much of the time at San Antonio, Texas. The family spent five years in St. Louis before returning to Maj. Morgan's birthplace to make their home. Mrs. Morgan was born at Athens, New York, on the Hudson river. She leaves beside her husband, three daughters, Mrs. Arthur Banta of Chicago, Misses Helen and Elizabeth Morgan of Alton, and two sons, John K. and James Morgan of Alton. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 10 o'clock from the family residence, and will be private. Services will be conducted by Rev. H. M. Chittenden of St. Paul's Episcopal church.

 

MORGAN, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 27, 1905
George Morgan of Bethalto was killed by a Big Four work train near East Alton Monday evening while walking home from East Alton. He had been drinking during the day at East Alton, and late in the evening he started to walk up the Big Four tracks towards his home. While on the way, he was hit by the dirt train, about 7:30 o'clock, and his body was found mangled and strewn along the track. Coroner Streeper was notified, and he went to East Alton at once to hold an inquest and to take charge of the body. A verdict of accidental death was found by the jury impaneled by the coroner, and no one was held responsible. The trainmen saw Morgan just before he was hit by the train. He was standing between the main track and a switch, and was just starting to cross over the main track when he stumbled and fell before the approaching train and was instantly killed. The body will be buried tomorrow, and funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock, interment at Vaughn cemetery. Morgan was a laborer, 65 years of age, and leaves a wife, three sons, and one daughter.

 

MORGAN, GUY/Source: Troy Star, June 14, 1894
Guy Morgan, the 9 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morgan, Jr., of Cheltenham, Mo., died Monday of brain fever. The remains were brought to this city Tuesday and interred in the Troy Cemetery, Rev. Sweeney officiating. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan were formerly residents of Troy, having left here only three years ago. They have the sincere sympathy of the entire community.

 

MORGAN, SAMUEL S./Source: Alton Telegraph, June 4, 1842
Died, in this city [Alton], on the 30th ult., of convulsions from dentition, Samuel S., infant son of James M. and Elizabeth Morgan, aged 10 months.

 

MORGAN, UNKNOWN WIFE OF JAMES N./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 21, 1909
The funeral of Mrs. James N. Morgan tomorrow morning will not be private, as announced, and friends of Mrs. Morgan are invited to attend. Interment at City cemetery will be private.

 

MORICK, CHARLES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 27, 1900
Charles Morick, an old resident of Alton, died this morning after a short illness at the home of his son, Adam Morick, on Union street. His death was a surprise to his friends in Alton, few of whom knew of his illness. Mr. Morick was 80(?) years of age, and had lived in Alton many years with his sons, Charles and Adam. Many years ago he conducted a shoemakers' shop on Ridge Street, and later he moved to Union street. His son, Charles, lives in St. Louis and conducts a shoe store there. Of late years, Mr. Morick made his home in St. Louis with Charles, but about three months ago he came here to stay with his son, Adam.

 

MORITZ, MARGARETHA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph October 23, 1909
Mrs. Margaretha Moritz, widow of Henry C. G. Moritz, for many years a prominent men's furnishing goods dealer in Alton, died this afternoon about 1:30 o'clock at her home, 1329 Bloomfield street, where she lived with her daughter, Mrs. Frank Clement. Mrs. Moritz's condition has been very serious for a long time. She went to Colorado, and while there was taken ill July 18. She returned to Alton August 18, a month later, with her daughter and her son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Thomas, Mr. Thomas being very ill also. The malady that caused the death of Mrs. MOritz was kidney trouble. When she went to Colorado she was in perfect health and was well for a long time afterward. Mrs. Moritz came to Alton when she was a young girl and was married here. At the time of her death she was 65 years of age. She leaves five children, three daughters and two sons. They are Mrs. Theodore Formhals, Mrs. J. B. Thomas, Mrs. Frank S. Clement, Messrs. Gus and Carl Moritz. The time of the funeral has not been set.

 

MORRILL, UNKNOWN WIFE OF DAVID T./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 22, 1902
The body of Mrs. David T. Morrill of Chicago arrived in Alton Saturday evening, accompanied by members of her family, and was taken to the Upper Alton Baptist church where it remained until after the funeral services Sunday morning. Mrs. Morrill was a remarkable woman, and through her children her influence in the cause of Christianity was felt throughout the country. The wife of a minister, she lived to see four of her five sons become ministers of the Gospel, and two of her daughters became the wives of ministers. The funeral party included Rev. G. L. Morrill and Frank Morrill of Minneapolis; Rev. Kingman K. Morrill of St. Cloud, Minn.; Rev. Herbert M. Morrill of Chicago; Mrs. J. A. Herrick of Bay City, Michigan; and Mrs. Homer W. Cook of Chicago, at whose home Mrs. Morrill died. The death of Mrs. Morrill followed closely that of her son, Horace Baldwin Morrill, one of the famous Morrill twins who died suddenly at Tekamah, Nebraska November 21, while preparing to conduct a series of revival services with his brother. The funeral services took the place of the regular Sunday morning services of the Upper Alton Baptist church. Rev. J. C. C. Clarke officiated, assisted by Rev. Dr. L. A. Abbott and Rev. L. M. Waterman. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery, where the four sons of Mrs. Morrill sang a quartet and Rev. G. L. Morrill offered the closing prayer.

 

MORRIS, ADELINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 13, 1907
Mrs. Adeline Morris, wife of John Morris, died from heart disease some time before midnight Saturday, and her death was discovered by her husband about 1 o'clock Sunday morning. Mrs. Morris had been in fairly good health, but complained Saturday evening after supper of not feeling exactly well. Her indisposition was believed to be slight, and not much thought was given the matter, the couple retiring to bed early. About 1 o'clock Sunday morning Mr. Morris happened to waken and he reached his hand over to touch his wife and he found her face cold. He hastened to secure help and a physician, but the latter could do nothing, as death had called upon Mrs. Morris several hours before the discovery of its presence. An inquest was held yesterday by Deputy Coroner Allen Keiser and the jury returned a verdict of death from heart disease. Mrs. Morris was greatly esteemed by her neighbors and acquaintances, and her death caused a great shock to them. Besides her husband she leaves one son.

 

MORRIS, EDITH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 30, 1907
Edith, 3 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Morris, died this morning at the family home, 609 North street, after a long illness. The funeral will be tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home.

 

MORRIS, FRANK R./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 9, 1920
Frank R. Morris, the father of three young children, died this morning at 1:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital where he was taken last Saturday night suffering from influenza. Morris was taken ill one week ago last Friday, and from the first his condition was known to be serious. When he was taken ill all other members of his family were down with the same disease. Morris, who was 35 years of age, is survived by his wife, Carrie Clark Morris, and three children, the oldest of whom is 4. He was an employee of the Federal Lead Company. He was married six years ago to Carrie Clark. His sister-in-law, Miss Annabelle Clark, a well known trained nurse, is just recovering from the influenza. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Clark home on Fullerton avenue. Mrs. Morris is ill and in all probability will not be able to attend her husband's funeral.

 

MORRISON, ARTHUR/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 14, 1918
Soldier Killed in France
That Arthur Morrison, a friend of Maurice Walter, had been killed in France was learned today, on the day that the killing of Maurice Walter was officially published. Arthur Morrison was a former resident of the North Side. He lived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Howarth, and he worked at the Laclede steel plant. He left here about 18 months ago, he went into the army in St. Louis. About two months ago the two friends met in France, relatives of Maurice Walter were informed. A brother of Morrison died in France, too.

 

MORRISON, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 7, 1907
James Morrison, 63 years old, died this morning after an illness from a complication of diseases. He was a native of New Jersey and came to Alton twenty-six years ago. He worked for the city of Alton many years in the street department and was an honest, industrious, well respected man. He leaves his wife and three children, Mrs. John McNally, Miss Catherine and Will Morrison, all of Alton. Former Sexton John Morrison of Greenwood cemetery is a brother. Another brother, Robert, lives in Assumption, Ill., and three sisters, Mrs. Phil Thornton of Alton, Mrs. McDonald of Virden and Mrs. Foster of Chicago also survive. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 10 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

MORRISON, JOHN C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 12, 1917
Greenwood Cemetery Sexton Dies - Had Interred All Bodies Buried There in Twenty Years
John Morrison, for twenty years sexton of Greenwood Cemetery, died at 12:45 o'clock Wednesday morning at his home, 822 Logan street in the North Side, from the effects of paralysis. Friday morning, after funeral services at 9 o'clock in SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral, friends of Mr. Morrison will perform for him the service that during a period of twenty years, he performed for many hundreds of people who were taken to Greenwood for their last rest. John C. Morrison was born in New Jersey in 1845. He leaves four sons, Frank, Charles, and George of Alton, and Eugene of Chicago; also a daughter, Mrs. A. Lawton of Alton. He leaves twelve grandchildren, and two sisters, Mrs. John Thornton of Alton and Mrs. Margaret McDonald of Virden. He was a charter member of SS. Peter and Paul's branch of the Western Catholic Union. A year ago he sustained a stroke of paralysis, and he never fully recovered. The last two weeks his death was looked for at any time.

 

MORRISON, LEWIS (or JOSEPH HOFFMAN)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 7, 1904
Man Found After Being Ground Up on Railroad Tracks
A laborer, whose name was either Lewis Morrison or Joseph Hoffman, was found lying between the rails of the Bluff Line track at Lover's Leap, Sunday morning at 5:30 o'clock, by David Barth. The man's body was horribly mutilated by the wheels of a passing train, and he had been dead several hours. Letters in the pockets indicated his name was Lewis Morrison, but the man was employed by Wolf, Maupin & Curdie on their sand dredge, and by them was known as Joe Hoffman. Mr. James Maupin says that Hoffman or Morrison, with two other men, worked together and lived together on the sand dredge, cooking their own meals. They were considered as being good workmen, and none of them was known to drink. While there is nothing to confirm the suspicion that the man was first killed and then placed on the track to obliterate traces of the crime, that theory has been given much credence. The man was paid off Saturday afternoon, and when found had only 65 cents in his pocket. Deputy Coroner W. H. Bauer held an inquest Sunday morning, and a verdict of accidental death was given by the jury.

 

MORRISSEY, BARBARA M. (nee BLAKE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 20, 1918
Mrs. Barbara M. Morrissey, wife of E. J. Morrissey, senior members of the firm of Morrissey brothers, died at her home, 400 Prospect street, this morning at 3:30 o'clock after a lingering illness. She was 50 years old. The death of Mrs. Morrissey is generally mourned in Alton and brings poignant grief to her husband and family to whom she was so devoted. The end came after years of suffering, which she bore with remarkable fortitude and cheerfulness. Mrs. Morrissey was known for her devotion to her family and home, and her interest and good-heartedness reached far out into the lives and affairs of the hosts of friends whom she had won. She had suffered much during her long illness, but always bore her trials sweetly and patiently. She is survived by her husband and five children, who will feel keenly the absence of their affectionate and devoted wife and mother. The children are James W., Edmund H., Eugene, Mary Antoinette, and Barbara E. One sister and two brothers also survive. They are Mrs. Joseph Graser of Springfield, Ill., John Blake of Arkuda, Fla., and Eugene Blake of Schuyler, Nebr. The funeral will be Friday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral to Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MORRISSEY, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 24, 1902
Resident of Alton Since 1842
James Morrissey, a resident of Alton since 1842, died suddenly Sunday morning at his home on Belle street after a long illness from heart disease. Mr. Morrissey had been in failing health since he lost his eyesight several years ago, but on Saturday he seemingly was growing better and his family thought the illness was abating. He was taken worse unexpectedly, and death resulted at 7:15 o'clock Sunday morning. Mr. Morrissey was born in county Limerick, Ireland, and was 73 years of age. He came to Alton in the days when Alton was a comparatively small city, and he made his home here the remainder of his life. For many years he was well known in business circles, and he was the head of one of the best known families in Alton. He leaves three children: Edward Morrissey, Will Morrissey and Miss Genevieve Morrissey. He was a man who made many firm friendships and there are many among the old residents of the city who will hold his memory in high esteem and have always been deeply interested in him. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock and services will be conducted in the Cathedral.

 

MOSBY, UNKNOWN INFANT OF EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1906
An infant child of Edward Mosby of North Alton died from dysentery disease last night.

 

MOSER, MARY ANNA (nee SIEDLER)/Source: Edwardsville Intelligencer, November 1, 1915
Mrs. Mary Anna Moser, wife of John Moser, died at 1:30 this morning at her home in Highland after an illness of only about ninety days. She had been in excellent health up to three months ago, when the trouble began to develop, which eventually caused her demise. It was diagnosed as a tumor, and on Saturday morning an operation was performed in the St. Joseph's Hospital at Highland. The operation was apparently entirely successful, and Mrs. Moser rallied nicely. Late Sunday night however, a sinking spell intervened, and she passed peacefully away early today. The funeral will be on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family residence, Rev. Carl Maier, pastor of the German Evangelical church, will conduct the services and the body will be laid to rest in the City cemetery. Mrs. Moser at the time of her demise was aged 47 years, 8 months, and 17 days. She was a native of Highland, born February 14, 1868. Her parents were Mr. and Mrs. John Siedler. Mrs. Moser grew to womanhood in Highland, and was educated in the schools of that city. She was married on December 22, 1887, to John Moser, foreman of the Highland Embroidery Works. Four children were born to the union, all of whom are living. They are: Gerold Moser who is city attorney of Highland; Arnold, Una and Paula Moser, all residing in Highland. There is one grandchild. Besides her aged mother, Mrs. Emma Siedler, there are surviving two brothers and two sisters, John R. Siedler of Chicago; and Joseph W. Siedler of St. Louis; Mrs. Minnie Moffert and Mrs. Emma Willhauk, both of Highland. Mrs. Moser was a long time member of the German Evangelical church, and was faithful in her attendance upon services. She belonged to the Frauenverein, the members of which will attend the funeral in a body. She was possessed of a kindly nature and was so generally esteemed that not alone in the home circle and among her acquaintances, but through the community at large she will be missed.

 

MOSHECK, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 21, 1900
Suicide by Shotgun
Coroner Bailey was called to Glen Carbon yesterday to hold an inquest over the body of Frank Mosheck who killed himself there yesterday morning. Mosheck was 49 years of age and unmarried. He had repeatedly threatened to kill himself, but no one paid any attention to his threats. Monday morning he borrowed a shotgun from a neighbor and Tuesday morning he blew his head to pieces with a heavy charge of buckshot. Mosheck went behind a shed at his home and resting the gun on the ground held the muzzle under his jaw on the right side. With a piece of lath he pushed the trigger and was killed instantly.

 

MOST, WILLIAM/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 28, 1922
Loses Life in Mississippi
William Most, in his 25th year, was drowned yesterday at Hop Hollow, in the Mississippi river, the tragic ending breaking up a North Side neighborhood picnic party which was being enjoyed by about thirty people. The drowning of Most was the result of the young man becoming cramped while in water, that was slightly over his head in depth. Miss Margaret Hall, daughter of William Hall, endangered her own life in an effort to save the drowning young man and she did have him by the hair of his head, tightly clutched in one hand, and held on to him until she too was in a bad way and had to be given assistance. She still had hold of Most's hair, she assured her rescuers, when she with John Mathie and his son, Wesley, became endangered and it was necessary for another member of the party, Gus Coffier, to reach a pole to them so they could be drawn in to a place of safety. About that time she was forced to relinquish her hold on the drowning Most, and he never came up again. The drowning occurred about 2:30 o'clock and the body was recovered about 25 minutes later. All efforts to revive him failed. His mother, Mrs. Anna Most, former assistant visiting nurse and now assistant school nurse, was a member of a party spending the day at a camp on the Missouri shore, directly across the river from where her son was drowned. She knew nothing of the drowning until she was sent for and brought home, then she was told of what had happened. Mrs. Most is a widow, and the drowned young man was her only child. He was assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Wood River, and was formerly connected with the other bank at Wood River. According to the story told by John Mathie, who was a member of the party went swimming just above two hours after dinner, members of the party went in swimming just above where the stream flows under the railroad trestle at Hop Hollow. Mr. Mathie had been taking care of the little children and helping them to learn to swim. His son, Wesley, with others of the party, had come out of the water. Some still remained in the river. Miss Florence Mathie, to whom it is said William Most was engaged, noticed that the young man had an agonized expression on his face as he was struggling in the water, and then she heard him shout for help. She called to her father and brother to go to the rescue of the young man. Miss Margaret Hall noticed the predicament of young Most, and she being nearest him courageously went to help him. She is a fairly good swimmer and reached him first. She caught him by the hair and struggled bravely to keep the drowning man up. She held him until John Mathie, who was in a bathing suit, and his son, Wesley, who was fully clad, could get to her. They took hold of her as Most was hidden under the water. She assured them she had hold of him and they were pulling her in, when all of them began floundering in an undertow. They called for help and Coffler reached them a pole and they were pulled in, but MIss Hall lost her hold on Most in the struggle and he was not seen again until the body was taken out of the water 25 minutes later. A shell fisherman nearby helped and a boat a short way down, in which there were some grab hooks, was brought into use. Only a few drags had been made when the body was brought up by Herman Brueggeman and Gus Coffler. The whole tragic affair was witnessed by the whole party which included the families of John Mathie, William Hall, Herman Brueggeman, Gus Coffler, Julius Volz, Herbert Challacombe with a few invited guests. The party returned to Alton with the body as soon as possible, but waited until a doctor could be had to apply any means of reviving the young man that could be used. The victim of this tragedy was one of the most popular boys in the city. He was an industrious young man, of the highest character and he was highly esteemed in the two banks where he had been employed. He was devoted to his mother and she to him, and both of them, their friends always said, arranged all their pleasures and their convenience for the accommodation of the other. The mother had only recently returned from a western trip, having spent her vacation in Colorado. The place where the drowning occurred seemed to be a good place for swimming. The slope off was gradual. Where Will Most lost his life, the water was just a little over his head and under ordinary circumstances, and but for his being made helpless by cramps, he would have been able with a few strokes to have gone in to where his feet could touch bottom. Will Most was a member of Piasa Lodge No. 27, A. F. & A. M., and of the Knights of Pythias Lodge at Wood River. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock and services will be conducted in the Evangelical Church at Eighth and Henry by Rev. O. W. Heggemeier. The burial will be under the auspices of the Masonic Lodge.

 

MOTTERSHEAD, ISABEL JESSIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 2, 1906
Mrs. Isabel Jessie Mottershead, aged 88, died Sunday morning at the home of her son-in-law, William Stites, on the Grafton Road, after a long illness. Beside her daughter, Mrs. Stites, she leaves a sister, Mrs. William Jackson of Godfrey. She was a life-long and consistent member of the Methodist church. The funeral was held this afternoon at 1 o'clock from the Stites home, and burial was in Upper Alton cemetery. Mrs. Mottershead was a native of England.

 

MOULTON, MARY E. (nee SCOTT)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 19, 1921
Mrs. Mary E. Moulton, widow of John H. Moulton, died yesterday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. W. Olin, on State street. Mr. Moulton was 83 years old. Mrs. Moulton was born in Maumee, Ohio on November 27, 1837. She had been a resident of Alton for about 29 years. During her residence in the city Mrs. Moulton made many friends by her kindly disposition. She was loved for her strength of character and her willingness to be of service, and her death causes sorrow among her many friends. Mrs. Moulton was formerly Miss Mary E. Scott, daughter of Dr. David B. and Mary A. Scott. She was married on Feb. 3, 1863 to John H. Moulton at Toledo, Ohio. Mr. Moulton died on Aug. 26, 1870. Until recent years Mrs. Moulton was actively connected with the Browning Club. Mrs. Moulton is survived by two daughters and a son. The daughters are Mrs. F. W. Olin and Mrs. D. V. R. Mauley of Toledo. The son is John H. Moulton of Hollywood, Calif. Funeral services will be conducted at the home of Mrs. Olin at 3 p.m., tomorrow, by the Rev. F. D. Butler, rector of St. Paul's Episcopal church. The body will be shipped to Toledo for burial.

 

MOWEREY, HENRY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 25, 1904
Old Soldier Dies in Ambulance - Civil War Wound Causes Death of Destitute Veteran
Henry Mowerey, said to be only 55 and a veteran of the Civil War, died in the ambulance just before being carried into St. Joseph's hospital shortly before noon today. Mowerey had been living with his 12 year old son in a tent back of the woolen mill building on Belle street. A wound he sustained in the Civil War had caused him trouble in his legs, and gangrene had set in recently. Neighbors had discovered his condition and had ministered to him. Monday morning members of Alton Post, G. A. R. asked that the old soldier be moved to St. Joseph's hospital, and Sergeant Pack took the ambulance to move him. The ambulance had been backed up to the hospital entrance, and he was about to be lifted out when Mowerey breathed his last. It is said that he has three brothers, and that his two sisters living in Kansas are well off and will see that he is given a decent burial. A divorced wife is living in Alton. Friends of Mowerey telegraphed his sisters in Kansas and notified them of their brother's death.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 26, 1904
It is a striking commentary on the rapidity of the decease of old soldiers that the burial ground in the eastern part of the City Cemetery is said to be filled, and that there was room for only one more grave before one was dug for Henry Mowerey today. When an old soldier would die in destitute circumstances, his comrades have been bearing him to the old burying ground in City Cemetery and laying him away under the shadow of the Soldiers Monument. Hereafter, old soldiers who die and own no burial lot must be buried in the other soldiers burial lot in the cemetery, on the north side.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 27, 1904
Henry Mowery, a veteran of the Civil War, was buried this morning at 10 o'clock from the G. A. R. hall under the auspices of the members of Alton Post G. A. R. Interment was in City Cemetery. In connection with Mowery's death, a story is recalled in which years of service in the army did not mitigate an offense given by his desertion from the army after three months service. Becoming dissatisfied with the infantry in which he was enlisted, he deserted at the age of 17 and rejoined the cavalry, where he served three years. He was given a pension for his cavalry service, but some years ago the pension department in looking up an application for an increase for him discovered he was on the roll of deserters. His pension was dropped and Mowery died in poverty, a constant sufferer from a wound he had received in the army.

 

MOWRY, ROBERT FERGUSON/Source: Alton Telegraph, August 7, 1846
Died in Alton on Saturday, the first instant, Robert Ferguson, infant son of C. B. and Esther O. Mowry, aged about 1 year.

 

MOZER [or MOZIER], CHARLES SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 14, 1901
Civil War Veteran
Charles Mozer Sr., a well known resident of this city for nearly fifty years, died Saturday night at his home, Eighth and Easton streets. He was born at Wurtemburg, Germany, and came to Alton when 15 years of age. He was an industrious, honest man and a good citizen. He served three years in the Civil War. He leaves a widow and four children: Misses Matilda and Louisa, and Charles Jr., and Albert Mosier [sic]. The funeral took place this afternoon, Rev. Theodore Oberhellmann officiating. Interment was in the City Cemetery.

 

MOZIER, LOUISE B./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 13, 1920
Mrs. Louise Beck Mozier, widow of Charles Mozier, died at 3:25 o'clock this morning in the home at 127 East Eighth street where she had lived over forty years. She was born in Alton and had lived here all of her life. Mrs. Mozier had suffered from influenza, but had seemingly recovered when she had a relapse and some malignant glandular trouble manifested itself about a week ago. Her condition grew rapidly desperate, and for several days it was realized by her family that the end would not be long delayed. Mrs. Mozier was born in Alton April 25, 1851. She was an interested member of the Evangelical church, and prominent in the ladies aid society of that body. Her husband died twenty years ago last January. She leaves four children, Charles Mozier of Beardstown; Albert Mozier of Alton; Mrs. Fred P. Weeks of Springfield, and Mrs. Hugh Scovell of Alton. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock from the Evangelical church. There will be no services at the home. The body will lie in state in the church from 1 to 3 pm. prior to the funeral, and friends of Mrs. Mozier are invited to be at the church.

 

MUELLER, ARMIN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 12, 1910
The funeral of Armin, the 12 year old son of Rev. and Mrs. E. L. Mueller, was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the German Evangelical church. Rev. G. Plassman of Granite City conducted the funeral services. Burial was in City cemetery. Practically the entire congregation of the church assembled to show by their presence their sympathy with the afflicted pastor and his wife.

 

MUELLER, JOSEPHINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 21, 1907
Miss Josephine Mueller, aged 21 years, died this morning at the home of her cousin, Miss Mary Mulligan, at Ninth and Easton streets, from tuberculosis. She was born in Las Vegas, N. M., but lived in Alton the past 17 years. Her parents are dead. The funeral will be held Saturday morning from the Cathedral.

 

MUELLER, MARIE C./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 13, 1916
Wife of Pastor Dies From Nervous Collapse - Anonymous Letter Strikes Fatal Blow
Mrs. Marie C. Mueller, wife of Rev. Ernest L. Mueller, passed away Wednesday evening at 10:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Hospital. Her death was said by the physicians to be due to apoplexy following a nervous collapse. She was taken ill two weeks ago, and a few days later was moved to St. Joseph's hospital where she steadily grew worse. Mrs. Mueller leaves her husband and four children, one daughter and three sons. The oldest child is 16 years of age and the youngest is 14 months. The death of Mrs. Mueller is the tragic ending of a period of worry. Three years ago the wife of the pastor received an anonymous letter. In this letter the writer deeply wounded the gentle spirit of the pastor's faithful wife. It made a lasting impression on her mind. She was blamed for various happenings in the church and her nervous sensibilities were deeply outraged by the nameless writer of the abusive epistle. She never forgot it, and she worried much about it. Every time that anything untoward arose in the work of the pastor, the gentle little woman recalled that letter which was written by some person lacking the courage to sign a name.....It was a shock to her when some time ago a petition was signed up asking that Mr. Mueller resign his pastorate. There were thirteen names on the petition, and three of them withdrew their names. Rev. Mueller knew of the petition and before a meeting of the church could be held, he tendered his resignation. The meeting was held and the church members by an overwhelming majority voted to refuse the resignation of the pastor.....The incident made a deep impression on the mind of Mrs. Mueller. She went to pieces, in a nervous collapse. During her delirium she would beat her breast pitifully and blame herself, "It was my fault, It was all my fault." ....Mrs. Mueller was born oat Jefferson City, Mo. She was a woman of refinement and education. Before her marriage to Rev. E. L. Mueller, twenty years ago, she had been secretary of a building and loan association. She leaves at Jefferson City two sisters, and it is planned to take her body back there for burial.

 

MUELLER, ROBERT SR./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1904
Robert Mueller Sr., one of the oldest residents of Upper Alton, died last evening at the family home on Main Street after a few day's illness. Mr. Mueller was 86 years old, and has been in excellent health all his life up to the last two or three years, when the infirmities of old age rendered him feeble. One week ago he was taken with a sudden illness, which resulted in his death last night. Mr. Mueller was born in Germany on March 5, 1818, and when about the age of 25 he came to America settling in St. Louis. He was a book-binder by trade, and upon his arrival in St. Louis he opened a book bindery at which he made his fortune. In 1839 he was married to Miss Catherine Herble of St. Louis. To this union there was born one child, Mrs. Emma Kuhlman, now of Houston, Texas. A short time after the birth of their daughter, Mrs. Mueller died. In a few years Mr. Mueller returned to Germany, where he was married to Louisa Shiebs, who survives him. In 1869 Mr. Mueller sold out his business in St. Louis because machinery was taking the place of his trade, and he moved his family to Upper Alton and retired from business. He had lived in Upper Alton almost 36 years. Besides his wife, he is survived by four children: Mrs. C. E. Megowen; Miss Agnes Mueller; and R. O. Mueller, of Upper Alton; and Mrs. Emma Kuhlman of Houston, Texas. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.

 

MUENCH, FRANK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 11, 1919
Electrician Fatally Hurt at Tannery
Frank Muench, aged 25, whose family reside at Washington, Mo., was fatally hurt at 7 o'clock Monday evening at the International Tannery, South Wood River, by falling backward from a ladder to a concrete floor, striking on his head. He died at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning at St. Joseph's Hospital where he was attended by five surgeons. Muench was working as an electrician and as repairing an electric motor, about twelve feet from the floor. He was working with a young man named Winn. Two ladders had been set up against the motor, one on each side, and a man was standing on each ladder. Winn, though very close to Muench, did not see anything happen to him. His first knowledge that an accident had occurred was when he saw Muench lying on the concrete floor, twelve feet below. The injured man never regained consciousness. His family were notified and they arrived this morning to claim the body.

 

MULLANE, LAWRENCE D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 2, 1901
The Edwardsville Intelligencer has the following sad news of former Altonians: "Lawrence D. Mullane, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. Mullane, died Wednesday, the day before its second birthday anniversary. Bronchitis was the cause. The funeral was Friday from St. Mary's church, and the interment was at Woodlawn."

 

MULLEN, MARGARET/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 15, 1903
Mrs. Margaret Mullen, widow of Patrick Mullen, died at St. Joseph's hospital Tuesday night at 11 o'clock with chronic bronchitis. She leaves only one son, James J. Mullen, the well known glassblower. Mrs. Mullen was long a sufferer with the malady which finally proved fatal, and in order that she might have the best of treatment she was removed from her home on Union street to the hospital. Mrs. Mullen was 65 years of age, and had lived in Alton since 1855. In 1862 she married Patrick Mullen, who died in 1881. Mrs. Mullen's death will be sincerely regretted by a large number of friends. The funeral will take place on Friday morning from the residence of her son, 1006 Union street, to St. Patrick's church, thence to Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MULLEN, NANCY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 13, 1914
Mrs. Nancy Mullen, wife of Patrick Mullen, aged about 70 years, died this morning at St. Joseph's hospital after a long illness from a complication of diseases. She was a long time resident of the Coal Branch, and was known as a kind hearted, charitable woman, a good neighbor, and a devoted wife and mother. She was taken to the hospital several weeks ago from the home for the purpose of having her get the best of attention, hoping her constitution and brave, hopeful, disposition would help the nurses pull her through. She was born in Ireland in 1844, but left that country in early childhood. She lived in England awhile before coming to America. For thirty-four years she has lived with her husband in North Alton. She is survived by her husband and two daughters, Mrs. James Wanamacher of Wanamacher's addition, and Mrs. George Morrison of 817 Long street. Two or three grandchildren, a sister and several more distant relatives survive. The body was taken this morning from the hospital to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Morrison, and the funeral will be held from there Monday morning to the Cathedral, where a requiem mass will be said at 9 o'clock. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

MULLEN, PATRICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 14, 1918
Patrick Mullen, a well known aged Altonian, died this morning at 11 o'clock at the home of J. Flatley on Alby street, after an illness with pneumonia. Mullen was 67 years of age, and is survived by a daughter, Mrs. George Morrison, and a granddaughter, Mrs. J. Wannamacher. Also two grandchildren, Donald and Gertrude Morrison. The funeral will be held Monday at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MULLIGAN, ANNIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 22, 1904
Miss Annie Mulligan, daughter of Mrs. Bridget F. Mulligan, died Sunday morning from pneumonia after a week's illness at the family home, 917 Easton street. She was 33 years of age. Miss Mulligan was employed as a milliner in St. Louis and was taken ill while home. She leaves her mother, three sisters and one brother, Mrs. John Nixon of Danver, Mary and Kate Mulligan and Richard Mulligan of Alton.

 

MULLIGAN, DICK/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 8, 1918
The body of Dick Mulligan, killed at Mitchell Thursday afternoon in a railroad accident, will be brought to Alton this evening by Undertaker James Klunk. Relatives of Mulligan in Alton were informed of his death Thursday night. Someone seeing the body of the dead man had identified it as that of Mulligan, and relatives were requested to go to Granite City to verify the identification. The body, after being picked up, was taken on to Granite City. Miss Mary Mulligan and Mrs. John Nixon, sisters, made the trip to Granite City Friday morning and there established the fact that the body was that of their brother. In addition to the two sisters, Mulligan leaves a third, Mrs. Julia Klein, of Alton. He was 57 years of age and had lived in Alton most of his life. He lost his arm many years ago.

 

MULQUEENEY, SADIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 18, 1911
Mrs. Sadie Mulqueeney, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Maguire, died this afternoon after a long illness from kidney trouble at her home, Sixth and Alby streets. Mrs. Mulqueeney's death was expected for a few weeks. She had been an invalid for almost a year. Beside her parents, brother and sisters, she leaves one son, Thomas Mulqueeney. She was 42 years of age. Mrs. Mulqueeney was prominent in several fraternal societies.

 

MULVILLE, EDWARD/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 12, 1909
Edward Mulville, son of the late J. C. Mulville, died Sunday night in St. Louis after a long illness from a complication of diseases. He was 38 years old and was a member of the well known contracting firm of Mulville Bros. He leaves a wife and one child. The body will be brought to Alton Wednesday morning and after services at the Cathedral will be buried in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MULVILLE, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 11, 1907
John Mulville, aged 56, died Saturday evening after an illness with congestion of the brain, which began on Christmas eve and was due to a fall. Mr. Mulville's death has been expected ever since he was taken to his home, 419 east Fourteenth street, after he was injured. He was downtown doing some Christmas shopping and his arms were full of packages for his family when he slipped on some ice at the entrance to sugar alley on Piasa street and fell, striking his head on the brick pavement. He lay in the darkness for some time before being discovered, it is said, and when picked up and taken home in the ambulance was in a very serious condition. But little hope was held out to members of his family and since then his children have been with him most of the time. He leaves beside his wife, six children. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock from SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral.

 

MUNGER, MARIE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 28, 1908
The first death in St. Joseph's home, the home for aged people conducted by St. Mary's congregation, occurred this morning. Mrs. Marie Munger, aged 72, died from old age. She is said to have a son living in New York city or close by, and Undertaker W. H. Bauer, to whom the body was turned over for burial, will hold the body until he can find the son, as it was the desire of the old woman that her son attend the funeral. Mr. Bauer says he will keep the body if necessary, all next summer.

 

MUNSEY, CANBY F./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 19, 1914
Canby F. Munsey died last evening at the family home, 1010 Staunton street after a long illness with stomach trouble. The funeral will be Monday morning at 8 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church. He leaves his mother, Mrs. Annie Munsey, a brother and a sister.

 

MURDOCK, GEORGE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 5, 1921
George Murdock, aged 69, a photographer, died this morning at his home in the Wiseman building after an illness with heart trouble. Mr. Murdock moved to Alton last July, buying the Wiseman studio, and he conducted the business until his breakdown over three weeks ago. He had been suffering from heart trouble for a long time, but when he moved to Alton from St. Louis five months ago, there was no thought of a collapse such as came. He had spent practically all his life in the business of photography and was a skilled workman. When Mr. Wiseman decided to dispose of his business here he selected Mr. Murdock as a worthy successor to himself and Mr. Murdock had not given cause for any change of opinion. He leaves his wife, and he was the last of his own family. The body will be taken to Indianapolis for burial, leaving tomorrow morning.

 

MURPHY, CATHERINE/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 10, 1917
Mrs. Catherine Murphy, wife of Patrick Murphy, for very many years a respected resident of Alton and vicinity, died this morning at her home in St. Louis, the family having moved from Alton a few years ago. For 30 years or more Mr. and Mrs. Murphy lived on the Wise farm (the Turner tract) in North State street, and reared a large family. She was a great church worker and was a charitable, kindly woman with many friends in Alton. Lewis Murphy of Wood River is a son, and she leaves besides her aged husband and son, Lewis, the following children, all of adult age: John, Daniel, Joseph, Emmett and Alfred, and Misses Annetta and Genevieve Murphy. The body will be brought to Alton early Monday morning, and a requiem mass will be said at 10 o'clock in the Cathedral of which congregation she had been almost a life-long member.

 

MURPHY, DANIEL/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 4, 1900
Daniel Murphy, one of the oldest residents of Alton, died today at the family home on Russell street, on Fourth of July hill. He was 78 years of age, and had been a resident of Alton nearly fifty years. He leaves his wife and three children, Messrs. Daniel and John and Miss Kate Murphy of St. Louis.

 

MURPHY, DANIEL E./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 10, 1913
The body of Daniel E. Murphy was brought to Alton from St. Louis this morning, and services were conducted in SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral by Rev. Father Costello. The pallbearers were, James Barrett, Patrick Maguire, Peter Fitzgerald, M. Mahoney, David Noona, David Walsh. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MURPHY, DANIEL P./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 1, 1916
Another Victim of John Barleycorn
Dan Murphy, who was a bartender at the Murphy saloon at Wood River, was found dead Tuesday morning by William Matheeny, a bartender at the same saloon, when Matheeny was on his way to work. Dan Murphy had been on a spree for two days, and late Monday night started for his home. On the way he stumbled and fell or laid down in a pool of water in the rear of the ______ coal office, and the exposure and cold proved fatal. Murphy's body was picked up and taken to the police station and held there for the coming of the coroner to hold an inquest. John Berner, the deputy coroner, took charge of the body. Coroner's Undertaker John Berner and John Hamilton, village marshal of Wood River, believe from investigations so far made that it is not impossible that Daniel P. Murphy, who was found frozen stiff and dead, half submerged in a pond of water in the road on Madison avenue beside the Nic Geibel coal office, could have been beaten to death and carried lifeless to the water and thrown in. The evidence has proved so conclusive that several arrests are expected before night in the case. Coroner Sims will hold an autopsy. Murphy was not working at the Murphy saloon last night. It is said that he was discharged a week ago as bartender, but he kept loafing around there and was reported to have got into an argument with some men in the saloon at a late hour. But this trouble is not blamed for Murphy's death. It was trouble which he is believed to have got into after he left the Murphy saloon that led to his death, if the supposition of the officials proves true. He is said to have visited a certain place in the Ivanoski building, and got into a quarrel there and was ejected. What really happened to him if he was involved in a quarrel there while under the influence of liquor may never be known unless someone is arrested and someone involved in the matter gives out some information. The rest is merely conjecture. Spots of blood were found leading from the steps of one part of the Ivanoski building to the place where he was found dead, which would indicate that he either fell against the steps and was hurt, or else was murdered somewhere about the building and then carried to where he was found.....Murphy was 28 years of age and single. He has lived about Alton for almost five years, the last two or three years being in Benbow City.

 

MURPHY, ELIZABETH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1922
Mrs. Elizabeth Murphy, widow of Joseph Murphy, died at 11:45 a.m. today, at her home, 2325 State street, following an illness of more than two years. She was 73 years old. Mrs. Murphy suffered a stroke two years ago last January, and last January became bedfast. Her condition for the past several days has been known to be serious and the end was not unexpected. In the death of Mrs. Murphy, Alton loses one of its most estimable women. Always kindly, ever willing to be of aid to others, she enjoyed the friendship and love of many persons who are grieved at her death. She was born in Germany, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bertmann, who emigrated to this country, and resided in Jersey County. Her husband, Joseph Murphy, died forty years ago. Mrs. Murphy had resided in the house at the State street address for forty years. During her illness, Mrs. Murphy had been cared for by her granddaughter, Miss Marie Murphy, formerly a teacher in the public schools. Miss Murphy resigned her teaching position that she might have her full time to devote to the care of her grandmother, with whom she had made her home since childhood. Mrs. Murphy is survived by two sons, Henry of Cape Girardeau, Mo., and William H. Murphy of this city, who is connected with the Alton Daily Times. Mrs. Murphy was a member of SS. Peter and Paul's Cathedral and of the Altar Society of that church. Mrs. Murphy was among the ardent workers of that parish and always found time to be of service. The funeral will be Friday morning from the home on State street, to the Cathedral, where requiem mass will be celebrated. Interment will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

 

MURPHY, ELIZABETH D./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 14, 1921
Mrs. Elizabeth D. Murphy, widow of William A. Murphy, died at the age of 84 this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. B. Browning, at 6:20 a.m. Mrs. Murphy has been a resident of Alton since she came here as a bride, at the age of 16 years. She was born in Westmoreland, Va., and when very young moved to Danville, Ill., with her parents, where she married William A. Murphy, and they came to Alton immediately afterward. Mr. Murphy was for many years a stockholder in the Alton Telegraph and a member of its editorial staff. Mrs. Murphy was the mother of eight children, two of whom survive, Mrs. F. B. Browning and Mrs. H. H. Welsh of Wood River. She also leaves three grandchildren and one great-grandchild. For many years she was a very active member of the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church and a devoted worker in all the church enterprises. She was, until recently, known for her good physical condition. She was strong and active and able to get about with all the energy that is seen in one thirty or forty years younger than she. Mrs. Murphy was a kindly dispositioned woman and she had a very large number of good friends who have been deeply interested in her last illness. She had been dying for weeks, but her vitality was so strong that she lasted long after her family had begun to expect the end at any time. The funeral will be held from the Twelfth Street Presbyterian church at 3 p.m. Thursday.

 

MURPHY, FRED/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 30, 1922
Frederick Murphy, 41, died at the home of Mrs. Richard Tone, 1420 Fourth street, at 7 a.m. today, from heart trouble. Mr. Murphy had been troubled with that malady for the last five years and occasionally it caused him considerable worry. Mr. Murphy went about his work yesterday as usual, and his sudden death was a great surprise to the many persons who knew him. He had been a business partner of Jerry Callahan in the East End Feed and Supply Co. He had been at work in the East End store for several years, and during the time h had gained the friendship of many persons. He arose as well as usual a few minutes before 7 o'clock this morning. He went to get a drink when he took a fainting spell. Mrs. Tone came in the room and did all in her power to revive him. His condition did not improve and in 15 minutes he died. Mr. Murphy came here from Kane 18 years ago. He has resided in this city ever since that time and was well known in this vicinity. He was born at Kane. His wife, a daughter of Mrs. Tone, died a few years ago. He leaves one sister, Mrs. Anna Davis of Seattle, Wash., and one brother, Edward Murphy, also of Seattle. Funeral arrangements have not been completed, as no word has been received from his sister at Seattle, who is expected to come here to attend the funeral. Mr. Murphy was a member of St. Patrick's Church and of the Knights of Columbus. Funeral services will be Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Patrick's church. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery.

 

MURPHY, JAMES/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 30, 1918
James Murphy, 70 years old, died last night at St. Joseph's Hospital after an illness that was serious only a few days. Murphy was a farmer, had lived all his life just north of Upper Alton on a farm the family owned. For many years after the mother died, he and his sister, Mary, lived on the farm together. Neither of the two were ever married, and they have been together on the farm up to a few days ago when Mr. Murphy's illness reached a serious stage and he went to the hospital. He had been suffering for a long time from a trouble, but he refused to submit to treatment. Last week he came to St. Joseph's Hospital and was examined. His case was found to be serious and an operation was considered. It was not performed, however, and Mr. Murphy returned home. A few days later he went back to the hospital when his condition was going from bad to worse. His death occurred last night before an operation was performed. Miss Mary Murphy, who has been living with her brother, is also very ill. She has been taken to the home of her sister, Mrs. James Welch of Godfrey. Jim Murphy was one of the best known old residents in the country north of Upper Alton. His farm was a small one and he farmed on a small scale. He spent as much time working for others in his neighborhood as he did on his own place. Murphy leaves two sisters, Mrs. James Walsh [sic] of Godfrey and Miss Mary Murphy. He was 72 years of age. The body will be taken to the home of Jerry Kennedy at 1408 East Fourth street on Saturday, and the funeral will be held from there. Complete funeral arrangements were not completed this afternoon.

 

MURPHY, JAMES M./Source: Alton Telegraph, October 9, 1846
Died on the 27th ult., at his residence in the American Bottoms, Mr. James M. Murphy, aged 43. The deceased was a worthy citizen and much respected by all who knew him, and has left a wife and family to deplore his loss.

 

MURPHY, JOSEPH/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 4, 1904
North Alton News - Joseph Murphy, eldest son of Mrs. Elizabeth Murphy, died at St. Joseph's hospital Tuesday afternoon after an illness with lung troubles. He was 35 years of age and unmarried. He lived in St. Louis for several years where he followed his trade, that of butcher, but he came home sick about six weeks ago and from the first there was little hope for his recovery. Beside his mother he leaves two brothers, Will Murphy, clerk-elect of North Alton, and Henry Murphy and hosts of friends who will sincerely deplore the untimely taking off of the genial, big-hearted young man. The funeral will be Thursday morning from the Cathedral.

 

MURPHY, JUANTA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, November 21, 1904
Sunday morning at 12:30, Juanta, 17 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Murphy, died at the home, Ninth and Piasa streets, after an illness with dropsy. The funeral was held Monday afternoon from the Cathedral. Interment was in Greenwood.

 

MURPHY, KATE (MOTHER SERAPHINE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 19, 1900
After ten weeks of intense suffering from stomach and kindred troubles, Mother Seraphine, one of the best beloved of the Ursuline sisters, entered into rest at noon today. She was a Miss Kate Murphy, and she leaves a brother, James, and two sisters - Mrs. James Welsh of Godfrey and Miss Mary Murphy of this city [Alton], besides numerous friends to mourn her death. She was the artist of the academy, and was a painter and musician of note. Last August her silver jubilee anniversary of admission to the order was celebrated, and during her long service she was a general favorite with the public, the faculty, and the students. She was 48 years of age. The funeral will take place Friday morning at 9 o'clock, Cathedral clergymen conducting the obsequies.

 

MURPHY, LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, August 14, 1906
Louis Murphy, for many years a resident of Alton and vicinity, died shortly after 12 o'clock Tuesday at St. Joseph's hospital where he was taken several weeks ago from his home on Elm street. His death was caused by dysentery. He was about 60 years of age and is survived by one son, Thomas Murphy, and a stepson, John McKeon of the Alton Printing House. He has a brother, Patrick, in Godfrey township, and another brother, Joseph, in Connecticut. His sister, Mrs. Kelly, died in St. Joseph's hospital a few months ago, like her brother having been taken from her home to the hospital very ill. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

MURPHY, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 17, 1915
The funeral of the late Mrs. Mary Murphy, who died Sunday night at the St. Joseph's Hospital, took place this morning at 9 o'clock from the home of her daughter, Mrs. James King of Alby street, to the Cathedral where a solemn high mass was celebrated by Rev. E. L. Spalding, with Rev. M. A. Tarrent as Deacon, and Rev. M. Costello as Sub-Deacon. The funeral was one of the largest held at the Cathedral for some time, the large church being filled with the sorrowing friends of the deceased, who went to pay their last respects to the deceased. The floral offerings were especially large and numerous, and showed with what high esteem she was held in by her friends. All the children were present at the obsequies but one, John Murphy, who was unable to arrive in time for the funeral. The burial took place in Greenwood Cemetery, Rev. Spalding and Rev. Tarrent accompanying the body. The pallbearers were Ned Whalen, Edward O'Leary, James Kerwin, Dan Sullivan, James Hagen and George Long, all old time friends of the family. Among the out of town people attending the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Chickirie, Maplewood, Mo.; Miss Catherine King, St. Louis; Mrs. Cora Widaman, Grafton; Miss Kate Kirwin, St. Louis; N. A. William, Hannibal; J. T. Morris, St. Louis; and Frank Volk, St. Louis.

 

MURPHY, NELLIE (nee TONE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, May 6, 1922
Mrs. Nellie Tone Murphy, wife of Fred Murphy, died Friday afternoon at her home, 1420 East Fourth street, following an illness of thirteen months. Early last summer Mrs. Murphy went to Colorado Springs, Colo., in hopes that the change might be beneficial to her health, but she continued to grow weaker. She returned to Alton last October. She was a most patient sufferer, bearing her illness with great fortitude. The marriage of Nellie Tone to Fred Murphy, a well known East End business man, took place two years ago last Thanksgiving at St. Patrick's Church. Mrs. Murphy, who was 33 years of age, was a woman possessed of a very pleasing personality and she was much beloved by relatives and friends. Her long illness has been the cause of much concern among her wide circle of friends. She was born and raised in Alton, was a member of St. Patrick's Church, and received her education at St. Patrick's School. Until her health failed, she was an active church worker and was a member of the Altar Society. She is survived by her husband, her mother, Mrs. Bridget Tone, and two sisters, Loretta and Pearl. The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

MURPHY, NINA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 15, 1907
The funeral of Miss Nina, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. Murphy of Godfrey, will be held tomorrow morning from the Cathedral. Because of the bad condition of the roads, the body will be brought to Alton on a Chicago and Alton train, arriving about 8:50 a.m. The hearse and carriages will meet the Godfrey funeral party at the Union depot in Alton.

 

MURPHY, MADISON J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, January 30, 1904
Madison J. Murphy, aged 31, a packer at the glass works and a step-brother of Officer L. A. Dewses(?), was found dead and almost dismembered beside the Big Four track between Walnut and Cherry streets, about 10 o'clock Friday night. The body had been lying there but a short time, and it was apparent that the man was killed by the Big Four plug train making the last trip into Alton at 9:35 p.m. The body was carried to the police station, and there it was identified by Officer Dewees as that of his step brother. Murphy lived in East End place, and leaves his wife and two children. He came here a few years ago from Grafton and his wife and two were visiting at Shiloh, four miles from Grafton, when the word of his death was sent to them last night. Murphy was a soldier of the Spanish War, and it is said that his malady was brought on by an illness he suffered while in the service. Rumor was that Murphy had in his possession about $30 Friday evening, but when the body was found only a few dollars remained of what he is said to have had. Murphy is said to have been a victim of epilepsy, and it is supposed that he fell in a fit on the railway track and was hit by the passing train. He was an industrious man and a member of the Junior Mechanics, who will have charge of the funeral. [Burial was in Grafton]

 

MURPHY, PETER/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, October 2, 1905
Mr. Peter Murphy, who for the past 35 years has lived and farmed on the Grafton road near North Alton, died Sunday night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Hugh McGinnis, on the Hull farm near the river. He was about 60 years of age, and came to Alton from Ireland when but a boy. He was a man of many kindly traits of character and was esteemed by all who knew him well. He is survived by three sons and two daughters. The sons are James F. of Brighton; Edward of North Alton; and T. H. of Wichita, Kansas. The daughters are Mrs. Hugh McGinnis and Miss Catherine Murphy of St. Louis. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral.

 

MURPHY, ROBERT H./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, April 12, 1919
Robert H. Murphy, 30 years, died this morning at his home, 270 Madison avenue, after a lingering illness. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Bertha Murphy, and three children, Beatrice, Victor and Edward Murphy. He leaves also his parents, and two sisters, Mrs. Otto Sigmund, and Mrs. John Miller, and a brother, Chester Murphy, all of Alton. The funeral will be Monday morning at 9 o'clock from the home on Madison avenue, and Requiem Mass will be celebrated at St. Mary's church. Interment will be in St. Joseph's Cemetery.

 

MURPHY, SAREPTA J./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, July 26, 1900
Mrs. Sarepta J. Murphy died at 5 o'clock this morning, after an illness of almost a year of cancer of the breast. Mrs. Murphy, during her long and very painful illness, bore her suffering with fortitude. Several months ago an operation was performed at St. Joseph's Hospital, which it was hoped would be beneficial. It served, possibly, to postpone the final struggle. Mrs. Murphy was well known and highly respected among a large acquaintance as a true and noble woman. She has been a faithful and consistent member and worker in the C. P. church for nearly 40 years. She was married to Ewell S. Murphy on November 2, 1852, and has lived in this city since that time. Her husband died in 1876. Mrs. Murphy leaves two daughters to mourn her loss, viz: Mrs. John M. Logan and Miss Angie B. Murphy. The funeral will take place on Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from the residence of J. M. Logan, 1330 Henry street.

 

MURPHY, THOMAS/Source: Alton Weekly Courier, January 8, 1857
An Irishman named Thomas Murphy was killed, and another named William Flinn was seriously injured yesterday, while engaged excavating earth from Fourth street near Market street. The bank, some twenty feet high, slid down, burying Murphy and Flinn beneath it. We learn that both Murphy's legs and his back were broken, his head was badly mashed, and he was otherwise badly injured. The extent of Flinn's injuries we have not learned.

 

MURPHY, THOMAS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 25, 1919
The funeral of Thos. Murphy was held this morning at 8 o'clock from the Nazareth Home Chapel. Requiem Mass was celebrated by Rev. S. Schauweeker, and was attended by a large crowd of friends of the deceased. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery. The pallbearers were Joe Dooley, Simon Downes, William Spellman and Thomas Burns.

 

MURPHY, UNKNOWN WIFE OF LOUIS/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, June 2, 1903
Mrs. Louis Murphy died at her home, 1229 Wharf street, Tuesday morning at 2:40 o'clock after a long illness. She had been confined to her bed for five months. Mrs. Murphy was born in Roscommon, Ireland, 70 years ago, but has lived in Alton 50 years. She was married twice, her first husband being Frank McKeon, who died in 1869. Her second husband, Louis Murphy, survives. She also leaves two sons, John McKeon, proprietor of the Alton Printing House, and Thomas Murphy, the well-known barber. She was a kindly, Christian, charitable woman, and leaves many friends to mourn her death. The funeral will be Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral to Greenwood Cemetery, North Alton.

 

MURRAY, JOHN/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 25, 1912
John Murray, a section hand on the C. & A. railroad, and residing in the railroad camp near Hartford, was thrown into a ditch as he tried to board a moving interurban car at 11 o'clock Wednesday morning near Wood River, and received injuries which were slight, but sustained a shock which caused his death. Murray and his partner attempted to catch the car, Murray catching hold the handle after the car had started. In this manner he was dragged a short distance and let go just as the car came to a trestle over a ditch, and he pitched headlong into the ditch. A cut on his forehead and a scratched nose seemed to be his only injuries, and he was able to walk. When he reached Alton he was taken to the office of Dr. Hastings, where his slight wounds were dressed, and a few minutes later he had a sinking spell and died. It is believed the shock from the fall caused the man's death. Conductor Hord of the interurban cautioned the man not to catch hold of the moving car, but he did not heed. Coroner C. N. Streeper took charge of the remains. Dr. Hastings said that he had no idea the man was about to die. His injuries seemed very slight and as the man was able to be moved around, he thought he was only slightly injured. The doctor made a careful examination and could find no indications of broken bones or other injuries of a grave character. Murray kept begging to be allowed to sit up while the doctor was dressing the wounds on his face, and finally Dr. Hastings having finished his work, he told Murray he could rise. Murray got up in the operating chair and immediately collapsed, apparently in a faint. Dr. Hastings made efforts to revive him and was surprised to discover that his patient had died in the chair. He said that he believed that the shock of the fall was too much for Murray. Street car men said that Murray was very much intoxicated.

 

MURRAY, MARTHA R. (nee SOUTHARD)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, March 29, 1920
Mother of Four Killed by Train
Mrs. Martha R. Murray, wife of Albert Murray of Sering Place, was killed Sunday afternoon at the Venice railroad crossing in Granite City when she leaped from an automobile in front of a terminal train that was carrying workmen. The automobile in which she was riding with five young women was hurled many feet, but the occupants escaped injury and had Mrs. Murray remained in the car, she too would probably have escaped injury. Mrs. Murray was dragged 60 feet and her neck was broken and skull fractured. Mrs. Murray was 32 years old, and besides her mother leaves four daughters, and her father, James Southard, a member of a well known Madison County family. Mrs. Murray had gone to Granite City to spend the day. In the automobile with her, driving toward St. Louis, were: Miss May Reinagel, 17 years old, who was driving the automobile which belonged to her father, Joseph Reinagel of 2318 E. Street, Granite City; her older sister, Miss Elizabeth Reinagel; Miss Agnes Roseberry, 18 years old, and her sister, Miss Muriel Roseberry, 21 years old, both of 2153 E Street, Granite City; and Miss Jessie Shamhart, 16 years old, 2451 B street, Granite City. The strong wind blowing in the faces of the party made it impossible for the driver to see or hear the train coming as she approached the dangerous crossing until it was too late. Then, according to a young woman in the seat with the other young woman driving, the driver became confused and attempted to beat the train to the crossing, but there was not time. Mrs. Murray, it is supposed, saw the train before the others did and jumped, but did not jump until she was so close that she landed squarely in front of the engine. C. N. Streeper was called to Granite City to take charge of the body of Mrs. Murray and brought it back to Alton Sunday night.

 

MURREL, WILLIAM L./Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 26, 1912
W. L. Murrel, aged 58, died at the home of his son-in-law, Gus Grennwaldt, on Burton avenue, after a lingering illness. The body will be kept at the Bauer undertaking rooms on account of other illness in the family. Arrangements for the funeral have not been made.

Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, December 27, 1912
William L. Murrell, aged 59, died yesterday noon at his home on Burton avenue in Upper Alton of Bright's disease. He was a lather by trade. He leaves several step-children. The body was brought to the Bauer undertaking rooms where the funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The Rev. M. W. Twing will officiate. The burial will be in Oakwood cemetery in Upper Alton.

 

MURRY, JAMES/Source: Alton Telegraph, Thursday, February 2, 1893
Victim of Wann Disaster
Mr. James Murray was buried on Tuesday at 3 p.m. from the M. E. church, the services being conducted by the pastor, Rev. N. Crow, assisted by Rev. G. W. Waggoner.

 

MUSGROVE, ETHEL (nee PRICE)/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 9, 1918
Woman Dies Following Childbirth - Husband Serving in Military
An effort to locate Lieut. Edward Musgrove of Wood River, in order that the dying request of his wife that he be present to attend her funeral, has so far proved ineffectual. No word can be secured from him at Ottawa, Ill., where he was last doing special work, and it is believed that he may have been ordered across the seas. In case he has gone over, it will probably be several weeks before he learns of his wife's death. His wife, who was formerly Miss Ethel Price, 18, died Sunday noon from blood poisoning following the birth of a child, eight days ago. The child is living and is said to be in good health. When the mother became ill she asked that her husband be located. Efforts were made then to get him home on a furlough, but he could not be located. Repeated efforts have been made by telegram and by telephone since her death, but so far no one has been located who knows his whereabouts. The family moved to Wood River last May from Houston, Tex., where Lieut. Musgrove was formerly stationed in charge of the Houston army post office. They moved to Wood River and he went to Ottawa, Ill., and was there until three weeks ago, when the last letter was received from him by members of the family. He kept inquiring about his wife's condition, and spoke of getting a furlough to come home soon. Since no word has been received from him. Mrs. Musgrove is survived by her husband, her mother, Mrs. William Price, with whom she was living in Wood River, three sisters and one brother, besides her grandparents in Evansville, Ind. The body will be sent to Evansville, Ind., tonight, accompanied by Wood River relatives, and the funeral will be held in Evansville.

 

MYERS, MARIETTA/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, September 19, 1921
Infantile paralysis proved fatal for Marietta Myers, the 8 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Myers, of 510 East Eleventh Street. The little girl died in the children's hospital in St. Louis Sunday evening at 6:30 o'clock. She was taken to the hospital yesterday morning when a malady from which she was suffering seemed to make the change advisable. She was eight years old last Tuesday. About the same time as her birthday she began to manifest the symptoms of some mysterious malady, and showed fever. This continued on until Sunday morning when her case had progressed so far she was moved to the hospital in St. Louis in the hope that something could be done for her there. Mr. Myers, who had been there with his daughter, came home Sunday afternoon late, on being told that there was hardly a chance for any great change in her condition and that he would be summoned if one took place. Very soon after the father arrived home the telephone message was received telling of the child's death. She was a bright attractive little girl and her death was a sad shock to the many friends of the family. Mr. Myers is general superintendent of the Alton, Granite and St. Louis Traction Co. Beside the little daughter who died, the parents have a little son born recently.

 

MYERS, MARY/Source: Alton Evening Telegraph, February 10, 1920
Mrs. Mary Myers, wife of Henry Myers, died last night at her home, 321 East Eighth street, four days after she suffered a stroke of paralysis. She was 65 years old. Mrs. Myers had been a resident of Alton since 1886. She is survived by her husband and a son, William Stewart. She was a member of St. Mary's Church and the Maccabees. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 8 o'clock at St. Mary's Church.

 

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